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About Nest verch Rhys

Nest ferch Rhys (died after 1136) was a Welsh princess of Deheubarth who was renowned for her beauty. Nest was the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr Mawr by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon. After her father's death in 1093, Deheubarth was conquered by the Normans and King Henry I of England appointed himself her protector. Nest is thought to have borne him a son, Henry FitzRoy (1103-1158).[1]

Around 1095 King Henry decided to marry Nest to one of his followers, Gerald de Windsor, whom he appointed Constable of Pembroke. Nest and Gerald had five children:

  1. William FitzGerald (died 1173)
  2. Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Llansteffan (died 1 September 1177)
  3. David FitzGerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan and Bishop of St David's
  4. Angharad de Windsor, who married William de Barry
  5. A daughter (possibly Gwladys), the mother of Milo de Cogan

During Christmas 1109, Nest and her husband were visited by her cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys. The story goes that Owain was so taken with Nest's beauty that he and fifteen companions attacked the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle or Carew Castle, both in Pembrokeshire), seized Nest, and carried her and her children off.

Tradition also states that Gerald escaped by jumping down the garderobe (i.e. the lavatory chute) to get away. The children were later returned to Gerald. Nest is said to have borne Owain two sons, Llywelyn and Einion, before finally being returned to her husband.

This abduction earned Nest the nickname "Helen of Wales" because it led to civil war on a small scale. Owain ap Cadwgan left the country to avoid retribution, whilst Owain's father, Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, lost his own lands. Gerald waited for Owain to return to Wales, then ambushed and killed him. After Gerald's death, Nest became the lover of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen who died in 1182.

Nest's daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry and had by him four sons: Robert; Philip, the founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland; Walter; the historian Gerald of Wales. Her sons Philip and Robert campaigned in Ireland with Strongbow; Robert died there in 1182.

Robert and Philip were the founders of the family Walsh/Welsh of Kilkenny where they built a Castle known as Castle hale of Kilkenny, Ireland Castle Hale of the Walsh Mountains Kilkenny They conquered Kilkenny. They had become known as the "Welshies" rather than "Hywel" and thus named,they remain to this day; the name Hale being derived from Howell.

Therefore the Welsh and Walsh family of Kilkenny Ireland are also descended from Hywel Dda.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nest_ferch_Rhys

The daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, a Welsh prince and Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon in sometime between 1095 and 1100

Gave the site of Carew Castle as a dowry

Had at least 5 children with Gerald de Windsor

Owain ap Cadwgan, Nest's cousin and son of another Welsh Prince, started a fire at Carew Castle in 1109

de Windsor escaped but Owain captured Nest

Had two children by Owain Glyn Dŵr

After Gerald de Windsor died, she married Stephen of Cardigan Castle

It is said that Nest's ghost haunts Carew Castle in the form of a gentle white lady.

From the Cadw guidebook for Cilgerran Castle

Nest, the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr and wife of Gerald of Windsor, was renowned for her beauty. As a princess of Deheubarth she was a notable 'catch' for Gerald in his bid to establish himself more firmly in Dyfed. There were three sons from the union and a daughter, Angharad, who became, in turn, the mother of Gerald of Wales.

The abduction of Nest in 1109 from the castle of Cenarth Bychan by her second cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, is fully documented in the medieval 'Chronicle of the Princes'. According to the chronicle, when

   'Owain had heard that Nest was in the castle, he went with but a few men in his company to visit her as a kinswoman. And after that he came of a night to the castle and but few men with him, about fourteen, unknown to the keepers of the castle. And then he came to the chamber in which Gerald and Nest were sleeping. And they raised a shout around and about the chamber in which Gerald was, and kindled tapers and set fire to the buildings to burn them. And when he heard the shout, Gerald awoke, not knowing what to do. And then Nest said to him, "Go not out to the door, for thine enemies await thee, but follow me".
   And that he did. And she led him to the privy which adjoined the chamber. And there, as is said, he escaped by way of the privy hole. And when Nest knew that he had escaped, she cried out from within and said to the men who were outside, "Why do you cry out in vain? He whom you seek is not here. He has escaped". And when they did not find them, they seized Nest and her two sons and her daughter and another son of his by a concubine, and they sacked and plundered the castle'. 

It was not the first, nor the last, of Nest's amorous adventures. She is reputed to have told Owain: 'If thou wouldst have me faithful to thee and keep me with thee, have my children escorted to their father'. It is impossible to know, at this distance of time, whether this was guile or a desire to stay with Owain. Nest became the mistress of a number of lovers, including King Henry I, earning herself notoriety as the 'Helen of Wales'.

http://www.castlewales.com/nest.html

Deheubarth (literally, "south part") was a south-western kingdom or principality of medieval Wales.

Deheubarth was founded Circa. 920 by Hywel Dda ("Hywel the Good") out of the territories of Seisyllwg and Dyfed, both of which had come into his possession. Later on the Kingdom of Brycheiniog would also be added to its territorial boundaries. The chief seat of the rulers of Deheubarth and its traditional capital was at Dinefwr (,although Carmarthen and Cardigan also served as the Kingdoms capital at certain points).

