Patrick de Dunbar, Earl of Dunbar (1213 - 1289) MP

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Nicknames: "10497"
Birthplace: Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Death: Died in Whittingham, Suffolk, England
Occupation: 6th Earl of Dunbar
Managed by: Maria Edmonds-Zediker, Volunteer Curator
Last Updated:

About Patrick de Dunbar, Earl of Dunbar

Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar was born circa 1213.1 He was the son of Patrick de Dunbar, 5th Earl of Dunbar and Euphemia Stewart.1 He married Cecil Fraser, daughter of John Fraser, in 1242.2 He died on 24 August 1289 at Whittingham, Suffolk, England.1

He succeeded to the title of 6th Earl of Dunbar [Scotland., c. 1115] in 1248.2 He was a member of a pro-English group among the Scots nobility, as which managed to get the boy King Alexander III away from the dominance of the Comyn family.2 He held the office of Regent of Scotland in 1255.2 He fought in the Battle of Largs in 1263 [see below], as commander of a division of the Scottish army in the victory over Norsemen.2

Children of Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar and Cecil Fraser

  • Cecilia de Dunbar3
  • Patrick de Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar+1 b. c 1242, d. 10 Oct 1308

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 506. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1207. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 214. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

The Battle of Largs

The Battle of Largs (2 October 1263) was an indecisive engagement between the kingdoms of Norway and Scotland near Largs, Scotland. The conflict formed part of the Norwegian expedition against Scotland in 1263, in which Hakon Hakonarson, King of Norway attempted to reassert Norwegian sovereignty over the western seaboard of Scotland. Since the beginning of the 12th century this region had lain within the Norwegian realm, ruled by magnates who recognised the overlordship of the Kings of Norway. However, in the mid-13th century, two Scottish kings, Alexander II and his son Alexander III, attempted to incorporate the region into their own realm. Following failed attempts to purchase the islands from the Norwegian king, the Scots launched military operations. Hakon responded to the Scottish aggression by leading a massive fleet from Norway, which reached the Hebrides in the summer of 1263. By the end of September, Hakon's fleet occupied the Firth of Clyde, and when negotiations between the kingdoms broke down, he brought the bulk of his fleet to anchor off The Cumbraes.

On the night of 30 September, during a bout of particularly stormy weather, several Norwegian vessels were driven aground on the Ayrshire coast, near the present-day town of Largs. On 2 October, while the Norwegians were salvaging their vessels, the main Scottish army arrived on the scene. Composed of infantry and cavalry, the Scottish force was commanded by Alexander of Dundonald, Steward of Scotland. The Norwegians were gathered in two groups: the larger main force on the beach and a small contingent atop a nearby mound. The advance of the Scots threatened to divide the Norwegian forces, so the contingent upon the mound ran to rejoin their comrades on the beach below. Seeing them running from the mound, the Norwegians on the beach believed they were retreating, and fled back towards the ships. Fierce fighting took place on the beach, and the Scots took up a position on the mound formerly held by the Norwegians. Late in the day, after several hours of skirmishing, the Norwegians were able to recapture the mound. The Scots withdrew from the scene and the Norwegians were able to reboard their ships. They returned the next morning to collect their dead. The weather was deteriorating, and Hakon's demoralised forces turned for home. Hakon's campaign had failed to maintain Norwegian overlordship of the seaboard, and his native magnates, left to fend for themselves, were soon forced to submit to the Scots. Three years after the battle, with the conclusion of the Treaty of Perth, Magnus Hakonarson, King of Norway ceded Scotland's western seaboard to Alexander III, and thus the centuries-old territorial dispute between the consolidating kingdoms was at last settled.

Although the Battle of Largs was apparently not considered a significant event by contemporaries, later partisan historians transformed it into an event of international importance. Today, most scholars no longer subscribe to such a view, and instead accord it just an important place in the failed Norwegian campaign.

The battle is commemorated in Largs in the form of an early 20th-century monument and the festivities which have been held there annually since the 1980s.

