Pierpont Edwards

Is your surname Edwards?

Research the Edwards family

Pierpont Edwards's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Pierpont Edwards

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (present USA)
Death: Died in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States
Place of Burial: Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Rev. Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Edwards
Husband of Frances Edwards and Mary Edwards
Father of Henrietta Frances Whitney; John Stark Edwards; Henry W. Edwards, Governor, U.S. Senator; Moses Ogden Edwards; Mary Edwards and 4 others
Brother of Sarah Parsons; Esther Burr; Jerusha Brainerd; Mary Dwight (Edwards); Lucy Woodbridge and 8 others

Occupation: Attorney, US DIstrict Court Judge, Assisted with writing the US Constitution & spoke Indian so proficiently he said he "thought in Indian", Judge, Head of the Democratic party in Connecticut
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Pierpont Edwards

A Patriot of the American Revolution for CONNECTICUT (SOLDIER). DAR Ancestor #: A036750 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierpont_Edwards

Pierpont Edwards (April 8, 1750 – April 5, 1826) was a delegate to the American Continental Congress, and later a United States federal judge. He has been described as "a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr"[citation needed]. Pierpont Edwards was the founder of the Toleration Party in Connecticut.


He was born in Northampton, Massachusetts as the 11th and youngest child of the Rev. Jonathan Edwards. Pierrepont Edwards graduated from Princeton College in 1768, at the age of 18, and entered private practice of law in New Haven, Connecticut in 1771. He served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, and thereafter was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1777, a Delegate from Connecticut to the Continental Congress from 1787 to 1788, and a member of the Connecticut Convention held in January 1788, a convention that ratified the Constitution of the United States. After the treason of Benedict Arnold, he became administrator of that officer's estate. Edwards was again in the Connecticut House of Representatives from 1784 to 1785 and from 1787 to 1790. He was in private practice of law in New Haven, Connecticut from 1790 to 1806, also serving in that time as the United States Attorney for Connecticut.


On February 21, 1806, Edwards was nominated by President Thomas Jefferson to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut vacated by Richard Law. Edwards was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 24, 1806, and received his commission the same day, serving thereafter for twenty years, until his death.


He died in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and was interred at Grove Street Cemetery. Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio is named for him.[1] There is a dormitory building at UMass Amherst named after him as well.


He was the uncle of Aaron Burr, Theodore Dwight, and Timothy Dwight IV, and father of Henry W. Edwards and John Stark Edwards.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pierpont Edwards was born April 8, 1750, in Northampton, Massachusetts as the 11th and youngest child of the Rev. Jonathan Edwards. His youth was passed among the Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Indians (also known as Mohicans), when his father was a missionary to these Indians. Pierpont became so proficient in the Mohican language that he was later wont to say he "thought in Indian."

He studied at Princeton, graduating at the age of 18 in 1768, and began the practice of law in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1771. He was elected to Connecticut's legislature several times. He was active in supporting the American colonies' independence from British rule, served in the Revolutionary Army, and was in two battles, including that of Danbury. Pierpont was appointed administrator of the estate of Benedict Arnold following Gen. Arnold's treason, and was a member of the Continental Congress during the last two years of that body's existence, 1787-1789. Pierpont Edwards was an able advocate for the Constitution in the ratification convention.

He was a member of the convention that framed the constitution of Connecticut; Speaker of the Connecticut House of Representatives, Judge of the U.S. District Court, and founder of the "Toleration party" in Connecticut. He was described as "a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr." He was an eminent lawyer and sometimes on cases as counsel with or against his nephew Col. Burr. He was a Democratic leader, and the first Grand Master of Masons in Connecticut. George Washington attended the "Blue Meeting house" with Edwards when in New Haven. He died April 5, 1826, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, at 76 years old, is buried in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, married May 1769, Frances, second daughter of Moses Ogden of Elizabeth, New Jersey, and sister of David Ogden. She died in New Haven, July 7, 1800 at the age of 51. He then married Mary Tooker who died Sept 6, 1859, at age 96 (according to her gravestone).

On February 21, 1806, Edwards was nominated by President Thomas Jefferson to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut vacated by Richard Law. Edwards was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 24, 1806, and received his commission the same day, serving thereafter for twenty years, until his death.

Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio is named for him. There is a dormitory building at U Mass Amherst named after him as well.

Pierpont Edwards was the uncle of Aaron Burr, Theodore Dwight, and Timothy Dwight IV, and father of Henry Waggaman Edwards and John Stark Edwards.

