Rædburh, Queen Consort of Wessex

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Rædburh, Queen Consort of Wessex

Also Known As: "Redburch", "Redburga", "Redburge", "Redburh", "Raedburh", "Readburth", "Raedbuth"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Wessex , England
Immediate Family:

Wife of Egbert, King of Wessex
Mother of Aethelwulf, King of Wessex

Occupation: Queen Consort of Wessex, Frankisk prinsesse
Managed by: Jason Scott Wills
Last Updated:

About Rædburh, Queen Consort of Wessex

Redburga or Raedburh was the wife of king Egbert of Wessex and may have been the sister-in-law of Charlemagne as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard; other sources describe her as his sister (although Charlemagne's only sister was named Gisela) or his great-granddaughter (which would be difficult to accomplish in the forty-six years after Charlemagne's birth) or the daughter of his sister-in-law or his niece. Some genealogies identify her as the granddaughter of Pepin the Short and great-granddaughter of Charles Martel; other scholars doubt that she existed at all, other than as a name in a much later manuscript, her existence might been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

She appears in a medieval manuscript from Oxford and is described as "regis Francorum sororia" which translates as "sister to the King of the Franks". More specifically, sororia means "pertaining to someone's sister", hence sister-in-law.

According to some accounts, Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800. Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa, King of Mercia, returned to England in 802, where he became King of Wessex and later king of all England. Raedburh's son Ethelwulf succeeded Egbert. Raedburh was also, according to this version of events, the grandmother of Thyra Dannebod Queen of Denmark, who was the wife of the Viking King Gorm "the Old" of Denmark and the mother of Harald Bluetooth Blataand King of Denmark.

Confusing matters still further is the rival tradition that Raedburh survived Egbert, who by these accounts died in 811. This individual devoted her life to helping the poor and became known as "Saint Ida of Herzfeld". Among her reported acts of kindness were filling a stone coffin with food each day, then giving it to the poor; she also reportedly founded the church at Hofstadt, Westphalia, and the convent of Herzfeld, sometimes recorded as Herford or Hervorden. where she is buried. She was canonized on November 26, 980, is the patron saint of brides and widows and is frequently depicted either as carrying a church or with a dove hovering over her head.

It appears, however, that this Saint Ida was married to a different Egbert, a duke of all Saxony between the Rhine and the Weser appointed by Charlemagne. Unless the Egbert reported in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to have regained his throne in Wessex in 802 was, in fact, serving instead as a feudal supporter of Charlemagne in Saxony for many of the years following his return to Wessex, Saint Ida was not the Raedburh who married Egbert of Wessex. Given the irreconcilable differences in the dates of death given for these two Egberts, that conclusion appears more likely.

This Egbert and Saint Ida are reported to be the parents of Warin, the abbot of Corvey from 826 to 856, Count Cobbo the Elder, and Addila or Mathilde, the abbess of Herzfeld; others suggest that a Saxon duke Liudolf, grandfather of Henry the Fowler, was also a son of Egbert and Ida and that Mathilde was their granddaughter.

Her son Ethelwulf later became King of England. Her grandson is Alfred the Great.

--------------------

Said to have been sister of King of Franks, who would have been Charlemagne, but there is little information about her.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800 . Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex .

--------------------

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800. Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex .

--------------------

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800 . Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800 . Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex .

--------------------

BIOGRAPHY: General Notes:

Queen of WESSEX, Queen of WEST SAXONY.

BOOKS

Barber Grandparents: 125 Kings, 143 Generations, Ted Butler Bernard and Gertrude Barber Bernard, 1978, McKinney TX, p74: "269S Ecgbert, King of Wessex, (S of 258, F of 279); attacked and ravaged surrounding small kingdoms of Kent, Sussex, Essex, East Anglia, Northumbria, and Mercia which he defeated and forced to accept him as their overlord; married Radeburgh."

Kings and Queens of Great Britain, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1990: "Ecgbert, King of West Saxons 802, King of Kent 825, First to be styled King of the Angles or English 829/830-839, Mar Redburga, Died 839."

ANCESTRAL FILE

Ancestral File 9HMF-TD Redburch Queen of WEST SAXONY, Ver 4.10 G70H-77 Redburg Queen of WESSEX Born Abt 788 Wessex England, KQGB Redburga.

