John Phillip Overmyer (Obermoyer Overmire) ), Sr.

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About John Phillip Overmyer (Obermoyer Overmire) ), Sr.

Philip's gravestone in the Old Cemetery at Lindsey, Ohio re ads: Philip Obermoyer d. March 24, 1843 "Being in the 7 2 year of his life."

--------------------

From "Overmyer history and genealogy, from 1680 to 1905" By Barnhart B. Overmyer, John C. Overmyer

http://www.archive.org/stream/overmyerhistoryg00over#page/138/mode/2up

PHILLIP (J. G.), third son of John George, the emigrant, and wife, was born in Pennsylvania, September 23rd, 1769.

Of the early life of Phillip we can find but little history, but we have reason to believe that it was uneventful, save the skirmishes which the settlers frequently had with the Indians on the frontier, as it then existed in his native state, and later, when he was about six years old, the Revolution was raging in the colonies and his illustrious father joined the patriot army and helped to free the Colonies from the British yoke, after which he again returned to his family and resumed his labors on the farm. Many incidents of those stirring times were often related by our subject, who knew much from his own memory, and from the stories as he received them from those who bore an active part in the conflict. Phillip learned to read both English and German, but beyond that his education was limited. He married in Pennsylvania, Rosanna Bishoff. They lived in Pennsylvania and had a farm of their own, but for some cause they sold their farm to their son William, and removed from there to near Cayuga Bridge, Aurelius township, Cayuga county, N. Y., about 1826, accompanied by their sons Daniel, George, Jacob and Samuel, and their families, and a son-in-law, John Cox, and his family. They resided there until the spring of 1834. Not having bought farms there, they now decided to make their future homes in Ohio. The families, above named, packed their belongings into the larke oaken chests and leather covered trunks, which may yet be found in some of the homes of the descendants, and hauled them in large wagons to Mt. Union, N. Y., where they loaded them upon canal boats and began their journey towards Buffalo. After a journey of 100 miles by canal they reached Buffalo, and there took pasage on a sail boat on Lake Erie for Sandusky, Ohio. The voyage on Lake Erie was not a pleasant one, and several times the boat stranded, as they were compelled to remain near the shore, and had a heavy load, and when they reached Dunkirk, N. Y., the boat grounded and they were obliged to remain there two or three days and had to unload a part of the cargo to release her. When they reached Huron, Ohio, Samuel and his family, with their household effects, started by wagon across the country, in order to lighten the load on the vessel. When the vessel finally reached Sandusky, all the Overmyer emigrants were sick excepting Sarah, or "Sally," a daughter of Phillip. From Sandusky they came on foot and by wagon, each family finding a home, or a place where they established one, and thus the history of each family begins separately, and will be treated under their respective heads. Phillip and his family located about five miles west of Lower Sandusky (now Fremont), where Nehemiah Engler now lives. Here they engaged in the tavern business, as was the custom with many of the pioneer sellers along the Western Reserve and Maumee Pike. Though the pike was not graded at that time and was a terrible mud road during the most of the year, yet it was the principal thoroughfare in the Northwest. They did not reside at that place very long, but soon erected a log house on some land belonging to Jacob, their son, in the northern part of the present corporation of Lindsey, Ohio, and just across the street from where Jacob Bowersox now resides. Here a comfortable log house, one and one-half stories high, erected of round logs, chinked with mud and sticks, and all the parts that made up the pioneer home were well looked after, and Phillip and his wife moved there and spent their declining years surrounded by their children. He was afflicted with dropsy and was sick for some time and the children and grandchildren would come and take care of him. One night while they were there watching by his bedside, his wife was taken suddenly ill and died May 17th, 1841, in the 62nd year of her age. He afterwards had nearly recovered from his affliction and had his home with his son, Jacob, where Amos Overmyer now lives. Here he died March 24th, 1843, in the 72nd year of his age. Both are interred in the old cemetery at Lindsey. Though no photograph was ever taken of our subject we can get a faint idea of his general appearance from the description given us by his oldest living grandchild, Mrs. S. B. Waggoner, who gave us many of the items set forth in the above sketch. He was a short, heavy-set man, with smooth face, black hair, dark eyes, and a ruddy complexion; was of a very genial, good-natured disposition, a member of the Lutheran church, and always engaged in farming, and always belonged to the Democratic party, until 1820, when Gen. Joseph Heister ran for Governor of Pennsylvania. He being related to Phillip's wife, then he and his family joined the Federalists, and ever after were anti-Democrats. They had the following children:

