Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

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Nicholas Vaux, 1st Barron Of Harrowden

Also Known As: "Vance", "1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in Clerkenwell, Middlesex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir William Vaux of Great Harrowden; William Vaux; Catherine Penistone and Katherine Vaux
Husband of Elizabeth Fitzhugh and Anne de Vaux
Father of Alice Sapcote; Katherine Throckmorton; Anne Catherine Strange; Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden; Maud Fermor and 3 others
Brother of Joan Vaux, Lady Guildford

Occupation: Baron, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460 – 14 May 1523) was a soldier and courtier in England and an early member of the House of Commons. He was the son of Lancastrian loyalists, Sir William Vaux of Harrowden and Katherine Peniston, daughter of George Peniston of Corticella (then part of Provence, now in Piedmont in northern Italy).[1][2] He grew up during the years of Yorkist rule, and served under Henry VII when he seized the throne in 1485.

Nicholas Vaux's mother, Katherine, an attendant on Margaret of Anjou, remained constant to her mistress when others forsook the Lancastrian cause. Katherine's husband, Sir William Vaux, whom she had married not long before she obtained her letters of denization, was attainted in 1461[3] and later slain at the Battle of Tewkesbury.[4] Despite her husband's misfortune, Katherine Vaux remained loyal to her mistress: she stayed by the Queen during her imprisonment in the Tower of London, and on Margaret's release in 1476 went with her into exile (as she had done earlier in the 1460s), living with her until her death six years later. Katherine's two children did not share either her confinement or her travels abroad; instead, Nicholas Vaux and his sister Joan, were brought up in the household of Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of Henry VII), without charge, even though Edward IV restored two manors to the family for the maintenance of him and his sister.

Katherine's devotion was rewarded after the triumph of Henry VII at Bosworth, where Nicholas Vaux, as a protégé of Margaret Beaufort, probably fought under her husband Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby; the petition for the reversal of the attainder on Vaux's father and the forfeiture of his property was accepted by the King in the Parliament of 1485, and not long after Vaux was named to the commission of the peace for his home county.

He fought for Henry VII at Stoke and Blackheath, being knighted on the field for his service in both battles. Not only was he active and diligent in local government but he was also frequently at court attending all the great state occasions at home and abroad until his death; in 1511 he entertained Henry VIII at Harrowden. It was as a soldier and diplomat, however, that he made his mark. Given the important command at Guisnes, he distinguished himself during the Tournai campaign in 1513 and then in the missions (he had had some earlier experiences in negotiating, chiefly with Burgundy) to the French King about the English withdrawal and the several royal marriage treaties. Later, he was one of the devisers of the Field of the Cloth of Gold. His sister, Jane or "Joan", had also benefited from the change of dynasty: she entered the royal household, became governess to Henry VII's daughters and married successively Sir Richard Guildford and the father of Sir Nicholas Poyntz, Sir Anthony Poyntz.

Vaux was a natural candidate for election to Parliament, although in the absence of so many returns for the early Tudor period he is known to have been a Member only in 1515 when he and Sir John Hussey took a memorandum on certain Acts from the Commons up to the Lords. Presumably, he sat for his own shire on this occasion as he was after wards appointed to the Northamptonshire commission for the subsidy which he had helped to grant.

Vaux married firstly Lady Elizabeth Parr (born FitzHugh), widow of Sir William Parr of Kendal, daughter of Sir Henry, 5th Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth, and Lady Alice Neville.[5][6] The wedding took place most likely after Richard III was defeated by Henry Tudor (later King Henry VII). The marriage was most likely to secure the allegiance of Elizabeth and her family to the Tudor dynasty. Elizabeth's mother was a niece of Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, so the new queen consort Elizabeth of York was a blood relation. By Elizabeth, Vaux had three daughters; Katherine, Alice, and Anne. Elizabeth, Lady Vaux, died on 29 January 1508.

Lord Vaux married secondly, shortly after 29 January 1508, Anne Green, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Thomas Green of Boughton and Green's Norton, Northamptonshire, and Jane Fogge, by whom he had two sons and three daughters. Anne was the sister of Lady Maud Parr, mother of Henry VIII's sixth wife, Catherine Parr. On 4 September 1514, Lady Vaux accompanied her husband on his journey to bring the King's sister, Princess Mary Tudor, to her wedding to Louis XII of France in Abbeville, France.[7] Both were present at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520 where they attended upon the King and Queen. The two were joined by Sir Thomas Parr, his wife Lady Parr, and Thomas's brother, Sir William Parr of Horton.[8] Anne, Lady Vaux, predeceased Lord Vaux. Anne provided Lord Vaux with his male heir, Thomas.[9]

By Elizabeth he had three daughters:

