Ottar Egilsson, King of Sweden

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Ottar (Vendilkrava) Egilsson (King of Sweden), "Vendelkråka", King in Uppsala Sweden

Also Known As: "Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow)", "Óttarr vendilkráka", "Óttarr", "Ohþere(misspelt )", "Ohtere", "Vendilkrava", "Vendelkråke", "Ottar", "Vendilkraka", "Vendelkråka", "/Vendelkråke/", "/Vendilkraka/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Upsala, Svitjod, Sweden
Death: Died in Sønderborg, Syddanmark, Denmark
Place of Burial: Vendel, Limfjord, Denmark
Immediate Family:

Son of Egil "Tunnadolg Vendikraka" Anunsson and NN (Mrs. Egil of Sweden)
Husband of NN (wife of Ottar) Eysteinsdotter, of Sweden
Father of Adils "The Great" Ottarsson and Eanmund Othereson, Prince of Sweden
Brother of Fusto Egilsson and Ingibjørg Angantyrsdatter of Sweden

Occupation: King in Sweden, Kong av Uppsala, många strider med Frode av Danmark., Rey de los vándalos., King in Uppsala Sweden
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ottar Egilsson, King of Sweden

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottar_Vendelkr%C3%A5ka http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere

-------------------------------------- Froders jarlar, som han lämnat kvar att värna Danmark när han var borta, samlade ihop en stor här och överraskade Ottar i Limfjorden. Slaget slutade med att Ottar och en stor del av hans manskap föll. Danerna tog hans lik och slängde det på en hög och lät djur och fåglar riva kroppen. De gjorde en träkråka och sände den till Svearna och sade att mer var inte deras kung Ottar värd.De kallade honom för Ottar vendelkråka. -------------------------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior"

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres), mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres), and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres, sunu Ohteres) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).

When Othere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela.

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention. Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel.

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils...

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N, 17°34′E) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916. It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king. The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior"[2].

Beowulf

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres)[3], mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres)[4], and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres[5], sunu Ohteres[6]) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres)[7].

When Othere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

   Þa wæs synn and sacu Sweona and Geata,
   ofer wid wæter wroht gemæne,
   here-nið hearda, syððan Hreðel swealt,
   oððe him Ongenþeowes eaferan wæran
   frome fyrd-hwate, freode ne woldon
   ofer heafo healdan, ac ymb Hreosna-beorh
   eatolne inwit-scear oft gefremedon.[8]
   There was strife and struggle 'twixt Swede and Geat
   o'er the width of waters; war arose,
   hard battle-horror, when Hrethel died,
   and Ongentheow's offspring grew
   strife-keen, bold, nor brooked o'er the seas
   pact of peace, but pushed their hosts
   to harass in hatred by Hreosnabeorh.[9]

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

Scandinavian sources

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention[10]. Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel (Laing has been influenced by Snorri's version in his translation):

   Féll Óttarr
   und ara greipar
   dugandligr
   fyrir Dana vápnum,
   þann hergammr
   hrægum fœti
   viti borinn
   á Vendli sparn.
   Þau frá ek verk
   Vötts ok Fasta
   sœnskri þjóð
   at sögum verða;
   at eylands
   jarlar Fróða
   vígframað
   um veginn höfðu.[11]
   By Danish arms the hero bold,
   Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.
   To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;
   By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,
   Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,
   The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.
   The Swedes have vowed revenge to take
   On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;
   Like dogs to kill them in their land,
   In their own homes, by Swedish hand.[12]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus, qui a suo æquivoco Ottaro Danorum comite et fratre ejus Fasta in una provinciarum Daniæ, scilicet Wendli, interemptus est. Cujus filius Adils [...][13] The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils [...][14] Historia Norvegiæ only informs that Ohthere was killed by the Danish brothers Ottar [sic.] and Faste in a Danish province called Vendel.

Ohthere's barrow

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) ( [show location on an interactive map] 60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133, 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.[15]

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916.[15] It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king.[16] The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist[17] reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation. -------------------- 31. OF KING OTTAR.

Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district; burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad. When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand."

  • ********************

Events in the life of _Ottarr Vendilkráku Egilsson

event 1 . ·succeeded to the domains and kingdom after his father † death 1 . ·When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. burial 1 . in Vendil, Jutland. ·The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: -- "By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand." event 1 . ·named for the wrong Vendel, it seems, not for Vendil in Jutland, as the Yngling Saga describes, but Vendel in Uppland, where the chief burial mound is known as "Ottars Hög" or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow, and some further speculate (one Ari Thorgilsson, which derived from a history of Norway from 1170) that it was not Ottar who was Vendelkraka, but his father, Egil event 1 . ·continued to refuse the Danes under King Frode his due taxes, and this caused them to come to blows event 1 . ·launched a raid against the homeland of King Frode, when he learned the latter was away, he sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeded westward to the Sound, and sailed north about to Jutland; landed at Lymfjord; plundered the Vend district; burned, and laid waste, and made desolate the country he went over with his army

-------------------- A powerful King and warrior and a son of Ongentheow, Ohthere and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats and also in Denmark as their father Ongentheow was killed by the Geats to avenge his death which ended the Swedish-Geatish wars. Ohthere pilliaged in their lands and triggered the war off again. In 515 around the time his father was killed in battle by the Geats, Ohthere succeeded his father as the king of Sweden and Ohthere led a large army against the Geats most probably because of what happened to his father, He besieged a Geatish army and nearly killed the Geatish king Hygelac but lost many of his forces in the conflict but did manage to get back to Sweden. Around the 520s Ohthere led a large raid to Denmark and plundered the Danish coast but a Danish army was waiting for him led by two Jarls, Ohthere besieged the Danish army and a battle broke out which was even the Danish were reinforced and Ohthere was defeated and killed in battle his corpse was taken back to Sweden and buried in a mound.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere -------------------- Ottar Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, son av Egil Vendilkråke og far til Adils. Han er omtala i Ynglingesoga og i Béowulf.

