Yehuda ben Betzalel Loew [Maharal of Prague] המהר״ל מפראג

Prague, Czech Republic

Is your surname Loew [Maharal of Prague]?

Research the Loew [Maharal of Prague] family

Yehuda ben Betzalel Loew [Maharal of Prague] המהר״ל מפראג's Geni Profile

Records for Yehuda Loew [Maharal of Prague]

183 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Yehuda ben Betzalel Loew [Maharal of Prague]

Hebrew: יהודה בן בצלאל לאו המהר"ל מפראג
Also Known As: "המהר"ל מפראג", "Maharal of Prague", "Loew / רבי יהודה לאו המהר"ל מפראג", "The Marahal of Prague"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: נולד י"ד ניסן ה'רע"ב or 1522, Poznan (Posen), Poland
Death: Died in Prague, Czech Republic
Cause of death: נפטר בשיבה טובה, י"ח אלול ה'שס"ט
Place of Burial: Old Jewish Cemetery at Josefov, Praha, Czech Republic
Immediate Family:

Son of Betzalel Loew [Maharal father] and Mrs. Betzalel Loew, [Maharal's mother -
Husband of Perel Loew [Maharal's wife]
Father of Tilla Sabatka-Wahl [Maharal daughter #3]; Rabbi Bezalel "Charif" Loew [Maharal son #1]; Gitele Maharal daughter Brandeis [Maharal daughter #2]; Rachel Heller-Wallerstein [Maharal Dau. #4]; Leah Katz [Maharal daughter #5] and 2 others
Brother of Daughter of R'Betzalel Loew [Maharal sis. #1]; Rabbi Chaim Loew [Maharal brother #2]; Rabbi Sinai ben Betzalel Loew; Rabbi Shimshon Loew [Brother #4 of Maharal]; Mrs. Zecharia Mendel Kloizner [Maharal sis. #5] and 1 other

Occupation: ABD & Chief Rabbi, Talmudist, Kabalist, Philosopher, Mystisist, rabbi, Chief Rabbi of Prague
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Yehuda ben Betzalel Loew [Maharal of Prague] המהר״ל מפראג

Talmudist, Kabbalist, chief rabbi of Prague. Popularly known as the "MaHaRaL", the abbreviation of "Moreinu Harav Rabbi Loew" ("Our teacher Rabbi Loew").

The Maharal of Prague was a towering giant in Torah and Kabbalah and a fearless leader of European Jewry during the sixteenth century.

Within the world of Torah and Talmudic scholarship, he is known for his works on Jewish philosophy and Jewish mysticism and his work Gur Aryeh al HaTorah, a supercommentary on Rashi's Torah commentary.

The Maharal is particularly known for the legend that he created The Golem of Prague, an animate being fashioned from clay, using mystical powers based on the esoteric knowledge of how God created Adam. This legend, which first appeared in print nearly 200 years after the Maharal's death, states he created the golem to defend the Jews of the Prague Ghetto from antisemitic attacks; particularly blood libels emanating from certain prejudiced quarters. See the silent movie "Der Golem (1920)", by Paul Webbner & Carl Boese.

Rabbi Loew is buried at the Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague in Josefov, where his grave and intact tombstone can still be visited.

___________________________________________________________________

The Maharal was probably born in Poznań (now in Poland), to Rabbi Betzalel (Loew), whose family originated from the German town of Worms. His birth year is uncertain, with different sources listing the eve of Passover Seder 1512 in Poznan, Poland (or 1520? or 1526? and birthplace Worms or Prague). His uncle Jacob was Reichsrabbiner ("Rabbi of the Empire") of the Holy Roman Empire, his brother Chaim of Friedberg a famous rabbinical scholar. Traditionally it is believed that the Maharal's family descended from the Babylonian Exilarchs (during the era of the Geonim) and therefore also from the Davidic dynasty. He received his formal education in various yeshivas (Talmudical schools), other sources claim that he was an "autodidact" and all his studies were of his own and not in any Yeshiva.