  • Katherine Vaux (c. 1490-c. 1571), married Sir George Throckmorton of Coughton and had issue.[10]
  • Alice Vaux (d. 1543), married Sir Richard Sapcote c. 1501. No issue.[10][11]
  • Anne Vaux, married Sir Thomas Le Strange (1493–1545) and had issue.[10][12]

By Anne Green he had two sons and three daughters:

  • Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1510 – Oct 1556). Married Elizabeth Cheney (1505 – 20 November 1556) c. 1523, daughter of Sir Thomas Cheney, of Irtlingburgh and Anne Parr, daughter from his father's first wife, Lady Elizabeth, by her first husband William Parr, 1st Baron Parr of Kendal. The two had issue.[10]
  • William Vaux[10] (d. May 1523), never married, no issue.
  • Margaret Vaux, married Sir Francis Pulteney of Misterton[10] (1502 – c. 17 May 1548). Had issue. Their son, Sir Gabriel Pulteney of Knowle Hall (d. 31 August 1599) married Dorothy Spencer, daughter of Sir William Spencer of Althorp.[13]
  • Bridget Vaux, married Maurice Welsh c. 1538.[10]
  • Maud Vaux (d. 14 April 1569), married Sir John Fermor of Easton Neston.[10] Had issue. Their daughter, Katherine Fermor m.2 Sir Henry Darcy, son of Sir Arthur Darcy and Mary Carew. Sir Arthur Darcy was a descendant of the Barons Darcy of Knaith.

Sir Nicholas Vaux is an important character in William Shakespeare's Henry VIII.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Vaux,_1st_Baron_Vaux_of_Harrowden