Deheubarth, like several other Welsh kingdoms, continued to exist until the Norman Conquest of Wales, but constant power struggles meant that only for part of the time was it a separate entity with an independent ruler. It was annexed by Llywelyn ap Seisyll of Gwynedd in 1018, then by Rhydderch ab Iestyn of Morgannwg in 1023. Llywelyn ap Sisyll's son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn again annexed Deheubarth and became ruler of most of Wales, but after his death the old Dinefwr dynasty regained power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deheubarth

--------------------

From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#_Toc159664189

King Henry I had one illegitimate son by Mistress (13):

22. HENRY ([1105/09]-killed in battle 1157). Giraldus Cambrensis names "Henricus…regi Henrici primi filius…ex nobili Nesta, Resi filii Theodori filia" in South Wales[236]. He was killed during King Henry II’s invasion of Anglesey[237]. m ---. The name of Henry's wife is not known. Henry & his wife had two children:

a) MEILER FitzHenry (-1220). The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Roberto Barrensi" and "Meilerius" as "Stephanidæque alter ex fratre, alter ex sorore nepotes"[238]. He took a leading part in the invasion of Ireland and became one of the most powerful Anglo-Irish lords[239]. m [secondly?] ---, niece of HUGH de Lacy Lord of Meath, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Meiler & his wife had one child:

i) MEILER ---. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

b) ROBERT FitzHenry. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Living in Leinster about 1180, died soon afterwards. The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Henrici filius Robertus, Meilerii frater"[240]. m ---. The name of Robert's wife is not known. Robert & his wife had one child:

i) HENRY . The Expugnatio Hibernica names "Henrici filius Robertus, Meilerii frater"[241].

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is not the same as Nesta d/o Gruffydd ap Llyewellyn & 2nd wife Ealdgyth of Mercia, who married Osbern FitzRichard and they had 3 children including Nesta who married Burnard de Neufmarche and they had 3 children including Sibylle who married Miles of Gloucester.

This is of the line line which is Various Welsh unpronouncable names leading to Tewdr Mawr f/o Rhys ap Tewdr who married Gwladus. They had 4 children including Nest who married Gerald FitzWalter of WIndsor and who was also mistress to Henry I King of England and Stephen Constable of Cardiff Castle by whom she had a child RObert FitzStephen.

Summing up Sybil was the daughter of Nest and Bernard but not of Nest and Henry I.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--------------------

Name: Nesta Verch Rhys 1 2 3

Sex: F

Name: Nesta Of Wales 2 1 3

Birth: ABT 1080 in Dynevor Castle, Carmarthenshire, Wales 1 3

Death: ABT 1163 1 2 3

Event: TITL Princess Of Wales 2 3

Reference Number: 8835

Note:

Nest or Nesta flourished 1106 as mistress of Henry I. She was the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, who died 1093, King of Dehenbarth, by Gwladys, daughter of Rhywallon. Rhys was made King of South Wales by England in 1063. Nesta received as her marriage portion the lordship of Carew, and about 1095, or soon afterwards, married Gerald de Windsor, Constable of Pembroke Castle, a loyal and prudent man. She was clever and beautiful. About 1106 her cousin Owen, son of Cadwgan, visited the castle by night, and in order to get to the room where she and her husband were set fire to the castle. Nesta pulled up a board and let her husband into the drain, by which he escaped. She was carried to Poys, together with two of her sons by Gerald and two of his children by another woman. Cadwgan was angry at his son's act for he feared the wrath of the English, and begged him to send Nesta back, but he would not. However, she persuaded him to send her husband's children back to him. Her abduction led to a war, in which Gerald took a conspicuous part. After a time she rejoined her husband, who appears to have died before 1136. She was also the wife of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan. In the list of her children, given by her descendant, Giraldus Cambrenses, the names of the three fathers, to whom the greater number of them are assigned, stand in order as Gerald, Stephen and King Henry. Indeed, it seems that her eldest son was by Gerald. It is probable that her connection with Stephen did not begin before 1110, and that she bore a son to Henry in 1114. Seven of her sons became lords of Cantreds in South Wales, and from her descended some of the most famous of the conquerors of Ireland. Her children by Gerald of Windsor were William FitzGerald, her eldest son, Maurice, David, and a daughter, Angharad, and two other sons.

Reference Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 40, pp. 228/9. See Generation No. 4. Gerald of Windsor or Gerald FitzWalter, who married Nesta.

