Philippe I, roi de France

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Philippe I de France, roi de France

Nicknames: "Philippe I.er Capet de France; Philippe I.er "l'amoreaux" de France (trad: es. Felipe I "el enamorado" de Francia; en. Philip I "the amorous" of France ; de. Philipp I. Frankreich; ned. Filips I van Frankrijk)", "Philippe I /Capet/", "Philip I /Capet/", "the..."
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France
Place of Burial: Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire, Loiret, Centre, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Henri I, roi de France and Anne de Kiev, reine consort de France
Husband of Bertha van Holland, comtesse de Hainaut and Bertrade de Montfort, Reine des Francs
Father of Constance, dame d'Attigny; Isabel de France; Louis VI le Gros, roi de France; Henri Capet de France; Charles Capet de France and 5 others
Brother of Emma Capet de France, Princesse; Robert Capet de France, (mort jeune) and Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois
Half brother of Infant Capet

Occupation: Roi de France, King of France from 1060 to his death., King of France (1060-1108), Kung i Frankrike 1060-1108, King of France, Reigned from 1060--1108, KING OF FRANCE 1060-1108, Fransk kung, b. before 5-23-1052; m. 1072, King, King of France (1060 - 1108)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Philippe I de France, roi de France

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00007648&tree=LEO

Philippe is probably the first prince in Western Europe to receive this name which was going to continue until today. He owes it to his mother, Anne of Kiev, whose paternal great-grandfather Romanus II, Emperor of Constantinople, declared tracing his ancestry to the kings of Macedonia. In the spring 1092, Philippe became infatuated with Bertrade de Montfort († 1117), wife of Fulk IV the Réchin. The king repudiated his first wife Bertha of Holland and then remarried Bertrade de Montfort on May 27, 1092. On 16 October 1094, the Council of Autun which met thirty-two bishops declared the excommunication of the king for bigamy. Excommunication was "confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[310]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104. Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13]." [Medlands]

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering his birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108A

HENRI de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles [Provence] ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[219]. His father installed him as Duke of Burgundy 25 Jan 1016 after completing his conquest of the duchy[220].

He was consecrated associate-king 14 May 1027, at Notre-Dame, Reims, despite the opposition of his mother.

He rebelled against his father, together with his brother Robert, 1029-1031, and captured Dreux, Beaune and Avallon[221].

He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France, at which time the duchy of Burgundy was given to his younger brother Robert.

In light of his mother’s continuing opposition to his succession, he was obliged to take refuge briefly in Normandy in 1033. He regained control with the help of Robert II Duke of Normandy.

The Annales Nivernenses record the death "1060 II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex, Rotberti regis filius"[222]. The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Non Aug" of "Henrici regis Francorum"[223]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex"[224]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 4 Aug of "Henricus rex Franciæ"[225].

Betrothed (May 1033) to MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia ([Oosterbecke] 1027[226]-Worms 1034, bur Worms Cathedral).

Wipo names "filia imperatoris Chuonradi et Giselæ, Mahthilda" when recording her death and burial at Worms in 1034, specifying that she was betrothed to "Heinrico regi Francorum"[227]. Her marriage was arranged to confirm a peace compact agreed between King Henri and Emperor Konrad at Deville in May 1033[228].

Her absence from the list of deceased relatives in the donation of "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" to the church of Worms by charter dated 30 Jan 1034 suggests that Mathilde died after that date, while her absence from the list of the children of Emperor Konrad named in the same charter is explicable on the basis of her youth[229].

m firstly (1034) MATHILDE, daughter of --- ([1025/26]-Paris 1044, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

Rodolfus Glaber records that King Henri married "Mathildem…de regno eius ex Germanie nobilioribus"[230]. Her precise origin is not known.

A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young and that King Henri's wife died soon after[231]. The Historia of Monk Aimon records that King Henri married "neptem Henrici Alamaniæ Imperatoris" in 1034[232].

Szabolcs de Vajay[233] suggests that she was Mathilde, daughter of Liudolf Markgraf von Friesland [Braunschweig] & his wife Gertrud von Egisheim, her supposed father being the uterine half-brother of Emperor Heinrich III.

The Historia Francica records the death in 1044 of "Mahildis Regina"[234]. The Miracula Sancti Bernardi records the death in Paris in 1044 of "Mahildis regina…ex Cæsarum progenie", and her burial "monasterio Sancti Dionysii"[235].

m secondly (Reims 19 May 1051) as her first husband, ANNA Iaroslavna, daughter of IAROSLAV I Vladimirovich "Mudriy/the Wise" Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir of Sweden (1036-5 Sep ([1075/78], bur Abbaye Villiers near La-Ferté-Alais).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam regis Russorum Annam" with King Henri[236]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum" as wife of King Henri[237].

She was consecrated Queen Consort at Reims on her wedding day.

She caused a scandal by marrying secondly ([1061]) as his third wife, Raoul III “le Grand” Comte de Valois, and was forced to leave the court, although she returned after his death in 1074[238]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "Anna, Henrici relicta" and "Rodulfo comitis"[239].

King Henri I & his first wife had one child:

1. daughter ([1040]-1044 or before). She died before her mother, under 5 years old[241].

King Henry I & his second wife had four children:

---

2. PHILIPPE de France (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[242].

He was consecrated Associate-King 23 May 1059, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.

---

3. EMMA de France (1054-).

4. ROBERT de France (before Jun 1054-[1063]).

5. HUGUES de France (1057-Tarsus 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus, church of St Paul).

Comte de Vermandois et de Valois by right of his wife.

Leader of the French contingent in the First Crusade Aug 1096. He returned to France after the victory of Antioch 1098 to raise another army. He set out again Mar 1101, but died from wounds received fighting the Greeks at Tarsus in Cilicia.

m (after 1067) as her first husband, ADELAIS Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy, daughter and heiress of HERIBERT IV Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Alix Ctss de Crépy ([1062]-28 Sep [1120/24]).

She succeeded her father in [1080] as Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy.

She married secondly (1103) as his first wife, Renaud de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis].

References:

[220] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 55.

[221] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[222] Annales Nivernenses 1060, MGH SS XIII, p. 90.

[223] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 163.

[224] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.

[225] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 16.

[226] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 244 footnote 17.

[227] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 32, MGH SS XI, p. 271.

[228] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[229] D K II 204, p. 275.

[230] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.23, p. 211.

[231] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157.

[232] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276.

[233] Vajay 'Mathilde', pp. 248-54.

[234] Ex Historiæ Francicæ Fragmento, RHGF XI, p. 161.

[235] Miracula Sancti Benedicti, auctore Andreæ monachi Floriacensis quartus, Liber VII, III, p. 252.

[236] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388.

[237] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[238] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 66.

[239] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[240] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157.