One biography of Maharal - ויקיגניה - claims that the Maharal was married twice. His first wife was the daughter of Rabbi Abraham Haiut, and Lea & Feigele were daughters of this marriage. Most other biography versions of Maharal do not mention the first marriage and named Pearl as the mother of all Maharal's children, including Lea and Feigele (see below).

The Maharal married at the "late" age of 32 (1544) to Pearl, of a wealthy family. He had six girls and one boy who was named after the Maharal's father, Betzalel.

He was independently wealthy, probably as a result of his father's successful business enterprises and his wife's generous dowry. He accepted a rabbinical position in 1553 as Landesrabbiner of Moravia at Mikulov (Nikolsburg), directing community affairs but also determining which tractate of the Talmud was to be studied in the communities in that province. He also revised the community statutes on the election and taxation process. Although he retired from Moravia in 1573 at age 60, the communities still considered him an authority long after that. In 1573 he moved to Prague, where he opened a yeshivah and became mentor of many outstanding disciples. The most prominent among these is Rabbi Lipman Heller, author of Tosefot Yomtov on the Mishnah. Not being appointed Chief Rabbi of Prague in 1583, he moved to his birth town Poznen in Poland as Chief Rabbi for 4 years, then returned to Prague for 5 years, and In 1592 the Maharal accepted the position of Chief Rabbi of Poland in Poznen, returning to Prague in 1597 to serve as its Chief Rabbi till 1604.

He was a prolific writer, and his works include: Tiferet Yisrael on the greatness of Torah and mitzvot; Netivot Olam, on ethics; Be'er Hagolah, a commentary on rabbinic sayings; Netzach Yisrael, on exile and redemption; Or Chadash, on the book of Esther; Ner Mitzvah, on Chanukah; Gevurot Hashem, on the Exodus; and many others. The Maharal's works reveal his illustrious personality as a profound thinker who penetrates the mysteries of Creation and metaphysics, clothing kabbalistic themes in a philosophic garment. His unique approach to Jewish thought influenced the ideologies of Chassidism and Mussar.

The Maharal castigated the educational methods of his day where boys were taught at a very young age and insisted that children must be taught in accordance with their intellectual maturity. Thus, Talmud and certainly not tosafot should be introduced only when the child is developmentally capable of fully comprehending what is being taught. He recommended that the system proposed in Pirkei Avot be followed.

The Maharal was a staunch leader of his community, he became the hero of many legends in which he appears as the defender of Prague Jewry against all its enemies, assisted by a Golem, a robot he made and gave life to by placing sacred writings in his mouth.

The Maharal's company and advice was sought by kings and nobleman giving rise to many colorful legends.

The Maharal's synagogue, Altneu Schul, still exists today and is preserved as a shrine by the Prague municipal authorities, who in 1917 erected a statue in his honor.

In the Torah world the Maharal lives on in his writings, which are an enduring source of wisdom and inspiration.

  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Maharal's father, Betzalel ben Haïm Loeb (Loew) was born about 1480. Unlike his young brother, stayed behind to help his father and did not pursue studies in Poland. Bezalel married the daughter of Rabbi Chaim Issemheimeror married daughter of Rabbi Yitzchak Klober of Worms. They had four sons and three daughters. The MAHARAL was the youngest. He served as Rabbi of Worms (ווירמיז).

Betzalel’s tombstone reads: ”his praise and merits can not be told and no man like him can be found”

  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prague, Czech Republic - Institute Dedicated to Legendary Golem Creator Opens Today 09-18-2008.

Rabbi Judah Loew a 16th century scholar, is linked to the legend of the Golem. In Prague, Czech Republic an academic institute dedicated to the legendary 16th- Century Jewish scholar Rabbi Judah Loew, also known as the Maharal of Prague opened.