I følgje Snorre Sturlason var han i trette med Frode den frøkne, kongen i Danmark. Ottar nekta å gje Frode den skatten som Egil far hans hadde lova, og det kom til strid mellom kongane. Frode reiste til Svitjod og herja der, og året etter reiste Ottar til Danmark på hemntog. Han la til nord i Jylland, og herja i Vendsyssel, eller Vendil. Jarlane til Frode, Vott og Faste, samla ein her mot Ottar og slog han. Ottar vart teken og lagt på ein haug, der fuglar og dyr reiv sund liket hans. Danene sende så ei Kråke av tre som vart send til Svitjod, og sa Ottar ikkje var meir verd enn denne kråka. Ottar vart kalla Vendilkråke i alle år etterpå.

Tjodolv seier i Ynglingatal:

Ottar fall under ørneklo, den dugande kjempa, for danske våpn. Ufreds-hauken hakka med blodut klo på Vendil den vise kongen. Eg veit, at um verke til Vott og Faste vil segnir ganga millom svenske menn, at jarlane hans Frode gjævingen tok og den drustelege drap i hel. Den eldste Noregshistoria fortel at Ottar vart drepen i Vendel i Danmark av ein namne, Ottar Danejarl. I samanlikninga mellom desse to kjeldene, kommenterte Halvdan Koht:

Egil blir hjå Are óg kalla med tilnamnet Vendelkråka; men Snorre fester dette tilnamnet til sonen Ottar, og det svarar med at Tjodolv segjer at Ottar fall i Vendel. Snorre meinte, liksom bokskrivaren her, at Vendel var i Danmark, sidan det står hjå Tjodolv at Ottar fall mot Danane; men no er det mange som trur at det er meint Vendel i Uppland i Sverike, og at Ottar fall der i strid med dei danske jarlane som Tjodolv kallar Våt og Faste, - det er vel Våt som hjå bokskrivaren her har vorte til Ottar Jarl. Sviakongen Ottar er dessutan nemnd i det angelsaksiske kvædet Béowulf frå om lag år 700; men der blir far hans kalla Anganty.

Béowulf kallar Ottar for Ohthere. Han er berre nemnd som far av Eadgils (Adils). At Ottar fall i det svenske Vendel, tykkjest vera meir truleg, av di Ottarshaugen (Ottarshögen) framleis er å finne i dette området.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottar_Vendilkr%C3%A5ke»

-------------------- Ottar Vendilkraake, Egils Søn, ophørte med at sende Frode Skatten; og da han fremdeles gav dennes Gesandter Afslag, udbrød en Krig. Frode faldt ind i Sverige med grum Hærjen. Aaret derpaa gjorde Ottar et Tog til Østersjøen, landsteg i Vendsyssel paa Jylland; men blev af Frodes to Jarler Ottar og Fæste slagen. Selv faldt han. Danskerne sendte nu en Træ-kraake til Sverige med den Hilsen, at Svenskernes Konge ikke var mere værd end denne Kraake. Denne Vanskjebne gav ham Navnet Vendilkraake. -------------------- Noteringar Ottar var kung över svearna i början av 500-talet. Man har gissat att hans regeringstid sträckte sig mellan år 520-535 efter Kristus. Han är mest känd för att ha stupat i Vendel i Uppland. Närmare bestämt ska han ha dräpts av två danska jarlar från Själland. Anledningen till detta var att danskarna med våld flyttat in i kungsgården Huseby. Ottar försökte med sina män kasta ut inkräktarna, men i den följande bataljen stupade så gott som alla svearna. Senare hämnades hans son Adils faderns död genom att anfalla Själland. Det sägs att en av gravarna som hittats i Vendel ska tillhöra Ottar Vendelkråka. Just namnet "vendelkråka" lär vara ett uttryck som använts om invånarna i Vendel. Son till Kung Egil Aunsson 'Tunnadolg' av Ynglingaätten i Svitjod, som dödades av en oxe i Svitjod 515 och höglades i Uppsala; barn: Adils 'den mäktige' av Uppsala. Mellan småkungarna Egil och Adils regeras svearna av en monark som står omnämnd i båda källorna; Beowulfkvädet benämner honom Ohthere och Snorri kallar honom Ottar med tillnamnet Vendelkråka. Dennes historiska existens anses därmed bevisad; han är den förste svenske konung varom allvarliga historieforskare vågar säga detta. (Källor: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson och Bra Böckers Förlag 1985) Höglagd i Vendel, i den sk Ottarshögen.


--------------------

 Fell in battle against the jarls of Frode. Mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere. A contemporary of the Danish King Hugleik, who died 515 AD. Suffered a great deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped King Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat in return. [WBH - Sweden]
   BURR, NEWLIN, MINOR, WAITE, FOSTER LINE
   !Took a fleet to Denmark and devastated Vendil in Jutland, but ws overwhelmed in a naval battle in the Limfjord. The victorious Danes carried his body ashore and exposed it on a mound for beasts and birds to ravage. They took a tree-crow (or a crow of wood) and sent it to Sweden with the taunt that Ottar their king was of no more account than that. However, it has been argued that Ottar was nicknamed not from Vendil in Jutland but from Vendil in Uppland in Sweden, where the chief burial mound has traditionally been known as Ottars Hog, King Ottar's Howe, or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow. It is Ottar's father Egill who is called vendilkr aka, Vendel-crow. [A History of the Vikings, p. 36-9]
   Son of King Egil. Ottar fell in battle against the jarls of King Frode of Denmark. Both he and his son Audils, who ruled Svithiod after him, are mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere and his son Eadgils of the royal Swedish line of the Scylfingas (Skilfings). This fact gives to Swedish history its first reliable date. The Danish king Hugleik, a contemporary of King Ottar, died in 515 AD, which renders with a certainty Ottar's reign as falling in the first part of the 6th century. [History of Sweden, p. 37-38]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-ZC

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note:
  3. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  4. Note:
  5. Note: 31. OF KING OTTAR.
  6. Note:
  7. Note:
   Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district;burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad.When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste,they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception,and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places,and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood  joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces.Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tellsso of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand."