[241] Bautier, R.-H. 'Anne de Kiev, reine de France, et la politique royale au XIe siècle. Etude critique de la documentation', Aspects des relations intellectuelles entre la France et la Russie, Revue des etudes slaves (Paris, 1985) t. 57, pp. 539-64, citing Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) André de Fleury Miracula sancti Benedicti, VII, ch III, p. 252, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70 footnote 46.

[242] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering his married family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B

PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his third wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[252]).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[253]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[254].

He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who became regent until 1066/67.

He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims.

Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[255]. King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[256].

In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter.

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[257]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[258]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[259].

Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey).

The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[260]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted.

m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 30 Jul 1093).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[261]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[262]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[263].

Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[264].

She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[265].

m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines).

The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[266]. William of Tyre records this marriage[267].

Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[268]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[269].

Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[270]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][271].

King Philippe I & his first wife had four children:

1. CONSTANCE de France ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[272]). Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[273]. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis", specifying that Constance married firstly "Hugoni Trecharum comiti", from whom she was separated for consanguinity, and secondly "Boamundo apud Carnotho"[274]. Orderic Vitalis confirms her parentage and her two marriages[275], recording 1106 as the year of her second marriage in an earlier passage[276].

An early sign of possible difficulties in Constance's first marriage is shown by the charter dated 1102 under which "Constantia, Philippi regis Francorum filia…Hugonis comitis Trecensium coniux legitima" donated property to the abbey of Molesme[277], the suggestion being that the reference to "coniux legitima" indicates that her husband may have had another "unofficial" relationship at this time. "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[278].

William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her (second) marriage[279]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[280]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[281].

Her second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her second marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[282].

She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her second husband[283]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France.

The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[284]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[285].

m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[286]) as his first wife, HUGUES I de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Crépy-Valois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126).

m secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch, son of ROBERT “Guiscard” Duke of Apulia and Calabria [Sicily] & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia).

2. LOUIS THIBAUT de France (Paris end 1081-Château Bethizy near Paris 1 Aug 1137, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis"[287].

He succeeded his father in 1108 as LOUIS VI "le Gros" King of France.

3. HENRI de France (1083-young).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Ludowicum et filiam Constantiam [atque Henricum]" as the children of King Philippe and "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam"[288].

King Philippe I & his second wife had four children:

4. PHILIPPE de France ([1093]-[2 Sep] after 1133).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[289]. His parentage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[290].

He succeeded as Seigneur de Montlhéry in 1104 by right of his wife.

His half-brother installed him as Comte de Mantes and Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvre in [1104].

Suger's Vita Ludovici records the rebellion of "regis Ludovici Philippus frater" against his brother, supported by "Amalricus de Monte Forti…avunculus eius" and "Fulco comes Andegavensis postea rex Hierosolymitanus frater eius", and the confiscation of his castles of Montlhéry and Mantes[291].

"Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][292].

The necrology of Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois records the death "IV Non Sep" of "Philippus frater Ludovici regis"[293], which may refer to Philippe Comte de Mantes.

m (1104) ELISABETH de Montlhéry Dame de Montlhéry, daughter and heiress of GUY [III] “Troussel” Seigneur de Montlhéry et de Chevreuse & his wife Mabile [Adelais] --- (-after 3 Mar 1141). The Chronica Regum Francorum records the betrothal of "unus illorum Regis illegitimus ex comitissa Andegavensi" and "filiam…Milonis de Montlehery"[294]. The dating clause of a charter dated to [1106/07] refers to the first year in which "Philippus filius Philippi regis Francorum" married "Helizabeth filiam Guidonis Trosselli"[295].

5. FLEURI [Florus] de France ([1095]-after 1119).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[296]. His parentage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[297].

Living in Anjou with his mother in 1117.

Seigneur de Nangis, by right of his wife.

m --- de Nangis, daughter & heiress of --- de Nangis. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.

Fleuri & his wife had one child.

6. CECILE de France ([1097]-after 1145).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem", specifying that the (unnamed) daughter married "Tanchredus Anthiochenus"[299]. Her parentage is recorded by William of Tyre, who also records her two marriages[300].

Her first marriage was arranged while Bohémond I Prince of Antioch was visiting the French court seeking support against Alexios I Emperor of Byzantium. She sailed for Antioch end 1106[301].

While dying, Prince Tancred made Pons de Toulouse promise to marry his wife[302]. Albert of Aix records the marriage at Tripoli of "Punctus filius Bertrannus de Tripla" and "uxorem Tancredi, quæ filia erat regis Franciæ", dated to [1115] from the context[303]. William of Tyre refers to the wife of the count of Tripoli as uterine sister of Foulques King of Jerusalem and names her[304]. She claimed Jebail as her dower, but was eventually satisfied with Chastel Rouge and Arzghan[305].

She became Lady of Tarsus and Mamistra, in Cilician Armenia, in 1126[306]. "Cecilia comitissa" donated property for the souls of "domini mei Poncii comitis…et filii mei Raimundi comitis" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1139[307].

m firstly (late 1106) TANCRED Prince of Tiberias, Regent of Antioch, son of ODO [Guillaume] “le Bon” Marquis & his wife Emma de Hauteville (-12 Dec 1112). He succeeded in 1111 as Prince of Antioch.

m secondly (Tripoli 1112) PONS Count of Tripoli, son of BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse and Tripoli & his second wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] ([1096]-executed near Pilgrim Castle, near Tripoli Mar 1137).

7. EUSTACHIE de France (-1143).

She and her husband are named by Kerrebrouck who cites no primary source on which this is based[308].

Founded the Abbaye de Yerres.

m JEAN Seigneur d'Etampes et de Corbeil, son of HUGUES de Breteuil Seigneur du Puiset et d’Etampes & his wife ---.

King Philippe had one [probably illegitimate] child [by an unknown mistress]:

8. EUDES de France (-1096).

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1096 of "Odo frater Ludovici Grossi de alia matre"[309]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[310], Eudes was the son of King Philippe & his first wife but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.

According to Kerrebrouck[311], Eudes was the son of King Philippe's second marriage but there seems little time for a third child to have been born to Bertrade de Montfort during the first three years of her marriage. It is therefore more likely that he was an illegitimate son of King Philippe.

References:

[252] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.

[253] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[254] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[255] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70.

[256] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1.

[257] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[258] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.

[259] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.

[260] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.

[261] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.

[262] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.

[263] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).

[264] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.

[265] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71.

[266] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.

[267] WT XIV.I, p. 606.

[268] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107.

[269] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.

[270] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.

[271] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142.

[272] Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in ΣΥΝΔΕΣΜΟΣ Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.

[273] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.

[274] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[275] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 265.

[276] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 183.

[277] Laurent, J. (ed.) (1911) Cartulaires de l'abbaye de Molesme, Tome II, 254, p. 237.

[278] Molesme II, 19, p. 26.

[279] WT XI.I, p. 450.

[280] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.

[281] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.

[282] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.

