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Oceanus - Ōkeanós Titan

Greek: Ώκεανός Titan
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Greek Mythology,,,
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Immediate Family:

Son of Ouranos - - Uranos . and - Gaia
Husband of - Gaia and Thetys Titanides
Father of Melia (Oceanid); Nereus; Thaumas; Todas as Nereidas titã do mar; Todas as espécies de peixes e seres dos mares and 30 others
Brother of Meliades; Gyges One hundered hander; Erichthonius Primordial; Many Furies; Ophion Primal and 26 others
Half brother of Megaera Erinýes / Furies; Tisiphone Erinýes / Furies and Aphrodite Goddess of Love

Occupation: Titan, Elder GOD of the Sea; aka Okeanos the River Ocean, okeanu pavelnieks / straume, One of the Titans
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Oceanos Titan

Oceanus (Greek: Ὠκεανός, lit. "ocean") was believed to be the world-ocean in classical antiquity, which the ancient Romans and Greeks considered to be an enormous river encircling the world. Strictly speaking, Okeanos was the ocean-stream at the Equator in which floated the habitable hemisphere (oikoumene οἰκουμένη).[1] In Greek mythology, this world-ocean was personified as a Titan, a son of Uranus and Gaia. In Hellenistic and Roman mosaics, this Titan was often depicted as having the upper body of a muscular man with a long beard and horns (often represented as the claws of a crab), and the lower torso of a serpent (cf. Typhon). On a fragmentary archaic vessel (British Museum 1971.11-1.1) of ca 580 BC, among the gods arriving at the wedding of Peleus and the sea-nymph Thetis, is a fish-tailed Oceanus, with a fish in one hand and a serpent in the other, gifts of bounty and prophecy. In Roman mosaics he might carry a steering-oar and cradle a ship.

--------------------

  1. D: I249638
  2. Name: Okeanos [<^>v] de Titans
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: BEF 100 in c 1365 BC

Father: Uranus [<^>v] de Gods b: in c 1400 BC

Mother: Gaea [<^>v] de Gods b: in c 1400 BC

Marriage 1 Tethys [<^>v] de Titans b: BEF 100 in c 1370 BC

Children

  1. Has Children King Xanthus Scamander [<^>v] de Titans b: BEF 100 in c 1360 BC
  2. Has Children Neilos [<^>v] de Mycenae
  3. Has Children Melia [<^>v] de Oceanids
  4. Has Children Inachus [<^>v] de Oceanids
  5. Has Children Klymene [<^>v] de Oceanids

sources:


http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=gilead07&id=I253485

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Oceanus

Oceanus is the unending stream of water encircling the world. Together with his wife Tethys produced the rivers and the three thousand ocean nymphs.


Web  Theoi         
OKEANOS 

Greek Name Transliteration Latin Spelling Translation


WkeanoV Ôkeanos Oceanus River Ocean

WghnoV Wghn Ogênos, Ogên Ogenus, Ogen River Ocean

 

Hephaestus, Eileithyia, Tethys & Oceanus, Athenian

black- figure dinos C6th B.C., British Museum, London

OKEANOS (or Oceanus) was the Titan god or Protogenos (primeval deity) of the great earth-encircling river Okeanos, the font of all the earth's fresh-water: including rivers, wells, springs and rain-clouds. Okeanos was also the god who regulated the rising and setting of the heavenly bodies which were believed to emerge and descend into his watery realm at the ends of the earth. Okeanos' wife was Tethys, the nurse, who was probably thought to distribute his water to the earth via subterranean caverns. Their children were the Potamoi or River-Gods and Okeanides, nymphs of springs and fountains. Unlike his brother Titanes, Okeanos neither participated in the castration of Ouranos nor joined the battle against the younger Olympian gods. He was probably identical to Ophion, an elder Titan in the Orphic myths who ruled heaven briefly before being wrestled and cast into the Ocean stream by Kronos.

