Niall Glúndub mac Áedo, High King of Ireland (830 - 919) MP

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Nicknames: "Niall Glúndub mac Áedo", "High King of /Ireland/", "9544"
Birthplace: Irland
Death: Died in near Rathfarnham, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Occupation: Høvding, High King of Ireland and King of the Cenél nEógain
Managed by: Esther ROWE Irish
Last Updated:

About Niall Glúndub mac Áedo, High King of Ireland

Niall Glúndub

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Niall Glúndub mac Áedo (d. October 919) was a 10th century Irish king of the Cenél nEógain and High King of Ireland. While many Irish kin groups were members of the Uí Néill, tracing their descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages (Niall Noígallach), the O'Neill take their name from Niall Glúndub rather than the earlier Niall.

Son of Aed Finliath, Niall is first recorded succeeding his brother Domnall mac Áeda as King of Aileach upon his death in 911. Extending his control to neighboring kingdoms, Niall defeated the Kings of Dál nAraidi and Ulaid at the Battles of Glarryford (in present day County Antrim) and Ballymena before his defeat by high-king Flann Sinna mac Maíl Sechnaill of the Clann Cholmáin Uí Néill at the Battle of Crossakeel (near present day Meath). Following Flann's death in 916, Niall succeeded him as High King of Ireland. It was during his reign in which he would reestablish the Óenach Tailteann, a traditional gathering of Irish clans.

Opposing the invasion by the Northmen during the next several years, Niall's forces fought a large battle against a group of Northmen in the summer of 917, ending inconclusively. With the support of the clans of Leth Cuinn (Northern half of Ireland), the Uí Néill eventually acknowledged his claim to the throne. Despite his continued offensive against the Northmen however, they would continue to settle the area in large numbers, establishing strongholds in Dublin and various ports on the eastern coast. Continuing to wage war against the Northmen, Niall advanced towards into Leinster, supported by the Uí Néill clans, the Airgíalla and the Ulaid. However, his forces were decimated by the Northmen under Sitric the Blind as Niall was killed, along with twelve other chieftains, at the Battle of Kilmashoge (near Rothfarham) in October. He was succeeded as High King by Donnchad Donn mac Flainn, son of Flann Sinna, and as King of Ailech by his son Muirchertach mac Néill, "the Hector of the Western World".

-------------------- Niall Glúndub

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Niall Glúndub mac Áedo (d. October 919) was a 10th century Irish king of the Cenél nEógain and High King of Ireland. While many Irish kin groups were members of the Uí Néill, tracing their descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages (Niall Noígallach), the O'Neill take their name from Niall Glúndub rather than the earlier Niall.

Son of Aed Finliath, Niall is first recorded succeeding his brother Domnall mac Áeda as King of Aileach upon his death in 911. Extending his control to neighboring kingdoms, Niall defeated the Kings of Dál nAraidi and Ulaid at the Battles of Glarryford (in present day County Antrim) and Ballymena before his defeat by high-king Flann Sinna mac Maíl Sechnaill of the Clann Cholmáin Uí Néill at the Battle of Crossakeel (near present day Meath). Following Flann's death in 916, Niall succeeded him as High King of Ireland. It was during his reign in which he would reestablish the Óenach Tailteann, a traditional gathering of Irish clans.

Opposing the invasion by the Northmen during the next several years, Niall's forces fought a large battle against a group of Northmen in the summer of 917, ending inconclusively. With the support of the clans of Leth Cuinn (Northern half of Ireland), the Uí Néill eventually acknowledged his claim to the throne. Despite his continued offensive against the Northmen however, they would continue to settle the area in large numbers, establishing strongholds in Dublin and various ports on the eastern coast. Continuing to wage war against the Northmen, Niall advanced towards into Leinster, supported by the Uí Néill clans, the Airgíalla and the Ulaid. However, his forces were decimated by the Northmen under Sitric the Blind as Niall was killed, along with twelve other chieftains, at the Battle of Kilmashoge (near Rothfarham) in October. He was succeeded as High King by Donnchad Donn mac Flainn, son of Flann Sinna, and as King of Ailech by his son Muirchertach mac Néill, "the Hector of the Western World". -------------------- Navn: Niall Glúndub mac Áedo

Fyrstehus: Cenél nEógain

Regjeringstid: 915–919

Død: 14. september 919, nær Dublin, Irland

Foreldre: far Aed Finliath, Maolmuire datter av Cinaed mac Alpin

Ektefelle‍(r): Gormlaith, datter av Flann Sinna

Barn: Muirchertach mac Néill

Niall Glúndub mac Áedo (død 14. september 919) var overkonge av Irland fra 915 til 919. Niall tilhørte klanen Cenél nEógain av den nordlige Uí Néill, og var sønn av den tidligere overkongen Aed Finliath.

Den første referansen til Niall i annalene er i 911 når han etterfølger sin bror Domnall mac Áeda som konge av Ailech. Han utvidet sitt maktområde til også å gjelde nabokongedømmene, og seiret over kongene av Dál nAraidi og Ulaid i slagene ved Glarryford (i dagens grevskap Antrim) og Ballymena. Han utfordret også overkongen Flann Sinna mac Maíl Sechnaill fra Clann Cholmáin (Sørlige Uí Néill), men tapte for ham i et slag ved Crossakeel i Mide.

