Private Robert Harris Jr.

Is your surname Harris?

Research the Harris family

Private Robert Harris Jr.'s Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Robert Harris, Jr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hucclecote, Gloucestershire, England
Death: Died in Kaysville, Davis, Utah, USA
Place of Burial: Kaysville City Cemetery, Kaysville, Davis, Utah, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Harris, Sr. and Sarah Harris
Husband of Hannah Maria Eagles Harris
Father of Joseph Robert Harris; Elizabeth Harris Van Orden; William "C" Harris; Thomas Eagles Harris; Enoch Harris and 9 others
Brother of John Harris; William Harris I died young; William Harris, II and Dianah "Diana" Harris

Managed by: Eldon Clark (C)
Last Updated:

About Private Robert Harris Jr.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Aaron Johnson Company (1850)

Find a Grave

Birth: Dec. 26, 1807, Hucclecote, Gloucestershire, England

Death: Feb. 29, 1876, Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, USA

Birth year on both stones is incorrect. Parish Registries of Leigh and Deerhurst, Gloucester, England show he was born at Hucclescote, Gloucestershire, England 26 December 1807 and christened 21 Feb 1808 at the Parish Church of Churchdown.

Robert was a son of Robert Harris, Sr., and Sarah Oakey. He married Hannah Maria Eagles, daughter of Ann Sparkes and Thomas Eagles on 18 Mar 1835, by their Methodist minister. Because English law decreed marriage was legal only if performed in the Church of England, they were remarried 28 September 1835. After posting banns in the church for four Sundays, they were married again, by the Reverend John Bishop at Saint Mary De Lode, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. His sister Elizabeth and her husband, Daniel Browett, were their witnesses.

Robert raised beef cattle and was a butcher by trade, as was his father and grandfather. He was an accomplished boxer, fighting at fairs and prize fights in England.

Robert and his family were converted to the LDS faith by Apostle Wilford Woodruff and baptized 11 June 1848 by Elder Thomas Kington. On 16 Feb 1841, they sailed from Liverpool aboard the "Echo". Traveling with him were his wife, Hannah Maria (8 months pregnant), children; Joseph Robert 5, Elizabeth 3, William "C" 14 mos, along with Robert's youngest sister Diana and her husband, Thomas Bloxham, their sister Elizabeth, her husband, Daniel Browett, and Daniel's younger Sister, Martha Rebecca.

A month out to sea his fourth child, Thomas Eagles Harris, was born on the Atlantic Ocean. They arrived at the Port of New Orleans (USA) 16 April 1841. Thomas is the paternal great grandfather of this contributor.

The family settled at Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, where son Enoch was born 1843, and daughter Sarah Ann, 1845. Robert volunteered to serve in the U.S. Army, Mormon Battalion in the War with Mexico, July 1846.

By 1847 his wife & children were in Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska, where Robert III was born and died before Robert returned from the march to California in early 1848. His sister, Diana H. Bloxham and his sister Elizabeth's son, Moroni Browett, also died before he was able to return for them.

His brother-in-law, Daniel Browett, had remained in California to lead the Sutter's Fort Battalion members over the pass near Donner Summitt. They were ambushed and he was killed, along with two fellow trail scouts, by Indians.

At Council Point, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, Robert's 8th child, Daniel Browett Harris, was born Oct. 1848. He was named to honor their beloved uncle, slain at Tragedy Spring, California.

After reaching the Great Salt Lake Valley, they settled at Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, where the following children were born: Maria 1851, Lucy Emma 1852, Janetta (twin) 1854, Henrietta (twin) 1854, Robert Charles 1856, Julia Ann 1858, Mary Ellen 1860.

Robert was an officer in the Utah Militia, serving in Echo Canyon. He served a mission to Muddy River Arizona for the LDS Church.

He moved his family to a farm at Muddy Creek, near Malad River, Idaho in 1869. After falling from a load of corn (about 1874) and suffering a concussion, he stated to his children, "This fall will cause my death". After failing to fully recover, they moved back to Kaysville near Holmes Creek. Robert then donated much time to the building of the Salt Lake Temple and died at his home 29 Feb 1876. LDS President, Wilford Woodruff, preached his funeral sermon.

He was buried alongside his wife, Hannah Maria, and his sister, Elizabeth, at Kaysville City Cemetery, Utah.