[283] Houben (2002), p. 31.

[284] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.

[285] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.

[286] Ivo of Chartes, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158, cited in Chibnall, Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5.

[287] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[288] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.

[289] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[290] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 263.

[291] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XVII, pp. 66-7.

[292] Fontevraud 156, p. 142.

[293] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chapitre Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois, p. 799.

[294] Ex Chronica Regum Francorum, RHGF XII, p. 208.

[295] Le cartulaire du prieuré de Notre-Dame de Longpont de l´ordre de Cluny au diocèse de Paris (Lyon, 1870) ("Longpont Notre-Dame"), CXCVII, p. 181.

[296] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[297] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 263.

[299] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[300] WT XI.I, p. 450, and XIV.I, p. 606.

[301] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 52.

[302] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 125.

[303] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XIX, p. 701.

[304] WT XIV.V, pp. 612 and XIV.VI, p. 614.

[305] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 134 footnote 3.

[306] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (2e edition Paris), p. 631.

[307] Rozière, E. de (ed.) (1849) Cartulaire de l'église de Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem (Paris) ("Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem"), 92, p. 183.

[308] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74.

[309] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1096, MGH SS XXIII, p. 805.

[310] ES II 11.

[311] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74.

--------------------

Basic information from Geneall (no sources cited for free users):

http://www.geneall.net/F/per_page.php?id=35

Philippe I, roi de France

  • 1053 + Melun 29.07.1108

Parents

Père: Henri I, roi de France * 04.05.1008

Mère: Anna of Kiev * c. 1024

Marriages

Marriage I: 1072

Bertha van Holland * c. 1055

Marriage II: 1092

Bertrade de Montfort * 1067

Enfants du Marriage I:

1. Constance, princesse de France * c. 1078

oo Hugues I de Blois, comte de Champagne

oo Boémond de Hauteville, principe di Antiochia

2. Louis VI, roi de France * 01.12.1081

oo Marie de Breuillet

oo Lucienne de Rochefort

oo Adelaide di Savoia

3. Henri, prince de France * 1083

4. Charles, prince de France * 1085

5. Eudes, prince de France * c. 1087

Enfants du Marriage II:

1. Philippe de France, comte de Mantes * c. 1093

oo Isabel de Montlhéry

2. Fleury, prince de France * c. 1095

oo N, dame de Nangis

3. Cecilie, princesse de France * c. 1097

oo Tancrède de Hauteville, prince of Tibérias

oo Pons de Toulouse, comte de Tripoli

4. Eustachie, princesse de France * c. 1100

oo Jean, comte d' Etampes

Titres

Rois de France (21)

--------------------

From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Philippe I de France:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10310.htm#i103094

Philippe I, Roi de France [1]

M, #103094, b. circa 1052, d. 29 July 1108

Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

Philippe I, Roi de France was born circa 1052.[2] He was the son of Henri I, Roi de France and Anne of Kiev.[2]

He married, firstly, Berthe de Hollande, daughter of Florent I, Comte de Hollande, in 1071/72.[3] He and Berthe de Hollande were divorced in 1091.[4]

He married, secondly, Bertrada de Montfort, daughter of Simon de Montfort, Sire de Montfort l'Aumari and Agnes d'Evreux, in 1095. He died on 29 July 1108.[2]

Philippe I, Roi de France was a member of the House of Capet.[1] He succeeded to the title of Roi Philippe I de France in 1060.[4],[1]

Philippe I, Roi de France also went by the nick-name of Philippe 'the Fair'.[1]

Children of Philippe I, Roi de France and Berthe de Hollande

1. Constance de France+

b. bt 1072 - 1095, d. 1125

2. Louis VI, Roi de France+

b. 1077/78, d. 1 Aug 1137

Children of Philippe I, Roi de France and Bertrada de Montfort

1. Philippe de France,[4]

b. 1093, d. a 1123

2. Cecilia de France

b. bt 1095 - 1108

Citations

1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 77. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

2. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 63. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.

3. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I, page 64.

4. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 64. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

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From the English Wikipedia page on Philip I of France:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_I_of_France

Philip I (23 May 1052 – 29 July 1108), called the Amorous (French: l' Amoureux),[1] was King of France from 1060 to his death.

His reign, like that of most of the early Direct Capetians, was extraordinarily long for the time. The monarchy began a modest recovery from the low it reached in the reign of his father and he added to the royal demesne the Vexin and Bourges.

Philip was the son of Henry I and Anne of Kiev. His name was of Greek origin, being derived from Philippos, meaning "lover of horses". It was rather exotic for Western Europe at the time and was bestowed upon him by his Eastern European mother.

Although he was crowned king at the age of 7 [2], until age 14 (1066) his mother acted as regent, the first queen of France ever to do so. Her co-regent was Baldwin V of Flanders.

Philip first married Bertha, daughter of Floris I, Count of Holland, in 1072. Although the marriage produced the necessary heir, Philip fell in love with Bertrade de Montfort, the wife of Count Fulk IV of Anjou. He repudiated Bertha (claiming she was too fat) and married Bertrade on 15 May 1092.

In 1094, he was excommunicated by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon, for the first time; after a long silence, Pope Urban II repeated the excommunication at the Council of Clermont in November 1095. Several times the ban was lifted as Philip promised to part with Bertrade, but he always returned to her, and after 1104, the ban was not repeated. In France, the king was opposed by Bishop Ivo of Chartres, a famous jurist.

Philip appointed Alberic first Constable of France in 1060. A great part of his reign, like his father's, was spent putting down revolts by his power-hungry vassals. In 1077, he made peace with William the Conqueror, who gave up attempting the conquest of Brittany. In 1082, Philip I expanded his demesne with the annexation of the Vexin. Then in 1100, he took control of Bourges.

It was at the aforementioned Council of Clermont that the First Crusade was launched. Philip at first did not personally support it because of his conflict with Urban II. The pope would not have allowed him to participate anyway, as he had reaffirmed Philip's excommunication at the said council. Philip's brother Hugh of Vermandois, however, was a major participant.

