Pieter Wolphertse Wolfertson Van Couwenhoven (Van Kouwenhoven), Lt. (1614 - 1689) MP

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Birthplace: Amersfoort, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Death: Died in New Amsterdam, New York, United States
Occupation: Brewer, Miller/Brewer, soldier/farmer
Managed by: James Earl Curry
Last Updated:

About Pieter Wolphertse Wolfertson Van Couwenhoven (Van Kouwenhoven), Lt.

Pieter Wolfertsen (also Wolphertsen) van Couwenhoven. Brewer. July 11, prior to 1658. Brewer Pieter Wolfertsen van Couwenhoven almost made history. As one of the first schepens in the newly incorporated municipality of New Amsterdam, he and two others were called upon to arrange for the security of the city. But the contract they offered to build a wall at the northern end of the city was priced so low that it attracted no bids. So the Council took over, conscripting “the citizens without exception” to dig a ditch five feet deep and 12 feet wide, and build the wall that lent Wall Street its name.

Biographical Notes Source:(Stokes, V.2)

--------------------

Notes for Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven:

Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was born circa 1614 at Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was the son of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van

Kouwenhoven married Hester Daws, daughter of Dawes Symon, on December 2, 1640 at Dutch Reformed Church, New York City, New York County, New York. Before January 7, 1642. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Maria du Trieux had a

relationship which resulted in issue. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Aeltje Sibrants obtained a marriage license on November 4, 1665 at New York. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven married Aeltje Sibrants on November 22, 1665.

Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven married Josynthe Thomas on May 19, 1699; Not all historians agree that this marriage took place .

Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was also known as Peter Van Cowenhoven. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was also known as Pieter Wolfertsen Van

Kouwenhoven. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was also known as Pieter Kowenhoven. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was also known as Pieter Van Couwenhoven. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven.

I, the undersigned Pieter Wolphersen, hereby acknowledge for myself, my heirs and successors that this day, date underwritten, I have adopted,as I do hereby adopt, Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven, my own daughter, whom I have begotten and procreated by Maria de Truy, promising therefore that from this date I shall do by the above-named, my daughter, as a god fearing father is bound and ought to do by his own legitimate daughter; therefore, I hereby discharge and release Cornelis Volckersen, husband and

guardian of the aforesaid Maria de Truy, from all charges and responsibilities incidental to the bringing up of a child till she becomes of age; I, Pieter Wolphersen, promising to look after the child, to let her learn to read and to bring her up according to my means.

Furthermore, if I do not beget any children by my present wife, the above named child shall be my rightful heiress and inheritrix, as if she were duly begotten in lawful wedlock, and if it happens that children be begotten by me and my wife, the above named

Aeltjen Pieters shall receive, like the legitimate children on my side, a just child's portion of all such goods, means and effects as it shall please the Lord God Almighty to bestow on me. Requesting that this may have effect before all courts, I have signed this

without fraud in the presence of the subscribing witnesses hereto invited. Done, the 7th day of January 1642.

This is x the mark of Pieter Wolphersen

Jacob Couwenhoven

Philippe du Trieux

Acknowledged before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary on January 7, 1642. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven commissioned a Lt. during the Esopus War on June 30, 1663. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven in 1688 at Brewer, Elizabethtown, Essex County, New Jersey.

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven:

pos Annetje Peterson+

Children of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Hester Daws:

Hester Van Kouwenhoven (after 1641 - )

Cornelius Van Kouwenhoven+ (after 1641 - )

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Maria du Trieux:

Altie Van Kouwenhoven+ (before January 7, 1642 - )

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Aeltje Sibrants: -------------------- Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was possible father and daughter. He was also known as Pieter Wolfertsen Van Kouwenhoven. He was also known as Peter Van Cowenhoven. He was also known as Pieter Kowenhoven. He was also known as Pieter Van Couwenhoven. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was born c 1614 at Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. He was the son of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter. Pieter married Hester Daws, daughter of Dawes Symon, on 2. Dec. 1640 at Dutch Reformed Church, New York City, New York County, New York. B 7. Jan. 1642 Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Maria du Trieux had a relationship which resulted in issue.

