Patience Spencer (Chadbourne) (1612 - 1683) MP

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Birthplace: Tamworth, Staffordshire, England
Death: Died in Berwick, York, Maine
Occupation: Tavern keeper
Managed by: John Robert Winning, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Patience Spencer (Chadbourne)

Widow Spencer kept an inn at Saco, 1662.

From Chadbourne.org:

2. PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3). A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2). The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found.

Thomas arrived at Piscataqua in July 1630 on the barque Warwick (TMS), returned to England in 1633, and returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634. In his 1904 work, Emery was probably mistaken when he said Spencer was from Winchcombe, Gloucester, England. Emery went on to say erroneously that this was also the English home of the Chadbournes. By the 1950s, it was known that this was untrue and that the Chadbournes came from Tamworth (Parish records). More may be learned about Thomas Spencer's arrival in Maine in MPC IV:172-4 and under #8 Humphrey Spencer.

Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Pope's Pioneers of Maine & New Hampshire says that Thomas was a proprietor of Cambridge MA in 1633, a freeman in 1634 who removed to Kittery. Patience and Thomas lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of "Piscataqua" (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (S Berwick). Dispute over Thomas' title to land in S Berwick (where William Chadbourne gave them a house) is described under their son Humphrey #8. They were of Saco in 1654 (Holmes, Dictionary of New England Families) and Patience was (erroneously) called a widow of Saco in 1662 (Savage, Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England). In 1682 Patience was probably of Berwick as Thomas died there in 1681 and she in 1683.

Thomas was disenfranchised for entertaining Quakers in 1659 (LND, 652). Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths" (MPC II:139). They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675 (ibid, II:306). In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised" (The Records of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, Vol 4, part 1, p 407). Edward Wharton piloted a vessel that carried a group of Quakers up the coast, and seven people were fined varying sums and/or disenfranchised (lost the right to vote) by the Massachusetts Bay government, the only entity which could disenfranchise a freeman. Thomas Spencer obviously answered their questions in sympathy with the Quakers, defied the government, and was cast out as a result. Because we don't have copies of his answers to the Court's questions, we don't know how steadfastly he supported the Quakers, but he clearly satisfied the Court that he was in sympathy with them or they would not have taken action against him. They did not take action against James Rawlings, for instance, whom they found to be "more innocent and ingenious then the rest."

Brother Humphrey Chadbourne expressed concern for his sister Patience Spencer when he wrote his will in 1662. Humphrey directed his wife to assist "sister Spencer" if she should fall into "decay" (qv).


After Thomas' death in Dec 1681, Patience may have continued to operate the tavern. After her death her children and relatives, William, Humphrey and Moses Spencer, Ephraim Joy, and Thomas Chick, chose William Spencer and Thomas Chick to help them divide the estate 15 Nov 1683 (MPC III:186), and then finally settled on Edward Rishworth, Richard Nason and James Emery to make the division (ibid, III:188), probably because William and Thomas were heirs.

Notes on burial site from Find A Grave Memorial# 101956495

There is no gravestone remaining to mark the resting place of Patience. According to historian John Frost, "The Old Fields Cemetery" of South Berwick originated as Thomas and Patience Spencer's burial plot. Frost believes that two of the three old plots near the woods on the riverbank, in what now appears to be an unmarked grave, hold the remains of Thomas and Patience and other early settlers of South Berwick.

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2. PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3). A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2). The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found.

Thomas arrived at Piscataqua in July 1630 on the barque Warwick (TMS), returned to England in 1633, and returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634. In his 1904 work, Emery was probably mistaken when he said Spencer was from Winchcombe, Gloucester, England. Emery went on to say erroneously that this was also the English home of the Chadbournes. By the 1950s, it was known that this was untrue and that the Chadbournes came from Tamworth (Parish records). More may be learned about Thomas Spencer's arrival in Maine in MPC IV:172-4 and under #8 Humphrey Spencer.

Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Pope's Pioneers of Maine & New Hampshire says that Thomas was a proprietor of Cambridge MA in 1633, a freeman in 1634 who removed to Kittery. Patience and Thomas lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of "Piscataqua" (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (S Berwick). Dispute over Thomas' title to land in S Berwick (where William Chadbourne gave them a house) is described under their son Humphrey #8. They were of Saco in 1654 (Holmes, Dictionary of New England Families) and Patience was (erroneously) called a widow of Saco in 1662 (Savage, Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England). In 1682 Patience was probably of Berwick as Thomas died there in 1681 and she in 1683.

Thomas was disenfranchised for entertaining Quakers in 1659 (LND, 652). Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths" (MPC II:139). They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675 (ibid, II:306). In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised" (The Records of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, Vol 4, part 1, p 407). Edward Wharton piloted a vessel that carried a group of Quakers up the coast, and seven people were fined varying sums and/or disenfranchised (lost the right to vote) by the Massachusetts Bay government, the only entity which could disenfranchise a freeman. Thomas Spencer obviously answered their questions in sympathy with the Quakers, defied the government, and was cast out as a result. Because we don't have copies of his answers to the Court's questions, we don't know how steadfastly he supported the Quakers, but he clearly satisfied the Court that he was in sympathy with them or they would not have taken action against him. They did not take action against James Rawlings, for instance, whom they found to be "more innocent and ingenious then the rest."

           Brother Humphrey Chadbourne expressed concern for his sister Patience Spencer when he wrote his will in 1662.  Humphrey directed his wife to assist "sister Spencer" if she should fall into "decay" (qv).

After Thomas' death in Dec 1681, Patience may have continued to operate the tavern. After her death her children and relatives, William, Humphrey and Moses Spencer, Ephraim Joy, and Thomas Chick, chose William Spencer and Thomas Chick to help them divide the estate 15 Nov 1683 (MPC III:186), and then finally settled on Edward Rishworth, Richard Nason and James Emery to make the division (ibid, III:188), probably because William and Thomas were heirs.

1679 Will of Thomas Spencer

           In the name of God amen I Thomas Spencer of Newgewanacke in the Townshipp of Kittery being sick of body, but through the mercys of god, sound of Mind & memory and not knowing how soone my Change may come desire to dispose of that Estate which god hath given unto Mee as followeth viz:
           Imps I give unto my Eldest sonn William Spencer after my decease & the decease of Patience my loving wife my now dwelling house & all out housing by it & belonging to it & all the Land adjoyning to it being now in my possession & lying on the North side of the highway, by my sd dwelling house, whither it be Gardens orchards, pasture Meddows Corne Land to him the sd William Spencer my child, & to his hayres for ever, provided hee pay or Cause to be paid unto my Two daughters, namely Susanna & Elizabeth with in six weeks after my decease & or my loving wife Patience, the full and just Sum of Tenn pounds, apiece in money or pay equivalent there unto the houses and the land lying responsable until ye Legseys aforsd bee duly payd.
           2ly I give to patience my loving wife all the rest of my Estate, whither bee in lands Chattles, Cattle, goods debts house hould stuff Meddows &c: not mentioned as abovesd for her to distribute & dispose of amongst my Children at her own discretion, except what I have already given to my Eldest sonn as abovesd
           Lastly I do nominate & appoynt patience my sd loveing wife to bee my Soole executrix of this my last will & testament in Consideration where of I have here unto set my hand & seale, the second day of June in the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred seaventy nine/1679