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 58
  • Vaux, Nicholas by Isaac Saunders Leadam
  • VAUX, Sir NICHOLAS, first Lord Vaux of Harrowden (d. 1523), courtier and soldier, was of the family of Vaus or Vaux, settled at Harrowden in Northamptonshire since the time of Henry IV. Vaux's mother is stated in a manuscript at the college of arms to have been ‘Katherina filia Georgii Peniston de Courtowsell Pedemontani’ (Vincent MS. 20). In Bridges's ‘History of Northamptonshire’ this is given as ‘Gregory Peniston of Courtesells in Piedmont.’ The lady's father was doubtless an English political refugee. Vaux's father, Sir William Vaux, was a zealous Lancastrian. He was attainted by Edward IV's first parliament in 1461 and his estates confiscated. It is not improbable that he then fled the country, and his eldest son, Nicholas, may have been the offspring of an Italian alliance, though Anthony Wood says that he was born in Northamptonshire. He probably returned to England at Easter 1471, accompanying Margaret of Anjou from Normandy. He was slain in the disastrous defeat of Tewkesbury on 4 May of that year (Paston Letters; Warkworth, Chron. p. 18; cf. Rot. Parl. vi. 304; Campbell, Materials, &c., ii. 325). One of the ladies taken prisoners in Queen Margaret's company was his wife, ‘Dame Kateryne Vaus’ (Warkworth, Chron. p. 19). Sir William Vaux's manor of Harrowden was, upon his attainder in 1461 (Rot. Parl. v. 516), given to Ralph Hastynges.
  • Wood states that Nicholas Vaux ‘in his juvenile years was sent to Oxford.’ But of this there is no evidence (Boase, Regist. Univ. Oxon.) A manuscript pedigree in the college of arms says of him, ‘floruit summa gratia apud Margaretam comitissam Richmundiæ,’ and she, it is known, retained Maurice Westbury, an Oxford man, for the instruction at her residence of ‘certayn yonge gentilmen at her findyng’ (Reg. Oxon. F. Ep. p. 458; Wood, Annals, i. 655; Churton, Life of Bishop Smyth, p. 13). This would account for the favour he evidently enjoyed with Henry VII, for within three months of the victory of Bosworth he obtained from the king a grant for life of the offices of steward of the towns of Olney and Newport Pagnell, dated 2 Nov. 1485 (Campbell, Materials, i. 168). Henry VII's first parliament met on 7 Nov. 1485, and a petition was immediately presented by Nicholas Vaux setting forth the attainder and forfeitures of his father, and praying the repeal of the act of 1461 and his restoration to his father's lands (Rot. Parl. vi. 304 b). The royal assent was at once given (ib.; cf. Campbell, Materials, ii. 325).
  • In 1487 Vaux was presumably resident upon his restored estates in Northamptonshire. He was mentioned by Polydore Vergil (ed. 1649, p. 728) among the notables who brought their followers to the support of Henry VII against Lambert Simnel in June 1487. After the king's victory on 16 June at Stoke, near Newark, Vaux received knighthood (Coll. Arms Vincent MS. 20; Metcalfe, Book of Knights, p. 14). Vaux actively devoted himself to agricultural improvement, and was in consequence returned by the commissioners for enclosures in 1517–18 as having violated the acts against enclosure at Stanton Barey in Buckinghamshire in 1490, at Harrowden in 1493, and at Carcewell, Northamptonshire, in 1509. For these and the numerous enclosures of his father-in-law, Sir Thomas Green of Green's Norton, whose daughter and coheiress, Anne, he had married, Vaux (and, after his death, his representatives) was repeatedly summoned before the court of exchequer in 1519 and 1527 (R. O. MSS. Exch. Q. R. Mem. Rolls, 2993, 11 Hen. VIII, M. T. m. 23; ib. 307, E. T. 19 Hen. VIII, 1527, m. 23). Vaux escaped the statutory penalties in the one case in which they seem to have been claimed by the crown during his lifetime by procuring a supersedeas (ib.) After his death a pardon for these and other similar offences was granted (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, iv. 4231).
  • In 1492 Vaux was among the knights appointed to ride and meet the French ambassadors. Ten years later Vaux became ‘lieutenant’ of Guisnes, three miles inland from Calais (cf. Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 4635). While here an attempt seems to have been made by the Yorkist party to tamper with his fidelity (cf. Gairdner, Letters and Papers of Richard III and Henry VII, i. 231). Henry VII, unlike his successor, was singularly free from uneasy suspicions of the loyalty of his professed friends. Vaux continued when in England to figure at court ceremonies, where his taste for magnificence of dress made him conspicuous (cf. Stow, Annals, p. 484; Grafton, p. 598, cp. p. 600; Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, ii. 4661).
  • Vaux augmented his ample patrimony by a second marriage with an heiress of extraordinary wealth. His first wife, Elizabeth Fitzhugh, was the widow of Sir William Parr, and the daughter and coheir of Henry, lord Fitzhugh (d. 1472). She died at some time during the reign of Henry VII, leaving three daughters by Vaux. About 1507 Vaux married Anne, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Green, who had died in 1506. This lady and her sister, who married Sir Thomas Parr, inherited lands in Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Buckinghamshire, Yorkshire, Kent, and Nottinghamshire. During her minority an attempt was made by Bishop Foxe, Lord Daubeney, Sir Charles Somerset, and others of Henry VI's court to obtain possession of this vast property for the crown (Baker, Hist. of Northamptonshire, ii. 60; cp. Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 602). This Vaux succeeded in defeating, but both he and Sir Thomas Parr were compelled on 10 July 1507 to enter into indentures for the payment of nine thousand marks (6,000l.) to the king, probably either as a fine for having married, or for license to marry wards of the crown. Of this sum 2,400 marks were paid, and the residue remitted by deed of 26 Oct. 1509, after the accession of Henry VIII (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 600, cp. 3049).
  • Henry VIII renewed Vaux's appointment at Guisnes under new and somewhat onerous pecuniary conditions (ib. i. 544, 545, 598, 599, 652; Chronicle of Calais, Camden Soc. xxxv. 203; Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 545). Vaux, who had perhaps suffered from the exactions of Sir Richard Empson [q. v.] and Edmund Dudley [q. v.] (ib. Nos. 464, 777, 1026), profited by their fall, receiving a large share of Empson's offices. On 28 Feb. 1511 Vaux was commissioned with five others to make inquisition as to the possessions of Empson, who had been executed in the preceding August (ib. 1518). In July of the same year he entertained the king at his Northamptonshire seat (ib. ii. p. 1452).
