Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

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Sir Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron of Harrowden (Vaux)

Also Known As: "Vance", "1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in Clerkenwell, Middlesex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir William Vaux of Great Harrowden and Catherine Penistone
Husband of Elizabeth Vaux; Elizabeth Fitzhugh and Ann Green (Lady de Vaux)
Father of Anne Catherine Strange; Alice Sapcote; Katherine Vaux; Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden; Maud Fermor and 3 others
Brother of Joan Vaux, Lady Guildford

Occupation: Baron, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden
Managed by: Bianca May Evelyn Brennan
Last Updated:

About Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden

son of William and Catherine Penistone

Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460-14 May 1523), was a soldier and courtier in England and an early member of the House of Commons. The son of Lancastrian loyalists who grew up during the years of Yorkian rule, Vaux served under Henry VII when he recovered the throne in 1485. Vaux was active in the early English parliament. In 1523 he was summoned to the House of Lords as Lord Vaux of Harrowden. At the time, he had already fallen ill, and he died that same year. He was succeeded by his son, the poet Thomas Vaux.

Baron Vaux of Harrowden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1523 for Sir Nicholas Vaux.The barony was created by writ, which means that it can pass through both male and female lines. Vaux was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was a poet and member of the courts of Henry VIII and Edward VI. On the death in 1663 of his great-grandson, the fifth Baron, the title fell into abeyance between the late Baron's surviving sister Joyce, and the heirs of his deceased sisters Mary, Lady Symeon, and Catherine, Baroness Abergavenny.

(Wikipedia)

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From Wikipedia:

Baron Vaux of Harrowden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1523 for Sir Nicholas Vaux. The barony was created by writ, which means that it can pass through both male and female lines. Vaux was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He was a poet and member of the courts of Henry VIII and Edward VI. On the death in 1663 of his great-grandson, the fifth Baron, the title fell into abeyance between the late Baron's surviving sister Joyce, and the heirs of his deceased sisters Mary, Lady Symeon, and Catherine, Baroness Abergavenny. The barony remained in abeyance for 175 years, until the abeyance was terminated in 1838 in favour of George Charles Mostyn, who became the sixth Baron. He was the son of Mary Lucinda Browne-Mostyn, a descendant of Mary, the eldest sister of the fifth Baron, by her marriage to Charles Mostyn, grandson of Sir Edward Mostyn, 5th Baronet (see Mostyn Baronets, of Talacre). He was succeeded by his grandson, the seventh Baron. He was in the Diplomatic Service. On his death in 1935 the title fell into abeyance between his three daughters, the Hon. Grace Mary Eleanor Gilby, the Hon. Gladys Flora Charleton and the Hon. Dorothy Alice Mostyn.

The abeyance was terminated in 1938 in favour of the eldest daughter, Grace, the eighth Baroness and so far the only woman to hold the barony. She was the wife of William Gordon Gilbey, the owner of a wine and spirits group. Grace was succeeded by her eldest son, Father Gabriel Gilbey, the ninth Baron. He was a monk at Ampleforth Abbey. Lord Vaux of Harrowden took his seat in the House of Lords in 1962 and thereby became the first Benedictine monk to do so since 1559. On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the tenth Baron. As of 2010[update] the title is held by the latter's eldest son, the eleventh Baron, who succeeded in 2002. He resides at Rusko, Gatehouse of Fleet, Dumfries and Galloway, and is a farmer and a councillor for the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party.

The Vaux family owned Great Harrowden Hall until 1695 when they sold it to Thomas Watson Wentworth, a son of Baron Rockingham, of Rockingham Castle. Two centuries later, the seventh Baron Vaux was able to buy back the Hall. However, the house is now the home of the Wellingborough Golf Club

Barons Vaux of Harrowden (1523)

   * Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460–1523)
   * Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1509–1556)
   * William Vaux, 3rd Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1535–1595)
   * Edward Vaux, 4th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1588–1661)
   * Henry Vaux, 5th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1591–1663) (abeyant 1663)
   * George Charles Mostyn, 6th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1804–1883) (abeyance terminated 1838)
   * Hubert George Charles Mostyn, 7th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1860–1935) (abeyant 1935)
   * Grace Mary Eleanor Gilbey, 8th Baroness Vaux of Harrowden (1887–1958)
   * Peter Hubert Gordon Gilbey, 9th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1914–1977)
   * John Hugh Philip Gilbey, 10th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (1915–2002)
   * Anthony William Gilbey, 11th Baron Vaux of Harrowden (b. 1940)

The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Richard Gilbey (b. 1965)

From thePeerage.com:

    Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden was born circa 1460. He was the son of Sir William Vaux and Katherine Peniston. He died on 14 May 1523.