Signed sealed & Delivered

Thomas Spencer

Presence of his mark

Gillbard Warrins his marke x

George Pearsons

           An Appendix to my last will & testament as on the other side of this paper, appeareth my further will in that, where as formerly I gave unto my sonn in law John Gattinsby who married my daughter Susannah a certen Tract of land being part of that too hundred acres that the Town of Kittery granted to mee, joyneing to my house lott, & the sd Gattensby sould his sd right or tract of land unto my sonn in law, Thomas Everington who married my daughter Mary, & the sd Gattinsby was fully Contented, & payd by sd Everington my sonn in law, for his sd land & the sayd Everington my sonn in law possessed the sd Land his life tyme, & left it to his heyres; and wh as I also gave unto my sonn Etherington a Certain Tract of Land adjoyning to the land hee bought of the sd John Gattinsby on which the dwelling house of the sayd Etherington now standeth, & both Tracts of land contayning about Twety foure Acres, by Estimation, bee it more or less, as they are now bounded with Richard Nason & the high way on the South, William Spencers land on the West, Daniell Goodins land & Humphry Spencers land on the North, & that part of my land Called Parkers Marsh on the East: And although some writeings have been Prused about the Premisses, yet nothing yt I know upon record about it, & that the sd Land according to my true intent discend unto the right heyres of it, both by the sayd Etherington's purchase of the sayd Gattensby in part, & my gift unto the sayd Etherington of the rest of the sd land: Now my will is that the sayd Land with the dwelling house Upon it, & all the appurtenances & priviledges yt unto belonging, should bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of John Wincoll Junior, sonn of John Wincoll of Kittery & of Mary his wife deceased, who was the daughter of my sd sonn in law Thomas Etherton & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould the sd tract of Land, dwelling house with all the appertuancnes, & priviledges there unto belonging to him the sd John Wincoll Junjr & his heyres lawfully begotten of his body; and if hee dy without such lawful heyres my will is that the sd Tract of Land houseing & all appurtenances and priviledges yt unto belonging shall bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of patience Atherton daughter unto sd Thomas Etherington & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould to her & her heyres for ever/ in witness where unto I have afixed my hand & Seale, this fifth day of June one thousand six hundred seventy nine 1679

Signed sealed & delivered

Thomas Spencer

in Presence of his mark

Gilbard Warrine his marke x

George Pearson

Acknowledged 15 June 1679, recorded 15 June 1682 Inventory taken 1 May 1682 and the estate valued at £257.14.0 by Richard Nason, Moses Spencer and John Wincoll 1 May 1682, who stated that Thomas Spencer was deceased in Dec 1681 (MW, 66-8). According to historian John Frost, the Old Fields cemetery of S Berwick originated as Thomas and Patience Spencer's burial plot. Frost believes that two of the three old plots near the woods on the riverbank, in what now appears to be an unmarked grave, hold the remains of Thomas and Patience (Chadbourne) Spencer and other early settlers ("Talk of George F Sanborn Jr," Pied Cow 7:1).

Children, surname SPENCER:

           i.          WILLIAMC3 b ca 1630/1; d 15 May 1696.  His will mentions no wife or children. He may be the child referred to by Torrey as b 1630.  William was granted land in Berwick in 1651 and served the town in various capacities.  He and Walter Allen were in charge of Great Works Mills sometime after 1650 (LND, 652).  As eldest son he inherited a considerable estate (MPA 1/34), which he left to his nephew Humphrey  Spencer as his sole heir on 18 June 1687 (MW 110-1).  A codicil to his will provided for servant Moses Spencer.

5 ii. MARGARET, b ca 1632.

6 iii. MARY, b ca 1634.

7 iv. SUSANNA, b Berwick ca 1636.

8 v. HUMPHREY, b Berwick ca 1638.

9 vi. ELIZABETH, b Berwick ca 1640 or 26 Mar 1848 (Gene Pool).

10 vii. MOSES, b Berwick ca 1642.

Figure 3: The First Permanent Settlement in Maine

adapted from Everett S Stackpole

Courtesy of Old Berwick Historical Society

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As stated in "Thomas Joy and His Descendants" by Thomas R. Joy published by James Richard Joy, Plainfield, NJ, July 4, 1900; compiled by James Richard Joy, New York:

"Patience Spencer was the widow of Thomas Spencer, who was sent over by Mason to Piscataqua in 1630, and the daughter of William Chadbourne, who, March 14, 1633-34, with his partners, James Wall and John Goddard, signed an agreement (a duplicate original in Massachusettes Archives 3,437) with John Mason to go over and remain five years, they to have three quarters of the profits from the mills and own three quarters of the houses which Mason was to furnish. They came over with Henry Jocelyn in the 'Pide Cow', arriving at Portsmouth July 8, 1634. Her brother, Humphrey Chadbourne, remembers her affectionately in his will May 6, 1667. Widow Spencer kept an inn at Saco, 1662."

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PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3). A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2). The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found.