Etter Flanns død i 914 etterfulgte Niall ham som overkonge i 915. Anført av to høvdinger fra Ivarætten, Sigtrygg Caech og Ragnvald vendte norrøne styrker tilbake til Irland og områdene rundt Dublin i 917. Nialls styrker utkjempet et større slag mot dem i 917, uten at han klarte å forhidre at Sigtrygg tok Dublin i besittelse. Med støtte fra klanene i hele den nordlige delen av Irland (Leth Cuinn), fikk han likevel anerkjennelse også av sørlige Uí Neill som overkonge, og hadde solid støtte i sin fortsatte krigføring mot de norrøne. Men trass i Niall offensiver fortsatte de norrøne å bosette seg i stort antall, og de anla befestnigner i Dublin og andre havner på østkysten. I 919 rykket Niall inn i Leinster med støtte fra Uí Néill klanene, styrker fra Airgíalla og Ulaid. Styrkene hans ble imidlertid knust av den norrøne hæren under Sigtryggs ledelse i slaget ved Kilmashoge, utenfor Dublin, 14.september 919. Niall selv og flere ander småkonger som støttet ham ble drept i slaget. Flann Sinnas sønn Donnchad Donn etterfulgte ham som overkonge, hans egen sønn Muirchertach mac Néill som konge av Ailech.

[rediger] Litteratur

Donnchadh Ó Corraín, «Vikings in Ireland and Scotland in the Ninth Century». I: Peritia 1998. Årbok for Medieval Academy of Ireland. issn 0332-1592 pdf

Donnchadh Ó Corraín, The Vikings & Ireland pdf

Annalene av de fire mesterne

Inisfallen-annalene

Ulster-annalene

[rediger] Sekundær litteratur

Webb, Alfred. A Compendium of Irish Biography: Comprising Sketches of Distinguished Irishmen and of Eminent Persons Connected with Ireland by Office or by Their Writings, New York: Lemma Publishing Corporation, 1970.

-------------------- http://www.clanmactavish.org/documents/niall_glundubh_anrothan_oneill.pdf

"The great O'Neills (O Neill) themselves descend from Niall Glundubh, High-King of Ireland, who fell fighting against the Vikings near Dublin in 919. (Note: Niall Glundubh was the son of Aed Finlaith and Mael Muire, daughter of Kenneth mac Alpin of Scotland). His grandson, Domhanall was the first to bear the dynastic name of O'Neill." -------------------- Called Neil of the Black Knee; killed fighting the Vikings in the Battle of Dublin. The O'Neills were the chiefs of the Cenel Eoghain tribe; their ancestral lands were sometimes called Tir Eoghain, roughly equivalent to the modern County Tyrone. The surname is derived from Ui Niall, meaning descendant of Niall. The Ui Niall were the great royal dynasty of Northern Ireland; they separated from their kinsmen, the Connachta, after the famous accomplishments of the legendary King Niall of the Nine Hostages. The surname, however, did not exist until after Niall Glundubh. Niall captured and drowned a murderer in 907 who had violated the sanctuary of Armagh. He campaigned repeatedly against the Danes and Vikings, but was mortally wounded in combat in Dublin

Owner of Drinking cup at Dunvegan

Neil Black-knee Glundubh -------------------- ◦Called Neil of the Black Knee; killed fighting the Vikings in the Battle of Dublin. The O'Neills were the chiefs of the Cenel Eoghain tribe; their ancestral lands were sometimes called Tir Eoghain, roughly equivalent to the modern County Tyrone. The surname is derived from Ui Niall, meaning descendant of Niall. The Ui Niall were the great royal dynasty of Northern Ireland; they separated from their kinsmen, the Connachta, after the famous accomplishments of the legendary King Niall of the Nine Hostages. The surname, however, did not exist until after Niall Glundubh. Niall captured and drowned a murderer in 907 who had violated the sanctuary of Armagh. He campaigned repeatedly against the Danes and Vikings, but was mortally wounded in combat in Dublin

Owner of Drinking cup at Dunvegan

Neil Black-knee Glundubh

-------------------- Niall Glundubh was the eldest son of Aodh Finnliath and the 170th High King (Ard Ri) of Ireland. He became King in 914 and remained in office until his death in 917. Niall had many conflicts with the Danes in which generally emerged victorious. At length, he mustered a great army to beseige the Viking town of Dublin. With this army, he engaged the Danes in battle at Cill Mosamhog, near Rathfarnham in Co.Dublin. There was "great slaughter" on both sides in this battle and Niall was among those who lost his life.

Glundubh means "Black-Knee," while Niall means a "Champion." The genitive form of Niall is Neill. The name O'Neill, meaning descended from Niall, was first used as a surname by Niall's grandson, Donal O'Neill [1] [2]

[1] "Annals of Ireland by the Four Masters," p.589

[2] "Irish Pedigrees," p. 394.