Parents:

Robert Harris (1777 - 1839)

Sarah Oakey Harris (1781 - 1837)


Spouse:

Hannah Maria Eagles Harris (1817 - 1888)


Children:

Elizabeth Harris Van Orden (1838 - 1893)

William Harris (1839 - 1911)

Thomas Eagles Harris (1841 - 1928)

Robert III Harris (1847 - 1847)

Daniel Browett Harris (1848 - 1922)

Henrietta Harris Bernhisel (1854 - 1909)

Robert Charles Harris (1856 - 1928)

Julia Ann Harris Hall (1858 - 1936)


--------------------

Robert Harris (1807-1876) and Hannah Maria Eagles (1817-1888) Family History. Robert Harris and Hannah Maria Eagles-- A Condensed History: The man who walked 5000 miles. While serving in the Mormon Battalion, Robert Harris, Jr. walked from Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Mexico and Southern California. He was released in Los Angeles in 1847, then traveled via the Fort Hall route into the Salt Lake Valley, arriving in October. Not finding his family, he continued on to Council Bluffs, arriving in mid-December. On the trip from the Salt Lake Valley to Council Bluffs he nearly starved to death. As a answer to prayer, a flock of wild turkeys flew into his camp, saving him and his companions. He was delivering a mule from one of the Battalion men, a close friend, to the man's wife in Winter Quarters. Despite nearly starving, he and the other men did not eat the mule.

Early life of Robert Harris, Jr.-Robert Harris was born 16 December 1807 in Hucclescote, England, the son of Robert Harris, Sr. and Sarah Oakey. He had two older brothers, William and John, and two younger sisters, Elizabeth and Dianah. His father was a butcher so that is the trade Robert adopted. The family moved to Deerhurst shortly after his birth. As a young man Robert loved to fight bare-fisted at the county fairs. His sister, Elizabeth, was his biggest fan.

His eventual wife, Hannah Maria Eagles, was born 10 June 1817, in Apperley, Gloucestershire, England. ,She went by "Maria" on the emigrant ship and in her temple sealing records, so we will refer to her by that name in this family history. H,er parents were Thomas Eagles and Ann Sparks. ,She had three living brothers and three living sisters. Robert and Maria were married 18 March 1835 by their Methodist minister but in September had the marriage repeated by the Church of England to make it "official." Their first son, Joseph, was born 26 March 1836, and a daughter, Elizabeth, was born 1 April 1838. Another son, William, was born 23 November 1839.

Their conversion - Sometime after their marriage they converted to the United Brethren Church. They were members when Elder Wilford Woodruff arrived in England and did missionary work in the Malvern Hills area where Robert and Maria were living. Daniel and Elizabeth Browett joined the Church immediately, but Robert resisted and actually was angry when he found Elder Woodruff teaching a group of people in his home. He tried to throw Woodruff out, but the Spirit overcame him and he was baptized in April a few days after Maria.

Life in Nauvoo - Robert's brother-in-law, Daniel Browett, was the leader of a company of Saints that sailed from England to America on 16 February 1841 on the ship "Echo". Robert was on of six assistants Daniel chose. The ship was blown off course during the voyage and they arrived in New Orleans two weeks late on 16 April. Another son was born to Robert and Maria during the voyage, a son they named Thomas Eagles Harris. A steamboat was secured for passage up the Mississippi to Nauvoo and they arrived in Nauvoo 1 May 1841.

Robert and Maria bought a lot in Nauvoo next to Daniel and Elizabeth. He eventually owned three lots, so may have moved two times. Maria received her patriarchal blessing from Hyrum Smil 12 November 1841, and Robert received his in April 1845. Two more children were born while they lived in Nauvoo, Enoch on 29 May 1843 and Sarah Ann on 11 June 1845. Robert served in the Lauvoo Legion. Every tenth day he worked on the Nauvoo Temple. T hey received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple on 7 February 1846.

In May, Robert went into Iowa and worked, building a sod fence for a farmer in exchange for a pair of steers to pull his wagon so he could join the Mormon exodus as enemies of the Church drove them out of Nauvoo. They suffered many hardships crossing Iowa territory.

Mormon Battalion - Robert and Daniel enlisted in the Mormon Battalion on 16 July 1846. They walked to Mexico then to San Diego, Los Angeles, Sacramento, and finally to the Salt Lake Valley. When they arrived in Santa Fe in October, they wrote letters to their wives. Robert and Daniel were released form the Battlaion on 16 July 1847 in Los Angeles. They traveled north to the Sacramento area, but as they were progressing east toward the Salt Lake Valley, Brigham Young sent word that half the Battalion members should stay and work. Daniel stayed and Robert continued, taking a route through Fort Hall and into the Salt Lake Valley, expecting to find his family. They had not made it, so Robert and several other men immediately left for Winter Quarters, arriving there in mid-December after many hardships and nearly starving.