Okeanos was depicted in ancient Greek vase painting as a bull-horned god with the tail of a serpentine fish in place of legs, similar to his river-god sons. His usual attributes were a fish and serpent. In the Hellenistic era, Okeanos was redefined as the god of the newly accessible Atlantic and Indian Oceans, and the old cosmological idea of a great, earth-encircling, fresh-water stream was discarded. In mosaic art he therefore appears simply as a sea-god or the sea personified, with crab-claw horns, and for attributes, a serpent, oar and school of fish. His wife Tethys, shown seated beside him, had wings on her brow, in the role of mother of rain-clouds.

PARENTS

[1.1] OURANOS & GAIA (Hesiod Theogony 133, Apollodorus 1.2, Diodorus Siculus 5.66.1)

[1.2] AITHER (or OURANOS) & GAIA (Hyginus Preface)


OFFSPRING

[1.1] THE OKEANIDES, THE POTAMOI (by Tethys) (Hesiod Theogony 133, Aeschylus Prometheus Bound 139, Hyginus Preface)

[1.2] THE POTAMOI (by Tethys) (Aeschylus Seven 304, Diodorus Siculus 4.69.1, Hyginus Preface, Nonnus Dionysiaca 23.280)

[1.3] THE POTAMOI (Homer Iliad 21.190, Philostratus Elder 2.8)

[1.4] THE OKEANIDES (by Tethys) (Apollodorus 1.8, Calimachus Hymns 3.40, Nonnus Dionysiaca 38.108)

[2.1] THE AURAI (Homer Odyssey 4.561)

[3.1] THE NEPHELAI (Aristophanes Clouds 264)

[4.1] THE KERKOPES (by Theia) (Homerica Cercopes Frag 1)

[5.1] TRIPTOLEMOS (by Gaia) (Pherecydes Frag, Apollodorus 1.32)

[6.1] THE LIMNAI (DNonnus ionysiaca 6.352)


ENCYCLOPEDIA

OCE′ANUS (Ôkeanos), the god of the river Oceanus, by which, according to the most ancient notions of the Greeks, the whole earth was surrounded. An account of this river belongs to mythical geography, and we shall here confine ourselves to describing the place which Oceanus holds in the ancient cosmogony. In the Homeric poems he appears as a mighty god, who yields to none save Zeus. (Il. xiv. 245, xx. 7, xxi. 195.) Homer does not mention his parentage, but calls Tethys his wife, by whom he had three daughters, Thetis, Eurynome and Perse. (Il. xiv. 302, xviii. 398, Od. x. 139.) His palace is placed somewhere in the west (Il. xiv. 303, &c.), and there he and Tethys brought up Hera, who was conveyed to them at the time when Zeus was engaged in the struggle with the Titans. Hesiod (Theog. 133, 337, &c., 349, &c.) calls Oceanus a son of Uranus and Gaea, the eldest of the Titans, and the husband of Tethys, by whom he begot 3000 rivers, and as many Oceanides, of whom Hesiod mentions only the eldest. (Comp. Apollod. iii. 8. § 1, 10. § 1.) This poet (Theog. 282) also speaks of sources of Oceanus. Representations of the god are seen on imperial coins of Tyre and Alexandria.

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PARENTAGE OF OCEANUS

Hesiod, Theogony 132 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or C7th B.C.) :

"She [Gaia the Earth] lay with Ouranos (Sky) and bare deep-swirling Okeanos, Koios and Krios and Hyperion and Iapetos, Theia and Rhea, Themis and Mnemosyne and gold-crowned Phoibe and lovely Tethys. After them was born Kronos."

Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 2 (trans. Aldrich) (Greek mythographer C2nd A.D.) :

"Ouranos (Sky) . . . fathered other sons on Ge (Earth), namely the Titanes : Okeanos, Koios, Hyperion, Kreios, Iapetos, and Kronos the youngest; also daughters called Titanides : Tethys, Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoibe, Dione, and Theia."

Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 5. 66. 1 (trans. Oldfather) (Greek historian C1st B.C.) :

"The Titanes numbered six men and five women, being born, as certain writers of myths relate, of Ouranos and Ge, but according to others, of one of the Kouretes and Titaia, from whom as their mother they derive the name they have. The males were Kronos, Hyperion, Koios, Iapetos, Krios and Okeanos, and their sisters were Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoibe and Tethys. [N.B. He omits Theia.] Each one of them was the discover of things of benefit to mankind, and because of the benefaction they conferred upon all men they were accorded honours and everlasting fame."

Pseudo-Hyginus, Preface (trans. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd A.D.) :

"From Aether and Terra (Earth) [were born various abstractions] . . . [From Caelum (Ouranos) and Terra (Gaia) were born ?] Oceanus, Themis, Tartarus, Pontus, the Titanes . . . Hyperion, and Polus [Koios], Saturnus [Kronos], Ops [Rhea], Moneta [Mnemosyne], Dione." [N.B. Hyginus' Preface survives only in summary. The Titanes should be listed as children of Ouranos (Caelum) and Gaia not Aither (Terra) and Gaia, but the notation to this effect seems to have been lost in the transcription.]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


O1.1 OCEANUS,

HEPHAESTUS

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE CHILDREN OF OCEANUS

Hesiod, Theogony 337 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or C7th B.C.) :

"Tethys bore to Okeanos the swirling Potamoi (Rivers), Neilos, Alpheios, and deep-eddying Eridanos, Strymon and Maiandros, Istros of the beautiful waters, Phasis and Rhesos and silver-swirling Akheloios, Nessos and Rhodios, Heptaporos and Haliakmon, Grenikos and Aisepos, and Simoeis, who is godlike, Hermos and Peneios, and Kaikos strongly flowing, and great Sangarios, and Ladon, and Parthenios, Euenos and Ardeskos, and Skamandros, who is holy.

She [Tethys] brought forth also a race apart of daughters, who with lord Apollon and the Rivers have the young in their keeping all over the earth, since this right from Zeus is given them. They are Peitho, Admete, Ianthe and Elektra, Doris and Prymno and Ourania like a goddess, Hippo and Klymene, Rhodeia and Kallirhoe, Zeuxo and Klytia, and Idyia and Pasithoe, Plexaura and Galaxaura and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe, and Polydora the shapely, Kerkeis of the lovely stature, and ox-eyed Plouto, Xanthe and Akaste, Perseis and Ianeira, Petraie the lovely, and Menestho, and Europa, Metis and Eurynome, Telesto robed in saffron, Khryseis, and Asia, and alluring Kalypso, Eudora and Tykhe, and Amphiro and Okyroe, and Styx, who among them all has the greatest eminence. Now these are the eldest of the daughters who were born to Tethys and Okeanos, but there are many others beside these, for there are three thousand light-stepping daughters of Okeanos scattered far and wide, bright children among the goddesses, and all alike look after the earth and the depths of the standing water."




--------------------

ENCYCLOPEDIA

OCE′ANUS (Ôkeanos), the god of the river Oceanus, by which, according to the most ancient notions of the Greeks, the whole earth was surrounded. An account of this river belongs to mythical geography, and we shall here confine ourselves to describing the place which Oceanus holds in the ancient cosmogony. In the Homeric poems he appears as a mighty god, who yields to none save Zeus. (Il. xiv. 245, xx. 7, xxi. 195.) Homer does not mention his parentage, but calls Tethys his wife, by whom he had three daughters, Thetis, Eurynome and Perse. (Il. xiv. 302, xviii. 398, Od. x. 139.) His palace is placed somewhere in the west (Il. xiv. 303, &c.), and there he and Tethys brought up Hera, who was conveyed to them at the time when Zeus was engaged in the struggle with the Titans. Hesiod (Theog. 133, 337, &c., 349, &c.) calls Oceanus a son of Uranus and Gaea, the eldest of the Titans, and the husband of Tethys, by whom he begot 3000 rivers, and as many Oceanides, of whom Hesiod mentions only the eldest. (Comp. Apollod. iii. 8. § 1, 10. § 1.) This poet (Theog. 282) also speaks of sources of Oceanus. Representations of the god are seen on imperial coins of Tyre and Alexandria.