The Maharal Institute plans to educate future rabbis, introducing them to Talmud, Jewish law, ethics and mysticism as well as to Loew’s writings, said institute collaborator Tomas Jelinek. Rabbi Loew’s work has influenced generations of Jewish scholars but he has been best known for a legend according to which he had created the Golem, a man-like being with magic powers.

“People know him only as a Jewish magician,” Jelinek said of Loew. “We want to study the thoughts that had once originated in Prague, explore that Maharal again.”

The institute’s founding opens a year of events commemorating the 400th anniversary of Loew’s death in Prague in September 1609. His grave at the Old Town Cemetery is among the city’s chief tourist attractions.

  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech Republic - The 'Golem of Prague' Stamp Issued in Honor of The Maharal Published on: August 11, 2009, at 05:54 PM; News Source: Haaretz

Czech Republic - The post has issued a new stamp to mark 400 years since the death of Rabbi Yehuda Loew ben Bezalel, also known as the Maharal of Prague, who according to legend created a man out of clay.

The Maharal was an important rabbi in Prague in the 16th and early 17th centuries. He best known for the legend of the "Golem," in which he is said to have created from clay a living being that had superhuman powers and that was used to defend the Jews of the Prague Ghetto.

Still today, many believe that the body of the Golem is trapped in the attic of Prague's "Alt Noi Shul" synagogue.

The Maharal served as an admired teacher during a difficult time for Jews shortly after Spanish Inquisition, the Protestant reformation movement and other major social changes.

He is buried in the Jewish cemetery in the Prague old city, and his grave serves as a place of pilgrimage to many Jews every year. Advertisement:

Neighboring Slovakia has also recently paid respect to its Jewish past, having issued a stamp to commemorate the Chasam Sofer, a leading rabbi in the capital Bratislava in the first half of the century.

  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Some books/articles about the Maharal:

  • "Maharal: Emerging Patterns" (English);
  • "The Golem of Prague" (English);
  • "The Maharal of Prague" (English);
  • Did a Disciple of the Maharal Create a Golem?
  • ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Judah Loew ben Betzalel, alt. Loewe, Löwe, or Levai, (c. 1520 – 17 September 1609) widely known to scholars of Judaism as the Maharal of Prague, or simply The MaHaRaL, the Hebrew acronym of "Moreinu ha-Rav Loew," ("Our Teacher, Rabbi Loew") was an important Talmudic scholar, Jewish mystic, and philosopher who served as a leading rabbi in the city of Prague in Bohemia for most of his life.

Within the world of Torah and Talmudic scholarship, he is known for his works on Jewish philosophy and Jewish mysticism and his work Gur Aryeh al HaTorah, a supercommentary on Rashi's Torah commentary.

The Maharal is particularly known for the legend that he created The Golem of Prague, an animate being fashioned from clay, using mystical powers based on the esoteric knowledge of how God created Adam. This legend, which first appeared in print nearly 200 years after the Maharal's death, states he created the golem to defend the Jews of the Prague Ghetto from antisemitic attacks; particularly blood libels emanating from certain prejudiced quarters. There are no contemporary accounts of this occurring.

Rabbi Loew is buried at the Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague in Josefov, where his grave and intact tombstone can still be visited. His descendants' surnames include Loewy, Loeb, Lowy, Oppenheimer, Pfaelzer, and Keim.

The Maharal was probably born in Poznań (Poland, though Perels lists the birth town - mistakenly - as Worms, Germany) to Rabbi Bezalel (Loew), whose family originated from the German town of Worms. His birth year is uncertain, with different sources listing 1512, 1520 and 1526. His uncle Jacob was Reichsrabbiner ("Rabbi of the Empire") of the Holy Roman Empire, his brother Chaim of Friedberg a famous rabbinical scholar. Traditionally it is believed that the Maharal's family descended from the Babylonian Exilarchs (during the era of the geonim) and therefore also from the Davidic dynasty. He received his formal education in various yeshivas (Talmudical schools).