--------------------

   Fell in battle against the jarls of Frode. Mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere. A contemporary of the Danish King Hugleik, who died 515 AD. Suffered a great deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped King Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat in return. [WBH - Sweden]
   BURR, NEWLIN, MINOR, WAITE, FOSTER LINE
   !Took a fleet to Denmark and devastated Vendil in Jutland, but ws overwhelmed in a naval battle in the Limfjord. The victorious Danes carried his body ashore and exposed it on a mound for beasts and birds to ravage. They took a tree-crow (or a crow of wood) and sent it to Sweden with the taunt that Ottar their king was of no more account than that. However, it has been argued that Ottar was nicknamed not from Vendil in Jutland but from Vendil in Uppland in Sweden, where the chief burial mound has traditionally been known as Ottars Hog, King Ottar's Howe, or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow. It is Ottar's father Egill who is called vendilkr aka, Vendel-crow. [A History of the Vikings, p. 36-9]
   Son of King Egil. Ottar fell in battle against the jarls of King Frode of Denmark. Both he and his son Audils, who ruled Svithiod after him, are mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere and his son Eadgils of the royal Swedish line of the Scylfingas (Skilfings). This fact gives to Swedish history its first reliable date. The Danish king Hugleik, a contemporary of King Ottar, died in 515 AD, which renders with a certainty Ottar's reign as falling in the first part of the 6th century. [History of Sweden, p. 37-38]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-ZC

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note:
  3. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  4. Note:
  5. Note: 31. OF KING OTTAR.
  6. Note:
  7. Note:
   Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district;burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad.When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste,they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception,and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places,and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood  joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces.Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tellsso of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand." -------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior".

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres), mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres), and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres, sunu Ohteres) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).

When Ohthere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars.

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133°N 17.567°E / 60.133; 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916. It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king. The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere -------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden who would have lived during the 6th century and belonged to the house of Scylfings. His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior".[2]

A powerful King and warrior and a son of Ongentheow, Ohthere and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats and also in Denmark as their father Ongentheow was killed by the Geats to avenge his death which ended the Swedish-Geatish wars. Ohthere pilliaged in their lands and triggered the war off again. In 515 around the time his father was killed in battle by the Geats, Ohthere succeeded his father as the king of Sweden and Ohthere led a large army against the Geats most probably because of what happened to his father, He besieged a Geatish army and nearly killed the Geatish king Hygelac but lost many of his forces in the conflict but did manage to get back to Sweden. Around the 520s Ohthere led a large raid to Denmark and plundered the Danish coast but a Danish army was waiting for him led by two Jarls, Ohthere besieged the Danish army and a battle broke out which was even until the Danish were reinforced and Ohthere was defeated and killed in battle his corpse was taken back to Sweden and buried in a mound.

Contents [hide]

1 Beowulf

2 Scandinavian sources

3 Ohthere's Barrow

4 Notes

5 References


[edit] Beowulf

In the Old English poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres),[3] mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres),[4] and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres,[5] sunu Ohteres[6]) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).[7]

When Ohthere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

Þa wæs synn and sacu Sweona and Geata,

ofer wid wæter wroht gemæne,

here-nið hearda, syððan Hreðel swealt,

oððe him Ongenþeowes eaferan wæran

frome fyrd-hwate, freode ne woldon

ofer heafo healdan, ac ymb Hreosna-beorh

eatolne inwit-scear oft gefremedon.[8] There was strife and struggle 'twixt Swede and Geat

o'er the width of waters; war arose,

hard battle-horror, when Hrethel died,

and Ongentheow's offspring grew

strife-keen, bold, nor brooked o'er the seas

pact of peace, but pushed their hosts

to harass in hatred by Hreosnabeorh.[9]

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

[edit] Scandinavian sources

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention.[1] Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel (Laing has been influenced by Snorri's version in his translation):

Féll Óttarr

und ara greipar

dugandligr

fyrir Dana vápnum,

þann hergammr

hrægum fœti

viti borinn

á Vendli sparn.

Þau frá ek verk

Vötts ok Fasta

sœnskri þjóð

at sögum verða;

at eylands

jarlar Fróða

vígframað

um veginn höfðu.[10] By Danish arms the hero bold,

Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.

To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;

By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,

Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,

The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.

The Swedes have vowed revenge to take

On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;

Like dogs to kill them in their land,

In their own homes, by Swedish hand.[11]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus, qui a suo æquivoco Ottaro Danorum comite et fratre ejus Fasta in una provinciarum Daniæ, scilicet Wendli, interemptus est. Cujus filius Adils [...][12]

The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils [...][13]
 

Historia Norvegiæ only informs that Ohthere was killed by the Danish brothers Ottar [sic.] and Faste in a Danish province called Vendel.

[edit] Ohthere's Barrow

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133°N 17.567°E / 60.133; 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen. The term Hög is derived from the Old Norse word haugr meaning mound or barrow. [14]

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916.[14] It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king.[15] The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist[16] reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation.

[edit] Notes

1.^ a b Ottar, an article in the encyclopedia Nordisk familjebok

2.^ Peterson, Lena. Lexikon över urnnordiska personnamn PDF

3.^ Line 2929.

4.^ Line 2933.

5.^ Lines 2381,

6.^ Line 2395.

7.^ Lines 2613.

8.^ Lines 2473-2480.

9.^ Modern English translation by Francis Barton Gummere

10.^ The original text at Heimskringla Norrøne Tekster og Kvad

11.^ Laing's translation at Sacred Texts

12.^ Storm, Gustav (editor) (1880). Monumenta historica Norwegiæ: Latinske kildeskrifter til Norges historie i middelalderen, Monumenta Historica Norwegiae (Kristiania: Brøgger), pp. 100-101.

13.^ Ekrem, Inger (editor), Lars Boje Mortensen (editor) and Peter Fisher (translator) (2003). Historia Norwegie. Museum Tusculanum Press. ISBN 8772898135, p. 77.