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

--------------------------

Web  Theoi         
OKEANOS 

Greek Name Transliteration Latin Spelling Translation


WkeanoV Ôkeanos Oceanus River Ocean

WghnoV Wghn Ogênos, Ogên Ogenus, Ogen River Ocean

 

Hephaestus, Eileithyia, Tethys & Oceanus, Athenian

black- figure dinos C6th B.C., British Museum, London

OKEANOS (or Oceanus) was the Titan god or Protogenos (primeval deity) of the great earth-encircling river Okeanos, the font of all the earth's fresh-water: including rivers, wells, springs and rain-clouds. Okeanos was also the god who regulated the rising and setting of the heavenly bodies which were believed to emerge and descend into his watery realm at the ends of the earth. Okeanos' wife was Tethys, the nurse, who was probably thought to distribute his water to the earth via subterranean caverns. Their children were the Potamoi or River-Gods and Okeanides, nymphs of springs and fountains. Unlike his brother Titanes, Okeanos neither participated in the castration of Ouranos nor joined the battle against the younger Olympian gods. He was probably identical to Ophion, an elder Titan in the Orphic myths who ruled heaven briefly before being wrestled and cast into the Ocean stream by Kronos.

Okeanos was depicted in ancient Greek vase painting as a bull-horned god with the tail of a serpentine fish in place of legs, similar to his river-god sons. His usual attributes were a fish and serpent. In the Hellenistic era, Okeanos was redefined as the god of the newly accessible Atlantic and Indian Oceans, and the old cosmological idea of a great, earth-encircling, fresh-water stream was discarded. In mosaic art he therefore appears simply as a sea-god or the sea personified, with crab-claw horns, and for attributes, a serpent, oar and school of fish. His wife Tethys, shown seated beside him, had wings on her brow, in the role of mother of rain-clouds.

-------------------------

the Titan Oceanus of Greek Myth1

the Titan Oceanus of Greek Myth||p114.htm#i13700|the Heaven Uranus of Greek Myth||p116.htm#i13787|the Earth Goddess Gaia of Greek Myth||p116.htm#i13788|the Light Aether of Greek Myth||p241.htm#i27378|the Day Hemera of Greek Myth||p241.htm#i27381||||the Air, Mist, and Fog Chaos of Greek Myth||p192.htm#i21444|

Father the Heaven Uranus of Greek Myth1

Mother the Earth Goddess Gaia of Greek Myth1

    The Titan Oceanus of Greek Myth was the son of the Heaven Uranus of Greek Myth and the Earth Goddess Gaia of Greek Myth.1 The Titan Oceanus of Greek Myth married the Titaness Tethys of Greek Myth, daughter of the Heaven Uranus of Greek Myth and the Earth Goddess Gaia of Greek Myth.1 

Family 1

Child the Oceanid Melia of Greek Myth+ 2


Family 2 the Titaness Tethys of Greek Myth

Children the Oceanid Dione of Greek Myth+ 1

the River God Asopus of Greek Myth+

the River God Ladon of Greek Myth+

the Oceanid Doris of Greek Myth+ 1

the Oceanid Pleïone of Greek Myth+ 1

the Oceanid Clymene of Greek Myth+ 1

the Oceanid Philyra of Greek Myth+ 1

the Oceanid Plouto of Greek Myth+ 3

the River God Nile of Greek Myth+ 4

the River God Inachus of Greek Myth+ 5

the River God Simois of Greek Myth+ 6

the River God Scamander of Greek Myth+ 6

the River God Acheloüs of Greek Myth+ 7


Citations

[S289] Greek Mythology Link, online http://hsa.brown.edu/~maicar/index.html

[S1333] Theoi Project, online www.theoi.com\index.htm, MELIA.