He was independently wealthy, probably as a result of his father's successful business enterprises. He accepted a rabbinical position in 1553 as Landesrabbiner of Moravia at Mikulov (Nikolsburg), directing community affairs but also determining which tractate of the Talmud was to be studied in the communities in that province. He also revised the community statutes on the election and taxation process. Although he retired from Moravia in 1588 at age 60, the communities still considered him an authority long after that.

One of his activities in Moravia was the rallying against slanderous slurs on legitimacy (Nadler) that were spread in the community against certain families and could ruin the finding of a marriage partner for the children of those families. This phenomenon even affected his own family. He used one of the two yearly grand sermons (between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur 1583) to denounce the phenomenon.

He moved back to Prague in 1588, where he again accepted a rabbinical position, replacing the retired Isaac Hayoth. He immediately reiterated his views on Nadler. On 23 February 1592, he had an audience with Emperor Rudolf II, which he attended together with his brother Sinai and his son-in-law Isaac Cohen; Prince Bertier was present with the emperor. The conversation seems to have been related to Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism) a subject which held much fascination for the emperor.

In 1592, the Maharal moved to Poznań, where he had been elected as Chief Rabbi of Poland. In Poznań he composed Netivoth Olam and part of Derech Chaim (see below). Towards the end of his life he moved back to Prague, where he died in 1609. He is buried there; his tomb is a famous tourist attraction. A daughter of the Maharal, born c 1565, married Rabbi Zachariah Mendel Gelernter d ? Poznan.

His name "Löw" or "Loew", derived from the German Löwe, "lion" (cf. the Yiddish Leib of the same origin), is a kinnuy or substitute name for the Hebrew Judah or Yehuda, as this name - originally of the tribe of Judah - is traditionally associated with a lion. In the Book of Genesis, the patriarch Jacob refers to his son Judah as a Gur Aryeh, a "Young Lion" (Genesis 49:9) when blessing him. In Jewish naming tradition the Hebrew name and the substitute name are often combined as a pair, as in this case. The Maharal's classic work on the Rashi commentary of the Pentateuch is called the Gur Aryeh al HaTorah, in Hebrew: "Young Lion [commenting] upon the Torah".

It is unknown how many Talmudic rabbinical scholars the Maharal taught in Moravia, but the main disciples from the Prague period include Rabbis Yom Tov Lipmann Heller and David Ganz. The former promoted his teacher's program of regular Mishnah study by the masses, and composed his Tosefoth Yom Tov (a Mishnah commentary incorporated into almost all published editions of the Mishnah over the past few hundred years) with this goal in mind. David Ganz died young, but produced the work Tzemach David, a work of Jewish and general history, as well as writing on astronomy; both the MaHaRal and Ganz were in contact with Tycho Brahe, the famous astronomer.

Jewish philosophy

In the words of a modern writer, the Maharal "prevented the Balkanization of Jewish thought" (Rabbi Yitzchak Adlerstein 2000, citing Rabbi Nachman Bulman).

His works inspired the Polish branch of Hasidism, as well as a more recent wave of Torah scholars originating from Lithuania and Latvia, most markedly Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezer Dessler (1892–1953) as well as Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook (1864–1935). A more recent authority who had roots in both traditions was Rabbi Isaac Hutner (1906–1980). Rabbi Hutner succinctly defined the ethos of the Maharal's teachings as being Nistar BeLashon Nigleh, meaning (in Hebrew): "The Hidden in the language of the Revealed". That is, the Maharal couched kabbalistic ideas in non-kabbalistic language. As a mark of his devotion to the ways of the Maharal, Rabbi Hutner bestowed the name of the Maharal's key work the Gur Aryeh upon a branch of the yeshiva he headed when he established its kollel (a yeshiva for post-graduate Talmud scholars) which then became a division of the Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin in New York during the 1950s, known as Kollel Gur Aryeh. Both of these institutions, and the graduates they produce, continue to emphasize the serious teachings of the Maharal. Rabbi Hutner in turn also maintained that Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808–1888) (Germany, 19th century) must also have been influenced by the Maharal's ideas basing his seemingly rationalistic Weltanschauung on the more abstract and abstruse teachings of the hard-to-understand Jewish Kabbalah.