He found his family living in Winter Quarters and soon moved them to Council Point, Iowa, where they lived until they came to Utah in 1850. A little boy had been born while he was gone by he died 3 February 1847. Maria named him Robert. He is buried at Winter Quarters. After working for nearly two years in the area, Robert finally accumulated enough to buy a team and a wagon and brought his family to the Salt Lake Valley in 1850 in the Aaron Johnson Company.

Life in Utah - As soon as he arrived in the Salt Lake Valley he took his family to Kaysville where many of his friends from England had settled. The Harris family stayed with the Edward Phillips family for a short time until Robert could build a "wattle" house, composed of sticks and mud. He later built a log home and expanded it as time and resources permitted. The home eventually became large enough to hold Church meetings. Robert was a personal friend of Edward Phillips in England and Nauvoo. He farmed a piece of ground near the shores of the Great Salt Lake.

Other friends from England who settled in Kaysville were Levi Roberts, John Marriott, John Gailey, John Hyrum Green, and Joseph "Cap" Hill. His brother-in-law, Thomas Bloxham (and his sister Dianah Harris Bloxham) also settled in Kaysville but later moved to Cambridge, Bannock County, Idaho. Dianah died in Kanesville, Iowa. Robert donated labor to built the Salt Lake Temple on a regular basis.

Robert's oldest son, Joseph, married two of the daughters of John Hyrum Green--Charlotte and Elizabeth. Joseph had a farm in Kaysville for a time then moved to Portage. Robert and Maria had a total of 15 children, 13 of whom lived to marry. In 1857, Robert and Maria had their sealing repeated in the Salt Lake Endowment House (they were also sealed by Orson Hyde wile living in Council Point, Iowa). During this time Robert had advanced to the rank of Captain in the Utah Militia (or Nauvoo Legion). He was active in building the walls and trenches in Echo Canyon to help defend Salt Lake Valley against an advancing U.S. Army of 2500 men sent to put down the so-called "Mormon Rebellion."

When the army entered Utah the next spring, Robert moved his family south to Payson for their protection, abandoning their home and farm in Kaysville. The move came about the time Maria gave birth to another child. He was able to move his family back to Kaysville in July. In 1862, Robert participated in the "Morrisite War."

Mission to the "Muddy" - In about 1864, the church made an appeal for volunteers to help colonize an area in southeastern Nevada, near St. George, Utah. It was a lonely, barren wasteland, inhabited by marauding desert Indians who were among the poorest Indians in America. President Brigham Young's reasons for wanting to colonize the area, which became known as the "Muddy," boil down to three:

(1) the Civil War had induced a reconsideration of the desirability of importing commodities by way of the Colorado River, and for that purpose Call's Landing had been established in 1864; food, feed and supplies came in from that route.

(2) When the Civil War interrupted sources of [textiles], the Latter-Day Saints built a large cotton factory in Washington, near St. George. This factory now needed cotton, which could by grown in the Muddy region of southeastern Nevada.

(3) The Saints felt strongly that they had an obligation to work with the Indian bands of the region to help them raise food, encourage them to be friendly, and to remind them of their ancient heritage of greatness.

To accomplish these purposes, President Brigham Young asked for volunteers to settle southeastern Nevada, an area known as the Moapa Valley, site of present-day communities such as Overton and Logandale, where the Muddy River and White River converge and eventually empty into Lake Mead. Bishops called couples on missions to work in the area. Robert and Maria were called by their bishop to serve a mission there. However, when Brigham Young visited the area in 1865, he was surpised to find Robert and Maria there with their family. President Young asked why he was there. Robert replied, "Because my bishop called me." President Young responded by saying, "Brother Harris, you have done enough for this church. You may go home to Kaysville."

Life in Portage - n 1869 Robert sold his farm in Kaysville and moved to Portage to help colonize that part of northern Utah. Several of his married sons moved with him, including his oldest son, Joseph. It was difficult living there--in 1872 crickets destroyed their grain crop. later, he fell from a wagon load of corn and injured himself. He moved back to Kaysville in 1875, purchasing a brick home and a farm. He again assisted in the construction of the Salt Lake Temple.

