Peleg Tripp, Sr.

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Peleg Tripp, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island, Colonial America
Death: Died in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island, Colonial America
Immediate Family:

Son of John Tripp, of Portsmouth, Rhode Island; John Tripp; Mary Tripp and Mary Paine Tripp
Husband of Anne Tripp
Father of Priscilla Tripp; John Tripp; Mehitable Tripp; Sarah Rogers; Job Tripp, Sr. and 5 others
Brother of John Tripp; Joseph Tripp; Mary Gatchell; Samuel Tripp; Elizabeth Hall and 7 others

Occupation: Surveyor / Constable / Town counsellor / Deputy to General Assembly
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Peleg Tripp, Sr.

SOURCE: Type: Periodical

Title: The Genealogist

Author: Neil D. Thompson(editor)

Publication: Association for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, New York, New York

BIOGRAPHY: #7 & #8 - Had nine children. Lived at Dartmouth MA and Portsmouth RI. He was very active in town affairs: constable in 1667, surveyor of highways 1672-3, member of the Town Council in 1667-9 and 1683, and Deputy from Portsmouth to the General Assembly in 1680, 1681 and 1686. InJanuary 1678 he was a member of a committee to audit and adjudge all accountsbetween Newport and Portsmouth "relating and growing only by reason of the lateIndian wars". In 1681 he helped work out the assessments; in 1684 he was Overseer of the Poor and a member of several commissions dealing directly with the Governor of Rhode Island. In 1687, during the Andros administration, he was on acommittee to assess taxes on the real estate of Rochester, alias Kingstown. Heis called "Mr." and on occasion "Major" in the records.

BIOGRAPHY: Copied from Internet - Herman William Tripp Remembering:

BIOGRAPHY: 1. Peleg TRIPP was born in 1642 in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island. He died on 13 Jan1714 in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island. He was christened. Peleg Tripp is my 7th Great Grandfather References: Randall, Peleg manuscript from the New Bedford Library; Breffni Wheland, decendant who specializes on daughters andtheir offspring; Peleg Tripp was child number 2 of John Tripp the Founder. I donot know where this name came from, but it was quite prevalent in the 16 and 17 hundreds.( I have since learned from my first cousin Frances Tripp Conyers that the name came from the bible. She has also contributed much information, particularly for editing. Peleg received from his father, while John was still living, one quarter section of land that John had purchased from John Alden. PelegTripp married Anne Sisson and had 10 children, including Job who was my directancestor. Peleg was left only 5 pounds sterling in John's will because John had already deeded land to him prior to his death. Herman William Tripp--Remembering----Grandpa Peleg

BIOGRAPHY: The following is typed verbatim from Valentine Research Studio, of Washington D.C., written by Caroline Valentine, and published in 1932. Page 67. The year before the death (1677) of John Tripp the Founder, Peleg, the second son of John the Founder, appears on the town Council, at the age of 35. In the October meeting of this year, his brother, Joseph, waschosen "to bee of the jury for the Court of Tryalls". Peleg was at once placedon a committee, and set at work for the Colony. In 1678, Peleg, Will Wodell andJacob Mott are on the town Council. At this time, Abiel, next younger, is admitted to be a Freeman of Portsmouth. The Tripp Boys are coming on. A special Town Meeting in December puts the town in touch with the General Assembly. The town has been "warned" to meet, "to here the Acts and Orders of the Court of Generall Assembly (held in October last) read, and also to make a rate of sixty eight pounds." "This, by the said court was ordered for this Towne of Portsmouth topay, as their part and share of A Colony Rate of three hundred pounds, etc."

Will of Peleg Tripp, dated 6 Nov 1713; proved 8 Feb 1714.

   Executrix wife Anne.
   Overseer, kinsman William Sanford.
   To wife, dwelling house and a third of great orchard for life and my garden
   and L18 yearly for life paid by son John.
   To daughter Priscilla Tripp, L15.
   To daughter Sarah Rogers, L15.
   To son Job, rest of land where I dwell, he paying rents and legacies and at
   death of wife he to have other land, great scales, weights and bed.
   To son Peleg, 5s.
   To daughter-in-law Sarah Tripp, 1s.
   To daughter Mary Smith, 10s.
   To daughter Anne Rogers, 10s., and land in Portsmouth.
   To daughter Mehitable Thurston, 10s.
   To daughter Priscilla Tripp, feather bed, &c.
   To wife Anne, 14 acres.
   To son Richard, land in Dartmouth, he paying his mother L 5, yearly.
   To wife Anne, rest of moveable estate, money, cattle, sheep , swine, household
   goods, &c.
   To overseer, 20s.