Rabbi Judah Loew was not a champion of the open study of Kabbalah as such, and none of his works are in any way openly devoted to it. According to him, only the greatest of Torah scholars are able to discern his true original inspirations and the intellectual framework for his ideas in their complex entirety. Nevertheless, kabbalistic ideas permeate his writings in a rational and philosophic tone. His main kabbalistic influences appear to have been the Zohar, Sefer Yetzirah, and traditions of the Chassidei Ashkenaz, as Lurianic Kabbalah had not by that time reached Europe.

Although he could not reconcile himself to the investigations of Azariah di Rossi, he defused the tension between the Aggada (narrative, non-legal parts of the Talmud) and rationalism by his allegorical interpretations of difficult passages. He was entirely in favor of scientific research insofar as the latter did not contradict divine revelation, all the while insisting on finding deep meaning in all the contributions of Talmudic teachers.

DescendantsAmong his many descendants were Schneur Zalman of Liadi, founder of Chabad Hasidism. Through him, he is the ancestor of many prominent later Jewish individuals, including Menachem Mendel Schneerson, seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch, and Yehudi Menuhin, the famous violinist.

Literature

The legend of his creation of a golem inspired Gustav Meyrink's 1915 novel Der Golem. Various other books have been inspired by this legend, the authenticity of which has been doubted; although the Golem motif is old, the connection between the Golem on the one hand and the Maharal and Prague on the other is known only from circa 1837 The famous story of the Golem of Prague created by the Maharal, which is usually considered to be a Jewish folk story from the 18th century at the latest, is considered by literary resercher Eli Eshed, who had published research on the subject in Hebrew ( http://www.notes.co.il/eshed/60482.asp), to be a later literary invention. According to Eshed , the story was created by Jewish German writer Berthold Auerbach for his 1837 novel Spinoza. Eshed suppose that the story of the Golem of Prague is the original creation of Auerbach which served as a "trigger " to almost immediate explosion in publication for various poems, stories, plays, novels and such and so created a false impression that it is an "ancient folk story" when in reality it was a completely modern invention by a well known writer . Maharal is featured in the book He, She and It and the Dutch work De Procedure ("The Procedure", Harry Mulisch, 1999), both retellings of the Golem legend. A poem by Jorge Luis Borges, entitled El Golem also tells the story of Judah Loew (Judá León) and his giving birth to the Golem. In that poem, Borges quotes the works of German Jewish philosopher Gershom Scholem. "The Maharal" by Yaakov Dovid Shulman (in English) questions if the stories about the golem are true. Even a Caldecott Medal winner (Golem by David Wisniewski) mentions Loew as Rabbi Loew. The fictional book Iron Council by China Miéville has a character named Judah Low who creates golems. In Leo Perutz' historical novel Nachts unter der steinernen Brücke (By Night Under the Stone Bridge) Loew appears as a key figure.

Rabbi Loew (spelled as 'Low') is also a major character in Abraham Rothberg's 1970 "The Sword of the Golem." Rabbi Loew and his descendants figure prominently in 2002's "Sword of The Golem" and 2004's "The Council of Eleven: Shall We Not Revenge" both by Jeff Minde and Ken Tucker.