I, the undersigned Pieter Wolphersen, hereby acknowledge for myself, my heirs and successors that this day, date underwritten, I have adopted, as I do hereby adopt, Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven, my own daughter, whom I have begotten and procreated by Maria de Truy, promising therefore that from this date I shall do by the above-named, my daughter, as a god fearing father is bound and ought to do by his own legitimate daughter; therefore, I hereby discharge and release Cornelis Volckersen, husband and guardian of the aforesaid Maria de Truy, from all charges and responsibilities incidental to the bringing up of a child till she becomes of age; I, Pieter Wolphersen, promising to look after the child, to let her learn to read and to bring her up according to my means.

Furthermore, if I do not beget any children by my present wife, the above named child shall be my rightful heiress and inheritrix, as if she were duly begotten in lawful wedlock, and if it happens that children be begotten by me and my wife, the above named Aeltjen Pieters shall receive, like the legitimate children on my side, a just child's portion of all such goods, means and effects as it shall please the Lord God Almighty to bestow on me. Requesting that this may have effect before all courts, I have signed this without fraud in the presence of the subscribing witnesses hereto invited. Done, the 7th day of January 1642.

This is x the mark of Pieter Wolphersen Jacob Couwenhoven Philippe du Trieux Acknowledged before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary.

Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was commisoned a Lt. during the Esopus War on 30. Jun. 1663.


He and Aeltje Sibrants obtained a marriage license on 4. Nov. 1665 at New York. Pieter married Aeltje Sibrants on 22. Nov. 1665. Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven was was a brewer in 1688 at Elizabethtown, Essex County, New Jersey. He married Josynthe Thomas on 19. May. 1699; Not historians agree that this marraige took place.      

Peter Covenhoven, or Conover, purchased land in what is now Atlantic County in 1695, between which date and 1698 he took up 150 acres in one tract, also 250 acres bounding on Great Egg Harbor River and Patconk Creek.

The founder of this family was Wolphert Garretson Van Courvenhoven, who came from Amersfoot, in the province of Utrecht, Holland, in 1630, and settled near Albany. He soon afterwards re­moved to Manhattan Island and was enrolled among the burghers of New Amsterdam, now New York. In 1636 he bought a tract of land on Long Island of the Indians, for which he received confirmation of patent from the Dutch in 1658. This tract was known as Flatlands, and here lie died in 1662. He had sons Jacob, Garret and Peter, all born in Holland, who came over with him in 1630. The son Peter, from whom descended the Conovers of Atlantic, was married three times. He first married Hester Symons Dows, De­cember 2, 1640; second Alye Sybrants, November 22, 1665; third Josyntee Thomas, May 19, 1699.