Robert died 29 June 1876 in Kaysville and Wilford Woodruff spoke at his funeral. By then he had 15 children, 13 living. Maria died 29 September 1888 in Portage. They are buried together in Kaysville. T hey had 132 grandchildren. The land that Robert farmed near the Great Salt Lake at Kaysville has never been developed. It is now part of the Nature Conservancy.

Harris Family Ancestors--Robert and Maria were from England. Our Harris ancestors came from England. As we examine the pedigree chart of Robert Harris, Jr., we find that his father was Robert Harris, Sr., born in Badgeworth, Gloucestershire, on 17 March 1777. The father of Robert Harris, Sr., was Zachariah Harris III, born in Standish, Gloucestershire on 27 May 1732. Zachariah's father was Zachariah Harris, Jr., a son of Zachariah Harris, Sr. The father of Zachariah Harris, Sr. was Cornelius Harris, born in the middle of the 1600s in the Gloucestershire area.

Gloucestershire is like a county in the United States. It is the site of two important port cities, Bristol and Gloucester. The most famous landmark there is the Gloucester Cathedral, completed in 1457. The Harris family lived in the Vale area of Gloucestershire, in small villages up and down the Severn valley. This area is in the extreme northern part of the county, near Herefordshire.

Cornelius lived in the small parish of Charfield in the Cotswolds and V. Ben Blozham could not find any record of his birth, perhaps due to the disruptions taking place as the time during the upheaval resulting in the beheading of King Charles I and the ruling of Oliver Cromwell and the Puritan movement. Cornelius married a lady named Sarah sometime before 1673 and they had nine children. Cornelius was a butcher by trade and probably learned the trade from his father, which continued to be passed down. Robert Harris, Jr. was a butcher and dealer in livestock, as was his father.

The third son of Cornelius was Zachariah (our ancestor), who settled in nearby Owlpen (population about 100) after his marriage. He raised dairy cows and sheep as well as working as a butcher, and tilled the land as a farmer. He had a nice orchard containing apple and pear trees. During his life a new king ruled England and laws were relaxed, allowing the import of goods from other countries. Because of this, Zachariah was introduced to potatoes, like them, and began to raise them on his farm.

Zachariah named his fourth son Zachariah, Jr. This son migrated a little distance up the valley, living in Standish, Hardwick, and finally Quedgely. He died at the age of 31, leaving an estate of 500 pounds. His widow, Alice, never remarried and lived to age 81.

They had a son, Zachariah Harris III, born in Standish in 1732. He grew up under the reign of King George III and at the time the New World was being conquered. Consequently, he probably had good knowledge of the American colonies. His wife, Sarah, died after only eight years of marriage, leaving him four children. He married a widow with three children of her own, thus combining the two families. They lived in Churchdown, near Cheltenham, then moved to Badgeworth, five miles from Gloucester. it was an area ideal for working as a farmer, butcher and dealer in livestock. In later years his second wife died and he married a third time.

One of Zachariah Harris III's sons was Robert Harris, Sr., born at Badgeworth in 1777. At age 25, he married and followed in his father's footsteps as a butcher, farmer and dealer in livestock, living in Churchdown. This was in the hamlet of Hucklecot that had about 950 inhabitants at the time. The hamlet was only two and half miles from Glocester. Later, they moved to Sandhurst on the other side of Gloucestershire.

Robert Harris, Sr. died on 30 August 1839, two and a half years after his wife died. Although the record does not indicate for certain, he may have converted from Methodism to the United Brethren congregation before he died. We know that Robert Harris, Jr. and his wife, Maria, were members of that congregation prior to their baptism into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Robert Harris, Sr. died of a lung ailment. He left an estate of less than 300 pounds, which was divided among his five surviving children.

SOURCE: Family Search.org

---------------------------------------------

Box Elder Lore of the 1900 Century Published by the Box Elder chapter - Sons of the Utah Pioneers:

One of the first settlers of Portage, Box Elder County, was Robert Harris, who settled there in 1868 with his wife and thirteen children. Two of their fifteen children having died in infancy. Born at Gloucestershire, England, Dec. 26, 1808 a son of Robert Harris and Sarah Okey. He married Hannah Maria Eagles about 1835. A member of the United Brethren, a religious group who were almost all converted to the Mormon Church. He was baptized by Wilford Woodruff who was then on a mission to England in March of 1840. With his wife on the 10th of Feb. 1841, boarded the sailing vessel "Echo" and started for America. Being ten weeks on the trip to Nauvoo, Illinois, where he was located until driven out with the Saints.