From Tompsett (http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/cgi-bin/gedlkup/n=royal?royal05170): "Known as the most beautiful woman in Wales. She had many lovers. In Christmas 1108 Owain ap Cadwgan of Cardigan came to visit Gerald and Nesta. He so lusted after her that he, that night, attacked the castle and carried her off and had his way with her. This upset Henry I so much that the incident started a war."[JohnFaye (8 Jun 05).FTW]

Nest or Nesta flourished 1106 as mistress of Henry I. She was the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, who died 1093, King of Dehenbarth, by Gwladys, daughter of Rhywallon. Rhys was made King of South Wales by England in 1063. Nesta received as her marriage portion the lordship of Carew, and about 1095, or soon afterwards, married Gerald de Windsor, Constable of Pembroke Castle, a loyal and prudent man. She was clever and beautiful. About 1106 her cousin Owen, son of Cadwgan, visited the castle by night, and in order to get to the room where she and her husband were set fire to the castle. Nesta pulled up a board and let her husband into the drain, by which he escaped. She was carried to Poys, together with two of her sons by Gerald and two of his children by another woman. Cadwgan was angry at his son's act for he feared the wrath of the English, and begged him to send Nesta back, but he would not. However, she persuaded him to send her husband's children back to him. Her abduction led to a war, in which Gerald took a conspicuous part. After a time she rejoined her husband, who appears to have died before 1136. She was also the wife of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan. In the list of her children, given by her descendant, Giraldus Cambrenses, the names of the three fathers, to whom the greater number of them are assigned, stand in order as Gerald, Stephen and King Henry. Indeed, it seems that her eldest son was by Gerald. It is probable that her connection with Stephen did not begin before 1110, and that she bore a son to Henry in 1114. Seven of her sons became lords of Cantreds in South Wales, and from her descended some of the most famous of the conquerors of Ireland. Her children by Gerald of Windsor were William FitzGerald, her eldest son, Maurice, David, and a daughter, Angharad, and two other sons.

Reference Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 40, pp. 228/9. See Generation No. 4. Gerald of Windsor or Gerald FitzWalter, who married Nesta.

From Tompsett (http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/cgi-bin/gedlkup/n=royal?royal05170): "Known as the most beautiful woman in Wales. She had many lovers. In Christmas 1108 Owain ap Cadwgan of Cardigan came to visit Gerald and Nesta. He so lusted after her that he, that night, attacked the castle and carried her off and had his way with her. This upset Henry I so much that the incident started a war."

Father: Rhys Ap (Tudor) Tewdor King Of South Wales b: ABT 1035 in Deheubarth, Wales

Mother: Gwladus Verch Rhiwallon b: ABT 1041 in Powys, Montgomeryshire, Wales

Marriage 1 Henry I (Beauclerc) King Of England b: AUG 1068 in Selby, Yorkshire, England

Married: 1 2

Married: WFT Est 1075-1118 1

Marriage Beginning Status: Other

Children

Meiler Fitzhenry
Maud Of England b: ABT 1099 in England
Henry Fitzhenry b: ABT 1105 in South Wales, Wales

Marriage 2 Owain Ap Cadwgon

Marriage 3 Gerald Fitzwalter Of Winsor b: ABT 1070 in Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Children

William Fitzgerald b: BEF 1100 in Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Maurice "The Invader" Fitzgerald Of Winsor b: ABT 1100 in Castle Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales
Hadewise Of Windsor b: ABT 1103 in Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales
NN De Windsor b: ABT 1106 in Windsor, Berkshire, England

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jcrow&id=I09216

--------------------

  • Nest verch Rhys Princess of Deuhebarth

born about 1073 Dynevor Castle, Carmarthenshire, Wales

father:

  • Rhys ap Tewdwr

born about 0997 Carmarthanshire, Wales

died 1093 Brecknock, Breconshire, Wales

mother:

  • Gwladys verch Rhiwallon

born about 1041 Powys, Wales

siblings:

  • Gruffydd ap Rhys born about 1081 Llandilo, Carmarthshire, Wales died April 1137
  • Llywelyn "Ddiriaid" ap Rhys born about 1084 Dynevor, Llandyfeisant, Carmarthenshire, Wales
  • Margred verch Rhys born about 1089 Carmarthenshire, Wales

spouse (1st):

  • Geraldus FitzWalter de Windsor Constable

born about 1070 Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales

died before 1136

children (from 1st marriage):

Andaret FitzGerald de Windsor born about 1096 Carew Castle, Pembroke, Wales

David FitzGerald de Windsor born about 1098 Carew Castle, Pembroke, Wales died about 1176

  • Maurice "Invader of Ireland" Fitzgerald born 1100 Windsor, Berkshire, England

died 1 September 1177 Abbey Grey Friar, Welford, Berkshire, England

buried Abbey Grey Friar, Welford, Berkshire, England

William FitzGerald de Windsor 1100 Carew Castle, Pembroke, Wales died about 1173

Mauger FitzGerald de Windsor born about 1104 Carew Castle, Wales

Robert FitzWalter de Windsor born after 1104 Gloucestershire, England died 1 November 1147

  • daughter of Geraldus FitzWalter de Windsor born before 1110?

spouse (2nd):

  • Henry I "Beauclerc" King of England

born 1068 Selby, Yorkshire, England

christened 5 August 1100 Selby, Yorkshire, England

died 1 December 1135 St. Denis, Seine-St. Denis, France

buried 4 January 1136 Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, England

children (from 2nd marriage):

  • Henry (FitzRoy) FitzHenry

born about 1105? South Wales

died 1157 Angelllsey, Caarvonshire, North Wales

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:

LDS

ancestry.com

Nest ferch Rhys

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nest ferch Rhys (died after 1136) was a Welsh princess of Deheubarth who was renowned for her beauty. Nest was the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr Mawr by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon. After her father's death in 1093, Deheubarth was conquered by the Normans and King Henry I of England appointed himself her protector. Nest is thought to have borne him a son, Henry FitzRoy (1103-1158).