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Peleg TRIPP was born in 1642 in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island. He died on 13 Jan 1714 in Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island. He was christened. References: Randall, Peleg manuscript from the New Bedford Library; Breffni Wheland, decendant who made many contributions to John and their offspring; Peleg Tripp was child number 2 of John Tripp the Founder. I do not know where this name came from, but it was quite prevalent in the 16 and 17 hundreds. Peleg received from his father, while John was still living, one quarter section of land that John had purchased from John Alden. Peleg Tripp married Anne Sisson and had 10 children. Peleg was left only 5 pounds sterling in John's will because John had already deeded land to him prior to his death. Herman William Tripp--Remembering----Grandpa Peleg The following is typed verbatim from Valentine Research Studio, of Washington D.C., written by Caroline Valentine, and published in 1932. Page 67. The year before the death (1677) of John Tripp the Founder, Peleg, the second son of John the Founder, appears on the town Council, at the age of 35. In the October meeting of this year, his brother, Joseph, was chosen "to bee of the jury for the Court of Tryalls". Peleg was at once placed on a committee, and set at work for the Colony. In 1678, Peleg, Will Wodell and Jacob Mott are on the town Council. At this time, Abiel, next younger, is admitted to be a Freeman of Portsmouth. The Tripp Boys are coming on. A special Town Meeting in December puts the town in touch with the General Assembly. The town has been "warned" to meet, "to here the Acts and Orders of the Court of Generall Assembly (held in October last) read, and also to make a rate of sixty eight pounds." "This, by the said court was ordered for this Towne of Portsmouth to pay, as their part and share of A Colony Rate of three hundred pounds, etc." Joseph and six others were to handle this assessment and to deliver their report "within one moneth next after the date of this meeting, unto the magestrate of this Towne, for him to take care of and to give for this warrant to the Towne Serjeant for the warning of all persons concerned to pay their parts. Rated according to court order". In January, Peleg was placed on a committee even more important. Its duty was to audit and adjudge all accounts pending between Newport and Portsmouth, "Relating and only growing by Reason of the late Indian wars". This Committee was also "to dispose of Indians for this Town's use according to the General Assembly's order". It appears that immediately on John Tripp's death, his son Peleg was chosen to fill his place. For, it was in December 1679 that Peleg was first sent as deputy to the next General Assembly, Like his father, he was held also to his work on the Town Coucil. This was feasible, because the Assembly sessions were very short. Twice, in 1680, Peleg was selected as deputy; as also once in 1681; and again June, 1683. In 1681 Peleg and Will Wodell helped work out the rates or assessments; the same two were on the 1884 committee. In this year, Peleg took his father's place as overseer of the Poor. By September of this year, "Major Peleg and others had procured a writing as "A confirmation or Enlargement of the Estate or Right of this Island with Intention of good to both Towns on the Island, and all the Freeholders therein". It was proposed (probably by Newport that Portsmouth should appoint a committee "to inspect the Said writing and to consult and advise with the procurers therof, how the Estate therin and therby procured may best be Conveyed to the Town in Generall." The public life of Peleg Tripp seems to have been more important than that of his father. The records indicate that he served his generation in the company of the strong men of his own and the other towns of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations, and gave added strenth to the Asssembly. A practical surveyor, he was ordered by the assembly to run the westerly line in 1680, when acting as Deputy for Portsmouth; this work to be done in conjuncion with Captain John Albro. "And the charges", says the report with definiteness", shall both to themselves and such as they shall employ in that worke, shall be trully borne and paid by the Generall Treasury of this Collony. And they are to begin and proceed in the premises, with what speed may bee, and make a true returne of what they doe therein, unto the next Generall assembly". It was formally voted also: "That the Recorder doe forthwith transcribe the acts of this Assembly for running the Westerly line of his Collony, and affix the seale of the Collony thereto, and deliver the same unto Captain John Albro and Mr. Peleg Tripp, or either of them". No sooner was the Assembly in session in March, 1680, than an immediate, serious and unexpected situation caused grave concern to the deputies. On the tenth of the month, at the initial session the Governor was chosen moderator. Apparently, the one mater disposed of before adjournment was the appointment of a committee "to bee assistant to the governor--to considerr of and to draw up an answer to the twenty-seven queries sent from the Lord of His Majesty's most Honorable Privy Council, to this Collony, and return what they draw up to this Assembly for their consideration and approbation". This committee of Governor's Assistants numbered seventeen Deputies, including the Deputy Governor, Mr. Peleg Tripp, Captain John Greene, and Captain John Foanes. Governor Cranston, however, was soon to be beyond the need of assistants. On the very next day