  • Samuel, born Febraury 24th, 1793; died January 8th, 1862.
  • William, born April 11th, 1795; died August 13th, 1869.
  • Jacob, born July 4th, 1797; died February 3rd, 1863.
  • Daniel, born April 15th, 1799; died June 15th, 1872.
  • Fillip, born August 31st, 1801; died May 20th, 1888.
  • Rossana and Phillip were twins born Aug. 31st, 1801.
  • George, born , 1804; died April 25th, 1857.
  • David, born January 11th, 1808; died January 20th, 1884.
  • Catherine, married John Cox; died in Sandusky county, O.
  • Barbara, married, Martin.
  • Sarah, born February 25th, 1816, married first to John Anderson and second to John Fox. She died November 8th, 1889; is burned in Indiana.

-------------------- SON OF REVOLUTIONARY WAR CAPTAIN JOHN GEORGE OVERMIRE

GREAT GRANDFATHER OF CIVIL WAR COL. JOHN B. OVERMEYER

PIONEER OF SANDUSKY COUNTY, OHIO, 1834

DEMOCRAT, THEN FEDERALIST

-------------------- Resided in Pennsylvania and moved to near Cayiga Bridge, Aurelius township, Cayuga county, New York residing there till spring of 1834 and moved to Sandusky county, Ohio . Lutheran Deomcrat until 1820 and joined the Federalists party.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bennett, Maxine Blankenhorn, The Overmeyer Family, Columbus Junction, IA:Clifford H Bennett, 1985. FHL 929.273 Ov3b

Bennett, Maxine Blankenhorn, The Vogt Family. Columbus Juntion, IA: CliffordH Bennett, 1985. FHL 929.273 V868b

RECORD:

1. Barnhaet B. and John C. Overmyer, Overmyer History and Genealogy 1680 to 1905 (1905, Fremont, Ohio, Cahs. S. Bellman Printer, reprint 1972 Light & Life Press). Light & Life Press, Winona Lake, Indiana Repository:. "PHILLIP (J. G.), third son of John George, the emigrant, and wife, was born in Pennsylvania, September 23rd, 1769. Of the early life of Phillip we can find but little history, but we have reason to believe that it was uneventful, save the skirmishes which the settlers frequently had with the Indians on the frontier, as it then existed in his native state, and later, when he was about six years old, the Revolution was raging in the colonies and his illustrious father joined the patriot army and helped to free the Colonies from the British yoke, after which he again returned to his family and resumed his labors on the farm. Many incidents of those stirring times were often related by our subject, who knew much from his own memory, and from the stories as he received them from those who bore an active part in the conflict. Phillip learned to read both English and German, but beyond that his education was limited. He married in Pennsylvania, Rosanna Bishoff. They lived in Pennsylvania and had a farm of their own, but for some cause they sold their farm to their son William, and removed from there to near Cayuga Bridge, Aurelius township, Cayuga county, N. Y., about 1826, accompanied by their sons Daniel, George, Jacob and Samuel, and their families, and a son-in-law, John Cox, and his family. They resided there until the spring of 1834. Not having bought farms there, they now decided to make their future homes in Ohio. The families, above named, packed their belongings into the larke [large] oaken chests and leather covered trunks, which may yet be found in some of the homes of the descendants, and hauled them in large wagons to Mt. Union, N. Y., where they loaded them upon canal boats and began their journey towards Buffalo. After a journey of 100 miles by canal they reached Buffalo, and there took pasage [passage] on a sail boat on Lake Eire for Sandusky, Ohio. The voyage on Lake Eire was not a pleasant one, and several times the boat stranded, as they were compelled to remain near the shore, and had a heavy load, and when they reached Dunkirk, N. Y., the boat grounded and they were obliged to remain there two or three days and had to unload a part of the cargo to release her. When they reached Huron, Ohio, Samuel and his family, with their household effects, started by wagon across the country, in order to lighten the load on the vessel. When the vessel finally reached Sandusky, all the Overmyer emigrants were sick excepting Sarah, or "Sally", a daughter of Phillip. From Sandusky they came on foot and by wagon each family finding a home, or a place where they established one, and thus the history of each family begins separately, and will be treated under their respective heads. Phillip and his family located about five miles west of Lower Sandusky (now Fremont), where Nehemiah Engler now lives. Here they engaged in the tavern business, as was the custom with many of the pioneer settlers along the Western Reserve and Maumee Pike. Though the Pike was not graded at that time and was a terrible mud road during most of the year, yet it was the principal thoroughfare in the Northwest. They did not reside at that place very long, but soon erected a log house on some land belonging to Jacob, their son, in the northern part of the present corporation of Lindsey, Ohio, and just across the street from Jacob Bowersox now resides. Here a comfortable log house, one and one-half stories high, erected of round logs, chinked with mud and sticks, and all the parts that made up the pioneer home were well looked after, and Phillip and his wife moved there and spent their declining years surrounded by their children. He was afflicted with dropsy and was sick for some time and the children and grandchildren would come and take care of him. One night while they were there watching by his bedside, his wife was taken suddenly ill and died May 17th, 1841, in the 62nd year of her age. He afterwards had nearly recovered from his affliction and had his home with his son, Jacob, where Amos Overmyer now lives. Here he died March 24th, 1843, in the 72nd year of his age. Both are interred in the old cemetery at Lindsey. Though no photograph was ever taken of our subject we can get a faint idea of his general appearance from the description given by his oldest living grandchild, Mrs. S. B. Waggoner, who gave us many of the items set forth in the above sketch. He was a short, heavy-set man, with smooth face, black hair, dark eyes, and a ruddy complexion; was of a very genial, good natured disposition, a member of the Lutheran church, and always engaged in farming, and always belonged to the Democratic party, until 1820, when Gen. Joseph Heister ran for Governor of Pennsylvania. He being related to Phillip's wife, then he and his family joined the Federalist, and ever after were Anti-Democrats. They had the following children:

  • Samuel, born February 24th, 1793; died January 8th, 1862.
  • William, born April 11th, 1795; died August 13th, 1869.
  • Jacob, born July 4th, 1797; died February 3rd, 1863.
  • Daniel, born April 15th, 1799; died June 15th, 1872.
  • Phillip, born August 31st, 1801; died May 20th, 1888.
  • Rosanna and Phillip were twins born August 31st, 1801.
  • George, born ------------, 1804; died April 25th, 1857.
  • David, born January 11th, 1808; died January 20th, 1884.
  • Catherine, married John Cox; died in Sandusky county, O.
  • Barbara, married Martin.
  • Sarah, born February 25th, 1816, married first to John Anderson and second to John Fox. She died November 8th, 1889; is buried in Indiana."

2. Ancestry.com, One World Tree (sm), Name: Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., n.d.;, www.ancestry.com. Source Medium: Ancestry.com. "Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line].Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc."

BIRTH:

3. Ancestry.com, One World Tree (sm), Name: Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., n.d.;, www.ancestry.com. Source Medium: Ancestry.com. "Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line].Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc."

DEATH:

4. Ancestry.com, One World Tree (sm), Name: Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., n.d.;, www.ancestry.com. Source Medium: Ancestry.com. "Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line].Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc."

BURIAL:

5. James R & Janet L Sims, Sandusky County, Ohio Cemeteries Vol. 1, Name: Ancestor Publishers; Location: Po Box 682, Arvada, Colorado80001; Date: 1979;, Page 127, In the possesion of Clement Gerke Jr.

--------------------

Overmyer history and genealogy, from 1680 to 1905 By Barnhart B. Overmyer, John C. Overmyer Page 144+