14.^ a b "Ottarshögen", Nationalencyklopedin, http://databas.bib.vxu.se:2057/jsp/search/article.jsp?i_art_id=277891

15.^ A presentation by the Swedish National Heritage Board

16.^ Fornvännen 1917, Sune Lindqvist, "Ottarshögen i Vendel", p. 142

-------------------- http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottar_Vendelkr%C3%A5ka http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere

-------------------------------------- Froders jarlar, som han lämnat kvar att värna Danmark när han var borta, samlade ihop en stor här och överraskade Ottar i Limfjorden. Slaget slutade med att Ottar och en stor del av hans manskap föll. Danerna tog hans lik och slängde det på en hög och lät djur och fåglar riva kroppen. De gjorde en träkråka och sände den till Svearna och sade att mer var inte deras kung Ottar värd.De kallade honom för Ottar vendelkråka. -------------------------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior"

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres), mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres), and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres, sunu Ohteres) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).

When Othere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela.

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention. Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel.

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils...

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N, 17°34′E) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916. It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king. The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior"[2].

Beowulf

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres)[3], mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres)[4], and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres[5], sunu Ohteres[6]) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres)[7].

When Othere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

  Þa wæs synn and sacu Sweona and Geata,
  ofer wid wæter wroht gemæne,
  here-nið hearda, syððan Hreðel swealt,
  oððe him Ongenþeowes eaferan wæran
  frome fyrd-hwate, freode ne woldon
  ofer heafo healdan, ac ymb Hreosna-beorh
  eatolne inwit-scear oft gefremedon.[8]
  There was strife and struggle 'twixt Swede and Geat
  o'er the width of waters; war arose,
  hard battle-horror, when Hrethel died,
  and Ongentheow's offspring grew
  strife-keen, bold, nor brooked o'er the seas
  pact of peace, but pushed their hosts
  to harass in hatred by Hreosnabeorh.[9]

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

Scandinavian sources

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention[10]. Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel (Laing has been influenced by Snorri's version in his translation):

  Féll Óttarr
  und ara greipar
  dugandligr
  fyrir Dana vápnum,
  þann hergammr
  hrægum fœti
  viti borinn
  á Vendli sparn.
  Þau frá ek verk
  Vötts ok Fasta
  sœnskri þjóð
  at sögum verða;
  at eylands
  jarlar Fróða
  vígframað
  um veginn höfðu.[11]
  By Danish arms the hero bold,
  Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.
  To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;
  By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,
  Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,
  The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.
  The Swedes have vowed revenge to take
  On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;
  Like dogs to kill them in their land,
  In their own homes, by Swedish hand.[12]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus, qui a suo æquivoco Ottaro Danorum comite et fratre ejus Fasta in una provinciarum Daniæ, scilicet Wendli, interemptus est. Cujus filius Adils [...][13] The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils [...][14] Historia Norvegiæ only informs that Ohthere was killed by the Danish brothers Ottar [sic.] and Faste in a Danish province called Vendel.

Ohthere's barrow

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) ( [show location on an interactive map] 60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133, 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.[15]

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916.[15] It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king.[16] The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist[17] reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation. -------------------- 31. OF KING OTTAR.

Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district; burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad. When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand."

   ********************

Events in the life of _Ottarr Vendilkráku Egilsson

event 1 . ·succeeded to the domains and kingdom after his father † death 1 . ·When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. burial 1 . in Vendil, Jutland. ·The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: -- "By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand." event 1 . ·named for the wrong Vendel, it seems, not for Vendil in Jutland, as the Yngling Saga describes, but Vendel in Uppland, where the chief burial mound is known as "Ottars Hög" or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow, and some further speculate (one Ari Thorgilsson, which derived from a history of Norway from 1170) that it was not Ottar who was Vendelkraka, but his father, Egil event 1 . ·continued to refuse the Danes under King Frode his due taxes, and this caused them to come to blows event 1 . ·launched a raid against the homeland of King Frode, when he learned the latter was away, he sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeded westward to the Sound, and sailed north about to Jutland; landed at Lymfjord; plundered the Vend district; burned, and laid waste, and made desolate the country he went over with his army

-------------------- A powerful King and warrior and a son of Ongentheow, Ohthere and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats and also in Denmark as their father Ongentheow was killed by the Geats to avenge his death which ended the Swedish-Geatish wars. Ohthere pilliaged in their lands and triggered the war off again. In 515 around the time his father was killed in battle by the Geats, Ohthere succeeded his father as the king of Sweden and Ohthere led a large army against the Geats most probably because of what happened to his father, He besieged a Geatish army and nearly killed the Geatish king Hygelac but lost many of his forces in the conflict but did manage to get back to Sweden. Around the 520s Ohthere led a large raid to Denmark and plundered the Danish coast but a Danish army was waiting for him led by two Jarls, Ohthere besieged the Danish army and a battle broke out which was even the Danish were reinforced and Ohthere was defeated and killed in battle his corpse was taken back to Sweden and buried in a mound.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere -------------------- Ottar Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, son av Egil Vendilkråke og far til Adils. Han er omtala i Ynglingesoga og i Béowulf.

I følgje Snorre Sturlason var han i trette med Frode den frøkne, kongen i Danmark. Ottar nekta å gje Frode den skatten som Egil far hans hadde lova, og det kom til strid mellom kongane. Frode reiste til Svitjod og herja der, og året etter reiste Ottar til Danmark på hemntog. Han la til nord i Jylland, og herja i Vendsyssel, eller Vendil. Jarlane til Frode, Vott og Faste, samla ein her mot Ottar og slog han. Ottar vart teken og lagt på ein haug, der fuglar og dyr reiv sund liket hans. Danene sende så ei Kråke av tre som vart send til Svitjod, og sa Ottar ikkje var meir verd enn denne kråka. Ottar vart kalla Vendilkråke i alle år etterpå.