“…Philip died in the castle of Melun and was buried per request at the monastery of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire – and not in St Denis among his forefathers. He was succeeded by his son, Louis VI, whose succession was, however, not uncontested. According to Abbot Suger:”

“… King Philip daily grew feebler. For after he had abducted the Countess of Anjou, he could achieve nothing worthy of the royal dignity; consumed by desire for the lady he had seized, he gave himself up entirely to the satisfaction of his passion. So he lost interest in the affairs of state and, relaxing too much, took no care for his body, well-made and handsome though it was. The only thing that maintained the strength of the state was the fear and love felt for his son and successor. When he was almost 60, he ceased to be king, breathing his last breath at the castle of Melun-sur-Seine, in the presence of the [future king] Louis... They carried the body in a great procession to the noble monastery of St-Benoît-sur-Loire, where King Philip wished to be buried; there are those who say they heard from his own mouth that he deliberately chose not to be buried among his royal ancestors in the church of St. Denis because he had not treated that church as well as they had, and because among so many noble kings his own tomb would not have counted for much. ”

Issue

Philip, Bertha and their two eldest children Constance and Louis

Philip's children with Bertha were:

1. Constance, married Hugh I of Champagne before 1097 and then, after her divorce, to Bohemund I of Antioch in 1106

2. Louis VI (1 December 1081 – 1 August 1137), King of the Franks

3. Henry (b.1083) (died young)

4. Eudes (1087–1096)

Philip's children with Bertrade were:

1. Philippe, Comte de Mantes (living 1123)

2. Fleury, seigneur de Nangis (1093-July 1119)[3]

3. Cecile of France, married Tancred, Prince of Galilee; married secondly Pons of Tripoli

Sources

Genealogiae Comitum Flandriae

(Nonexistent link)

References

1. ^ Kings of France

http://www.britannia.com/history/resource/france.html

2. ^ History Today, Philip I Crowned King of France

http://www.historytoday.com/archive

3. ^ Europäische Stammtafeln XIV 146 les seigneurs de Nangis

Philip I of France

House of Capet

Born: 23 May 1052

Died: 29 July 1108 (age 56) Melun, France

Burial: Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire

King of France

Coronation: 23 May 1059

Co-reign: 23 May 1059 - 4 August 1060

Solo Reign: 4 August 1060 – 29 July 1108

Preceded by Henry I

Succeeded by Louis VI

Spouses:

Bertha of Holland

Bertrade de Montfort

Issue:

Constance, Princess of Antioch

Louis VI of France

Cecile, Princess of Galilee

Father Henry I of France

Mother Anne of Kiev

--------------------

(En Francais) From the French Wikipedia page on Philippe I de France: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippe_Ier_de_France

Philippe Ier de France [1], né en 1052, mort le 30 juillet 1108 au château de Melun en Seine-et-Marne, fut roi des Francs de 1060 à 1108, quatrième de la dynastie dite des Capétiens directs.

Il est le fils d'Henri Ier, roi de France, et d'Anne de Kiev (voir son ascendance sur trois degrés).

Biographie

Prénom

Philippe est sans doute le premier prince en Europe occidentale à recevoir ce prénom qui allait se perpétuer jusqu'à nos jours. Il le doit à sa mère, Anne de Kiev, dont l'arrière grand-père paternel Romain II, empereur de Constantinople, affirmait descendre des rois de Macédoine [2].

Couronnement

Couronné à Reims le 23 mai 1059 du vivant de son père, Philippe Ier ne règne seul qu’à partir de 1066, car son oncle, le comte de Flandre Baudouin V, assisté de l’archevêque de Reims Gervais de Belleme ainsi que, dans un premier temps, d'Anne de Kiev, exerce la régence de la mort d'Henri Ier en 1060 à 1066. Il sera couronné plusieurs fois dans son règne, par exemple le 25 décembre 1071, par l'évêque Élinand, en la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Laon [3],[4], comme le voulait la coutume de son temps.

Règne

Sous son règne se dessinent les grandes lignes de la politique des souverains capétiens du xiie siècle : assurer une base réelle à la puissance royale en consolidant le domaine, et abaisser ou contenir les trop puissants vassaux.

Pour agrandir le domaine royal, il s’empare d’une partie du Vermandois, du Gâtinais (1068), du Vexin français (1077). En 1101, il rachète pour une forte somme (60 000 sols d'or) la vicomté de Bourges et la seigneurie de Dun-le-Roi à Eudes Arpin [5], un chevalier qui part à la croisade. Il développe l’administration royale et, pour assurer des revenus à la couronne, dispose des biens de l’Église et vend les charges ecclésiastiques, ce qui lui attire les foudres des réformateurs grégoriens.

En 1071, il soutient Richilde de Hainaut, veuve du comte Baudouin VI de Flandre, et ses fils Arnoul III et Baudouin II contre leur beau-frère et oncle, Robert le Frison. Philippe est défait à la bataille de Cassel en février mais parvient à prendre Saint-Omer en mars. Arnoul III étant mort au cours de la bataille, il conclut la paix avec Robert qu'il reconnaît comme comte de Flandre et dont il épouse la belle-fille, Berthe.

Mais pendant la plus grande partie de son règne, Philippe Ier lutte pour réduire la puissance de son vassal le plus redoutable, Guillaume le Conquérant, duc de Normandie devenu roi d’Angleterre en 1066. Philippe trouve l’appui de Foulque IV le Réchin, comte d'Anjou et de Robert le Frison, comte de Flandre qui se sentent aussi menacés par ce trop puissant voisin. Afin de consolider son alliance avec la Flandre, il épouse Berthe de Hollande (v. 1055-† 1094), fille de Florent Ier comte de Hollande et de Gertrude de Saxe.

En 1076, Philippe inflige une grave défaite à Guillaume au pied de Dol, en Bretagne. L'année suivante, fort de sa victoire, Philippe Ier s'empare du Vexin français, possession de Simon de Vexin (fils de Raoul de Crépy, beau-père de Philippe Ier [note 1]), qui se fait moine, avec les châtellenies de Mantes et de Pontoise. Guillaume le Conquérant renonce à la Bretagne et fait la paix avec Philippe Ier. Ce dernier reste toutefois inquiet de la menace anglo-normande. Selon une politique qui sera reprise par ses successeurs, il va s’efforcer de développer les dissensions à l’intérieur de la famille du Conquérant.

En 1078, il prend parti pour Robert Courteheuse ou Courtecuisse, le fils aîné de Guillaume, qui s'est révolté contre son père. Après avoir confié la garde du château de Gerberoy, à côté de Beauvais, à Robert, il semble que Philippe 1er se soit retourné contre ce dernier. On le retrouve en 1079, en train d'assiéger le château en compagnie de Guillaume qui est blessé au cours du siège. Peu après, Robert Courteheuse obtient le gouvernement de la Normandie. Le roi capétien reçoit en récompense la ville de Gisors située sur la rive droite de l’Epte.

En février 1079, alors que le roi hiverne à Étampes, éclate une rébellion des vassaux directs du roi, menée par Hugues Blavons, seigneur du Puiset [6]. Au printemps l'armée royale est battue à plates coutures près du Puiset [7]. L'autorité royale, profondément humiliée, ne sera restaurée dans le secteur qu'à la génération suivante.

Dans les années qui suivent la mort de Guillaume le Conquérant, Philippe aide Robert Courteheuse qui essaie de récupérer le trône d'Angleterre dont son frère, Guillaume II le Roux, a hérité. Ce dernier tente, en représailles, de lui prendre le Vexin dans les années 1097-1099, mais échoue au cours de trois campagnes successives.