  • During the campaign in France of 1513 Vaux saw much service. In April of that year he, under Lord Lisle [see Brandon, Charles], was one of the commanders of the English van of 3,200 men (ib. i. 3885; cf. 4008, 4021). During the siege of Therouenne Vaux and Sir Edward Belknapp convoyed the supplies from Calais, and on 29 June 1513, being surprised by the French, narrowly escaped with their lives after losing three hundred men (Chron. of Calais, p. 12). On 30 June Henry VIII landed at Calais (ib.), and Vaux was attached to the division of 9,466 men immediately under the king's command (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 4307). At the end of the war in August 1514 Vaux, despite signs of loss of royal favour, was still at Guisnes. On 4 Sept. 1514 he was one of those who were selected to meet the Princess Mary, the sister of Henry VIII, and conduct her to Abbeville for her marriage with Louis XII. Lady Vaux was to accompany him (ib. No. 5379). His appointments were characteristically sumptuous—‘forty horses in his train and all with scarlet cloth’ (ib., and 5407). At the end of the year he probably returned to England, for on 1 Dec. 1514 he was placed upon the commission of the peace for Northamptonshire, a position to which he had not been nominated since January 1512 (ib. 5658, cp. 2045). Thenceforth his custom was apparently to spend the summer months at his post, and the autumn and winter in England (ib. App. iv. 87). His favour at court continued, for in October 1518 he was nominated with others to settle both the terms of peace and the marriage treaty between Henry VIII's daughter, the Princess Mary, and the dauphin (ib. ii. 4529, 4564). On 14 Dec. 1518 Vaux, as ambassador, together with his colleagues, received the oath of Francis I to the treaty (ib. 4649, 4661, 4669; Rymer, Fœdera, xiii. 672). On 10 Feb. 1519 Vaux and his colleagues surrendered Tournay to the French in accordance with the terms of peace (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, iii. 65, 71). In March 1520 he was (Chron. of Calais, p. 18) making preparation at Guisnes (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, iii. 704) for the Field of the Cloth of Gold held between Guisnes and Ardres (ib. 737, 750; cf. Chron. of Calais, pp. 79–85). The interview between the two kings took place on 7 June following (ib. p. 28). Vaux and Sir William Parr represented the knighthood of Northamptonshire (ib. p. 21). On 10 July Henry VIII rode to Gravelines with a large retinue, in a list of which Vaux's name stands first among the knights, to meet the king of the Romans (afterwards the emperor, Charles V) (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, iii. 906; cf. Rutland Papers, Camden Soc. p. 31).
  • Vaux had maintained his intimacy with some of the Yorkist leaders, and in May 1521 Wolsey suspected him of complicity in the intended treason of Edward Stafford, third duke of Buckingham (Brewer's Reign of Henry VIII, i. 379–80). There does not appear to have been any direct evidence against Vaux, and no proceedings were taken against him; but, with a refined cruelty frequently practised by Henry VIII's government upon persons whose sympathies were suspected, he was nominated upon the commission of oyer and terminer in the city of London, which on 8 May 1521 found an indictment against the duke (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, iii. 1284). Vaux shared Buckingham's hatred of Wolsey. He took into his service in France in 1522 a refugee from England, Buckingham's former chaplain, John Coke or Cooke, against whom a warrant was out for seditious preaching at Walden in Essex, and using violent language against the king, cardinal, and the Duke of Norfolk (ib. iii. 1070, iv. 4040).
  • On 29 May 1522 war was declared against France. Vaux was probably already at his post (ib. iii. 2020). During June he was actively engaged in securing the defence of Guisnes (ib. 2326, 2352, 2878). On 22 Sept. Sandys wrote to Wolsey from the camp at Hesdin giving an account, in a letter which is unfortunately mutilated, of what was probably a quarrel between Sir Richard Wingfield, captain of Calais, and Vaux, ‘touching the castle of Guisnes.’ He adds, ‘Sir N. Vaux lieth very sore,’ as though he had been wounded (ib. p. 2560). Probably as a recognition of his services during the war, Vaux was raised to the peerage in 1523 as Lord Vaux of Harrowden. Dugdale, on the authority of Stow, gives 27 April 1523 (cf. ib. 2982). On 14 May following Vaux was reported, in a letter from an anonymous correspondent in London to the Earl of Surrey, as ‘sick and in great danger’ (ib. 3024); and on 16 May his successor, Sir William Fitzwilliam, was appointed to the command of Guisnes (ib. 3027). Vaux died on 14 May 1523. His will, undated, was proved on 3 July of the same year. He bequeathed 100l. for religious uses, founded a chantry in the parish church of Harrowden, and left 500l. each to his three daughters by his second marriage. He was succeeded in the title by his eldest son, Thomas [q. v.]
  • [Coll. Arm. MSS. Vincent 20, B. and H. fol. 169 b, Philpot 29 b; Record Office MSS., Exch. Q.R. Mem. Rolls, 299 and 307; Gairdner's Letters and Papers of Richard III and Henry VII, vols. i. iii.; Campbell's Materials for the Reign of Henry VII, vols. i. ii.; Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, vols. i. ii. iii. iv.; Rot. Parl. vols. v. vi.; Domesday of Inclosures (Roy. Hist. Soc. 1897); Chronicle of Calais (Camden Soc. 35); Paston Letters, vol. iii. ed. Gairdner; Warkworth's Chronicle (Camden Soc. 10); Nicolas's Testamenta Vetusta, 1826, ii. 559; Dugdale's Baronage, 1676, ii. 304; Nicolas's Historic Peerage, 1856, p. 487; Clutterbuck's Hist. of Hertfordshire, 1827, iii. 81; Baker's Hist. of Northamptonshire, 1822–36, i. 33; Collins's Peerage, ed. Brydges, iv. 202; Brewer's Reign of Henry VIII, vol. i.]
  • From: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Vaux,_Nicholas_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati58stepuoft#page/192/mode/1up to https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati58stepuoft#page/194/mode/1up