Tjodolv seier i Ynglingatal:

Ottar fall under ørneklo, den dugande kjempa, for danske våpn. Ufreds-hauken hakka med blodut klo på Vendil den vise kongen. Eg veit, at um verke til Vott og Faste vil segnir ganga millom svenske menn, at jarlane hans Frode gjævingen tok og den drustelege drap i hel. Den eldste Noregshistoria fortel at Ottar vart drepen i Vendel i Danmark av ein namne, Ottar Danejarl. I samanlikninga mellom desse to kjeldene, kommenterte Halvdan Koht:

Egil blir hjå Are óg kalla med tilnamnet Vendelkråka; men Snorre fester dette tilnamnet til sonen Ottar, og det svarar med at Tjodolv segjer at Ottar fall i Vendel. Snorre meinte, liksom bokskrivaren her, at Vendel var i Danmark, sidan det står hjå Tjodolv at Ottar fall mot Danane; men no er det mange som trur at det er meint Vendel i Uppland i Sverike, og at Ottar fall der i strid med dei danske jarlane som Tjodolv kallar Våt og Faste, - det er vel Våt som hjå bokskrivaren her har vorte til Ottar Jarl. Sviakongen Ottar er dessutan nemnd i det angelsaksiske kvædet Béowulf frå om lag år 700; men der blir far hans kalla Anganty.

Béowulf kallar Ottar for Ohthere. Han er berre nemnd som far av Eadgils (Adils). At Ottar fall i det svenske Vendel, tykkjest vera meir truleg, av di Ottarshaugen (Ottarshögen) framleis er å finne i dette området.

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottar_Vendilkr%C3%A5ke»

-------------------- Ottar Vendilkraake, Egils Søn, ophørte med at sende Frode Skatten; og da han fremdeles gav dennes Gesandter Afslag, udbrød en Krig. Frode faldt ind i Sverige med grum Hærjen. Aaret derpaa gjorde Ottar et Tog til Østersjøen, landsteg i Vendsyssel paa Jylland; men blev af Frodes to Jarler Ottar og Fæste slagen. Selv faldt han. Danskerne sendte nu en Træ-kraake til Sverige med den Hilsen, at Svenskernes Konge ikke var mere værd end denne Kraake. Denne Vanskjebne gav ham Navnet Vendilkraake. -------------------- Noteringar Ottar var kung över svearna i början av 500-talet. Man har gissat att hans regeringstid sträckte sig mellan år 520-535 efter Kristus. Han är mest känd för att ha stupat i Vendel i Uppland. Närmare bestämt ska han ha dräpts av två danska jarlar från Själland. Anledningen till detta var att danskarna med våld flyttat in i kungsgården Huseby. Ottar försökte med sina män kasta ut inkräktarna, men i den följande bataljen stupade så gott som alla svearna. Senare hämnades hans son Adils faderns död genom att anfalla Själland. Det sägs att en av gravarna som hittats i Vendel ska tillhöra Ottar Vendelkråka. Just namnet "vendelkråka" lär vara ett uttryck som använts om invånarna i Vendel. Son till Kung Egil Aunsson 'Tunnadolg' av Ynglingaätten i Svitjod, som dödades av en oxe i Svitjod 515 och höglades i Uppsala; barn: Adils 'den mäktige' av Uppsala. Mellan småkungarna Egil och Adils regeras svearna av en monark som står omnämnd i båda källorna; Beowulfkvädet benämner honom Ohthere och Snorri kallar honom Ottar med tillnamnet Vendelkråka. Dennes historiska existens anses därmed bevisad; han är den förste svenske konung varom allvarliga historieforskare vågar säga detta. (Källor: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson och Bra Böckers Förlag 1985) Höglagd i Vendel, i den sk Ottarshögen.

--------------------

Fell in battle against the jarls of Frode. Mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere. A contemporary of the Danish King Hugleik, who died 515 AD. Suffered a great deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped King Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat in return. [WBH - Sweden]
  BURR, NEWLIN, MINOR, WAITE, FOSTER LINE
  !Took a fleet to Denmark and devastated Vendil in Jutland, but ws overwhelmed in a naval battle in the Limfjord. The victorious Danes carried his body ashore and exposed it on a mound for beasts and birds to ravage. They took a tree-crow (or a crow of wood) and sent it to Sweden with the taunt that Ottar their king was of no more account than that. However, it has been argued that Ottar was nicknamed not from Vendil in Jutland but from Vendil in Uppland in Sweden, where the chief burial mound has traditionally been known as Ottars Hog, King Ottar's Howe, or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow. It is Ottar's father Egill who is called vendilkr aka, Vendel-crow. [A History of the Vikings, p. 36-9]
  Son of King Egil. Ottar fell in battle against the jarls of King Frode of Denmark. Both he and his son Audils, who ruled Svithiod after him, are mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere and his son Eadgils of the royal Swedish line of the Scylfingas (Skilfings). This fact gives to Swedish history its first reliable date. The Danish king Hugleik, a contemporary of King Ottar, died in 515 AD, which renders with a certainty Ottar's reign as falling in the first part of the 6th century. [History of Sweden, p. 37-38]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-ZC

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note:
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note:
   Note: 31. OF KING OTTAR.
   Note:
   Note:
  Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district;burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad.When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste,they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception,and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places,and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood  joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces.Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tellsso of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand."

--------------------

  Fell in battle against the jarls of Frode. Mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere. A contemporary of the Danish King Hugleik, who died 515 AD. Suffered a great deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped King Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat in return. [WBH - Sweden]
  BURR, NEWLIN, MINOR, WAITE, FOSTER LINE
  !Took a fleet to Denmark and devastated Vendil in Jutland, but ws overwhelmed in a naval battle in the Limfjord. The victorious Danes carried his body ashore and exposed it on a mound for beasts and birds to ravage. They took a tree-crow (or a crow of wood) and sent it to Sweden with the taunt that Ottar their king was of no more account than that. However, it has been argued that Ottar was nicknamed not from Vendil in Jutland but from Vendil in Uppland in Sweden, where the chief burial mound has traditionally been known as Ottars Hog, King Ottar's Howe, or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow. It is Ottar's father Egill who is called vendilkr aka, Vendel-crow. [A History of the Vikings, p. 36-9]
  Son of King Egil. Ottar fell in battle against the jarls of King Frode of Denmark. Both he and his son Audils, who ruled Svithiod after him, are mentioned in Beowulf as Ohthere and his son Eadgils of the royal Swedish line of the Scylfingas (Skilfings). This fact gives to Swedish history its first reliable date. The Danish king Hugleik, a contemporary of King Ottar, died in 515 AD, which renders with a certainty Ottar's reign as falling in the first part of the 6th century. [History of Sweden, p. 37-38]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-ZC

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note:
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note:
   Note: 31. OF KING OTTAR.
   Note:
   Note:
  Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district;burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad.When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste,they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception,and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places,and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood  joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces.Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tellsso of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand." -------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden belonging to the house of Scylfings.