Au printemps 1092, Philippe s'entiche de Bertrade de Montfort († 1117), l'épouse de Foulque IV le Réchin. Il répudie alors Berthe de Hollande et se remarie avec Bertrade de Montfort le 27 mai 1092. Le 16 octobre 1094, le concile d’Autun où sont réunis trente-deux évêques prononce l'excommunication du roi.

Venu en France pour répandre la réforme grégorienne et excommunier le roi à nouveau, le pape Urbain II, prêche la première croisade au concile de Clermont le 27 novembre 1095. Frappé d'anathème, le roi ne participe pas à la croisade dont Hugues de Vermandois, son frère est l'un des principaux acteurs avec aussi Raimond IV de Toulouse, et surtout Godefroy de Bouillon.

Philippe laisse le soin des opérations militaires dans le Vexin à son fils Louis VI [8] qu'il a associé à la couronne vers 1098, 1099.

Après une controverse au sujet du dépositaire de l'évêché de Beauvais, entre 1100 et 1104, Philippe se réconcilie avec la papauté et est absous en 1104. En 1107, le pape Pascal II se rend en France où il rencontre Philippe et le futur Louis VI à Saint-Denis. L'alliance entre le royaume de France et la papauté contre l'Empire est alors définitivement scellée pour un siècle.

Décès

Le 29 juillet 1108, Philippe Ier meurt au château royal de Melun après quarante-huit ans de règne (le troisième plus long règne de l'histoire de France après ceux de Louis XIV (1643-1715) et Louis XV (1715-1774) qui ont tous les deux régné plus de cinquante ans). Ne voulant pas, en raison de ses fautes, être enterré à côté de ses ancêtres en la basilique de Saint-Denis, il a demandé à être inhumé dans l'abbaye de Fleury à Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire. Son fils Louis VI que l'on surnommera le Gros, âgé de vingt-sept ans, lui succède. Son épouse Bertrade de Montfort, à trente-huit ans, prend le voile à l'abbaye de Fontevraud.

Descendance

Gisant de Philippe Ier, Abbaye de Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire, XIIIe siècle.

De l'union avec Berthe de Hollande sont issus :

1. Constance (v. 1078 - † 1126) épouse d'Hugues Ier de Champagne, puis de Bohémond Ier d'Antioche

2. Louis (1081 - † 1137)

3. Henri (1083-mort jeune)

4. Charles (1085-mort jeune)

5. Eudes (1087-mort jeune)

De la seconde union avec Bertrade de Montfort sont issus :

1. Philippe (v. 1093-† apr. 1133), comte de Mantes, marié à la fille de Gui II de Montlhéry

2. Fleury (v. 1095-† apr. 1119)

3. Cécile (v. 1097-† apr. 1145), mariée à Tancrède de Hauteville, puis à Pons de Tripoli

4. Eustachie, souvent mentionnée en généalogie, n'aurait jamais existé[9].

Bibliographie

Augustin Fliche, Le règne de Philippe 1er, roi de France (1060-1108), Paris, 1912. Ouvrage de référence pour l'événementiel quoique dépassé sur les questions d'interprétation.

Georges Duby, Le Moyen Âge, Histoire de France, Hachette, 1991.

André Castelot et Alain Decaux, Histoire de la France et des Français au jour le jour, 1974, éd. Plon, (ISBN 2-221-50579-4)

Damien Varenne, Espace d'action et d'influence du pouvoir royal sous le règne de Philippe Ier, sous la direction d'Yves Sassier, mémoire déposé à l'université Paris IV-Sorbonne, 2007.

Bernard Gineste [éd.], «Eustache de Saint-Père: Appel en justice devant le roi à Étampes (8 février 1079)», in Corpus Étampois, 2007.

http://www.corpusetampois.com/cls-11-eustachedesaintpere1079notice.html

Liens externes

Wikimedia Commons propose des documents multimédia libres sur Philippe Ier de France.

La mort de Philippe Ier, 1108 (texte)

http://hypo.ge-dip.etat-ge.ch/www/cliotexte/sites/Arisitum/textes/histo/mort1.html (Outdated link)

Voir aussi

Philippe Ier de France , roi des Francs 1060-1108

Précédé par Henri I,

Suivi par Louis VI

Notes

1. ↑ Veuve du roi Henri Ier, Anne de Kiev, mère de Philippe Ier a épousé en secondes noces Raoul de Crépy

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_de_Kiev

Références

1. ↑ Généalogie de Philippe Ier sur le site Medieval Lands

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#_Toc154137003

2. ↑ Françoise Guérard, Dictionnaire des Rois et Reines de France, Vuibert (ISBN 2-7117-4436-1)

3. ↑ Philippe I King of France. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#_ftnref207

4. ↑ 2e couronnement de Philippe Ier, page 66.

http://www.histoireaisne.fr/memoires_numerises/chapitres/tome_36/Tome_036_page_058.pdf

5. ↑ Paul Joanne, Géographie du département du Cher, 1906, p. 24

http://books.google.fr/books?id=pz4QAAAAYAAJ&q=Bourges+Eudes+Arpin+60000&dq=Bourges+Eudes+Arpin+60000&pgis=1

6. ↑ Tout cet épisode a récemment été mis en lumière par Bernard Gineste, « Eustache de Saint-Père: Appel en justice devant le roi à Étampes (8 février 1079) », in Corpus Étampois,(2007).

http://www.corpusetampois.com/cls-11-eustachedesaintpere1079notice.html

7. ↑ Le récit de cet épisode par Raoul Tortaire, vers 1114, a été édité et traduit par Bernard Gineste dans le Corpus Etampois (2008)

http://www.corpusetampois.com/cls-12-raoultortaire1114debacledupuiset1079.html

8.↑ Michel Parisse et Xavier Barral I Altet (médiéviste de renommée internationale), Le roi de France et son royaume, autour de l'an Mil, 1987, p. 36

9. ↑ Bernard Gineste, citant Dom Basile Fleureau : Son mariage prétendu avec Jean d'Etampes repose sur une confusion avec Eustachie, fille de Ferry de Châtillon, fondatrice de l'abbaye d'Yerre Corpus Etampois

http://www.corpusetampois.com/che-16-legendedejeandetampes.html#fleureau

--------------------

Portuguese biographical information on Philip I of France:

Durante o seu longo reinado, a monarquia francesa iniciou uma modesta recuperação do ponto mais baixo que atingiu no reinado do seu pai, tendo adicionado os territórios Vexin e Bourges aos domínios da coroa.

Filho de Henrique I de França e Ana de Kiev, foi o primeiro príncipe da Europa ocidental com o, na época exótico, prenome de Filipe. A avó materna da sua mãe era descendente da dinastia macedónica de Bizâncio, que afirmava remontar a Alexandre o Grande e a Filipe da Macedónia, e na qual este nome era comum.