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Baron Vaux of Harrowden

  • Baron Vaux of Harrowden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1523 for Sir Nicholas Vaux. The barony was created by writ, which means that it can pass through both male and female lines. Vaux was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was a poet and member of the courts of Henry VIII and Edward VI. On the death in 1663 of his great-grandson, the fifth Baron, the title fell into abeyance between the late Baron's surviving sister Joyce, and the heirs of his deceased sisters Mary, Lady Symeon, and Catherine, Baroness Abergavenny. The barony remained in abeyance for 175 years, until the abeyance was terminated in 1838 in favour of George Charles Mostyn, who became the sixth Baron. He was the son of Mary Lucinda Browne-Mostyn, a descendant of Mary, the eldest sister of the fifth Baron, by her marriage to Charles Mostyn, grandson of Sir Edward Mostyn, 5th Baronet (see Mostyn Baronets, of Talacre). He was succeeded by his grandson, the seventh Baron. He was in the Diplomatic Service. On his death in 1935 the title fell into abeyance between his three daughters, the Hon. Grace Mary Eleanor Gilby, the Hon. Gladys Flora Charleton and the Hon. Dorothy Alice Mostyn.
  • The abeyance was terminated in 1938 in favour of the eldest daughter, Grace, the eighth Baroness and so far the only woman to hold the barony. She was the wife of William Gordon Gilbey, the owner of a wine and spirits group. Grace was succeeded by her eldest son, Father Gabriel Gilbey, the ninth Baron. He was a monk at Ampleforth Abbey. Lord Vaux of Harrowden took his seat in the House of Lords in 1962 and thereby became the first Benedictine monk to do so since 1559. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the tenth Baron. As of 2010[update] the title is held by the latter's eldest son, the eleventh Baron, who succeeded in 2002. He resides at Rusko, Gatehouse of Fleet, Dumfries and Galloway, and is a farmer and a councillor for the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party.
  • The Vaux family owned Great Harrowden Hall until 1695 when they sold it to Thomas Watson Wentworth, a son of Baron Rockingham, of Rockingham Castle. Two centuries later, the seventh Baron Vaux was able to buy back the Hall. However, the house is now the home of the Wellingborough Golf Club

Barons Vaux of Harrowden (1523)

  • Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460–1523)
  • Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1509–1556)
  • William Vaux, 3rd Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1535–1595)
  • Edward Vaux, 4th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1588–1661)
  • Henry Vaux, 5th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1591–1663) (abeyant 1663)
  • George Charles Mostyn, 6th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1804–1883) (abeyance terminated 1838)
  • Hubert George Charles Mostyn, 7th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1860–1935) (abeyant 1935)
  • Grace Mary Eleanor Gilbey, 8th Baroness Vaux of Harrowden (1887–1958)
  • Peter Hubert Gordon Gilbey, 9th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1914–1977)
  • John Hugh Philip Gilbey, 10th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1915–2002)
  • Anthony William Gilbey, 11th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (b. 1940)
  • Richard Hubert Gordon Gilbey, 12th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (b. 1965)
  • The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Alexander John Charles Gilbey (b. 2000).
  • From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Vaux_of_Harrowden

