Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen (c.1625 - 1717) MP

public profile

44

匹配

0 0 44
Adds more complete birth date, more complete birth place, more complete death place, more complete burial place, residence, sibling(s), spouse(s)child(ren).

View Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen
  • Request to view Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen's family tree

分享

Related Projects

Nicknames: "Paulus Martenese /Van Benthuysen/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Benthuizen, South Holland, Netherland
Death: Died in Albany, NY, USA
Occupation: wheelwright and/or windowmaker
Managed by: Della Dale Smith
Last Updated:

About Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen

Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen may have arrived in New Netherland in 1654. By the end of the decade, he had settled in Beverwyck* where he was known as Paulus Martense. He was the patriarch of the early Albany family known as Van Benthuysen. About 1660 he married Catharina Van Kleeck of Harleem, North Holland, Netherlands. They were married in Flatbush, NY. The marriage produced several children who survived to adulthood. He was a member of the Albany Dutch Church. He was known as a wheelwright and/or windowmaker. He lived at several locations in Albany and was an active buyer and seller of properties within the stockade. He lived on Market Street before he sold the property to Harme Gansevoort in 1677. In 1679, his name appeared on a census of Albany householders. In 1697 his household included Catharina and one child. Two years later, signed an oath pledging allegiance to the King of England. In 1702 his first ward house was assessed at ten pounds. In 1683 he was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ (Dutch Reformed) in Albany. On October 17, he was invited to the funeral of Jeremiah Van Renssellaer, Director of Renssellaerswyck Colony. The list of those invited to the funeral was later photographed and a copy (with his name on it) is hanging on the wall of the office of the Holland Society in New York. Later in life he engaged in farming, and in 1694 and 1695 he is shown as Inspector of Supplies for Albany County.

Source: http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/albany/bios/vb/pamvbt.html

Other source material came from a book called, "The Van Benthuysen Genealogy", by Alvin Seaward Van Benthuysen and Edith M. McIntosh Hall, published in 1953 by Wilson Engraving and Printing Company, Clay Center, KS

  • Beverwyck is the popular and mythical name given to the community of fur traders that first emerged along the river to the north of Fort Orange during the 1640's. The name came into official use in 1652 when the Dutch West India Company established a judicial jurisdiction for the land north of the trading post/fort. That act began a legacy of home rule for Albany that was primarily responsible for its development into a pre-urban center. Immediately following, the first houselots were parcelled out. By the end of the decade, a long palisade had enclosed the settlement. Anchored by an increasingly broad range of issues that were considered by the Beverwyck court, by 1660 that community had achieved a commercial, production, and services identity that would make it increasingly different from surrounding Rensselaerswyck - basically a plantation of small farms and budding processing operations. Although the Indian fur trade was at the heart of the community economy, a diversity of functions characterized the settlement from its earliest days. during the 1650's, Beverwyck couples began to raise large families that would give the growing settlement its cultural character for much of the next century. By 1660, the fur trade had become so competitive that groups of traders were petitioning the court regarding conflicting visions of the fur trading process. In 1664, New Netherland fell to the English and Beverwyck was renamed "Albany". The Beverwyck court was continued as the court of Albany, Rensselaerswyck, and Schenectady. In 1673, New York was retaken by the Dutch and Albany was called "Williamstadt". The English regained jurisdiction in 1674 and the community has been called Albany ever since! Today the names of many Albany-area places, organizations, and things recall the community's earliest incarnation. In 2002, a year-long commemoration marked the 350th anniversary of Beverwyck's formal establishment. The term "Beverwyck" has several folk origins and means different things to different people. It also has been variously spelled. The colonial Albany Social History Project has adopted the spelling used on this page for the sake of accessibility and because it is the spelling most frequently encountered in historical resources!

Sources: The comprehensive and most readable source on the community is the new book by Janny Vanema entitled Beverwijck: A Dutch Village on the American Frontier, 1652-1664 - a must read for all students and comparable to the best work on other early American communities. Thankfully, it is destined to serve as a primer for our subsequent work on Albany's ancestor! Also accessible in print is Janny Venema, "Poverty and Charity in Seventeenth-Century Beverwijck/Albany, 1652-1700", New York History (October 1999). The distribution of lots within Beverwyck is considered in detail by Venema in Beverwijck. Her exposition is aided and supported by several diagram maps.

website: http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/albany/beverwyck.html

查看所有12

Paulus Martense Van Benthuysen's Timeline

1625
1625
Benthuizen, South Holland, Netherland
1660
1660
Age 35
Flatbush, Kings, New York
1661
March 8, 1661
Age 36
Albany, Albany, New York
1664
1664
Age 39
Albany, Albany, New York
1664
Age 39
Albany, Albany, New York
1670
1670
Age 45
Albany, NY
1674
1674
Age 49
Albany, Albany, New York
1675
1675
Age 50
Albany, Albany, New York
1679
1679
Age 54
Albany, Albany, New York
1717
1717
Age 92
Albany, NY, USA