R' Shmuel Margolioth A.B.D. Posen

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Rabbi Shmuel (C.Judge Posna) Margaliyos (Margolioth), A.B.D. Posen

Hebrew: Rabbi Shmuel מרגליות Margaliyos (Margolioth), A.B.D. Posen
Nicknames: "R' Shmuel Margolioth - Dayan MiPosen"
Birthdate:
Death: Died
Immediate Family:

Son of Moshe מרגליות Margolios, [in Prague] and Bluma Katz
Husband of Jutta bat Jacob Margolios
Father of Harav Moshe Mordechai Halevi Margaliyos; Rabbi Menachem Mendel Margoliot (Of Vilna); Rabbi Zvi Hirsh Margoliot (Of Vladmir) and Rabbi Abraham Margoliot (Of Zolkiev)
Brother of Yitchak Isaac Margolios
Half brother of Shmaya Margolios and Avigdor Margolios

Occupation: Av Beis Din Posne, Av bais din Posen
Managed by: Yanki Wolf
Last Updated:

About R' Shmuel Margolioth A.B.D. Posen

Margolioth/Posen In a document which was issued by Sigismund I., dated Aug. 6, 1527, R. Samuel Margolioth of Posen was confirmed as chief rabbi of Great Poland, and was vested with important powers over all the Jews of that district.

According to the Baal Shem Tov, There are three famous Jewish families that are pure, generation after generation: Horowitz, Margoliot and Shapiro. (The Light and Fire of the Baal Shem Tov by Yitzhak Buxbaum)

Margolioth (מַרְגָּלִיּוֹת). This Polish family of Talmudic scholars that traces its descent from Rashi, on the one side, and from the families of Shor and Samuel Edels on the other.

The first Margolioth known was Samuel, dayyan at Posen about 1550; one of his sons, Moses Mordecai, was rabbi at Cracow. The daughter of R. Moses Mordecai married a relative, Mendel Margolioth, rabbi at Przemysl (d. April 2, 1652), and bore him eight sons, all of whom were distinguished Talmudists.

MARGOLIOTH FAMILY:

Polish family of Talmudic scholars that traces its descent from Rashi, on the one side, and from the families of Shor and Samuel Edels on the other. The first Margolioth known was Samuel, dayyan at Posen about 1550; one of his sons, Moses Mordecai, was rabbi at Cracow.

The daughter of R. Moses Mordecai married a relative, Mendel Margolioth, rabbi at Przemysl (d. April 2, 1652), and bore him eight sons, all of whom were distinguished Talmudists. It is not certain from which one of Mendel Margolioth's sons Judah of Potok (d. 1672) was descended.

From Mordecai ben Menahem Monis, the great-great-grandson of Judah of Potok, descended a line of scholars. Mordecai himself was a cabalist and had Talmudic controversies with the author of Noda' bi-Yehudah, among others.

The most renowned of this branch of the Margolioth family was Ephraim Solomon of Brody (d. there August 5, 1828). Ephraim Solomon was not a rabbi, but his numerous works were accepted in the rabbinical world as authoritative.

There are numerous scholars bearing the name of Margolioth whose relationship to the family, though probable, can not be determined.

  • ▪ Abi Ezra Selig Margolioth:
  • ▪ Abraham Elijah b. Nathan Margolioth:
  • ▪ Alexander Margolioth:
  • ▪ Asher Solomon Margolioth.
  • ▪ Ephraim Zalman Margolioth:
  • ▪ Ḥayyim Mordecai Margolioth:
  • ▪ Isaac ben Jacob Margolioth:
  • ▪ Jacob Margolioth of Nuremberg:
  • ▪ Jacob Margolioth of Ratisbon:
  • ▪ Jacob Koppel b. Ẓebi Margolioth:
  • ▪ Judah Löb ben Asher Margolioth:
  • ▪ Meïr b. Ẓebi Hirsch Margolioth:
  • ▪ Moses b. Judah Löb Margolioth:
  • ▪ Moses Mordecai ben Samuel Margolioth:
  • ▪ Naphtali Margolioth (Margaritha):
  • ▪ Saul b. Meïr Margolioth:
  • ▪ Moses ben Samuel Levi Margaliot, chief rabbi of Transylvania (1778-1817)
  • ▪ Mordecai Jaffe-Margolies-Schlesinger of Vienna (David Sered): Rabbi at Bösing (Pezinok), Hungary; descendant of Mordecai Jaffe, and, on his mother's side, of Liva b. Bezaleel of Prague; author of "Meḥolat ha-Maḥanayim", responsa (Pressburg, 1859); "Har Tabor", responsa, with a supplement in German directed against Dr. W. A. Meisel, chief rabbi of Budapest (Pressburg, 1861); and "Ḥazon la-Mo'ed", on the calendar.
  • . . . More

References This article incorporates text from the 1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia, a publication now in the public domain.