Filipe foi coroado em Reims a 23 de Maio de 1059, na presença de seu pai. Com a morte do seu pai em 4 de Agosto de 1060, subiu ao trono e o primeiro condestável da França seria nomeado nesse mesmo ano. Só reinaria sozinho a partir de 1066, ao atingir a maioridade. A sua mãe, e depois o seu tio Balduíno V, conde da Flandres, assistido pelo arcebispo Gervásio de Reims, exerceram a regência desde a morte de Henrique I. Conforme o costume do seu tempo, seria coroado várias vezes durante o seu reinado: em 25 de Dezembro de 1071, pelo bispo Elinando de Laon, na catedral dessa cidade, em 16 de Maio de 1098 em Tours e em 25 de Dezembro de 1100 em Reims.

Durante a maior parte do seu reinado, Filipe I lutou para diminuir o poder do seu mais importante vassalo, Guilherme o Conquistador, duque da Normandia e rei da Inglaterra a partir de 1066. Para isto, contou com o apoio de Fulque IV, conde de Anjou e de Roberto I da Flandres, que se sentiam também ameaçados por este vizinho demasiadamente poderoso. A fim de consolidar a sua aliança com a Flandres, casou-se com Berta da Holanda (c. 1055 - 1094), filha do conde Florent I da Holanda e de Gertrude de Saxe.

Filipe infligiu uma grave derrota a Guilherme perto de Dol-de-Bretagne, em 1076. No ano seguinte, reforçado pela vitória, tomou a Vexin francesa a Simon de Crépy, filho do terceiro esposo de Ana de Kiev, que se tornou monge das castelarias de Mantes e de Pontoise.

Guilherme I de Inglaterra renunciou à Bretanha e acordou uma paz com o rei francês, que mesmo assim se manteve preocupado com a ameaça anglo-normanda. Através de uma política continuada pelos seus sucessores, esforçou-se em desenvolver dissenções na família d'o Conquistador.

Em 1078 a França tomou o partido de Roberto II da Normandia, o primogénito de Guilherme, quando este se revoltou contra o pai. Depois de lhe ter confiado a guarda do castelo de Gerberoy, nos arredores de Beauvais, Filipe terá mudado de aliado. No ano seguinte preparou-se para cercar o castelo juntamente com Guilherme, que se feriu na operação. Pouco depois, Roberto obteve o ducado da Normandia. O rei capetíngio recebeu por recompensa a vila de Gisors na margem direita do rio Epte.

Depois da morte de Guilherme I da Inglaterra, a 9 de Setembro de 1087, mesmo com Roberto II da Normandia tentando tomar a Vexin francesa a Filipe, este ajudou-o a tentar recuperar o trono da Inglaterra que o seu irmão, Guilherme II da Inglaterra, herdara. O novo monarca inglês tentaria, como represália, tomar também a Vexin entre 1097 e 1099, mas falhou nas três campanhas sucessivas.

Na Primavera de 1092, Filipe enamorou-se de Bertranda de Monforte (c. 1061 - 1117), esposa de Fulque IV, conde de Anjou. Repudiou Berta da Holanda e casou-se em segundas núpcias com Bertranda a 27 de Maio de 1092. A 16 de Outubro de 1094, o concílio de 32 bispos em Autun pronunciou a excomunhão do rei.

Chegado a França para retomar a reforma gregoriana e excomungar novamente o rei, a 27 de Novembro de 1095 o papa Urbano II pregou a Primeira cruzada no concílio de Clermont. Declarado anátema, Filipe não participou das cruzadas, apesar de o seu irmão Hugo I de Vermandois ter sido um dos principais intervenientes, juntamente com Raimundo IV de Toulouse.

Depois de associar o seu filho Luís à coroa em 1098, deixou-o encarregado das operações no terreno. Depois de uma controvérsia sobre o bispado de Beauvais, entre 1100 e 1104, Filipe reconciliou-se com o papado e foi absolvido em 1104. Em 1107, o papa Pascoal II deslocou-se à França, onde se encontrou com o rei e o herdeiro da coroa em Saint-Denis. Seria assim selada por um século a aliança entre o reino da França e o papado contra o Sacro Império Romano-Germânico.

A 29 de Julho de 1108, Filipe I morreu no castelo real de Melun depois de quarenta e oito anos de reinado, o terceiro mais longo da história da França. Devido aos pecados que cometera durante a sua vida, não quis ser sepultado ao lado dos seus ancestrais na basílica de Saint-Denis, mas sim na abadia de Fleury em Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire. Seria sucedido pelo seu filho Luís VI de França, cognominado o Gordo, de 29 anos de idade. A sua esposa Bertranda de Monforte tomou o véu aos 38 anos na abadia de Fontevraud.

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Unknown basic information (some sources cited):

Philippe Ier de France

Father: Henri I.er de France [b. 1008, d. 04.08.1060]

Mother: Anne de Kiev [b. c. 1024, d. a. 1075]

Born_ 1053

Title_ King of France [1060 - 1108]

Marriage* He married first Bertha of Holland (?), daughter of Count Florent I of Holland and Gertrude of Saxony, in 1072.1,5

Marriage* He married Bertrade de Montfort, daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes d' Evreux, on 15 May 1092.1,6

Death* He died on 29 July 1108 at Meulan, France.1,3

Burial* He was buried at Abbaye St-Benoit-Sur-Loire.1,3

Family 1 Bertrade de Montfort b. circa 1060, d. 14 February 1117

Child

1. Cecile de France d. a 1145

Family 2 Bertha of Holland (?) b. circa 1055, d. 1094

Children

1. Constance of France (?) b. c 1078, d. bt 1124 - Jan 1126

2. Louis VI of France "the Fat" b. 1081, d. 1 Aug 1137

Last Edited 3 Dec 2004

Citations

1. [S218] Marlyn Lewis, Ancestry of Elizabeth of York.

2. [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 101-22.

3. [S338] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed., 101-23.

4. [S338] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed., 101-22.

5. [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 101-23.

6. [S347] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans, p. 159.

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BIOGRAPHY: Excommunicated for bigamy.

Count of Paris

BIOGRAPHY: General Notes:

King of FRANCE Reigned 1059/1060-1108.

BOOKS

Kings and Queens of Europe, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1989: "Philippe I, Son of Henri I and Anna Kiev, King of France 1060- 1108, Mar =1 Bertha Holland, Died 1108."

The Political History of England, Vol II, George Burton Adams Longmans Green and Co, 1905, Ch I, p150:

"...In the summer of 1108, the long reign of Philip I of France had closed, and the reign, nearly as long, of his son, Louis VI, had begun, the first of the great Capetian kings, in whose reign begins a definite policy of aggrandizement for the dynasty directed in great part against their rivals, the English kings..."