-------------------- Patrick III, 7th Earl of Dunbar[1](c1213 - August 24, 1289) was lord of the feudal barony of Dunbar and its castle, which dominated East Lothian, and the most important military personage in the Scottish Borders.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_III,_Earl_of_Dunbar -------------------- Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar1 M, #186457, b. circa 1213, d. 24 August 1289

Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar|b. c 1213\nd. 24 Aug 1289|p18646.htm#i186457|Patrick de Dunbar, 5th Earl of Dunbar|d. bt May 1248 - Dec 1248|p18646.htm#i186460|Eupheme FitzAlan|d. c 1267|p18647.htm#i186461|Patrick de Dunbar, 4th Earl of Dunbar|b. 1152\nd. 31 Dec 1232|p10781.htm#i107802|Ada of Scotland|b. b 1174\nd. 1200|p10781.htm#i107801|Walter fitz Alan, 1st Great Steward of Scotland|d. c 1177|p405.htm#i4047||||

Last Edited=15 Aug 2009

    Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar was born circa 1213.1 He was the son of Patrick de Dunbar, 5th Earl of Dunbar and Eupheme FitzAlan.1 He married Cecil Fraser, daughter of John Fraser, in 1242. He died on 24 August 1289 at Whittingham, Suffolk, England.1
    Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar was commander a div of the Scottish army in the victory over Norsemen at Largs 1263.2 He gained the title of 6th Earl of Dunbar. In 1249 memb of a pro-English group among the Scots nobility, as which managed to get the boy King ALEXANDER III (reigned /6) away from the dominance of the Comyn family, becoming in consequence 1255 Regent of Scotland and Guardian to ALEXANDER III and hi.2

Child of Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar and Cecil Fraser Patrick de Dunbar, 7th Earl of Dunbar+ b. c 1242, d. 10 Oct 13081 Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 506. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1207. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_III%2C_Earl_of_Dunbar -------------------- Patrick III, Earl of Dunbar From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia • Learn more about using Wikipedia for research • Patrick III, 7th Earl of Dunbar[1](c1213 - August 24, 1289) was lord of the feudal barony of Dunbar and its castle, which dominated East Lothian, and the most important military personage in the Scottish Borders.

Background

Said to be aged 35 in 1248,[2] he was the son of Patrick II, Earl of Dunbar (by Eupheme de Brus), who was son of Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Waltheof, Earl of Dunbar, who was descendant in male line of Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by Patrick IV, Earl of March. [edit]Career

Patrick did homage for his lands in England to King Henry III in 1249. The earl was part of the English faction who opposed the Comyns and in 1255 he and others procured the dismissal of the Comyns and their faction from power. The same year he was nominated Regent and Guardian of the King and Queen. In 1258 the Comyn's faction prevailed, and Earl Patrick was excluded from the government.[3] In 1263 he founded a monastery for the Carmelites or White Friars in Dunbar; and led the left division of the Scottish army at the battle of Largs the same year. In 1266 when Magnus V of Norway ceded the Isle of Man and the Hebrides to King Alexander III of Scotland, the Earl of Dunbar's seal appears on the treaty, signed in Norway in 1266. Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, was second in the list of thirteen earls who signed the marriage contract of Princess Margaret of Scotland and King Eric of Norway in 1281. In 1284 he attended the parliament at Scone which declared the Princess Margaret of Norway to be heiress to the Scottish Crown. He died at Whittingehame, and was buried at Dunbar, East Lothian.[4]

Marriage

He married before 1240, Cecily, daughter of John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth, Northumberland (d.1240),[5] [6] and had five known children: Patrick IV, Earl of March, a 'Competitor'[7] (1242 - 1308), son and heir. Sir John de Dunbar, Knt.[8] Sir Alexander de Dunbar, Knt.[9] Agnes de Dunbar, who married Christell de Seton, 'in Jedburgh Forrest' (d.c1300)[10] Cecily (or Cecilia) de Dunbar, who married Sir James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.[11][12] -------------------- In 1263 he founded a monastery for the Carmelites or White Friars in Dunbar; and led the left division of the Scottish army at the battle of Largs the same year. In 1266 when Magnus V of Norway ceded the Isle of Man and the Hebrides to King Alexander III of Scotland, the Earl of Dunbar's seal appears on the treaty, signed in Norway in 1266.

Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, was second in the list of thirteen earls who signed the marriage contract of Princess Margaret of Scotland and King Eric of Norway in 1281. In 1284 he attended the parliament at Scone which declared the Princess Margaret of Norway to be heiress to the Scottish Crown.

-------------------- Patrick III, 7th Earl of Dunbar[1] (c. 1213 – 24 August 1289) was lord of the feudal barony of Dunbar and its castle, which dominated East Lothian, and the most important military personage in the Scottish Borders.

Said to be aged 35 in 1248,[2] he was the son of Patrick II, Earl of Dunbar (by Eupheme de Brus), who was son of Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Waltheof, Earl of Dunbar, who was descendant in male line of Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by Patrick IV, Earl of March.

Patrick did homage for his lands in England to King Henry III in 1249. The earl was part of the English faction who opposed the Comyns and in 1255 he and others procured the dismissal of the Comyns and their faction from power. The same year he was nominated Regent and Guardian of the King and Queen. In 1258 the Comyn's faction prevailed, and Earl Patrick was excluded from the government.[2]

In 1263 he founded a monastery for the Carmelites or White Friars in Dunbar; and led the left division of the Scottish army at the battle of Largs the same year. In 1266 when Magnus V of Norway ceded the Isle of Man and the Hebrides to King Alexander III of Scotland, the Earl of Dunbar's seal appears on the treaty, signed in Norway in 1266.

Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, was second in the list of thirteen earls who signed the marriage contract of Princess Margaret of Scotland and King Eric of Norway in 1281. In 1284 he attended the parliament at Scone which declared the Princess Margaret of Norway to be heiress to the Scottish Crown.

He died at Whittingehame, and was buried at Dunbar, East Lothian.[2]

He married firstly, before 1240, Cecily, daughter of John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth, Northumberland (died 1240),[2][3]

He married secondly Christiana,[4][5][6] daughter of Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, the 'Competitor' (1210–1295),[7] and had five known children:

Patrick IV, Earl of March, a 'Competitor'[8] (1242–1308), son and heir. Sir John de Dunbar, Knt.[9] Sir Alexander de Dunbar, Knt.[10] Agnes de Dunbar, who married Christell de Seton, 'in Jedburgh Forrest' (died c. 1300)[11] Cecily (or Cecilia) de Dunbar, who married Sir James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.[12][13] Preceded by Patrick II Earl of Dunbar 1248–1289 Succeeded by Patrick IV

More research needs to done on Patrick III Earl of Dunbar. The marriages listed above are not consistent with known records. His mother was Cecily (wife of Patrick II). His wife and mother of Cecily of Dunbar that married Alexander Steward was Marjory Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn Earl of Buchan. This raises serious questions as to his taking sides against the Clan Comyns and their power for he had married one them and had several children.

Notes^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md., 2005, p.209, ISBN 0-8063-1759-0 ^ a b c d Richardson (2005) p.209 ^ Foster, Joseph, editor, The Visitation of Yorkshire 1584/5, & 1612 by Robert Glover, Somerset Herald, and Henry St.George, Norroy King of Arms, London, 1875:609 ^ Harvey, Charles C.H., & MacLeod, John, editors,Calendar of Writs preserved at Yester House 1166-1625, Scottish Record Society, Edinburgh, 1930, p.8, no.14, for a Charter of circa 1240-1248 by "Cristiana de Brus Comitissa de Dunbar". ^ Miller, James, The History of Dunbar, Dunbar, 1830, p.24, where she is named "Christian, only daughter of 'the Competitor', Robert Bruce" ^ Burke, Sir Bernard, Ulster King of Arms, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, London, 1883, p.606, which gives this lady the name of 'Christiana' and states that she is the daughter of Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale ^ Fiona Watson, "Dunbar, Patrick, eighth earl of Dunbar or of March, and earl of Moray (1285–1369)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, October 2005 accessed 29 September 2008 ^ Dunbar, Sir Alexander H., Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899:87 - 93 and 282 ^ Miller, James, The History of Dunbar, Dunbar, 1830: 24 ^ Miller (1830) p.24 ^ Richard Maitland of Lethington, Knt., The Genealogy of the House and Surname of Setoun", 1561 reprint, Edinburgh, 1830 ^ Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713. ^ Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England Scotland and Wales, with Their Descendants etc., London, 1851, volume 2, page xlvi.