Around 1095 King Henry decided to marry Nest to one of his followers, Gerald de Windsor, whom he appointed Constable of Pembroke. Nest and Gerald had five children:

William FitzGerald (died 1173)

Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Llansteffan (died 1 September 1177)

David FitzGerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan and Bishop of St David's

Angharad de Windsor, who married William de Barry

A daughter (possibly Gwladys), the mother of Milo de Cogan

During Christmas 1109, Nest and her husband were visited by her cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys. The story goes that Owain was so taken with Nest's beauty that he and fifteen companions attacked the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle or Carew Castle, both in Pembrokeshire), seized Nest, and carried her and her children off.

Tradition also states that Gerald escaped by jumping down the garderobe (i.e. the lavatory chute) to get away. The children were later returned to Gerald. Nest is said to have borne Owain two sons, Llywelyn and Einion, before finally being returned to her husband.

This abduction earned Nest the nickname "Helen of Wales" because it led to civil war on a small scale. Owain ap Cadwgan left the country to avoid retribution, whilst Owain's father, Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, lost his own lands. Gerald waited for Owain to return to Wales, then ambushed and killed him. After Gerald's death, Nest became the lover of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen who died in 1182.

Nest's daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry and had by him four sons: Robert; Philip, the founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland; Walter; the historian Gerald of Wales. Her sons Philip and Robert campaigned in Ireland with Strongbow; Robert died there in 1182.

Robert and Philip were the founders of the family Walsh/Welsh of Kilkenny where they built a Castle known as [1] Castle Hale of the Walsh Mountains Kilkenny They conquered Kilkenny. They had become known as the "Welshies" rather than "Hywel" and thus named,they remain to this day; the name Hale being derived from Howell.

Therefore the Welsh and Walsh family of Kilkenny Ireland are also descended from Hywel Dda.

--------------------

Princess Nesta was a very notorius woman. She is sometimes referred to as the "mother of the Irish invasion" since her sons, by various fathers, and her grandsons were the leaders of the invasion. She had, in the course of her eventful life, two lovers, two husbands, and many sons and daughters.

Her father is quoted as saying that she had 10 children as a result of her matrimonial escapades, eight sons and two daughters, among them William fitzGerald de Windsor.

One of her lovers was King Henry I of England. Some years before she married Gerald, her father, the fierce old Prince of South Wales, was fighting the English under Henry, (then the Prince and later King). Henry succeeded in taking the lovely Nesta as hostage. By this royal lover, she had two sons; Meyler fitzHenry and the celebrated Robert of Gloucester.

It would seem that Gerald, busily engaged in military business, could have had no peace about his wife, since she was clever as well as beautiful, and every warrior seems to have fallen in love with her.

In 1095, Gerald led an expedition against the Welsh on the borders of what is now Pembrokeshire. In 1100, he went to Ireland to secure for his lord, Arnulf Montgomery, the hand of the daughter of King Murrough in marriage.

He was the first of the Geraldines to set foot in Ireland, where they were later to rule like kings. Later, Arnulf joined in a rebellion against the King, was deprived of his estates and exiled in 1102. Then the King granted custody of Pembroke Castle to Gerald.

Later, he was appointed president of the County of Pembrokeshire. But it was Nesta that occupied the center of their stage during their marriage. Her beauty continued to excite wonder and desire throughout Wales.

At Christmas in 1108, Cadwgan, Prince of Cardigan, invited the native chieftains to a feast at Dyvet (St. Davids). Nestas beauty was a subject of conversation. She excited the curiosity of Owen, the son of Prince Cadwgan, who resolved to see her. She was his cousin, so that the pretense of a friendly visit was easy. He successfully obtained admission with his attendants into Pembroke Castle. Her beauty -- it was even greater than he expected -- excited his lust. He determined to carry her off In the middle of the night, he set fire to the castle, and his followers surrounded the room where Gerald and Nesta were sleeping. Gerald was awakened by the noise and about to discover the cause, but Nesta, suspecting some treason, persuaded him to make his escape. She pulled up a board and let her husband escape down a drain by a rope. Then Owen broke open the door, seized Nesta and two of her sons, and carried them off to Powys, leaving the castle in flames.

Owen had his way with Nesta, (historians say that one of her ten children was his), though whether she yielded from desire or force was uncertain. But at her request, Owen hastened to send back the two sons to Gerald.

When King Henry heard of Nestas abduction, he was furious. He regarded it as an injury almost personal, since Gerald was not only his steward, but his particular friend. The abduction of Nesta led to a war, which resulted in her return to her husband, and Owen fled to Ireland. Gerald took a conspicuous role in the fighting. In 1116, Henry ordered Owen, who had returned to Wales, to apprehend Gruffuyd, son of Rhys ap Tewdyr. As he passed through a wood on his march to join up with the royal forces, Owen seized some cattle. The owners of the cattle, as they fled, met Gerald, Constable of Pembroke. Gerald was also on his way to join the royal forces. When the cattle owners requested his assistance, he was only too delighted to have the opportunity for revenge for the insult to his honor done by Owens abduction of Nesta. He lost no time in pursuing Owen, found him, and a skirmish followed. Owen was slain, an arrow piercing his heart, and Geralds honor was avenged. Gerald died about 1135, leaving three sons and a daughter by Nesta. They were: Maurice, one of the principal leaders of the Irish invasion in 1169; William, ancestor of the families of Carew, Grace, Fitzmaurice, Gerald, and the Keatings of Ireland; David, who became bishop of St. Davids; and Angareth, wife of William de Bari, and mother of the historian, Gerald Cambrensis.