His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior".

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres), mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres), and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres, sunu Ohteres) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).

When Ohthere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars.

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133°N 17.567°E / 60.133; 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen.

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916. It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king. The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohthere -------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden who would have lived during the 6th century and belonged to the house of Scylfings. His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior".[2]

A powerful King and warrior and a son of Ongentheow, Ohthere and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats and also in Denmark as their father Ongentheow was killed by the Geats to avenge his death which ended the Swedish-Geatish wars. Ohthere pilliaged in their lands and triggered the war off again. In 515 around the time his father was killed in battle by the Geats, Ohthere succeeded his father as the king of Sweden and Ohthere led a large army against the Geats most probably because of what happened to his father, He besieged a Geatish army and nearly killed the Geatish king Hygelac but lost many of his forces in the conflict but did manage to get back to Sweden. Around the 520s Ohthere led a large raid to Denmark and plundered the Danish coast but a Danish army was waiting for him led by two Jarls, Ohthere besieged the Danish army and a battle broke out which was even until the Danish were reinforced and Ohthere was defeated and killed in battle his corpse was taken back to Sweden and buried in a mound.

Beowulf

In the Old English poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres),[3] mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres),[4] and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres,[5] sunu Ohteres[6]) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).[7]

When Ohthere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

   Þa wæs synn and sacu Sweona and Geata,
   ofer wid wæter wroht gemæne,
   here-nið hearda, syððan Hreðel swealt,
   oððe him Ongenþeowes eaferan wæran
   frome fyrd-hwate, freode ne woldon
   ofer heafo healdan, ac ymb Hreosna-beorh
   eatolne inwit-scear oft gefremedon.[8]

   There was strife and struggle 'twixt Swede and Geat
   o'er the width of waters; war arose,
   hard battle-horror, when Hrethel died,
   and Ongentheow's offspring grew
   strife-keen, bold, nor brooked o'er the seas
   pact of peace, but pushed their hosts
   to harass in hatred by Hreosnabeorh.[9]

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

Scandinavian sources

Ynglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention.[1] Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel (Laing has been influenced by Snorri's version in his translation):

   Féll Óttarr
   und ara greipar
   dugandligr
   fyrir Dana vápnum,
   þann hergammr
   hrægum fœti
   viti borinn
   á Vendli sparn.
   Þau frá ek verk
   Vötts ok Fasta
   sœnskri þjóð
   at sögum verða;
   at eylands
   jarlar Fróða
   vígframað
   um veginn höfðu.[10]

   By Danish arms the hero bold,
   Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.
   To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;
   By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,
   Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,
   The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.
   The Swedes have vowed revenge to take
   On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;
   Like dogs to kill them in their land,
   In their own homes, by Swedish hand.[11]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus, qui a suo æquivoco Ottaro Danorum comite et fratre ejus Fasta in una provinciarum Daniæ, scilicet Wendli, interemptus est. Cujus filius Adils [...][12]

The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils [...][13]

Historia Norvegiæ only informs that Ohthere was killed by the Danish brothers Ottar [sic.] and Faste in a Danish province called Vendel.

Ohthere's Barrow

Ohthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133°N 17.567°E / 60.133; 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen. The term Hög is derived from the Old Norse word haugr meaning mound or barrow. [14]

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916.[14] It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king.[15] The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist[16] reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation. -------------------- 16. OTTAR VENDELCROW - King in Svitjod who died in 460. After many encounters between Ottar of Svitjod and Frode of Denmark, Ottar was at last killed and his body left for the ravens and wild animals to consume. His son was:

17. ADILS - King in Svitjod 460 Co 505. -------------------- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This is about the Swedish king Ohthere. For the Norwegian voyager by the same name, see Ohthere of Hålogaland


Ohthere's Mound located at Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden.Ohthere, Ohtere (the name is sometimes misspelt Ohþere), Óttarr, Óttarr vendilkráka or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 – ca 530[1]) was a semi-legendary king of Sweden who would have lived during the 6th century and belonged to the house of Scylfings. His name has been reconstructed as Proto-Norse *Ōhtaharjaz or *Ōhtuharjaz meaning "feared warrior".[2]

A prince of the Swedes, Ohthere and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats after King Hrethel had died. In 515, Ongentheow was killed in battle by the Geats and Ohthere succeeded his father as the king of Sweden. Ohthere led an army against the Geats, and besieged one of their armies. He nearly killed the Geatish king Hygelac but lost many of his forces in the conflict. Ohthere managed to get back to Sweden. In the 520s, Ohthere led a large raid to Denmark and plundered the Danish coast. A Danish army led by two Jarls, however, was waiting for him. Battle broke out. The Danish were reinforced, and Ohthere was killed in the battle. His corpse was taken back to Sweden and buried in a mound.

Contents 1 Beowulf 2 Scandinavian sources 3 Ohthere's Barrow 4 Notes 5 References


[edit] BeowulfIn the Old English poem Beowulf the name of Ohthere only appears in constructions referring to his father Ongenþeow (fæder Ohtheres),[3] mother (Onelan modor and Ohtheres),[4] and his sons Eadgils (suna Ohteres,[5] sunu Ohteres[6]) and Eanmund (suna Ohteres).[7]

When Ohthere and his actions are concerned, he is referred to as Ongenþeow's offspring together with his brother Onela. The section deals with Ohthere and Onela pillaging the Geats at the death of their king Hreðel, restarting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

Þa wæs synn and sacu Sweona and Geata, ofer wid wæter wroht gemæne, here-nið hearda, syððan Hreðel swealt, oððe him Ongenþeowes eaferan wæran frome fyrd-hwate, freode ne woldon ofer heafo healdan, ac ymb Hreosna-beorh eatolne inwit-scear oft gefremedon.[8] There was strife and struggle 'twixt Swede and Geat o'er the width of waters; war arose, hard battle-horror, when Hrethel died, and Ongentheow's offspring grew strife-keen, bold, nor brooked o'er the seas pact of peace, but pushed their hosts to harass in hatred by Hreosnabeorh.[9]

Later, it is implied in the poem that Ohthere has died, because his brother Onela is king. Ohthere's sons Eadgils and Eanmund fled to the Geats and the wars began anew.