Children, surname SPENCER:

           i.          WILLIAMC3 b ca 1630/1; d 15 May 1696.  His will mentions no wife or children. He may be the child referred to by Torrey as b 1630.  William was granted land in Berwick in 1651 and served the town in various capacities.  He and Walter Allen were in charge of Great Works Mills sometime after 1650 (LND, 652).  As eldest son he inherited a considerable estate (MPA 1/34), which he left to his nephew Humphrey  Spencer as his sole heir on 18 June 1687 (MW 110-1).  A codicil to his will provided for servant Moses Spencer.

5 ii. MARGARET, b ca 1632.

6 iii. MARY, b ca 1634.

7 iv. SUSANNA, b Berwick ca 1636.

8 v. HUMPHREY, b Berwick ca 1638.

9 vi. ELIZABETH, b Berwick ca 1640 or 26 Mar 1848 (Gene Pool).

10 vii. MOSES, b Berwick ca 1642.

Patience Chadbourne

      Sex: F

Individual Information

         Birth: Nov 8, 1612 - Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, England
   Christening: 
         Death: Nov 7, 1683 - Berwick, York Co., Maine

Parents

        Father: William Chadbourne
        Mother: Elizabeth Sparry

Spouses and Children

1. *Thomas Spencer

      Marriage: 1630 - Berwick, York Co., Maine
      Children:
               1. Margaret Spencer
               2. William Spencer
               3. Mary Spencer
               4. Susanna Spencer
               5. Humphrey Spencer
               6. Elisabeth Spencer
               7. Moses Spencer

A false clue has long obscured the true ancestry of immigrant William Chadbourne of Kittery, Maine (Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby, and Walter Goodwin Davis, Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire [Portland, Me.: The Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939 (reprinted Baltimore, 1972)], 134, 651-2). Libby, Noyes, and Davis repeated a speculation that William was from Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, and indeed, a William does appear in the baptismal register for that parish. An exhaustive search of the Winchcombe registers produced nearly one hundred Chadbourne entries between 1595 and 1635 and nineteen distinct Chadbourne families, but failed to reveal a William with children Humphrey and Patience, as seen in the Kittery family. Probably influenced by the Banks manuscripts at the Library of Congress, Libby, Noyes, and Davis went on to mention Tamworth, Staffordshire, a parish about 90 miles north of Winchcombe, in their Chadbourne entry.

That Tamworth was the true origin of the American Chadbournes was communicated sometime before April, 1959, by R.O. Wilson, then living in Richmond, Surrey, England, to the late Fred Babson Chadbourne of New York, New York, who hired Noel Currer-Briggs to look into the matter. Here we find the names Patience, Humprey, and William as children of a William Chadbourne, the exact combination which appears in the records of Maine, and this family disappears from English records at precisely the time we would expect the immigrants to Maine to do so. A short manuscript synopsis of Currer-Briggs' work was compiled by Fred B. Chadbourne in May of 1959 and circulated privately to interested family members.

In 1972 the will of Robert Chadbourne of Tamworth, father of the immigrant William, was abstracted and published by Noel Currer-Briggs on page 80 in his English Wills of Colonial Families, (Cottonport, La.: Polyanthos, 1972). Since that time, several people have published sketchy outlines of the correct Chadbourne pedigree, most notably Helen and Evelyn Stager of Luverne, Minnesota (A Family Odyssey, The Ancestors and Descendants of Joseph Harrison and Ada Belle (Marsh) Stager [Pipestone, Minn.: The Authors, 1983]).

Tamworth straddles the border between Staffordshire and Warwickshire, but since the parish church of St Editha, where William Chadbourne's family was recorded, is in the Staffordshire part of the city, references to Tamworth here will use Staffordshire for consistency. It is noted, however, that Robert Chadbourne, in his will, states his residence as Tamworth in Warwickshire, and it may be that the family resided in that portion of the parish.

view all 19

Patience Spencer's Timeline

1611
1611
Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
1612
November 8, 1612
Tamworth, Staffordshire, England
November 8, 1612
Tamworth, Warwickshire, England
November 8, 1612
Saint Editha's, Tamworth, Staffordshire, England
1630
1630
Age 17
England
1631
1631
Age 18
England
1633
1633
Age 20
South Berwick, York, Maine, United States
1634
1634
Age 21
York, Maine
1636
1636
Age 23
South Berwick, York, Maine
1638
1638
Age 25
South Berwick, York, Maine, United States