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  • VAUX, Sir Nicholas (c.1460-1523), of Great Harrowden, Northants.
  • Family and Education
  • b. c.1460, o. s. of Sir William Vaux of Great Harrowden by Catherine, da. of Gregory Penison or Peniston of Coursello, Provence. m. (1) Elizabeth, da. of Henry, 5th Lord FitzHugh, wid. of Sir William Parr (d.1483/84) of Kendal, Westmld., 3da.; (2) 1507/8, Anne, da. and coh. of Sir Thomas Green of Boughton and Greens-Norton, Northants., 2s. 3da. suc. fa. 4 May 1471. Kntd. 16 June 1487, banneret 17 June 1497; cr. Baron Vaux 27 Apr. 1523.2
  • Offices Held
    • Steward, Olney and Newport Pagnell, Bucks. 1485; numerous other stewardships; j.p. Northants. 1485-d.; commr. musters 1488, subsidy 1512, 1515; sheriff 1495-6, 1501-2, 1516-17; constable, Rockingham castle, Northants. 1502; lt. Guisnes 8 July 1502-d.; knight of the body 1508.3
  • Biography
  • Nicholas Vaux’s mother, an attendant on Queen Margaret of Anjou, remained constant to her mistress when others forsook the Lancastrian cause. Her husband, whom she had married not long before she obtained her letters of denization, was slain at the battle of Tewkesbury after which he was attainted and his property forfeited, but not even his death shook Catherine Vaux’s loyalty: she stayed by the Queen during her imprisonment in the Tower and on Margaret’s release in 1476 went with her into exile (as she had done earlier in the 1460s), living with her until her death six years later. Catherine’s two children did not share either her confinement or her travels abroad; instead, Nicholas Vaux was brought up in the household of Margaret, Countess of Richmond, without charge even though Edward IV restored two manors to the family for the maintenance of him and his sister.4
  • Catherine’s devotion was rewarded after the triumph of Henry VII at Bosworth, where Nicholas Vaux, as a protégé of Margaret Beaufort, probably fought under her husband Lord Stanley; the petition for the reversal of the attainder on Vaux’s father and the forfeiture of his property was accepted by the King in the Parliament of 1485, and not long after Vaux was named to the commission of the peace for his home county. He fought for the King at Stoke and Blackheath, being knighted on the field for his service in both battles. Not only was he active and diligent in local government but he was also frequently at court attending all the great state occasions at home and abroad until his death; in 1511 he entertained Henry VIII at Harrowden. It was as a soldier and diplomat, however, that he made his mark. Given the important command at Guisnes, he distinguished himself during the Tournai campaign in 1513 and then in the missions (he had had some earlier experiences in negotiating, chiefly with Burgundy) to the French King about the English withdrawal and the several royal marriage treaties. Later, he was one of the devisers of the Field of Cloth of Gold. His sister had also benefited from the change of dynasty: she entered the royal household, became governess to Henry VII’s daughters and married successively Sir Richard Guildford and the father of Sir Nicholas Poyntz.5
  • Vaux was a natural candidate for election to Parliament, although in the absence of so many returns for the early Tudor period he is known to have been a Member only in 1515 when he and Sir John Hussey took a memorandum on certain Acts from the Commons up to the Lords. Presumably he sat for his own shire on this occasion as he was afterwards appointed to the Northamptonshire commission for the subsidy which he had helped to grant.6
  • In October 1522 Sir William Sandys reported that Vaux was laid ‘very sore’ at Calais. Evidently he recovered sufficiently to return to England where in the following year he was summoned to the Upper House as a baron, apparently after the Parliament had opened at the Blackfriars. He did not survive the first session, dying on 14 May at the hospital of St. John, Clerkenwell. Three days previously he had made a will by which he provided for his children and servants and left the residue of his estate to his executors. who included Sir Henry Guildford, George Throckmorton and Richard Knightley; among the supervisors he appointed Henry Marney, Lord Marny, and Sir William Parr. He was presumably buried at the Blackfriars, which of his three choices for interment was the nearest.7
  • Ref Volumes: 1509-1558
  • Author: A. D.K. Hawkyard
  • Notes
  • 1. LJ, i. 46.
  • 2. Birth follows Wood, Ath. Ox. ed Bliss, i. 41; G. Anstruther, Vaux of Harrowden, 2, 489; CP; EHR, lxxxvii. 82, 99.
  • 3. CPR, 1485-94, pp. 279, 495; 1494-1509, pp. 255, 550, 552; CCR, 1500-9, nos. 99, 131-2; LP Hen. VIII, i; Statutes, iii. 88, 169.
  • 4. Anstruther, 4-7; CPR, 1452-61, p. 342; 1476-85, p. 94.
  • 5. Anstruther, 7-31; LP Rich. III and Hen. VII (Rolls Ser. xxiv), i. 403, 410; ii. 87, 291; LP Hen. VIII, i-iii; Rutland Pprs. (Cam. Soc. xxi), 31, 45; C. G. Cruickshank, Army Royal, 58; Chron. Calais (Cam. Soc. xxv), 3, 86.
  • 6. LJ, i. 46; Statutes, iii. 169.
  • 7. Anstruther, 37; LP Hen. VIII, iii; Orig. Letters, ed. Ellis (1st ser.), i. 223; PCC *11 Bodfelde
  • From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/vaux-sir-nicholas-1460-1523