[edit] Scandinavian sourcesYnglingatal, Ynglinga saga, Íslendingabók and Historia Norvegiae all present Óttarr as the son of Egill (called Ongenþeow in Beowulf) and as the father of Aðísl/Aðils/athils/Adils (Eadgils).

According to the latest source, Ynglinga saga, Óttarr refused to pay tribute to the Danish king Fróði for the help that his father had received. Then Fróði sent two men to collect the tribute, but Óttarr answered that the Swedes had never paid tribute to the Daner and would not begin with him. Fróði then gathered a vast host and looted in Sweden, but the next summer he pillaged in the east. When Óttarr learnt that Fróði was gone, he sailed to Denmark to plunder in return and went into the Limfjord where he pillaged in Vendsyssel. Fróði's jarls Vott and Faste attacked Óttarr in the fjord. The battle was even and many men fell, but the Daner were reinforced by the people in the neighbourhood and so the Swedes lost (a version apparently borrowed from the death of Óttarr's predecessor Jorund). The Daner put Óttarr's dead corpse on a mound to be devoured by wild beasts, and made a wooden crow that they sent to Sweden with the message that the wooden crow was all that Óttarr was worth. After this, Óttarr was called Vendelcrow.

It is only Snorri who uses the epithet Vendelcrow, whereas the older sources Historia Norvegiae and Íslendingabók use it for his father Egill. Moreover, it is only in Snorri's work that story of Óttarr's death in Vendsyssel appears, and it is probably his own invention.[1] Ynglingatal only mentions that Óttarr was killed by the Danish jarls Vott and Faste in a place named Vendel (Laing has been influenced by Snorri's version in his translation):

Féll Óttarr und ara greipar dugandligr fyrir Dana vápnum, þann hergammr hrægum fœti viti borinn á Vendli sparn. Þau frá ek verk Vötts ok Fasta sœnskri þjóð at sögum verða; at eylands jarlar Fróða vígframað um veginn höfðu.[10] By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand.[11]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation (continuing after Egil):

Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus, qui a suo æquivoco Ottaro Danorum comite et fratre ejus Fasta in una provinciarum Daniæ, scilicet Wendli, interemptus est. Cujus filius Adils [...][12]

The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, who was assassinated in Vendel, a law province of Denmark, by his namesake, a Danish jarl, and this man's brother, Fasta. His son Adils [...][13]
 

Historia Norvegiæ only informs that Ohthere was killed by the Danish brothers Ottar [sic.] and Faste in a Danish province called Vendel.

[edit] Ohthere's BarrowOhthere's barrow (Swedish: Ottarshögen) (60°08′N 17°34′E / 60.133°N 17.567°E / 60.133; 17.567) is located in Vendel parish, Uppland, Sweden. The barrow is 5 metres high and 40 metres wide. In the 17th century the barrow was known locally as Ottarshögen. The term Hög is derived from the Old Norse word haugr meaning mound or barrow. [14]

The barrow was excavated in the period 1914-1916.[14] It showed the remains of both a man and a woman, and the finds were worthy of a king.[15] The Swedish archaeologist Sune Lindqvist[16] reported that in its centre there was a wooden vessel with ashes. There were few finds but they were well-preserved. There were some decorative panels similar to those found in the other Vendel era graves nearby. A comb with a case was found, as well as a golden Roman coin, a solidus, dated to be no later than 477. It had been perforated and was probably used as decoration, but it showed signs of wear and tear and had probably been worn for a longer time. Lindquist stated that the identification of the barrow as that of Ohthere could not receive more archaeological confirmation than those provided by the excavation.

-------------------- Onela was according to Beowulf a Swedish king during the first half the 6th century. He was the son of Ongentheow and the brother of Ohthere. He usurped the Swedish throne, but was killed by his nephew Eadgils, who won by hiring foreign assistance.

In Scandinavian mythology a king by the same name exists, Áli (the Old Norse form of Onela, also rendered as Ole, Åle or Ale), who had the cognomen hinn Upplenzki ("from Uppland").

In the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, Onela plays a central part in the Swedish-Geatish wars. Onela and his brother Ohthere were the sons of the Swedish king Ongenþeow. When the Geatish king Hreðel died, Onela and Ohthere saw the opportunity to pillage in Geatland starting the Swedish-Geatish wars:

The war ended with Ongenþeow's death.

It is implied by the poem that Onela eventually became king, because Ohthere's two sons, Eanmund and Eadgils, had to seek refuge with Heardred, Hygelac's successor as king of the Geats. This caused Onela to attack the Geats. During the battle, Eanmund was killed by Onela's champion Weohstan and Heardred was killed as well, after which Onela returned home.

Eadgils, however, survived and later, Beowulf helped him avenge Eanmund by slaying Onela.

By a conjectural emendation of line 62 of this poem some editors represent Onela as the son-in-law of Healfdene/Halfdan king of Denmark.

The animosity between Eadgils and Onela also appears in Scandinavian tradition. In the Norse sagas, which were mostly based on Norwegian versions of Scandinavian legends, Onela seems to appear as Áli of Uppland, but is called Norwegian. This is generally regarded as a late confusion between the Swedish Uppland, the core province of the Swedes, and its namesake, the Norwegian Oppland. By the time Ynglingatal was used as a source by Snorri Sturluson, there appears no longer to have been a Scandinavian tradition of Áli as a relation of Eadgils.

The earliest extant Scandinavian source where Onela appears is the 9th century skaldic poem Ynglingatal, Eadgils (Aðils) is called Onela's enemy (Ála dólgr). Ála is the genitive case of Áli, the Old Norse form of the name Onela.

-------------------- Onela was according to Beowulf a Swedish king, the son of Ongentheow and the brother of Ohthere. He usurped the Swedish throne, but was killed by his nephew Eadgils, who won by hiring foreign assistance.