Nesta married again. Her second husband was Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had one son, Robert fitzStephen. Nestas children and their descendants constituted a menace to the English rule of Wales. Royal Welsh blood mingled with the blood of the nobles of Normandy in all the half-brothers, sons of Gerald of Windsor and Stephen of Cardigan. Bastard or legitimate, they were turbulent princes in a troubled land. Now fighting the Welsh natives, now allying themselves with their cousin, Nestas brother Gruffuyd, the unconquered Prince of Wales, on whose head Henry had set "a mountain of gold", they remained a constant source of trouble to the King, an ever-present threat to his security. And so they fought, these Norman barons, and they went on fighting. It was the able and ambitious Henry II, one of Englands really great kings, (the Henry of "Becket" and "Lion in Winter"),the father of Richard the Lionhearted and John of the Magna Carta, who was to find a solution. He was to give these Norman adventurers a free hand in Ireland. It was thus that the Norman invasion of Ireland came about, and the Geraldines arrived in 1169. -------------------- Nest ferch Rhys (died after 1136) was a Welsh princess of Deheubarth who was renowned for her beauty. Nest was the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon. After her father's death in 1093, Deheubarth was conquered by the Normans and King Henry I of England appointed himself her protector. Nest is thought to have borne him a son, Henry FitzRoy (1103-1158).[1]

Around 1095 King Henry decided to marry Nest to one of his followers, Gerald Fitz Walter, whom he appointed Constable of Pembroke. Consequently, Nest is the maternal progenitor of the FitzGerald dynasty, one of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain (The Fitzgeralds are a Hiberno-Norman or Cambro-Norman dynasty, and have been Peers of Ireland since at least the 14th Century). Nest and Gerald had five children:

1.William FitzGerald (died 1173)

2.Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Llansteffan (died 1 September 1177)

3.David FitzGerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan and Bishop of St David's

4.Angharad de Windsor, who married William de Barry

5.A daughter (possibly Gwladys), the mother of Milo de Cogan

During Christmas 1109, Nest and her husband were visited by her cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys. The story goes that Owain was so taken with Nest's beauty that he and fifteen companions attacked the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle or Carew Castle, both in Pembrokeshire), seized Nest, and carried her and her children off.

Tradition also states that Gerald escaped by jumping down the garderobe (i.e. the lavatory chute) to get away (one suspects that this is a Welsh tradition). The children were later returned to Gerald. Nest is said to have borne Owain two sons, Llywelyn and Einion, before finally being returned to her husband.

This abduction earned Nest the nickname "Helen of Wales" because it led to civil war on a small scale. Owain ap Cadwgan left the country to avoid retribution, whilst Owain's father, Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, lost his own lands. Gerald waited for Owain to return to Wales, then ambushed and killed him in combat as retribution for kidnapping his wife and children. After Gerald's death, Nest became the lover of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen who died in 1182.

Nest's daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry and had by him four sons: Robert; Philip, the founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland; Walter; the historian Gerald of Wales. Her sons Philip and Robert campaigned in Ireland with Strongbow; Robert died there in 1182. Robert and Philip were the founders of the family Walsh/Welsh of Kilkenny where they built a Castle known as Castle hale of Kilkenny, Ireland.

-------------------- Heiress of Carew Rhys

BIOGRAPHY: She was known as the most beautiful woman in Wales and had many lovers. At Christmas of 1108, Owain ap Cadwgan of Cardigan visited Gerald and Nesta. Owain so lusted after her that he, that night, attacked the castle and carried her off. This incident upset Henry I so much that it started a war.

Individual:

Nest (who also [in addition to Gerald fitz Walter] had by Stephen,

Constable of Cardigan, a son (Robert fitz Stephen) and by Henry I another son (Henry, killed 1158, father of Meiler fitz Henry), daughter of Rhys ap Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales. [Burke's Peerage, p. 1679] -------------------- Died: BEF 1136

Notes:

Known as the most beautiful woman in Wales. She had many lovers.

In Christmas 1108 Owain ap Cadwgan of Cardigan came to visit Gerald and Nesta.

He so lusted after her that he, that night, attacked the castle and carried

her off and had his way with her. This upset Henry I so much that the incident

started a war.