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  • Sir Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden, Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Constable of Rockingham Castle1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
  • M, #32882, b. circa 1460, d. 14 May 1523
  • Father Sir William Vaux10,11,6,12,9 b. c 1436, d. 4 May 1471
  • Mother Katherine Peniston10,11,6,12,9 b. 1440, d. a 28 Jun 1509
  • Sir Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden, Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Constable of Rockingham Castle was born circa 1460 at of Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England.2,5,8 He married Elizabeth FitzHugh, daughter of Sir Henry FitzHugh, 5th Lord FitzHugh, Master Forester & Keeper of the New Forest, Trier of Petitions for Parliament and Alice Neville, between 26 February 1484 and 1486; They had 3 daughters (Katherine, wife of Sir George Throckmorton; Alice, wife of Sir Richard Sapcott; & Anne, wife of Sir Thomas Strange).13,2,14,4,5,6,7,8 Sir Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden, Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Constable of Rockingham Castle married Anne Greene, daughter of Sir Thomas Greene and Joan Fogge, circa 29 January 1508; They had 2 sons (Sir Thomas, 2nd Lord Vaux of Harrowden; & William) and 3 daughters (Margaret, wife of Sir Francis Poulteney; Bridget, wife of Maurice Welsh; & Maud, wife of Sir John Fermor (Farmer)).15,2,5,8 Sir Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden, Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Constable of Rockingham Castle left a will on 11 May 1523.8,9 He died on 14 May 1523 at Hospital of the Knights of St. John Jerusalem, Clerkenewell, London, Middlesex, England.2,5,6,8,9 His estate was probated on 3 July 1523.5,6,8,9
  • Family 1 Elizabeth FitzHugh b. c 1460, d. bt 1501 - 10 Jul 1507
  • Children
    • Katherine Vaux+2,5,8 b. c 1487, d. 1571
    • Alice Vaux+2 b. c 1489, d. c 1543
    • Anne Vaux+2 b. c 1491
  • Family 2 Anne Greene b. c 1489, d. b 14 May 1523
  • Children
    • Sir Thomas Vaux, 2nd Lord Vaux of Harrowden, Governor of Jersey+16,3,5,8 b. 25 Apr 1509, d. a 12 Mar 1556
    • Maud Vaux+17 b. c 1520, d. 14 Apr 1569
  • Citations
  • [S10159] Unknown author, Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 39/40; Stemmata Robertson, p. 162/3.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 561-562.
  • [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XII/2, p. 216-9.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 201.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 290-291.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 298-299.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 633.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 295-296.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 305.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 561.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 289-290.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 295.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 326.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 566.
  • [S4764] Unknown author, Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris., p. 39.
  • [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XII/2, p. 219-221.
  • [S11572] The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, by Gerald Paget, Vol. II, p. 168.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1095.htm#i32882

______________________

  • Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden1
  • M, #146595, b. circa 1460, d. 14 May 1523
  • Last Edited=24 Sep 2013
  • Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden was born circa 1460.2 He was the son of Sir William Vaux and Katherine Peniston.2 He married, firstly, Elizabeth FitzHugh, daughter of Henry FitzHugh, 5th Lord FitzHugh and Alice Neville.3 He married Anne Greene, daughter of Sir Thomas Greene and Joan Fogge, between November 1507 and January 1508.4 He died on 14 May 1523.5
  • Stoke 1487 fought Battle of , following which he was ktd.6 Allegedly educ Oxford.6 He gained the title of 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden. In November 1485 procured nullification of his f's attainder on HENRY VII's coming to the throne, also restoration of his estates.6 In November 1485 Steward Olney and Newport Pagnell, Bucks.6 He was High Sheriff Northamptonshire , 1501–02 and 1516–17 in 1495.6 He was Knight, Order of the Bath (K.B.) in 1497.6 He was Constable Rockingham Castle , Lieutenant Guisnes Castle in English-held Picardy 1502 and 1509 on, Kt for the Body to HENRYs VII and VIII in 1502.6 On 27 April 1523 so created.6
  • Child of Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden
    • Maud Vaux+7
  • Children of Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden and Elizabeth FitzHugh
    • Alice Vaux8
    • Anne Vaux8
    • Katherine Vaux+9 b. 1487, d. 1587
  • Child of Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden and Anne Greene
    • Thomas Vaux, 2nd Lord Vaux of Harrowden+ b. 25 Apr 1509, d. Oct 1556
  • Citations
  • [S1281] Dr. Andrew Gray, "re: Sir Robert George Maxwell Throckmorton, 11th Bt.," e-mail message to Darryl Lundy, 28 February 2005. Hereinafter cited as "re: Robert George Maxwell Throckmorton."
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 216. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • [S79] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry (Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004), page 561. Hereinafter cited as Plantagenet Ancestry.
  • [S4881] Caroline Russell, "re: Carne Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 September 2010. Hereinafter cited as "re: Carne Family."
  • [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 219.
  • [S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 3982. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  • [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 607. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.
  • [S79] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, page 562.
  • [S34] BP1970 page 2643. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S34]
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p14660.htm#i146595