Henry Waggaman Edwards, senator, son of Pierpont, born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1779 ; died there, 22 July 1847, was graduated at the College of New Jersey (which later became Princeton) in 1797, and studied at the Litchfield Law School. He settled in New Haven, and was twice elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving from December 6, 1819, till March 3, 1823. He was appointed U. S. senator to fill a vacancy, and subsequently elected for a term, serving from December 1, 1823, till 4 March 1827. He was afterward elected a member of the state senate (1827-9), and of the state house of representatives, of which he was chosen speaker in 1830. In 1833 he was elected governor of Connecticut, and again in 1835 and 1838. In 1833 he received the degree of LL.D. from Yale. During his term of office as governor he recommended a geological survey of the state, which was accordingly made.

--------------------

Born April 8, 1750, Princeton College 1768, his youth was passed among the Stockbridge Indians whose language he acquired perfectly. He began practicing law in New haven 1771, was active in favor of Independence, served in the Revolutionary Army & was in 2 battles, including that of Danbury. Pierrepont was a member of the old Continental Congress 1787-1789; and an able advocate for the Constitution in the ratification convention.

He was a member of the convention that framed the constitution of Conn; Speaker of the Conn House of Reps, Judge of the U.S. District Court, founder of the "Toleration party" in Connecticut. He was an eminent lawyer and sometimes on cases as counsel with or against his nephew Col. Burr. He was a Democratic leader, and the first Grand Master of Masons in Conn. Washington Attended the "Blue Meeting house" with Edwards when in New Haven. He died Bridgeport, Connecticut, April 5, 1826, at 76 years old, is buried in Grove St. Cemetery, New Haven, married may 1769, Frances, second daughter of Moses Ogden of Elizabeth new Jersey and sister of David Ogden. She died in New Have, July 7, 1800 in the 51st year of her age. He then married Mary Tooker who died Sept 6, 1859, at age 96 per her gravestone.

Pierrepont Edwards, lawyer, youngest son of Jonathan, Sr., born in Northampton, Massachusetts, 8 April 1750; died in Bridgeport, Connecticut, 5 April 1826. From the fact that his father was a missionary to the Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Indians, he early became so proficient in their language that he was wont to say that he "thought in Indian." He was graduated at Princeton in 1'768, and began the practice of law in New Haven in 1771. He was frequently elected to the legislature, and was appointed administrator of the estate of Benedict Arnold at the time of his treason. He took an early stand in favor of independence, and served in the Revolutionary army, taking part in two hard-fought battles.

He was a member of the Continental congress of 1787'8, and an able advocate of the constitution of the United States in the convention held to ratify it. He was the founder of the Toleration party in Connecticut, and by his ability and perseverance drew upon himself the animosity of the Calvinists.

At the time of his death he was a judge of the U. S. district court.

Henry Waggaman Edwards, senator, son of Pierrepont, born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1779 ; died there, 22 July 1847, was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1797, and studied at the Litchfield Law School. He settled in New Haven, and was twice elected to congress as a Democrat, serving from 6 December 1819, till 3 March 1823. He was appointed U. S. senator to fill a vacancy, and subsequently elected for a term, serving from 1 December 1823, till 4 March 1827. He was afterward elected a member of the state senate (1827'9), and of the state house of representatives, of which he was chosen speaker in 1830. In 1833 he was elected governor of Connecticut, and again in 1835 and 1838. In 1833 he received the degree of LL.D. from Yale. During his term of office as governor he recommended a geological survey of the state, which was accordingly made.

-------------------- Pierpont Edwards was born April 8, 1750, in Northampton, Massachusetts as the 11th and youngest child of the Rev. Jonathan Edwards. His youth was passed among the Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Indians (also known as Mohicans), when his father was a missionary to these Indians. Pierpont became so proficient in the Mohican language that he was later wont to say he "thought in Indian."

He studied at Princeton, graduating at the age of 18 in 1768, and began the practice of law in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1771. He was elected to Connecticut's legislature several times. He was active in supporting the American colonies' independence from British rule, served in the Revolutionary Army, and was in two battles, including that of Danbury. Pierpont was appointed administrator of the estate of Benedict Arnold following Gen. Arnold's treason, and was a member of the Continental Congress during the last two years of that body's existence, 1787-1789. Pierpont Edwards was an able advocate for the Constitution in the ratification convention.

He was a member of the convention that framed the constitution of Connecticut; Speaker of the Connecticut House of Representatives, Judge of the U.S. District Court, and founder of the "Toleration party" in Connecticut. He was described as "a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr." He was an eminent lawyer and sometimes on cases as counsel with or against his nephew Col. Burr. He was a Democratic leader, and the first Grand Master of Masons in Connecticut. George Washington attended the "Blue Meeting house" with Edwards when in New Haven. He died April 5, 1826, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, at 76 years old, is buried in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, married May 1769, Frances, second daughter of Moses Ogden of Elizabeth, New Jersey, and sister of David Ogden. She died in New Haven, July 7, 1800 at the age of 51. He then married Mary Tooker who died Sept 6, 1859, at age 96 (according to her gravestone).