Peter Conover was settled in New Amsterdam (New York) as early as 1633. ,He engaged in mercantile pursuits with his brother Jacob, who was a miller, a considerable trade being carried on in flour, which was bolted in windmills. Jacob became embarrassed in some private speculations and Peter separated his business connections. The property of Jacob, consisting of a good stone dwelling and a mill, was sold. Peter continued his mercantile pursuits and also engaged in brewing, then a profitable business. He also held civil positions and was a magistrate in 1652-4-8-9 and 1661-3. His residence in New York was in Pearl street, near Whitehall, and his place of business at the corner of those streets. He was also a lieutenant in the military service under General Stuyvesant, and on several occasions was in service against unfriendly Indians. In 1663 the Dutch who were settled at Esopus (now Kingston), on the Hudson River, were set upon by a large band of savages. The male portion of the settlers had gone to the field to their accustomed labor, when a number of savages entered the village in a careless manner, sauntering among the inhabitants. Soon after, they sounded their war whoop and began to kill or take captive the women and children. Many of the men were also killed in the field. The total loss of the Dutch was seventy; twenty-five killed and forty-five taken captive. Twelve dwellings, being every house, were destroyed. The mill alone was left. General Stuyvesant ordered Captain Martin Kriger and Lieutenant Covenhoven to retaliate. Their company consisted of two hundred and ten men. of whom forty were friendly Indians, and they marched to Esopus late one afternoon in July. Proceeding four miles, they halted until the moon rose and then marched again, but the country being wild they could not proceed by night. The day being come, they marched forward, felling trees to cross streams, for they had wagons and a cannon. With great difficulty they proceeded twenty-four miles and came within four miles of an Indian fort, to which all the captives had been taken. Lieutenant Coven­hoven was sent forward with one hundred and sixteen men to sur­prise the fort, but the Indians had decamped to the mountains, tak­ing their captives with them. Covenhoven continued in hot pursuit and reached an Indian camp, but that too was deserted. The pur­suit was given tip after burning up the Indian stores of maize, beans and grain growing. They then marched to another fort, thirty-six miles distant, when a fight took place and several savages were killed.

Some years later Covenhoven became involved in lawsuits and his temper was soured by some adverse decisions in suits to which he was a party. As he thought these decisions unjust, he made some remarks derogatory of the character of the court, for which he was sentenced to a brief imprisonment and fined. For these reasons he left New Amsterdam in disgust, and Valentine's New York Manual says he retired to a farm which he owned at Elizabethtown, New Jersey, where he spent most of his time.

The surname of this family, originally Courvenhoven, it is said, means "cold farms." In earliest New Jersey records it is given as Corvenhoven, Covenover and Covenhoven, and about the time of the Revolution many members adopted the spelling now generally used of Conover. The descendants in old Gloucester of Peter Covenhoven have a good Revolutionary record. One Peter Covenhoven was a lieutenant, commissioned November 14, 1777; Isaac, John and Joseph were privates. Of those who gave their names as Conover, David, Jesse, Micajah, Peter and Peter B., were soldiers in that war. The family branched over into other counties, and among these Isaiah Conover was a member of the Legislature many years ago from Salem County. Another descendant named Joseph went to old Monmouth County, and was in the Legislature in 1824-26. The given names of Peter and Joseph are quite frequent among descendants of the first Peter. The name of the founder of the Conover family, Wolphert Garretson Van Courvenhoven, means Wolphert the son of Garret of Courvenhoven. Garret, the father of Wolphert, must have been born over three hundred years ago, as his grandson, Peter, was in business in New York in 1633. The Conovers have substantial claim to he considered an old family, as their known family record dates back at least three centuries.

First Families of Eyren Haven.

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven pos Annetje Peterson+

Children of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Hester Daws Hester Van Kouwenhoven (a 1641 - ) Cornelius Van Kouwenhoven+ (a 1641 - )

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Maria du Trieux Altie Van Kouwenhoven+ (b 7. Jan. 1642 - )

Child of Lt. Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven and Aeltje Sibrants Peter Cownover+ (27. Feb. 1669 - 21. Mar. 1704) -------------------- Pieter Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven, Lt.

  • birth; circa 1614, Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • husband of; Maria du Trieux
  • commisioned a Lt. during the Esopus War

-------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/i/n/Joyce-A-Kintzel/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0877.html

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Pieter Wolphertse Van Couwenhoven, Lieutenant's Timeline

1614
1614
Amersfoort, Utrecht, The Netherlands
1640
December 2, 1640
Age 26
New Amsterdam, New Netherlands
1642
January 7, 1642
Age 28
New Amsterdam, New York
1644
1644
Age 30
Yoeternoude, Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
1665
November 22, 1665
Age 51
1669
February 27, 1669
Age 55
Long Island, New York, United States
1689
1689
Age 75
New Amsterdam, New York, United States
????
30
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