---

The Story of Civilization, Will Durant, Vol IV, The Age of Faith, Bk V, The Climax of Chrisianity, Ch XXV, The Recovery of Europe, Sec XI France,

p 688: "Philip Augustus was the first of three powerful rulers who in this age raised France to the intellectual, moral, and political leadership of Europe. But there had been strong men before him. Philip I (1060-1108) made a secure niche for himself in history by divorcing his wife at forty and persuading Count Fulk of Anjou to cede to him the Countess Bertrade. A priest was found to solemnize the adultery as marriage, but Pope Urban II, coming to France to preach the First Crusade, excommunicated the King. Philip persisted in sin for twelve years; at last he sent Bertrade away and was shriven; but a while later he repented his repentance, and resumed his Queen. She traveled with him to Anjou, taught her two husbands amity, and seems to have served both of them to the best of her charms. Having grown fat at forty-five, Philip handed over the major affairs of state to his son Louis VI (1108-1137), himself known as Louis the Fat."

p589: "...the feudal leaders who had taken the cross [of the First Crusade] had assembled each his own force in his own place. No king was among them; indeed Philip I of France, William II of England, and Henry IV of Germany were all under sentence of excommunication when Urban preached the crusade..."

p668: "[William the Conqueror] warred with Philip I of France over boundaries;when he tarried at Rouen, almost immovable with corpulence Philip jested (it was said) that the King of England was lying in,' and there would be a grand display of candles at his churching. William swore that he would indeed light many candles. He ordered his army to burn down Mantes and all its neighborhood, and to destroy all crops and fruits; and it was done."

---

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1981, Micropaedia,Vol VII,

p940, Philip I: "Born 1052, Died 29/30 Jul 1108 Melun France, King of France who came to the throne at a time when the Capetian monarchy was extremely weak but who succeeded in enlarging the royal treasury by a policy of devious alliances, the sale of his neutrality in quarrels of powerful vassals, and the practice of simony on an enormous scale."

---

"Philip was the elder son of Henry I of France by his second wife, Anne of Kiev. Crowned at Reims in May 1059, he became sole king on his father's death in 1060. His minority ending in 1066, he immediately displayed a talent for skillful manoeuvre and in 1068 obtained from Fulk IV of Rechin the county of Gatinais as the price of his neutrality in the struggle between Fulk and his brother for the heritage of Anjou. Philip thus secured a territorial link between his possessions in Sens and the lands of the royal domain around Paris, Melun, and Orleans. In 1070 he took advantage of a similar dynastic conflict to attach the town of Corbie to the royal domain. His major efforts, however, were directed toward Normandy, in which from 1076 he supported Robert II Curthose, the ineffectual duke of Normandy first against his father, King William I of England, then against his brother, William II. Philip's true goal was to prevent the emergence of a rival power in Normandy, for he was willing to abandon Robert whenever it seemed possible that he might become dangerous."

"Because of his firm determination to retain control over all ecclesiastical appointments, Philip was eventually drawn into conflict with the papacy. This conflict was exacerbated when in 1092 Philip abducted Fulk IV of Rechin's wife, Bertrada de Montfort. He next demanded the annulment of his marriage with his wife Bertha, and of Fulk's with Bertrada; before long he had found a complaisant bishop, and the King and Bertrada went through a marriage ceremony of dubious legality. Pope Urban II and later his successor Pashal II repeatedly excommunicated Philip, and not until 1104, after Philip and the papacy had settled some of their political differences, did Paschal II turn a blind eye to his relations with Bertrada. By this time Louis VI, Philip's son by Bertha, had taken over the administration of the kingdom, Philip having been rendered inactive by his extreme obesity."

---

The Wall Chart of World History, Edward Hull, 1988, Studio Editions, France 1060:

"Philip I, Son of Henry I, King of France 1060-1108, First Crusade 1099 by Peter the Hermit...Eight Crusades or Holy Wars. A cross of red cloth on their right shoulder, hence Crusade'...1st 1096-1099, preached by Peter the Hermit 1096. 300,000 men blessed by Urban II. Godfrey commands. Jerusalem taken 1099. Godfrey king..."

---

BIOGRAPHY: b. 1052

d. July 29/30, 1108, Melun, Fr.

king of France (1059/60-1108) who came to the throne at a time when the Capetian monarchy was extremely weak but who succeeded in enlarging the royal treasury by a policy of devious alliances, the sale of his neutrality in the quarrels of powerful vassals, and the practice of simony on a huge scale.

Philip was the elder son of Henry I of France by his second wife, Anne of Kiev. Crowned at Reims in May 1059, he became sole king on his father's death in 1060. Two years after he came of age in 1066, he obtained the county of Gâtinais as the price of his neutrality in a family struggle over Anjou and thereby linked the royal possessions in Sens with those around Paris, Melun, and Orléans. His major efforts, however, were directed toward Normandy, in which from 1076 he supported Robert II Curthose, its ineffectual duke, first against Robert's father, King William I of England, then against Robert's brother, William II. Philip's true goal was to prevent emergence of a rival power in Normandy, for he was willing to abandon Robert whenever it seemed possible he might become dangerous.

Because of his firm determination to retain control over all appointments to ecclesiastical posts, which he blatantly sold, Philip was eventually drawn into conflict with the papacy. This conflict was exacerbated by his matrimonial affairs; his scandalous "marriage" with Bertrada de Montfort, wife of a vassal, brought him repeated excommunication. By 1104, when the struggle with the papacy was finally ended, Louis VI, Philip's son by his legitimate wife, Bertha, had taken over the administration of the kingdom, Philip having been rendered inactive by his extreme obesity.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

---

Philip I (of France) (1052-1108), king of France (1060-1108), the eldest son of Henry I, king of France. The first six years of his reign were spent under the regency of his mother and his uncle. Philip's reign was troubled by many clashes with his powerful vassals, particularly in Normandy (Normandie), but he succeeded in enlarging his dominions. Philip was excommunicated in 1095 because he had repudiated his wife, Bertha of Holland, and married Bertrada, the wife of the count of Anjou.

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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First name aka 'Philippe'. Described as 'obese'. Philip was excommunicated in 1095 because he had repudiated his wife, Bertha of Holland, & married Bertrada (the wife of the Count of Anjou). Buried where he was, instead of the tradional place of his ancestors, because he didn't feel worthy. His tomb was discovered in 1830.

Source:

Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia

The book, 'The Oxford History of Medieval Europe'

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'

Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia

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From the Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, Page 427:

http://books.google.cl/books?id=o8ZPAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA427&lpg=RA1-PA427&dq=%22Henri+I%22+of+France+death&source=bl&ots=EHyDvRf2ZG&sig=w6otVx2dohYo36Fsnuz5NQxNDjI&hl=es&ei=rjncTPWXE8Gs8Ab8qrz8CQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCDgK#v=onepage&q=%22Henri%20I%22%20of%20France%20death&f=false

1060.) Philippe I, son of Henri I, born AD 1053.