Father: ap Tewdwr Mawr, Rhys, Prince S. Wales

Mother: , Gwladys

Married to de Windsor, Gerald, Constable of Pembroke Ctl

Child 1: Fitzgerald, William

Child 2: de Windsor, Maurice Fitzgerald, b. 1100

Child 3: Fitzgerald, David, Bishop of St. Davids

Child 4: Fitzgerald, Angharad

Princess Nesta was a very remarkable woman. She is sometimes referred to as the "mother of the Irish invasion" since her sons, by various fathers, and her grandsons were the leaders of the invasion. She had, in the course of her eventful life, two lovers, two husbands, and many sons and daughters. Her father is quoted as saying that she had 10 children as a result of her matrimonial escapades, eight sons and two daughters, among them William fitzGerald de Windsor. One of her lovers was King Henry I of England. Some years before she married Gerald, her father, the fierce old Prince of South Wales, was fighting the English under Henry, (then the Prince and later King). Henry succeeded in taking the lovely Nesta as hostage. By this royal lover, she had two sons; Meyler fitzHenry and the celebrated Robert of Gloucester. It would seem that Gerald, busily engaged in military business, could have had no peace about his wife, since she was clever as well as beautiful, and every warrior seems to have fallen in love with her. In 1095, Gerald led an expedition against the Welsh on the borders of what is now Pembrokeshire. In 1100, he went to Ireland to secure for his lord, Arnulf Montgomery, the hand of the daughter of King Murrough in marriage. He was the first of the Geraldines to set foot in Ireland, where they were later to rule like kings. Later, Arnulf joined in a rebellion against the King, was deprived of his estates and exiled in 1102. Then the King granted custody of Pembroke Castle to Gerald. Later, he was appointed president of the County of Pembrokeshire.

But it was Nesta that occupied the center of their stage during their marriage. Her beauty continued to excite wonder and desire throughout Wales. At Christmas in 1108, Cadwgan, Prince of Cardigan, invited the native chieftains to a feast at Dyvet (St. David's). Nesta's beauty was a subject of conversation. She excited the curiosity of Owen, the son of Prince Cadwgan, who resolved to see her. She was his cousin, so that the pretense of a friendly visit was easy. He successfully obtained admission with his attendants into Pembroke Castle. Her beauty -- it was even greater than he expected -- excited his lust. He determined to carry her off! In the middle of the night, he set fire to the castle, and his followers surrounded the room where Gerald and Nesta were sleeping. Gerald was awakened by the noise and about to discover the cause, but Nesta, suspecting some /treason, persuaded him to make his escape. She pulled up a board and let her husband escape down a drain by a rope. Then Owen broke open the door, seized Nesta and two of her sons, and carried them off to Powys, leaving the castle in flames. Owen had his way with Nesta, (historians say that one of her ten children was his), though whether she yielded from desire or force was uncertain. But at her request, Owen hastened to send back the two sons to Gerald. When King Henry heard of Nesta's abduction, he was furious. He regarded it as an injury almost personal, since Gerald was not only his steward, but his particular friend. The abduction of Nesta led to a war, which resulted in her return to her husband, and Owen fled to Ireland. Gerald took a conspicuous role in the fighting. In 1116, Henry ordered Owen, who had returned to Wales, to apprehend Gruffuyd, son of Rhys ap Tewdyr. As he passed through a wood on his march to join up with the royal forces, Owen seized some cattle. The owners of the cattle, as they fled, met Gerald, Constable of Pembroke. Gerald was also on his way to join the royal forces. When the cattle owners requested his assistance, he was only too delighted to have the opportunity for revenge for the insult to his honor done by Owen's abduction of Nesta. He lost no time in pursuing Owen, found him, and a skirmish followed. Owen was slain, an arrow piercing his heart, and Gerald's honor was avenged.

Gerald died about 1135, leaving three sons and a daughter by Nesta. They were: Maurice, one of the principal leaders of the Irish invasion in 1169; William, ancestor of the families of Carew, Grace, Fitzmaurice, Gerald, and the Keatings of Ireland; David, who became bishop of St. David's; and Angareth, wife of William de Bari, and mother of the historian, Gerald Cambrensis. Nesta married again. Her second husband was Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had one son, Robert fitzStephen. Nesta's children and their descendants constituted a menace to the English rule of Wales. Royal Welsh blood mingled with the blood of the nobles of Normandy in all the half-brothers, sons of Gerald of Windsor and Stephen of Cardigan. Bastard or legitimate, they were turbulent princes in a /troubled land. Now fighting the Welsh natives, now allying themselves with their cousin, Nesta's brother Gruffuyd, the unconquered Prince of Wales, on whose head Henry had set "a mountain of gold", they remained a constant source of /trouble to the King, an ever-present threat to his security.

And so they fought, these Norman barons, and they went on fighting. It was the able and ambitious Henry II, one of England's really great kings, (the Henry of "Becket" and "Lion in Winter"), the father of Richard the Lionhearted and John of the Magna Carta, who was to find a solution. He was to give these Norman adventurers a free hand in Ireland. It was thus that the Norman invasion of Ireland came about, and the Geraldines arrived in 1169.

-------------------- Princess of Deheubarth -------------------- Nesta was by all accounts an extraordinary beauty and had many lovers including King Henry I. She married the Norman Gerald of Windsor, but was abducted by Owain, the son of the Welsh Prince of Powys during a Welsh attack on Cilgerran Castle in 1109. The incident set off a war in Wales and earned Nesta renown as "the Welsh Helen of Troy." Eventually, Nesta was returned to her husband and Owain was killed in a skirmish with Gerald and his men.