the records show him "By God's Providence, soe visitted with sickness that he is detained from the Assembly". Matters "of greate concerne to this Collony, for which the Assembly was called, that are of necessity to be resolved by the Assembly" demanding immediate attention, the Deputy Govenor was appointed interim Moderator. After a four day interval, that is on the fifteenth of March, "The Assembly called and satt". Its one order of business was to vote adjournment for the day in order to attend the funeral of Governor John Cranston. But the business of the Assembly was pressing. On the next day, therfore, Major Peleg Sanford was "chosen Governor and engaged in open Assembly." After the new governor was duly chosen moderator, it was voted: "The Deputy Governor, Captain Arthur Fenner, Mr. John Coggeshall, Captain Randall Howlden, Mr. Peleg Tripp and John Sanford are chosen a Committee to goe to Mrs. Mary Cranston, widow of our late deceased, honored Governor Cranston, esquire, for the charter and all other writeings belonging to the Collony, that were in the late Governor Cranston's custody, and have power to give the said Mrs. Cranston a full discharge in behalfe of this Assembly for what they receive; who are to returne the same to this assembly forwith". At the expiration of the "forthwith" period, it was voted that the Committee, having returned to the Assembly the charter and other articles, "this Assembly have received them; and they are in this present assembly delivered to the present Governor's custody". This gets them, formally, out of the Assembly's care. On the twenty-ninth of June, 1686, Mr. Peleg Tripp again sitting in the Asssembly for the town of Portsmouth (with Mr. John Coggeshall, Mr. William Wodell and Mr. Robert Hodgson) the Assembly considered a writ of "Quo Warranto" from His Majesty. "This Assembly" the records say, "upon the serious consideration of the above said premise, do hereby order, publish and declare that they have determined not to stand suit with His Majesty, but to proceed by our humble address to his Majesty to continue our privileges and liberties according to our charter, formerly granted by his late Majesty, Charles the Second, of blessed memory." Whereupon the assembly orderd that this act should be published "forthwith" in three "convenient places for that end", in Newport, "and the same to be done by the Recorder, with the Generall and Town Sergeant, and the beat of the drum". Later, it was voted: "That a Committee be chosen and empowered by this Assembly, they or the major part of them, on this Collony's behalf, to draw up our humble address to his Majesty our Sovereign Lord, the King, and to take speedy and effectual care for the safe conveyance thereof by way of Boston and York. And also to procure a messenger as soon as they can, to go for "England; and to draw up letters to the Governor of York, to President Dudley, and to Esquire Randolph." The persons chosen and empowered are: "our Honored Governor and Deputy Governor, for Newport; Mr. Joseph Jencks, for Providence; Mr. peleg Tripp and the Recorder, for Portsmouth; Major John Green, for Warwick." The importance of the subject matter and the standing of the other members of the Committee, with the added fact that Peleg Tripp was chosen when John Coggeshall was available, are an earnest of the esteem and confidence reposed in Peleg Tripp, the second son of John of Portsmouth. Born near 1642, at Portsmouth, Peleg early bought from his father one-fourth of the tract which John had from John Alden. Thus, he became also "of Dartmouth", on the eighth of September, 1665. In some way, the vital records of his immediate descendants were destroyed, so that we must depend chiefly for these upon his will, made in 1713, and proved February 8, 1714 Peleg married Anne Sisson, who brought him nine children. His will names first his son Job. In order, follow Priscilla Tripp; Sara Rogers; Peleg Tripp; Daughter in-law Sara Tripp; daughters Mary Smith, Anne Rogers and Mehitable Thurston; son Richard, who with Anne Rogers received land in Portsmouth. Anne, the widow, received the dwelling house and one third "of great orchard for life and my garden and L18 yearly for life paid by my son Job." This favored son received "rest of land where I dwell, he paying rents and legacies and at death of wife he to have other land", etc. Fourteen acres of land were added to the orchard provision for the widow, Anne. Richard, too, was to pay Anne L5 yearly tax on his Dartmouth legacy. The daughter-in-law, Sarah, named in Peleg's will was of Adam Mott's family, her mother having been at marriage Mary Lott, whom the first Adam Mott brought from England, when he came to America. Mary (Lott) Mott's interesting will appears elsewhere. She was Adam's step-daughter. That Good government was coming to be a part of the daily task of John Tripp's sons, as the years passed, their records attest. The Tripps, being "Gentlemen", of course married, at first, strictly within their class. The Founder, although a carpenter, must have had means, as the English idea of a "Gentleman" included also the possession of sufficient money to live as befitted his social position. The ancestral wills too, show the possession of many estates. Peleg's descendants took over an entire County almost, very early and later produced a candidate for the Presidency of the United States, Warren G. Harding, elected twice to that office. Moreover, a son of the first Tripp- Harding alliance married back into the Tripp blood; Bock: (Austin 208; Randall, James Tripp 5-7). Herman William Tripp--Remembering----7th Great Grandfather Peleg He was married to Ann SISSON in 1666.