[S1333] Theoi Project, online www.theoi.com\index.htm, PLOUTO.

[S1332] Royal Houses of Mythical Greece, online http://www.timelessmyths.com/, Genealogy: House of Argos (Proëtids and Aeolids).

[S1078] Plato and his dialogues, online http://phd.evansville.edu/tools/index.htm

[S1332] Royal Houses of Mythical Greece, online http://www.timelessmyths.com/, Genealogy: House of Troy and Dardania.

[S1332] Royal Houses of Mythical Greece, online http://www.timelessmyths.com/, Genealogy: House of Calydon (Aeolids).



--------------------

In classical antiquity, Oceanus (from Greek: Ὠκεανός, lit. "ocean") was believed to be the world-ocean, which the ancient Romans and Greeks considered to be an enormous river encircling the world. Strictly speaking, Oceanus was the ocean-stream at the Equator in which floated the habitable hemisphere (oikoumene οἰκουμένη). In Greek mythology, this world-ocean was personified as a Titan, a son of Uranus and Gaia. In Hellenistic and Roman mosaics, this Titan was often depicted as having the upper body of a muscular man with a long beard and horns (often represented as the claws of a crab), and the lower torso of a serpent (cf. Typhon). On a fragmentary archaic vessel (British Museum 1971.11-1.1) of ca 580 BC, among the gods arriving at the wedding of Peleus and the sea-nymph Thetis, is a fish-tailed Oceanus, with a fish in one hand and a serpent in the other, gifts of bounty and prophecy. In Roman mosaics he might carry a steering-oar and cradle a ship.

Some scholars believe that Oceanus originally represented all bodies of salt water, including the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, the two largest bodies known to the ancient Greeks. However, as geography became more accurate, Oceanus came to represent the stranger, more unknown waters of the Atlantic Ocean (also called the "Ocean Sea"), while the newcomer of a later generation, Poseidon, ruled over the Mediterranean.

Oceanus' consort is his sister Tethys, and from their union came the ocean nymphs, also known as the three-thousand Oceanids, and all the rivers of the world, fountains, and lakes. From Cronus, of the race of Titans, the Olympian gods have their birth, and Hera mentions twice in Iliad book xiv her intended journey "to the ends of the generous earth on a visit to Oceanus, whence the gods have risen, and Tethys our mother who brought me up kindly in their own house." -------------------- Titã -------------------- Oceanus (Greek: Ὠκεανός, lit. "ocean") was believed to be the world-ocean in classical antiquity, which the ancient Romans and Greeks considered to be an enormous river encircling the world. Strictly speaking, Okeanos was the ocean-stream at the Equator in which floated the habitable hemisphere (oikoumene οἰκουμένη).[1] In Greek mythology, this world-ocean was personified as a Titan, a son of Uranus and Gaia. In Hellenistic and Roman mosaics, this Titan was often depicted as having the upper body of a muscular man with a long beard and horns (often represented as the claws of a crab), and the lower torso of a serpent (cf. Typhon). On a fragmentary archaic vessel (British Museum 1971.11-1.1) of ca 580 BC, among the gods arriving at the wedding of Peleus and the sea-nymph Thetis, is a fish-tailed Oceanus, with a fish in one hand and a serpent in the other, gifts of bounty and prophecy. In Roman mosaics he might carry a steering-oar and cradle a ship.

view all 39

Oceanos Titan's Timeline

-1570
-1570
Hebron, Canann, Plaestine
-1400
-1400
Troad, Troy, Greece
-1365
-1365
Greek Mythology,,,
-1365
Greek Mythology,,,
-1360
-1360
Age 4
Escynthia, Ancient Turkey, Teucry, Black Sea Region, Turkey
100
100
Age 1464
Anatolia, Greece
100
Age 1464
Troy, Turkey
????
????
????