Robert Harris enlisted with the Mormon Battalion at Council Bluffs, Iowa, July 16, 1846 under the command of Captain Cook and was honorably discharged at Los Angeles, July 21, 1847. He was a member of Company E under Captain Daniel C. Davis. He was a butcher while in the service.

He returned to his family in Winter Quarters, Dec 25, 1847 and in the spring of 1850 prepared to come to Utah obtaining two old wagons and fixing them up with covers and bows. They arrived in Utah in the fall of 1850 in Aaron Johnson's company living first in Salt Lake and moving to Kaysville, in 1854. Captain of a company in the Echo Canyon War, he moved his family south with the Saints when Johnson's army came in 1958. He went on a mission to Southern Utah in 1865 with his family and moved to Portage, Box Elder County in the early part of 1868 where he farmed and raised livestock. He died suddenly Jan. 29, 1876 and President Woodruff preached his funeral sermon.

SOURCE: Family Search.org and Obtained at the Brigham City, Utah Library

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following information is from Find A Grave.com:

Birth year on both grave stones is incorrect. Parish Registries of Leigh and Deerhurst, Gloucester, England show he was born at Hucclescote, Gloucestershire, England 26 December 1807 and christened 21 Feb 1808 at the Parish Church of Churchdown. Robert was a son of Robert Sr. Harris and Sarah Oakey. He married Hannah Maria Eagles, daughter of Ann Sparkes and Thomas Eagles on 18 Mar 1835, by their Methodist minister. Because English law decreed marriage was legal only if performed in the Church of England, they were remarried 28 September 1835. After posting banns in the church for four Sundays, they were married again, by the Reverend John Bishop at Saint Mary De Lode, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. His sister Elizabeth and her husband, Daniel Browett, were their witnesses.

Robert raised beef cattle and was a butcher by trade, as was his father and grandfather. He was an accomplished boxer, fighting at fairs and prize fights in England. Robert and his family were converted to the LDS faith by Apostle Wilford Woodruff and baptized 11 June 1848 by Elder Thomas Kington. On 16 Feb 1841, they sailed from Liverpool aboard the "Echo". Traveling with him were his wife, Hannah Maria (8 months pregnant), children; Joseph Robert 5, Elizabeth 3, William "C" 14 mos, along with Robert's youngest sister Diana and her husband, Thomas Bloxham, their sister Elizabeth, her husband, Daniel Browett, and Daniel's younger Sister, Martha Rebecca.

A month out to sea his fourth child, Thomas Eagles Harris, was born on the Atlantic Ocean. They arrived at the Port of New Orleans (USA) 16 April 1841. Thomas is the paternal great grandfather of this contributor.

The family settled at Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, where son Enoch was born 1843, & daughter Sarah Ann, 1845. Robert volunteered to serve in the U.S. Army, Mormon Battalion in the War with Mexico, July 1846.

By 1847 his wife & children were in Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska, where Robert III was born and died before Robert returned from the march to California in early 1848. His sister, Diana H. Bloxham and his sister Elizabeth's son, Moroni Browett, also died before he was able to return for them.

His brother-in-law, Daniel Browett, had remained in California to lead the Sutter's Fort Battalion members over the pass near Donner Summitt. They were ambushed and he was killed, along with two fellow trail scouts, by Indians.

At Council Point, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, Robert's 8th child, Daniel Browett Harris, was born Oct. 1848. He was named to honor their beloved uncle, slain at Tragedy Spring, California.

After reaching the Great Salt Lake Valley, they settled at Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, where the following children were born: Maria 1851, Lucy Emma 1852, Janetta (twin) 1854, Henrietta (twin) 1854, Robert Charles 1856, Julia Ann 1858, Mary Ellen 1860.

Robert was an officer in the Utah Militia, serving in Echo Canyon. He served a mission to Muddy River Arizona for the LDS Church.

He moved his family to a farm at Muddy Creek, near Malad River, Idaho in 1869. After falling from a load of corn (about 1874) and suffering a concussion, he stated to his children, "This fall will cause my death". After failing to fully recover, they moved back to Kaysville near Holmes Creek. Robert then donated much time to the building of the Salt Lake Temple and died at his home 29 Feb 1876. LDS President, Wilford Woodruff, preached his funeral sermon.