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Peleg Tripp's will was made in 1713 and proved 8 Feb 1714. He was a deputy at Portsmouth. The line of descent from Peleg Tripp and Ann Sisson to Warren Gamaliel Harding, 29th President of the United States, is as follows:

1) Job Tripp m. Elizabeth Sweet

2) Isaac Tripp m. Sarah Sweet

3) William Tripp m. Sarah Slocum

4) Phoebe Tripp (August 17, 1767 - November 2, 1844) m. Amos Harding (March 1764 - July 10, 1839) on August 21, 1784.

5) George Tryon Harding m. Elizabeth Madison

6) Charles Alexander Harding m. Nancy Ann Crawford

7) George Tryon Harding II (June 12, 1844 in Blooming Grove, OH, - November 23, 19280 m. Phoebe Elizabeth Dickerson (Dec. 21, 1843 in North Bloomfield, OH, - May 20, 1920)

8) Warren Gamaliel Harding (Nov. 2, 1865, Blooming Grove, OH - August 2, 1923 San Francisco, CA) m. Florence Mabel Kling (b. August 15, 1860 in Marion OH, d. November 21, 1924) on July 8, 1891.

Warren G. Harding was the 29th president of the United States.

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Peleg Tripp1

M, b. 1642, d. 13 January 1714/15

Peleg Tripp|b. 1642\nd. 13 Jan 1714/15|p99.htm#i424131|John Tripp|b. 6 Feb 1609/10\nd. 12 Feb 1678|p142.htm#i425413|Mary Paine|b. 1611\nd. 12 Feb 1687/88|p115.htm#i424613|||||||Anthony Paine||p23.htm#i421723|Susannah R. Potter||p29.htm#i422016|

    Peleg Tripp Surveyor, constable 1672-3, member of town council 1677-8-9-83, deputy to the General Assembly 1680-1-6.1 He was born in 1642 at Portsmouth, Newport Co., RI.1 He was the son of John Tripp and Mary Paine.1 Peleg Tripp married Anne Sisson between 1665 and 1667 at Portsmouth, Newport Co., RI.1 Peleg Tripp died on 13 January 1714/15 at Portsmouth, Newport Co., RI.1

Children of Peleg Tripp and Anne Sisson

◦John Tripp1 b. c 1667, d. 9 Mar 1686/87

◦Priscilla Tripp1 b. c 1669

◦Sarah Tripp1 b. c 1671

◦Job Tripp+1 b. c 1673, d. 3 Sep 1751

◦Mehitable Tripp+1 b. 6 Jan 1674/75

◦Peleg Tripp1 b. c 1677, d. b Jul 1746

◦Mary Tripp+1 b. 1677, d. 30 Jun 1729

◦Anne Tripp+1 b. c 1679, d. 1736

◦Richard Tripp+1 b. c 1683

Citations

1.Dale Thompson, Tripp Gedcom - D.Thompson.

A Landon Lineage

Person Page - 99

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Acus was son of Benoni Tripp and Elizabeth Mosher who married on 21 Nov 1728 at Little Compton, Newport, RI. Benoni was probably born ca 1706, son of Job Tripp and a first wife who must have married prior to 1706. This wife apparently died and Job married second Elizabeth Sweet, daughter of James Sweet and Jane Browning. Job was the son of Peleg Tripp and Anne Sisson; Peleg the son of John Tripp and Mary Paine.

The children of Job and his first wife are:

1. Job Jr. b 1701

2. Isaac, b 1704, m Sarah Dow

3. Mehitable, bc 1705

4. Benoni, b 1706, m Elizabeth Mosher

5. Ann, bc 1707, m Robert John Moon 1729 Kingston

6. Mary, bc 1709, m John Dawley 1730

7. Phebe, bc 1710, m William Rice 1730

8. William, bc 1712, m Mary Wilcox and Mary Waite

9. Abigail, bc 1713, m Henry Greene and Benjamin Tanner

view all 22

Peleg Tripp, Sr.'s Timeline

196
February 21, 196
1642
1642
Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island, Colonial America
1666
1666
Age 24
1667
1667
Age 25
Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island
1667
Age 25
Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
1669
January 6, 1669
Age 27
Portsmouth, Newport, RI
1669
Age 27
Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island, Colonial America
1672
1672
- 1673
Age 30
Portsmouth, RI, United States
1673
1673
Age 31
Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
1677
1677
Age 35
Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island