MARRIAGE: Marriage Information:

Redburch married King Egbert WEST SAXONY, son of King Ealhmund KENT and Queen Eahlmund KENT, in , Wessex, England. (King Egbert WEST SAXONY was born in 775-784 in , West Saxony, England and died about 4 Feb 839 in , West Saxony, England.)

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800 . Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex .

The uncertainty over Redburga has been further complicated by the existence of an Egbert at the Carolingian court, and attempts have been made to identify this continental nobleman with the exiled Wessex prince. That Egbert, who was duke of all Saxony between the Rhine and the Weser, died in 811. He was survived by his widow, who devoted her life to helping the poor and became known as "Saint Ida of Herzfeld", the patron saint of brides and widows. These identifications would make Redburga identical to Saint Ida. However, unless the Egbert reported in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to have regained his throne in Wessex in 802 was, in fact, serving instead as a feudal supporter of Charlemagne in Saxony for many of the years following his return to Wessex, Saint Ida was not the Raedburh who married Egbert of Wessex. Given the irreconcilable differences in the dates of death given for these two Egberts, this solution is dismissed by most scholars.

Redburga would be mother of Æthelwulf, who later became King of England. Her grandson is Alfred the Great.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

Redburga or Raedburh appears in a late medieval manuscript held by Oxford University as wife of king Egbert of Wessex . She is described there as "regis Francorum sororia", which means "pertaining to the sister of the French king". This is somewhat vague and has been taken to mean sister of Charlemagne , sister-in-law as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard , or some more distant relationship. Her very existence has been questioned, she being found only in manuscript of a much later date, suggested to have been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

Chronologically, it has been suggested that Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800 . Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa , King of Mercia , returned to England in 802 , where he became King of Wessex .

--------------------

Redburga or Raedburh was the wife of king Egbert of Wessex and may have been the sister-in-law of Charlemagne as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgard; other sources describe her as his sister (although Charlemagne's only sister was named Gisela) or his great-granddaughter (which would be difficult to accomplish in the forty-six years after Charlemagne's birth) or the daughter of his sister-in-law or his niece. Some genealogies identify her as the granddaughter of Pepin the Short and great-granddaughter of Charles Martel; other scholars doubt that she existed at all, other than as a name in a much later manuscript, her existence might been forged to link the early Kings of England to the great West Emperor.

She appears in a medieval manuscript from Oxford and is described as "regis Francorum sororia" which translates as "sister to the King of the Franks". More specifically, sororia means "pertaining to someone's sister", hence sister-in-law.

According to some accounts, Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800. Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa, King of Mercia, returned to England in 802, where he became King of Wessex and later king of all England. Raedburh's son Ethelwulf succeeded Egbert. Raedburh was also, according to this version of events, the grandmother of Thyra Dannebod Queen of Denmark, who was the wife of the Viking King Gorm "the Old" of Denmark and the mother of Harald Bluetooth Blataand King of Denmark.

Confusing matters still further is the rival tradition that Raedburh survived Egbert, who by these accounts died in 811. This individual devoted her life to helping the poor and became known as "Saint Ida of Herzfeld". Among her reported acts of kindness were filling a stone coffin with food each day, then giving it to the poor; she also reportedly founded the church at Hofstadt, Westphalia, and the convent of Herzfeld, sometimes recorded as Herford or Hervorden. where she is buried. She was canonized on November 26, 980, is the patron saint of brides and widows and is frequently depicted either as carrying a church or with a dove hovering over her head.

It appears, however, that this Saint Ida was married to a different Egbert, a duke of all Saxony between the Rhine and the Weser appointed by Charlemagne. Unless the Egbert reported in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to have regained his throne in Wessex in 802 was, in fact, serving instead as a feudal supporter of Charlemagne in Saxony for many of the years following his return to Wessex, Saint Ida was not the Raedburh who married Egbert of Wessex. Given the irreconcilable differences in the dates of death given for these two Egberts, that conclusion appears more likely.

This Egbert and Saint Ida are reported to be the parents of Warin, the abbot of Corvey from 826 to 856, Count Cobbo the Elder, and Addila or Mathilde, the abbess of Herzfeld; others suggest that a Saxon duke Liudolf, grandfather of Henry the Fowler, was also a son of Egbert and Ida and that Mathilde was their granddaughter.