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  • Nicholas VAUX (1° B. Vaux of Harrowden)
  • Born: ABT 1460
  • Acceeded: 27 Apr 1523
  • Died 14 May 1523
  • Notes: See his Biography.
  • Father: William VAUX of Great Harrowden (Sir)
  • Mother: Catherine PENNISON
  • Married 1: Elizabeth FITZHUGH (B. Vaux of Harrowden) ABT 1483/4, Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
  • Children:
    • 1. Catherine VAUX
    • 2. Alice VAUX
    • 3. Anne VAUX
  • Married 2: Anne GREEN (dau of Sir Thomas Green and Jane Fogge) 1507
  • Children:
    • 4. Thomas VAUX (2° B. Vaux of Harrowden)
    • 5. William VAUX
    • 6. Margaret VAUX
    • 7. Maud VAUX
    • 8. Bridget VAUX
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/VAUX.htm#Nicholas VAUX (1° B. Vaux of Harrowden)
  • Born ABT 1460, only son of Sir William Vaux of Great Harrowden by Catherine, dau. of Gregory Penison or Peniston of Coursello, Provence. Married first Elizabeth, dau. of Henry, 5th Lord FitzHugh, widow of Sir William Parr of Kendal, by whom he had three daughters. Married secondly, 1507/8, Anne, dau. and coheiress of Sir Thomas Green of Boughton and Greens-Norton, Northants., by whom he had two sons and three daughters. Succeeded family 4 May 1471. Kntd. 16 Jun 1487, banneret 17 Jun 1497; cr. Baron Vaux 27 Apr 1523. Steward, Olney and Newport Pagnell, Bucks. 1485; numerous other stewardships; j.p. Northants. 1485-d.; commr. musters 1488, subsidy 1512, 1515; sheriff 1495-6, 1501-2, 1516-17; constable, Rockingham castle, Northants. 1502; lt. Guisnes 8 Jul 1502-d.; knight of the body 1508.
  • Nicholas Vaux's mother, an attendant on Queen Margaret of Anjou, remained constant to her mistress when others forsook the Lancastrian cause. Her husband, whom she had married not long before she obtained her letters of denization, was slain at the battle of Tewkesbury after which he was attainted and his property forfeited, but not even his death shook Catherine Vaux's loyalty: she stayed by the Queen during her imprisonment in the Tower and on Margaret's release in 1476 went with her into exile (as she had done earlier in the 1460s), living with her until her death six years later. Catherine's two children did not share either her confinement or her travels abroad; instead, Nicholas Vaux was brought up in the household of Margaret, Countess of Richmond, without charge even though Edward IV restored two manors to the family for the maintenance of him and his sister.
  • Catherine's devotion was rewarded after the triumph of Henry VII at Bosworth, where Nicholas Vaux, as a protégé of Margaret Beaufort, probably fought under her husband Lord Stanley; the petition for the reversal of the attainder on Vaux's father and the forfeiture of his property was accepted by the King in the Parliament of 1485, and not long after Vaux was named to the commission of the peace for his home county. He fought for the King at Stoke and Blackheath, being knighted on the field for his service in both battles. Not only was he active and diligent in local government but he was also frequently at court attending all the great state occasions at home and abroad until his death; in 1511 he entertained Henry VIII at Harrowden. It was as a soldier and diplomat, however, that he made his mark. Given the important command at Guisnes, he distinguished himself during the Tournai campaign in 1513 and then in the missions (he had had some earlier experiences in negotiating, chiefly with Burgundy) to the French King about the English withdrawal and the several royal marriage treaties. Later, he was one of the devisers of the Field of the Cloth of Gold. His sister had also benefited from the change of dynasty: she entered the royal household, became governess to Henry VII's daughters and married successively Sir Richard Guildford and the father of Sir Nicholas Poyntz.
  • Vaux was a natural candidate for election to Parliament, although in the absence of so many returns for the early Tudor period he is known to have been a Member only in 1515 when he and Sir John Hussey took a memorandum on certain Acts from the Commons up to the Lords. Presumably he sat for his own shire on this occasion as he was afterwards appointed to the Northamptonshire commission for the subsidy which he had helped to grant.
  • In Oct 1522 Sir William Sandys reported that Vaux was laid ‘very sore’ at Calais. Evidently he recovered sufficiently to return to England where in the following year he was summoned to the Upper House as a baron, apparently after the Parliament had opened at the Blackfriars. He did not survive the first session, dying on 14 May at the hospital of St. John, Clerkenwell. Three days previously he had made a will by which he provided for his children and servants and left the residue of his estate to his executors. who included Sir Henry Guildford, George Throckmorton and Richard Knightley; among the supervisors he appointed Henry Marney, 1º B. Marney, and Sir William Parr. He was presumably buried at the Blackfriars, which of his three choices for interment was the nearest.
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/NicholasVaux(1BHarrowden).htm

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Date of death has also been reported to be May 14, 1523.

links

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-------------------- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Vaux,_1st_Baron_Vaux_of_Harrowden

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Vaux_of_Harrowden

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Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden's Timeline

1460
1460
Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1487
1487
Age 27
Probably Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1488
1488
Age 28
Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1500
1500
Age 40
Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1502
1502
Age 42
Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1507
1507
Age 47
Greens Norton, Northamptonshire, England
1509
April 25, 1509
Age 49
1520
1520
Age 60
Northampton, Northamptonshire, UK
1523
June 14, 1523
Age 63
Clerkenwell, Middlesex, England
1937
January 9, 1937
Age 63