Nesta (who also [in addition to Gerald fitz Walter] had by Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, a son (Robert fitz Stephen) and by Henry I another son (Henry, killed 1158, father of Meiler fitz Henry), daughter of Rhys ap Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales. [Burke's Peerage, p. 1679]

He [Gerald de Windsor] married Nest, daughter of Rhys ap Tudor Mawr, PRINCE OF SOUTH WALES. The date of his death is not known, presumably before 1136. [Complete Peerage X:10-11,]

In 1106, when Owen ap Cadugan carried her off, two of her sons and a daughter by Gerald de Windsor were taken with her, the sons being returned later to their father. By Stephen, constable of Cardigan (query after Gerald's death), Nesta bore a son, Robert FitzStephen, and by Henry I a son Henry (killed 1158), father of Meiler FitzHenry, which Robert and Meiler were later brothers-in-arms of the Geraldines in Ireland.

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nest_ferch_Rhys

Nest ferch Rhys (died after 1136) was a Welsh princess of Deheubarth who was renowned for her beauty. Nest was the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon. After her father's death in 1093, Deheubarth was conquered by the Normans and King Henry I of England appointed himself her protector. Nest is thought to have borne him a son, Henry FitzRoy (1103-1158).

Around 1095 King Henry decided to marry Nest to one of his followers, Gerald de Windsor, whom he appointed Constable of Pembroke. Consequently, Nest is the maternal progenitor of the FitzGerald dynasty, one of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain (The Fitzgeralds are a Hiberno-Norman or Cambro-Norman dynasty, and have been Peers of Ireland since at least the 14th Century). Nest and Gerald had five children:

1.William FitzGerald (died 1173)

2.Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Llansteffan (died 1 September 1177)

3.David FitzGerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan and Bishop of St David's

4.Angharad de Windsor, who married William de Barry

5.A daughter (possibly Gwladys), the mother of Milo de Cogan

During Christmas 1109, Nest and her husband were visited by her cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys. The story goes that Owain was so taken with Nest's beauty that he and fifteen companions attacked the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle or Carew Castle, both in Pembrokeshire), seized Nest, and carried her and her children off.

Tradition also states that Gerald escaped by jumping down the garderobe (i.e. the lavatory chute) to get away. The children were later returned to Gerald. Nest is said to have borne Owain two sons, Llywelyn and Einion, before finally being returned to her husband.

This abduction earned Nest the nickname "Helen of Wales" because it led to civil war on a small scale. Owain ap Cadwgan left the country to avoid retribution, whilst Owain's father, Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, lost his own lands. Gerald waited for Owain to return to Wales, then ambushed and killed him in combat as retribution for kidnapping his wife and children. After Gerald's death, Nest became the lover of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen who died in 1182.

Nest's daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry and had by him four sons: Robert; Philip, the founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland; Walter; the historian Gerald of Wales. Her sons Philip and Robert campaigned in Ireland with Strongbow; Robert died there in 1182. Robert and Philip were the founders of the family Walsh/Welsh of Kilkenny where they built a Castle known as Castle Hale of Kilkenny, Ireland.

-------------------- Nest ferch Rhys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nest ferch Rhys (died after 1136) was a Welsh princess of Deheubarth who was renowned for her beauty. Nest was the daughter of Prince Rhys ap Tewdwr by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon. After her father's death in 1093, Deheubarth was conquered by the Normans and King Henry I of England appointed himself her protector. Nest is thought to have borne him a son, Henry FitzRoy (1103-1158).[1]

Around 1095 King Henry decided to marry Nest to one of his followers, Gerald de Windsor, whom he appointed Constable of Pembroke. Consequently, Nest is the maternal progenitor of the FitzGerald dynasty, one of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain (they are a Hiberno-Norman or Cambro-Norman dynasty, and have been Peers of Ireland since at least the 14th Century). Nest and Gerald had five children:

  1. William FitzGerald (died 1173) Father of Raymond FitzGerald and Isabella Le Gros md William De Haya Wallenisis.
  2. Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Llansteffan (died 1 September 1177)
  3. David FitzGerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan and Bishop of St David's
  4. Angharad de Windsor, who married William de Barry
  5. A daughter (possibly Gwladys), the mother of Milo de Cogan

During Christmas 1109, Nest and her husband were visited by her cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, Prince of Powys. The story goes that Owain was so taken with Nest's beauty that he and fifteen companions attacked the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle or Carew Castle, both in Pembrokeshire), seized Nest, and carried her and her children off.

Tradition also states that Gerald escaped by jumping down the garderobe (i.e. the lavatory chute) to get away. The children were later returned to Gerald. Nest is said to have borne Owain two sons, Llywelyn and Einion, before finally being returned to her husband.

This abduction earned Nest the nickname "Helen of Wales" because it led to civil war on a small scale. Owain ap Cadwgan left the country to avoid retribution, whilst Owain's father, Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, lost his own lands. Gerald waited for Owain to return to Wales, then ambushed and killed him in combat as retribution for kidnapping his wife and children. After Gerald's death, Nest became the lover of Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, by whom she had another son, Robert Fitz-Stephen who died in 1182.