In Scandinavian mythology a king by the same name exists, Áli (the Old Norse form of Onela, also rendered as Ole, Åle or Ale), who had the cognomen hinn Upplenzki ("from Uppland").

-------------------- Ohþere, Ohthere, Ohtere or Ottar Vendelkråka (Vendelcrow) (ca 515 - ca 530) was a king of the Swedish house of Scylfings. He was the son of Ongenþeow and the brother of Onela. He was the father of Eadgils, and according to Beowulf he also had a son named Eanmund.

Ohþere is mentioned in several independent sources, but there are however, two different versions of his death

According to the oldest source, Beowulf, he was captured by the Geats together with his mother and his younger brother Onela. They were saved by his father Ongenþeow who killed the Geatish king Hæþcyn and besieged the Geats in a forest named Ravenswood. However, Geatish reinforcements arrived led by the Geatish prince Hygelac whose warrior Eofor slew Ongenþeow.

Later Ohþere was murdered by his brother Onela. This version fits the Swedish tradition which claims that Ottar resided at the ancient royal estate in Vendel, in Uppland, and that he was buried in Ottarshögen (Ohþere's mound). An archaeological excavation in 1917 supported the tradition dating the finds to the first half of the 6th century. It was a burial befitting a king[1] (http://www.raa.se/sites/ottarshogen.asp). -------------------- BIOGRAFI:

Ottar Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, son av Egil Vendilkråke og far til Adils. Han er omtala i Ynglingesoga og i Béowulf.

I følgje Snorre Sturlason var han i trette med Frode den frøkne, kongen i Danmark. Ottar nekta å gje Frode den skatten som Egil far hans hadde lova, og det kom til strid mellom kongane. Frode reiste til Svitjod og herja der, og året etter reiste Ottar til Danmark på hemntog. Han la til nord i Jylland, og herja i Vendsyssel, eller Vendil. Jarlane til Frode, Vott og Faste, samla ein hær mot Ottar og slog han. Ottar vart teken og lagt på ein haug, der fuglar og dyr reiv sund liket hans. Danene sende så ei Kråke av tre som vart send til Svitjod, og sa Ottar ikkje var meir verd enn denne kråka. Ottar vart kalla Vendilkråke i alle år etterpå. -------------------- Misc. Notes

31. OF KING OTTAR.

Ottar was the name of King Egil's son who succeeded to the domains and kingdom after him. He did not continue friendly with King Frode, and therefore King Frode sent messengers to King Ottar to demand the scatt which Egil had promised him. Ottar replied, that the Swedes had never paid scatt to the Danes, neither would he; and the messengers had to depart with this answer. Frode was a great warrior, and he came one summer with his army to Sweden, and landed and ravaged the country. He killed many people, took some prisoners, burned all around in the inhabited parts, made a great booty, and made great devastation. The next summer King Frode made an expedition to the eastward; and when King Ottar heard that Frode was not at home in his own country, he went on board his own ships, sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeds westward to the Sound, and sails north about to Jutland; lands at Lymfjord; plunders the Vend district; burns, and lays waste, and makes desolate the country he goes over with his army. Vatt and Faste were the names of the earls whom Frode had appointed to defend the country in Denmark while he was abroad. When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: --

"By Danish arms the hero bold,
Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold.
To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne;
By eagles' claws the corpse is torn,
Spattered by ravens' bloody feet,
The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat.
The Swedes have vowed revenge to take
On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake;
Like dogs to kill them in their land,
In their own homes, by Swedish hand." 
  • ********************

Events in the life of _Ottarr Vendilkráku Egilsson

event 1 . ·succeeded to the domains and kingdom after his father † death 1 . ·When the earls heard that the Swedish king was laying Denmark waste, they collected an army, hastened on board their ships, and sailed by the south side to Lymfjord. They came unexpectedly upon Ottar, and the battle began immediately. The Swedes gave them a good reception, and many people fell on both sides; but as soon as men fell in the Danish army other men hastened from the country to fill their places, and also all the vessels in the neighbourhood joined them. The battle ended with the fall of Ottar and the greater part of his people. burial 1 . in Vendil, Jutland. ·The Danes took his body, carried it to the land, laid it upon a mound of earth, and let the wild beasts and ravens tear it to pieces. Thereafter they made a figure of a crow out of wood, sent it to Sweden, and sent word with it that their king, Ottar, was no better than it; and from this he was called Ottar Vendelcrow. Thjodolf tells so of it: -- "By Danish arms the hero bold, Ottar the Brave, lies stiff and cold. To Vendel's plain the corpse was borne; By eagles' claws the corpse is torn, Spattered by ravens' bloody feet, The wild bird's prey, the wild wolf's meat. The Swedes have vowed revenge to take On Frode's earls, for Ottar's sake; Like dogs to kill them in their land, In their own homes, by Swedish hand." event 1 . ·named for the wrong Vendel, it seems, not for Vendil in Jutland, as the Yngling Saga describes, but Vendel in Uppland, where the chief burial mound is known as "Ottars Hög" or the mound of Ottar Vendel-crow, and some further speculate (one Ari Thorgilsson, which derived from a history of Norway from 1170) that it was not Ottar who was Vendelkraka, but his father, Egil event 1 . ·continued to refuse the Danes under King Frode his due taxes, and this caused them to come to blows event 1 . ·launched a raid against the homeland of King Frode, when he learned the latter was away, he sailed over to Denmark, and ravaged there without opposition. As he heard that a great many people were collected at Sealand, he proceeded westward to the Sound, and sailed north about to Jutland; landed at Lymfjord; plundered the Vend district; burned, and laid waste, and made desolate the country he went over with his army

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Ottar Egilsson, King of Sweden's Timeline

551
551
Sweden
572
572
Age 21
Uppsala, Sweden
617
617
Age 66
Sønderborg, Syddanmark, Denmark

Was killed by his nephew Eadgils, who won by hiring foreign assistance.

1923
May 28, 1923
Age 66
May 28, 1923
Age 66
May 28, 1923
Age 66
May 28, 1923
Age 66
1928
April 25, 1928
Age 66
April 25, 1928
Age 66
April 25, 1928
Age 66