Children of Nicholas Vaux, 1st Lord Vaux of Harrowden

   * Katherine Vaux+
   * Thomas Vaux, 2nd Lord Vaux of Harrowden d. Oct 1556
   * Maud Vaux+
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Baron Nicholas Vaux died in Hospital of St. John, Clerkenwell. He was a member of Parliament.

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Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460 – 14 May 1523) was a soldier and courtier in England and an early member of the House of Commons. The son of Lancastrian loyalists, Sir William Vaux of Harrowden and Katherine Penison; daughter of Gregory Penison or Peniston of Coursello, Provence, France, who grew up during the years of Yorkist rule, Vaux served under Henry VII when he recovered the throne in 1485. Nicholas Vaux's mother, Katherine, an attendant on Margaret of Anjou, remained constant to her mistress when others forsook the Lancastrian cause. Katherine's husband, Sir William, whom she had married not long before she obtained her letters of denization, was attainted by 1466 and later slain at the battle of Tewkesbury. Despite her husband's misfortune, Katherine Vaux remained loyal to her mistress: she stayed by the Queen during her imprisonment in the Tower and on Margaret's release in 1476 went with her into exile (as she had done earlier in the 1460s), living with her until her death six years later. Katherine's two children did not share either her confinement or her travels abroad; instead, Nicholas Vaux and his sister Joan, were brought up in the household of Lady Margaret Beaufort(mother of Henry VII), without charge, even though Edward IV restored two manors to the family for the maintenance of him and his sister. Katherine's devotion was rewarded after the triumph of Henry VII at Bosworth, where Nicholas Vaux, as a protégé of Margaret Beaufort, probably fought under her husband Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby; the petition for the reversal of the attainder on Vaux's father and the forfeiture of his property was accepted by the King in the Parliament of 1485, and not long after Vaux was named to the commission of the peace for his home county. Politics: He fought for Henry VII at Stoke and Blackheath, being knighted on the field for his service in both battles. Not only was he active and diligent in local government but he was also frequently at court attending all the great state occasions at home and abroad until his death; in 1511 he entertained Henry VIII at Harrowden. It was as a soldier and diplomat, however, that he made his mark. Given the important command at Guisnes, he distinguished himself during the Tournai campaign in 1513 and then in the missions (he had had some earlier experiences in negotiating, chiefly with Burgundy) to the French King about the English withdrawal and the several royal marriage treaties. Later, he was one of the devisers of the Field of the Cloth of Gold. His sister, Jane or "Joan", had also benefited from the change of dynasty: she entered the royal household, became governess to Henry VII's daughters and married successively Sir Richard Guildford and the father of Sir Nicholas Poyntz, Sir Anthony Poyntz. Vaux was a natural candidate for election to Parliament, although in the absence of so many returns for the early Tudor period he is known to have been a Member only in 1515 when he and Sir John Hussey took a memorandum on certain Acts from the Commons up to the Lords. Presumably, he sat for his own shire on this occasion as he was after wards appointed to the Northamptonshire commission for the subsidy which he had helped to grant. Death at Clerkenwell: In Oct 1522, Sir William Sandys reported that Vaux was laid "very sore" at Calais. Evidently he recovered sufficiently to return to England where in the following year he was summoned to the Upper House as a Baron, apparently after the Parliament had opened at the Blackfriars. He did not survive the first session, dying on 14 May at the hospital of St. John, Clerkenwell. Three days previously he had made a will by which he provided for his children and servants and left the residue of his estate to his executors which included Sir Henry Guildford, George Throckmorton and Richard Knightley. Among the supervisors he appointed Henry Marney, 1st Baron Marney and Sir William Parr. He was presumably buried at the Blackfriars, which of his three choices for interment was the nearest.