Her son Ethelwulf later became King of England. Her grandson is Alfred the Great. -------------------- WIKIPEDIA:

Redburga or Raedburh was the wife of king Egbert of Wessex and may have been the sister-in-law of Charlemagne as the sister of his fourth wife, Luitgarde; other sources describe her as his sister (although Charlemagne's only sister was named Gisela) or his great-granddaughter (which would be difficult to accomplish in the forty-six years after Charlemagne's birth) or the daughter of his sister-in-law or his niece. Some genealogies identify her as the granddaughter of Pepin the Short and great-granddaughter of Charles Martel; other scholars doubt that she existed at all, other than as a name in a much later manuscript. She appears in a medieval manuscript from Oxford and is described as "regis Francorum sororia" which translates as "sister to the King of the Franks". More specifically, sororia means "pertaining to someone's sister", hence sister-in-law.

According to some accounts, Charlemagne arranged Raedburh's marriage to Egbert in the year 800. Egbert, who had been forced into exile at Charlemagne's court by Offa, King of Mercia, returned to England in 802, where he became King of Wessex and later king of all England. Raedburh's son Ethelwulf succeeded Egbert. Raedburh was also, according to this version of events, the grandmother of Thyra Dannebod Queen of Denmark, who was the wife of the Viking King Gorm "the Old" of Denmark and the mother of Harald Bluetooth Blataand King of Denmark. Confusing matters still further is the rival tradition that Raedburh survived Egbert, who by these accounts died in 811. This individual devoted her life to helping the poor and became known as "Saint Ida of Herzfeld". Among her reported acts of kindness were filling a stone coffin with food each day, then giving it to the poor; she also reportedly founded the church at Hofstadt, Westphalia, and the convent of Herzfeld, sometimes recorded as Herford or Hervorden. where she is buried. She was canonized on November 26, 980, is the patron saint of brides and widows and is frequently depicted either as carrying a church or with a dove hovering over her head.

It appears, however, that this Saint Ida was married to a different Egbert, a duke of all Saxony between the Rhine and the Weser appointed by Charlemagne. Unless the Egbert reported in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to have regained his throne in Wessex in 802 was, in fact, serving instead as a feudal supporter of Charlemagne in Saxony for many of the years following his return to Wessex, Saint Ida was not the Raedburh who married Egbert of Wessex. Given the irreconcilable differences in the dates of death given for these two Egberts, that conclusion appears more likely.

This Egbert and Saint Ida are reported to be the parents of Warin, the abbot of Corvey from 826 to 856, Count Cobbo the Elder, and Addila or Mathilde, the abbess of Herzfeld; others suggest that a Saxon duke Liudolf, grandfather of Henry the Fowler, was also a son of Egbert and Ida and that Mathilde was their granddaughter. Her son Ethelwulf later became King of England. Her grandson is Alfred the Great.

References Lives of the Saints:(www.catholic-forum.com/saints/sainti14.htm) Essay on the relationship between Egbert and Charlemagne:(archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/1998-12/0912872813)

[edit] Sources On Latin usage: Niermeyer, Mediae latinitatis lexicon minus

Children 1. AETHELWULF OF WESSEX b: ABT 800 2. Editha 3. Athelstan

Sources:

  1. Title: WIKIPEDIA
     Publication: www
     Date: 1 Jan 2008
     Page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redburga
  2. Title: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650
     Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists
     Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
     Publication: Genealogical Publishing Company,
     Repository:
     Media: Book
     Note: Prokasy Library
     Date: 1999
     Place: Baltimore, MD, USA
     Date: 1 Mar 2007
     Page: Line 1-13 

-------------------- Leo: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 78.

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Rædburh, Queen Consort of Wessex's Timeline

774
774
795
795
Age 21
Wessex Kingdom, England
857
January 13, 857
Age 83
Wessex , England
1911
June 20, 1911
Age 83
June 20, 1911
Age 83
June 20, 1911
Age 83
1924
February 5, 1924
Age 83
February 5, 1924
Age 83
February 5, 1924
Age 83
1993
January 28, 1993
Age 83