On February 21, 1806, Edwards was nominated by President Thomas Jefferson to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut vacated by Richard Law. Edwards was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 24, 1806, and received his commission the same day, serving thereafter for twenty years, until his death.

Pierpont Township, Ashtabula County, Ohio is named for him. There is a dormitory building at U Mass Amherst named after him as well.

Pierpont Edwards was the uncle of Aaron Burr, Theodore Dwight, and Timothy Dwight IV, and father of Henry Waggaman Edwards and John Stark Edwards.

Henry Waggaman Edwards, senator, son of Pierpont, born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1779 ; died there, 22 July 1847, was graduated at the College of New Jersey (which later became Princeton) in 1797, and studied at the Litchfield Law School. He settled in New Haven, and was twice elected to Congress as a Democrat, serving from December 6, 1819, till March 3, 1823. He was appointed U. S. senator to fill a vacancy, and subsequently elected for a term, serving from December 1, 1823, till 4 March 1827. He was afterward elected a member of the state senate (1827-9), and of the state house of representatives, of which he was chosen speaker in 1830. In 1833 he was elected governor of Connecticut, and again in 1835 and 1838. In 1833 he received the degree of LL.D. from Yale. During his term of office as governor he recommended a geological survey of the state, which was accordingly made.

--------------------

Born April 8, 1750, Princeton College 1768, his youth was passed among the Stockbridge Indians whose language he acquired perfectly. He began practicing law in New haven 1771, was active in favor of Independence, served in the Revolutionary Army & was in 2 battles, including that of Danbury. Pierrepont was a member of the old Continental Congress 1787-1789; and an able advocate for the Constitution in the ratification convention.

He was a member of the convention that framed the constitution of Conn; Speaker of the Conn House of Reps, Judge of the U.S. District Court, founder of the "Toleration party" in Connecticut. He was an eminent lawyer and sometimes on cases as counsel with or against his nephew Col. Burr. He was a Democratic leader, and the first Grand Master of Masons in Conn. Washington Attended the "Blue Meeting house" with Edwards when in New Haven. He died Bridgeport, Connecticut, April 5, 1826, at 76 years old, is buried in Grove St. Cemetery, New Haven, married may 1769, Frances, second daughter of Moses Ogden of Elizabeth new Jersey and sister of David Ogden. She died in New Have, July 7, 1800 in the 51st year of her age. He then married Mary Tooker who died Sept 6, 1859, at age 96 per her gravestone.

Pierrepont Edwards, lawyer, youngest son of Jonathan, Sr., born in Northampton, Massachusetts, 8 April 1750; died in Bridgeport, Connecticut, 5 April 1826. From the fact that his father was a missionary to the Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Indians, he early became so proficient in their language that he was wont to say that he "thought in Indian." He was graduated at Princeton in 1'768, and began the practice of law in New Haven in 1771. He was frequently elected to the legislature, and was appointed administrator of the estate of Benedict Arnold at the time of his treason. He took an early stand in favor of independence, and served in the Revolutionary army, taking part in two hard-fought battles.

He was a member of the Continental congress of 1787'8, and an able advocate of the constitution of the United States in the convention held to ratify it. He was the founder of the Toleration party in Connecticut, and by his ability and perseverance drew upon himself the animosity of the Calvinists.

At the time of his death he was a judge of the U. S. district court.

Henry Waggaman Edwards, senator, son of Pierrepont, born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1779 ; died there, 22 July 1847, was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1797, and studied at the Litchfield Law School. He settled in New Haven, and was twice elected to congress as a Democrat, serving from 6 December 1819, till 3 March 1823. He was appointed U. S. senator to fill a vacancy, and subsequently elected for a term, serving from 1 December 1823, till 4 March 1827. He was afterward elected a member of the state senate (1827'9), and of the state house of representatives, of which he was chosen speaker in 1830. In 1833 he was elected governor of Connecticut, and again in 1835 and 1838. In 1833 he received the degree of LL.D. from Yale. During his term of office as governor he recommended a geological survey of the state, which was accordingly made.

view all 15

Pierpont Edwards's Timeline

1750
April 8, 1750
Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (present USA)
April 15, 1750
1769
May 7, 1769
Age 19
Elizabethtown, NJ
1770
1770
Age 19
1771
December 24, 1771
Age 21
East Windsor, Hartford, CT
1777
August 23, 1777
Age 27
New Haven, New Haven, CT
1779
October 1779
Age 29
East Windsor, Hartford, CT
1781
August 1781
Age 31
New Haven, New Haven, CT
1781
Age 30
1782
August 12, 1782
Age 32
Bridgeport, Fairfield, CT