The power of the first four Capetian kings was very small, and the kingdom over which their nominal sovereignty extended was not co-extensive with modern France; Lorraine, Transjurane Bourgogne, and Provence were subject to the Imperial crown. Their reigns constitute the era of the rise of chivalry. The reign of Philippe I was marked by the conquest of England by William of Normandie. The communes or municipalities of France originated in leagues of the inhabitants of towns for defence against baronial oppression, formed in the reign of Philippe, though commonly ascribed to the reign of his successor. Philippe was engaged repeatedly in hostilities with the Anglo-Norman kings, William I and William II. The first crusade took place in Philippe's reign, and by exhausting the power of the nobles, prepared for the emerging of the regal authority from its deprived conditions. -------------------- Philip I (23 May 1052 – 29 July 1108), called the Amorous (French: l' Amoureux),[1] was King of France from 1060 to his death. His reign, like that of most of the early Direct Capetians, was extraordinarily long for the time. The monarchy began a modest recovery from the low it reached in the reign of his father and he added to the royal demesne the Vexin and Bourges.

Philip was the son of Henry I and Anne of Kiev. His name was of Greek origin, being derived from Philippos, meaning "lover of horses". It was rather exotic for Western Europe at the time and was bestowed upon him by his Eastern European mother. Although he was crowned king at the age of seven[2], until age fourteen (1066) his mother acted as regent, the first queen of France ever to do so. Her co-regent was Baldwin V of Flanders.

Philip first married Bertha, daughter of Floris I, Count of Holland, in 1072. Although the marriage produced the necessary heir, Philip fell in love with Bertrade de Montfort, the wife of Count Fulk IV of Anjou. He repudiated Bertha (claiming she was too fat) and married Bertrade on 15 May 1092. In 1094, he was excommunicated by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon, for the first time; after a long silence, Pope Urban II repeated the excommunication at the Council of Clermont in November 1095. Several times the ban was lifted as Philip promised to part with Bertrade, but he always returned to her, and after 1104, the ban was not repeated. In France, the king was opposed by Bishop Ivo of Chartres, a famous jurist.

Philip appointed Alberic first Constable of France in 1060. A great part of his reign, like his father's, was spent putting down revolts by his power-hungry vassals. In 1077, he made peace with William the Conqueror, who gave up attempting the conquest of Brittany. In 1082, Philip I expanded his demesne with the annexation of the Vexin. Then in 1100, he took control of Bourges.

It was at the aforementioned Council of Clermont that the First Crusade was launched. Philip at first did not personally support it because of his conflict with Urban II. The pope would not have allowed him to participate anyway, as he had reaffirmed Philip's excommunication at the said council. Philip's brother Hugh of Vermandois, however, was a major participant. “ …Philip died in the castle of Melun and was buried per request at the monastery of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire – and not in St Denis among his forefathers. He was succeeded by his son, Louis VI, whose succession was, however, not uncontested. According to Abbot Suger: ” “ … King Philip daily grew feebler. For after he had abducted the Countess of Anjou, he could achieve nothing worthy of the royal dignity; consumed by desire for the lady he had seized, he gave himself up entirely to the satisfaction of his passion. So he lost interest in the affairs of state and, relaxing too much, took no care for his body, well-made and handsome though it was. The only thing that maintained the strength of the state was the fear and love felt for his son and successor. When he was almost sixty, he ceased to be king, breathing his last breath at the castle of Melun-sur-Seine, in the presence of the [future king] Louis... They carried the body in a great procession to the noble monastery of St-Benoît-sur-Loire, where King Philip wished to be buried; there are those who say they heard from his own mouth that he deliberately chose not to be buried among his royal ancestors in the church of St. Denis because he had not treated that church as well as they had, and because among so many noble kings his own tomb would not have counted for much. ”

-------------------- From Wikipedia

Biography

Philip was the son of Henry I and Anne of Kiev. Unusual at the time for Western Europe, his name was of Greek origin, being bestowed upon him by his mother. Although he was crowned king at the age of seven, until age fourteen (1066) his mother acted as regent, the first queen of France ever to do so. Baldwin V of Flanders also acted as co-regent.

Following the death of Baldwin VI of Flanders, Robert the Frisian seized Flanders. Baldwin's wife, Richilda requested aid from Philip, who defeated Robert at the battle of Cassel in 1071.

Philip first married Bertha, daughter of Floris I, Count of Holland, in 1072. Although the marriage produced the necessary heir, Philip fell in love with Bertrade de Montfort, the wife of Count Fulk IV of Anjou. He repudiated Bertha (claiming she was too fat) and married Bertrade on 15 May 1092. In 1094, he was excommunicated by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon, for the first time; after a long silence, Pope Urban II repeated the excommunication at the Council of Clermont in November 1095. Several times the ban was lifted as Philip promised to part with Bertrade, but he always returned to her, and after 1104, the ban was not repeated. In France, the king was opposed by Bishop Ivo of Chartres, a famous jurist.

Philip appointed Alberic first Constable of France in 1060. A great part of his reign, like his father's, was spent putting down revolts by his power-hungry vassals. In 1077, he made peace with William the Conqueror, who gave up attempting the conquest of Brittany. In 1082, Philip I expanded his demesne with the annexation of the Vexin. Then in 1100, he took control of Bourges.

It was at the aforementioned Council of Clermont that the First Crusade was launched. Philip at first did not personally support it because of his conflict with Urban II. Philip's brother Hugh of Vermandois, however, was a major participant.

Philip died in the castle of Melun and was buried per request at the monastery of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire – and not in St Denis among his forefathers. He was succeeded by his son, Louis VI, whose succession was, however, not uncontested. According to Abbot Suger: “ … King Philip daily grew feebler. For after he had abducted the Countess of Anjou, he could achieve nothing worthy of the royal dignity; consumed by desire for the lady he had seized, he gave himself up entirely to the satisfaction of his passion. So he lost interest in the affairs of state and, relaxing too much, took no care for his body, well-made and handsome though it was. The only thing that maintained the strength of the state was the fear and love felt for his son and successor. When he was almost sixty, he ceased to be king, breathing his last breath at the castle of Melun-sur-Seine, in the presence of the [future king] Louis... They carried the body in a great procession to the noble monastery of St-Benoît-sur-Loire, where King Philip wished to be buried; there are those who say they heard from his own mouth that he deliberately chose not to be buried among his royal ancestors in the church of St. Denis because he had not treated that church as well as they had, and because among so many noble kings his own tomb would not have counted for much. ”

view all 56

Philippe I, roi de France's Timeline

1052
1052
1060
1060
- 1108
Age 8
France
1072
1072
Age 20
France
1078
1078
Age 26
Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1080
1080
Age 28
1081
December 1, 1081
Age 29
Paris, Île-de-France, France
1083
1083
Age 31
Reims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1085
1085
Age 33
France
1087
1087
Age 35
France
1092
May 15, 1092
Age 40
Ile de France, France