References: Burke, Sir Bernard, Ulster King of Arms, Burke's Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, London, 1883, p. 606.

--------------------



Notes ◦1 - 1263 Commanded a division in the battle of Largs

2 - Battle of the Largs
1 October 1283: Invasion of Scotland by Haakon, King of Norway, attacked on the beaches by gathering Scottish forces, beginning the Battle of the Largs.
5 October 1283: Norwegians abandon invasion of Scotland, leaving ships and wounded on the beach.
Despite the victory of Brian Boru over the Danes in Ireland in 1014, the Scandinavian incursions into the Celtic nations took a long time to fade away. It would be nearly 270 years after the Battle of Clontarf before the Scandinavians' last hurrah in the spectacular Battle of the Largs.
In the year 1283 the English were just consolidating their conquest of Wales with the execution on 3 October of Dafydd, the last native Prince of Wales. The power of Norway still dominated the North Sea and reached around the coast of Scotland into the Irish Sea, hedging the growing power of Scotland with a chain of island possessions that included the Orkneys, Shetland, the Hebrides, and the Isle of Mann.
When Scotland's boy king Alexander III turned 21 in 1262, one of his first acts was to try to purchase the Hebrides from Norway. The offer was refused, but when the Earl of Ross led a bloody raid on the Norwegian-held Isle of Skye, the Norwegian King Haakon prepared for an armed showdown with Scotland.
Haakon assembled a fleet of 100 ships, the largest armada yet seen in those waters, and was joined by Magnus, the King of Mann, along with other Scandinavian jarls. But after wasting the summer in fruitless sparring and maneuvering, Haakon divided his forces, sending most of the Manx fleet off on coastal raids and dispatching 40 other ships to be dragged overland and floated in Loch Lomond, a novel if pointless tour de force.
King Alexander in the meantime was biding his time, keeping his field armies intact behind a defensive screen of castles. The opportunity he was waiting for came at last on 1 October, when the first storms of autumn forced Haakon to decide between abandoning the campaign or chancing a risky landing on the Scottish coast. Haakon chose to go for the landing. The Norwegians struggled through the storm-roiled surf on the west coast of Scotland only to be met on the beaches by a Scottish vanguard of archers and mailed knights, who commenced a running battle with the Norwegians on 2 October.
The bedraggled Norwegians were in no shape to deal with a hot landing zone, but found themselves unable to put back out to sea due to the worsening weather. They were equally unable to gain a secure beachhead for themselves in the face of the growing numbers of Scots that Alexander dispatched from their inland bases as soon as he learned of the Norwegian predicament. After some 72 hours of debilitating and almost continuous combat, the weather lifted just enough to enable the remaining Norwegians to make a hasty evacuation, leaving most of their dead and wounded on beaches lit by the burning hulks of their ships.
The Battle of the Largs marked the rise of independent Scotland and the terminal decline of Norway's North Sea hegemony. The victory was followed by the death of Haakon, Norway's cessation of the Hebrides to Scotland, and the Scottish takeover of the Orkneys and the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles. Scotland eventually gained Shetland too, as a wedding present, but that is a story for another day.
[ http://www.celticleague.org/ ]
3 - Mentioned in the Nigel Tranter novel "True Thomas" about the life of Thomas Learmonth of Ercildoune who married Bethoc, Sir Patrick's eldest daughter. The novel shows his wife as Christian Bruce, sister of Robert Bruce of Annandale, and suggests she is also the mother of all of Earl Patrick's children.

 

Sources 1.[S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

2.[S260] Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain 2001, Peter Beauclerk Dewar,, (2001.)

3.[S299] David Douglas, Douglas, Sir Robert, (David Douglas)

4.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Dunbar01: (Reliability: 3)

5.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Dunbar01 (Reliability: 3)




      
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Patrick de Dunbar, 6th Earl of Dunbar's Timeline

1213
December 13, 1213
Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
1242
1242
Age 28
Dunbar - son of Patrick 7th Earl of Dunbar
1242
Age 28
Dunbar, East Lothian, , Scotland
1242
Age 28
1271
1271
Age 57
1289
August 24, 1289
Age 75
Whittingham, Suffolk, England
August 24, 1289
Age 75
Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
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