He was buried alongside his wife, Hannah Maria, and his sister, Elizabeth, at Kaysville City Cemetery, Utah.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~***~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The following is a tribute from his 4th great granddaughter:

It has been said that you don't know another man's trials until you've walked in his footsteps. I know that American Veterans who have defended our country by serving in our armed forces are unique in their bravery.

The history of this brave service is interesting to me because I wonder what it takes to be a "hero". Some people say a hero isn't afraid of anything. I think a hero is someone who does what's right, even if they are afraid. Those who've put their lives on the line to protect others are too sensitive and intelligent to have not felt the sting of fear.

My great grandfather served in the United States Navy during World War II. It was an awful time; when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, it was a savage attack; many naval men were killed. My grandmother said her father never talked about the fear, just the destruction of so many lives. When she asked him why he'd joined the navy during such a dangerous time, he would laugh it off saying, "Well, it was that or the air force, so I knew I could swim, and I sure as heck couldn't fly, so I decided to take my chances on a ship instead of a plane!"

My great uncle served in the air corps as a medic during the Korean War. He came home with post traumatic syndrome (shell shock) and even now, after nearly sixty years, he still suffers from it's effects. He doesn't talk about it but, I remember the family saying how it affected his nerves. He, many times, had to drag wounded men onto hovering helicopters while the enemy would fire at them, often shooting legs off a struggling comrade.

Once they were in the helicopter, it was Uncle Kim's job to save them long enough to get them to mobile medical units for emergency surgery. He still has nightmares about the brutality of the enemy, who routinely disregarded "rules of war".

I have read accounts of earlier wars, having had ancestors who served in the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, the Civil War and the War with Mexico. It makes me feel more patriotic to know that my family members have thus served our country and I think it is important to honor them and not forget their sacrifices.

My family celebrates Memorial Day by decorating graves. Several times we've been involved in planning programs at the local cemetery honoring our veterans. We also participate in placing flags on veteran's graves.

Two years ago, we decided to go on a pioneer trek; the trail we took in Wyoming was part of a route the Mormon Battalion soldiers took in coming west to protect the United States in the War with Mexico.

My great great grandfather was one of those soldiers; as I walked that dreary desert, I knew I was walking in the footsteps of a hero. We should all cherish their memories, letting them never be forgotten!

Parents:

 

Robert Harris (1777 - 1839)

 

Sarah Oakey Harris (1781 - 1837)


Spouse:

 

Hannah Maria Eagles Harris (1817 - 1888)


Children:

 

Joseph Robert Harris (1836 - 1896)

 

Elizabeth Harris Van Orden (1838 - 1893)

 

William Harris (1839 - 1911)

 

Thomas Eagles Harris (1841 - 1928)

 

Enoch Harris (1843 - 1924)

 

Sarah Ann Harris Green (1845 - 1882)

 

Robert III Harris (1847 - 1847)

 

Daniel Browett Harris (1848 - 1922)

 

Lucy Emma Phillips (1852 - 1919)

 

Henrietta Harris Bernhisel (1854 - 1909)

 

Jenetta Harris Parkinson (1854 - 1921)

 

Robert Charles Harris (1856 - 1928)

 

Julia Ann Harris Hall (1858 - 1936)

 

Mary Ellen Harris McCrary (1860 - 1921)


Siblings:

 

William Harris (1804 - 1804)

 

William Harris (1805 - 1840)

 

John Harris (1806 - 1859)

 

Robert Harris (1807 - 1876)

 

Dianah "Diana" Harris Bloxham (1809 - 1847)

 

Zacharias Harris (1811 - 1811)

 

Elizabeth Harris Browett (1814 - 1899)

 

Caroline Harris (1815 - 1815)

Maintained by: history4sure

Originally Created by: SMSmith

Record added: Feb 02, 2000

Find A Grave Memorial# 123972

view all 18

Private Robert Harris Jr.'s Timeline

1807
December 26, 1807
Hucclecote, Gloucestershire, England
1836
March 26, 1836
Age 28
1838
April 1, 1838
Age 30
Gloucester, England
1839
November 23, 1839
Age 31
Cheshire, England
1841
March 29, 1841
Age 33
UT, USA
1843
May 23, 1843
Age 35
Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA
1845
1845
Age 37
1847
1847
Age 39
1848
1848
Age 40
1852
1852
Age 44