Nest's daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry and had by him four sons: Robert; Philip, the founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland; Walter; the historian Gerald of Wales. Her sons Philip and Robert campaigned in Ireland with Strongbow; Robert died there in 1182. Robert and Philip were the founders of the family Walsh/Welsh of Kilkenny where they built a Castle known as Castle hale of Kilkenny, Ireland.

Nest's Son William had a daughter named Isabella Le Gros whom married William De Haya Wallenisis and had David Walensis and Philip Walensis. David and Philip where considered The Welshman and the starting of the Welsh/Walsh (Philip) Walensis/Wallace (David) going from Scotland to Ireland. Philip Walensis had a son named Howell of Welsh Walensis. Howell of Welsh Walensis had a son named Griffin Geoffory of Welsh Walensis. Griffin Geoffory of Welsh Walensis had a son named Roger of Welsh whom married Maud Waulip.

Roger of Welsh whom married Maud Waulip son was William Walsh: William Walsh son was Robert Le Walsh: Robert Le Walsh son was John Le Walsh: John Le Walsh son was: Robert Le Walsh: Robert Le Walsh son was Thomas Walsh: Thomas Walsh son was John Walsh: John Walsh son was Adam Walsh: Adam Walsh son was John Walsh: John Walsh son was John Walshe of Olveston whom married Elizabeth Forster. Contents [hide]

   * 1 See also
   * 2 Footnotes
   * 3 In fiction
   * 4 References

[edit] See also

   * Gerald of Wales

[edit] Footnotes

  1. ^ A History of Wales

[edit] In fiction

   * Fairburn, Eleanor, "The Golden Hive", London: Heinemann, 1966
   * Knight, Bernard, "Lion Rampant", London: Robert Hale, 1972
   * Orford, Margaret, "Royal Mistress", Swansea [Wales] : C. Davies, 1976.
   * Bell, Anne, "Daughter of the Dragon", London: Robert Hale, 1978
   * McKinlay, Margaret, "Pawns of Kings", London: Robert Hale, 1981

[edit] References

   * Davies, John, "A History of Wales", p. 110, 123, 128, ISBN 978-0-14-028475-1, Penguin Books, 2007
   * Dictionary of National Biography, p. 228-229
   * Bartrum, Peter, Welsh Genealogies: 300-1400, 941 pages, University of Wales Press (December 1976)
   * Maund, Kari, Princess Nest of Wales: Seductress of the English (Stroud: Tempus, 2007)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Recieved from http://www.geni.com/people/Deborah-Thomas/6000000013441878632 10 September 2011:

Nest ferch Rhys ap Tewdwr (Agnes, daughter of Rhys son of Theodor), born c 1085, died before 1136. She was never styled :"princess", as the Welsh never styled their royal women as such, even when a lady's husband was king or prince. Nest was referred to as "the nobly-born daughter of" or :"the noble lady".

Nest was the oldest legitimate daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last king of South Wales (Deheubarth), by his wife Gwladus ferch Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn, prince of Powys. Nest's full brothers were Gruffydd ap Rhys, father of the Lord Rhys, and Hywel ap Rhys. An older (illegitimate) half brother, Goronwy ap Rhys, died in the Tower after their father's death. Marared ferch Rhys and Efa ferch Rhys may have been older (illegitimate) half sisters. Nest was obviously not the sister of " Agnes [Nest] [de] Windsor.".

Nest was briefly one of the many concubines of Henry I of England, by whom she had one son, Henry fitz Henry (c 1102- 1105). Being illegitimate, Henry fitz Roy was not, of course, a prince of England.

The king then married Nest to Gerald fitz Walter de Windsor, constable of Pembroke, by whom she had five surviving children: William fitz Gerald -- who was lord of Carew, not Baron of Pembroke or Windsor, -- Maurice fitz Gerald, David fitz Gerald, Angharad fitz Gerald, and Gwladus fitz Gerald.

Mauger FitzGerald, Robert FitzWalter, Winslow Garrard (Garrett); and Roesia De Windsor; are otherwise unknown. Einion [ab] Owain and Llywelyn [ap] Cadwgan, are alleged to have been her sons fathered after she was raped by Owain ap Cadwgan raped her, but the few sources for this are spurious. William [de lay] Hay was not a son of Nest, as sometimes alleged; he was the son-in-law of Nest's son, Maurice.

Nest died sometime before 1136. Her grave, like that of her two husbands, is unknown.

-------------------- Heiress of the lands of Carew, near Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire

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Nest verch Rhys's Timeline

1072
1072
Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, , Wales
1085
1085
Dynevor, Llandyfesisant, Carmarthenshire, Wales
1095
1095
Age 10
Windsor, Berkshire, , England
1099
1099
Age 14
Carew Castle, Pembroke, Wales
1100
1100
Age 15
Pembrokeshire, Wales
1100
Age 15
Carru Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1102
1102
Age 17
Selby, Yorkshire, England
1104
1104
Age 19
Carew Castle, Pembrokeshire, , Wales
1105
1105
Age 20
Narberth, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1110
1110
Age 25
Windsor, Berkshire, England