http://books.google.com/books?id=MDpBAAAAMAAJ

PHILLIP (J. G.), third son of John George, the emigrant, and wife, was born in Pensylvania, September 23rd, 1769. Of the early life of Phillip we can find but little history, but we have reason to believe that it was uneventful, save the skirmishes which the settlers frequently had with the Indians on the front ier, as it then existed in his native state, and later, when he was about six years old, the Revolution was raging in the colonies and his illustrious father joined the patriot army and helped to free the Colonies from the British yoke, after which he again returned to his family and resumed his labors on the farm. Many incidents of those stirring times were often related by our subject, who knew much from his own memory, and from the stories as he received them from those who bore an active part in the conflict. Phillip learned to read both English and German, but beyond that his education was limited. He married in Pennsylvania, Rosanna Bishoff. They lived in Pennsylvania and had a farm of their own, but for some cause they sold their farm to their son William, and removed from there to near Cayuga Bridge, Aurelius township, Cayuga county, N. Y., about 1826, accompanied by their sons Daniel, George, Jacob and Samuel, and their families, and a son-in-law, John Cox, and his family. They resided there until the spring of 1834. Not having bought farms there, they now decided to make their future homes in Ohio. The families, above named, packed their belongings into the larke oaken chests and leather covered trunks, which may yet be found in some of the homes of the descendants, and hauled them in large wagons to Mt. Union, N. Y., where they loaded them upon canal boats and began their journey towards Buffalo. After a journey of 100 miles by canal they reached Buffalo, and there took pasage on a sail boat on Lake Erie for Sandusky, Ohio. The voyage on Lake Erie was not a pleasant one, and several times the boat stranded, as they were compelled to remain near the shore, and had a heavy load, and when they reached Dunkirk, N. Y., the boat grounded and they were obliged to remain there two or three days and had to unload a part of the cargo to release her. When they reached Huron, Ohio, Samuel and his family, with their household effects, started by wagon across the country, in order to lighten the load on the vessel. When the vessel finally reached Sandusky, all the Overmyer emigrants were sick excepting Sarah, or "Sally," a daughter of Phillip. From Sandusky they came on foot and by wagon, each family finding a home, or a place where they established one, and thus the history of each family begins separately, and will be treated under their respective heads. Phillip and his family located about five miles west of Lower Sandusky (now Fremont), where Nehemiah Engler now lives. Here they engaged in the tavern business, as was the custom with many of the pioneer setlers along the Western Reserve and Maumee Pike. Though the pike was not graded at that time and was a terrible mud road during the most of the year, yet it was the principal thoroughfare in the Northwest. They did not reside at that place very long, but soon erected a log house on some land belonging to Jacob, their son, in the northern part of the present corporation of Lindsey, Ohio, and just across the street from where Jacob Bowersox now resides. Here a comfortable log house, one and one-half stories high, erected of round logs, chinked with mud and sticks, and all the parts that made up the pioneer home were well looked after, and Phillip and his wife moved there and spent their declining years surrounded by their children. He was afflicted with dropsy and was sick for some time and the children and grandchildren would come and take care of him. One night while they were there watching by his bedside, his wife was taken suddenly ill and died May 17th, 1841, in the 62nd year of her age. He afterwards had nearly recovered from his affliction and had his home with his son, Jacob, where Amos Overmyer now lives. Here he died March 24th, 1843, in the 72nd year of his age. Both are interred in the old cemetery at Lindsey. Though no photograph was ever taken of our subject we can get a faint idea of his general appearance from the description given us by his oldest living grandchild, Mrs. S. B. Waggoner, who gave us many of the items set forth in the above sketch. He was a short, heavy-set man, with smooth face, black hair, dark eyes, and a ruddy complexion; was of a very genial, good-natured disposition, a member of the Lutheran church, and always engaged in farming, and always belonged to the Democratic party, until 1820, when Gen. Joseph Heister ran for Governor of Pennsylvania. He being related to Phillip's wife, then he and his family joined the Federalists, and ever after were anti-Democrats. They had the following children:

Samuel, born Febraury 24th, 1793; died January 8th, 1862. 

William, born April 11th, 1795; died August 13th, 1869. Jacob, born July 4th, 1797; died February 3rd, 1863. Daniel, born April 15th, 1799; died June 15th, 1872. Pillip, born August 31st, 1801; died May 20th, 1888. Rossana and Phillip were twins born Aug. 31st, 1801.

George, born , 1804; died April 25th, 1857. David, born January 11th, 1808; died January 20th, 1884. Catherine, married John Cox; died in Sandusky county, O. Barbara, married, Martin.

Sarah, born February 25th, 1816, married first to John Anedrson and second to John Fox. She died November 8th, 1889; is burned in Indiana.

view all 17

John Phillip Overmyer (Obermoyer Overmire) ), Sr.'s Timeline

1741
August 1, 1741
Ödenwald, Freudenstadt, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
1769
September 23, 1769
Paxton Twp., Dauphin, Pennsylvania
1792
1792
Age 22
Union, Pennsylvania, USA
1793
February 24, 1793
Age 23
Union City, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
1795
April 11, 1795
Age 25
Union City, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
1797
July 4, 1797
Age 27
Union City, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
1799
April 15, 1799
Age 29
Center Twp, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
1801
August 31, 1801
Age 31
Union City, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
August 31, 1801
Age 31
Union City, Union, Pennsylvania, United States
1804
1804
Age 34
Near Weiricktown (Now Centerville), Union, Pennsylvania