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  • VAUX, Sir Nicholas (c.1460-1523), of Great Harrowden, Northants.
  • Family and Education
  • b. c.1460, o. s. of Sir William Vaux of Great Harrowden by Catherine, da. of Gregory Penison or Peniston of Coursello, Provence. m. (1) Elizabeth, da. of Henry, 5th Lord FitzHugh, wid. of Sir William Parr (d.1483/84) of Kendal, Westmld., 3da.; (2) 1507/8, Anne, da. and coh. of Sir Thomas Green of Boughton and Greens-Norton, Northants., 2s. 3da. suc. fa. 4 May 1471. Kntd. 16 June 1487, banneret 17 June 1497; cr. Baron Vaux 27 Apr. 1523.2
  • Offices Held
  • Steward, Olney and Newport Pagnell, Bucks. 1485; numerous other stewardships; j.p. Northants. 1485-d.; commr. musters 1488, subsidy 1512, 1515; sheriff 1495-6, 1501-2, 1516-17; constable, Rockingham castle, Northants. 1502; lt. Guisnes 8 July 1502-d.; knight of the body 1508.3
  • Biography
  • Nicholas Vaux’s mother, an attendant on Queen Margaret of Anjou, remained constant to her mistress when others forsook the Lancastrian cause. Her husband, whom she had married not long before she obtained her letters of denization, was slain at the battle of Tewkesbury after which he was attainted and his property forfeited, but not even his death shook Catherine Vaux’s loyalty: she stayed by the Queen during her imprisonment in the Tower and on Margaret’s release in 1476 went with her into exile (as she had done earlier in the 1460s), living with her until her death six years later. Catherine’s two children did not share either her confinement or her travels abroad; instead, Nicholas Vaux was brought up in the household of Margaret, Countess of Richmond, without charge even though Edward IV restored two manors to the family for the maintenance of him and his sister.4
  • Catherine’s devotion was rewarded after the triumph of Henry VII at Bosworth, where Nicholas Vaux, as a protégé of Margaret Beaufort, probably fought under her husband Lord Stanley; the petition for the reversal of the attainder on Vaux’s father and the forfeiture of his property was accepted by the King in the Parliament of 1485, and not long after Vaux was named to the commission of the peace for his home county. He fought for the King at Stoke and Blackheath, being knighted on the field for his service in both battles. Not only was he active and diligent in local government but he was also frequently at court attending all the great state occasions at home and abroad until his death; in 1511 he entertained Henry VIII at Harrowden. It was as a soldier and diplomat, however, that he made his mark. Given the important command at Guisnes, he distinguished himself during the Tournai campaign in 1513 and then in the missions (he had had some earlier experiences in negotiating, chiefly with Burgundy) to the French King about the English withdrawal and the several royal marriage treaties. Later, he was one of the devisers of the Field of Cloth of Gold. His sister had also benefited from the change of dynasty: she entered the royal household, became governess to Henry VII’s daughters and married successively Sir Richard Guildford and the father of Sir Nicholas Poyntz.5
  • Vaux was a natural candidate for election to Parliament, although in the absence of so many returns for the early Tudor period he is known to have been a Member only in 1515 when he and Sir John Hussey took a memorandum on certain Acts from the Commons up to the Lords. Presumably he sat for his own shire on this occasion as he was afterwards appointed to the Northamptonshire commission for the subsidy which he had helped to grant.6
  • In October 1522 Sir William Sandys reported that Vaux was laid ‘very sore’ at Calais. Evidently he recovered sufficiently to return to England where in the following year he was summoned to the Upper House as a baron, apparently after the Parliament had opened at the Blackfriars. He did not survive the first session, dying on 14 May at the hospital of St. John, Clerkenwell. Three days previously he had made a will by which he provided for his children and servants and left the residue of his estate to his executors. who included Sir Henry Guildford, George Throckmorton and Richard Knightley; among the supervisors he appointed Henry Marney, Lord Marny, and Sir William Parr. He was presumably buried at the Blackfriars, which of his three choices for interment was the nearest.7
  • Ref Volumes: 1509-1558
  • Author: A. D.K. Hawkyard
  • Notes
  • 1. LJ, i. 46.
  • 2. Birth follows Wood, Ath. Ox. ed Bliss, i. 41; G. Anstruther, Vaux of Harrowden, 2, 489; CP; EHR, lxxxvii. 82, 99.
  • 3. CPR, 1485-94, pp. 279, 495; 1494-1509, pp. 255, 550, 552; CCR, 1500-9, nos. 99, 131-2; LP Hen. VIII, i; Statutes, iii. 88, 169.
  • 4. Anstruther, 4-7; CPR, 1452-61, p. 342; 1476-85, p. 94.
  • 5. Anstruther, 7-31; LP Rich. III and Hen. VII (Rolls Ser. xxiv), i. 403, 410; ii. 87, 291; LP Hen. VIII, i-iii; Rutland Pprs. (Cam. Soc. xxi), 31, 45; C. G. Cruickshank, Army Royal, 58; Chron. Calais (Cam. Soc. xxv), 3, 86.
  • 6. LJ, i. 46; Statutes, iii. 169.
  • 7. Anstruther, 37; LP Hen. VIII, iii; Orig. Letters, ed. Ellis (1st ser.), i. 223; PCC *11 Bodfelde
  • From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/vaux-sir-nicholas-1460-1523
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Date of death has also been reported to be May 14, 1523.

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Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden's Timeline

1460
1460
Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1487
1487
Age 27
Probably Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1488
1488
Age 28
Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1500
1500
Age 40
Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1502
1502
Age 42
Harrowden, Northamptonshire, England
1507
1507
Age 47
Greens Norton, Northamptonshire, England
1509
April 25, 1509
Age 49
1520
1520
Age 60
Northampton, Northamptonshire, UK
1523
June 14, 1523
Age 63
Clerkenwell, Middlesex, England
1937
January 9, 1937
Age 63