The Golem of Prague is a major plot device in Michael Chabon's 2000 The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

Works

  • Gur Aryeh ("Young Lion", see above), a supercommentary on Rashi's Pentateuch commentary
  • Netivoth Olam ("Pathways of the World"), a work of ethics
  • Tif'ereth Yisrael ("The Glory of Israel"), philosophical exposition on the Torah, intended for the holiday of Shavuot
  • Gevuroth Hashem ("God's Might[y Acts]"), for the holiday of Passover
  • Netzach Yisrael ("The Eternity of Israel"; Netzach "eternity", has the same root as the word for victory), on Tisha B'Av (an annual day of mourning about the destruction of the Temples and the Jewish exile) and the final deliverance
  • Ner Mitzvah ("The Candle of the Commandment"), on Hanukkah
  • Or Chadash ("A New Light"), on Purim
  • Derech Chaim ("Way of Life"), a commentary on the Mishnah tractate Avoth
  • Be'er ha-Golah ("The Well of the Diaspora"), an explanatory work on the Talmudic and Midrashic *Aggadah, mainly responding to interpretations by the Italian scholar Azariah di Rossi (min ha-Adumim)
  • Chiddushei Aggadot ("Novellae on the Aggada", the narrative portions of the Talmud), discovered in the 20th century
  • Derashot (collected "Sermons")
  • Divrei Negidim ("Words of Rectors"), a commentary on the Seder of Pesach, published by a descendant
  • Chiddushei al Ha-Shas, a commentary on Talmud, recently published for the first time from a manuscript by Machon Yerushalyim on Bava Metzia, others may be forthcoming.

Various other works, such as his responsa and works on the Jewish Sabbath and the holidays of Sukkot, Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, have not been preserved.

His works on the holidays bear titles that were inspired by the Biblical verse in I Chronicles 29:11: "Yours, O Lord, are the greatness, and the might, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty, for all that is in the heavens and on the earth [is Yours]; Yours is the kingdom and [You are He] Who is exalted over everything as the Leader." The book of "greatness" (gedula) on the Sabbath was not preserved, but the book of "power" (gevurah) is Gevurath Hashem, the book of glory is Tif'ereth Yisrael, and the book of "eternity" or "victory" (netzach) is Netzach Yisrael.

--------------------

-------------------- The LOEB (a.k.a. LÖEW/LÖEWE/LÖW/LIEB/LIV/LIVA/LIWA/LIWAI). Note: 2006 Maharal's ancestry under review see: www.davidicdynasty.org, Descendants, Rabbi Meir Perels' of Prague error in the date of death of Yehudah Leib the Elder (below) does not necessarily eliminate the possibility that the Maharal descended from King David, in some way other than through the so-called Yehudah Leib the Elder. Many indicators point to a tradition of descent from Rabbi Yehudah Hanassi, of the House of Hillel, who descended from King David’s son Shefatiah, and not through Hai Gaon who was descended from King Solomon. Unfortunately the names of the Maharal’s ancestors between his grandfather Chaim of Worms and Rabbi Yehudah Hanassi are not recorded in any known source .."

? R' Bezalel (Hazaken) ben Yehuda

*New research on the grave in Prague states the year to be 1539 and not 1439, as previously documented by Rabbi Meir Perels. Yehudah was known as: "Liva The Elder of Prague" and was the head of a Yeshiva in Worms. According to some manuscripts, Yehuda Lev Hazaken is the son of Isaac son of Bezalel Hazaken and the death year on Yehudah Lieb/Liva in Prague is actually 1539
  • Tzvi Saba son of Yosef Yoshke, Av Beit Din of Lublin, grandson of the great eagle, the absolute Gaon, head of the Exile, marana[xxvii] Liva son of Betzalel, of blessed and holy memory, known by the name Maharal from Prague. And his lineage is from the holy Tanna Reb Yehudah Hanassi as explained in the books Arkhei Hakinuim, Marot Tzovot.
  • above ref chfreedman.blogspot.com

-------------------- http://www.geni.com/family-tree/index/4432452399170023720

About יהודה בן בצלאל לאו המהר"ל מפראג] (עברית)

המהר"ל נולד ככל הנראה בפוזנן שבפולין, לרבי בצלאל, כבן הצעיר במשפחה של ארבעה בנים. אחיו היו גם הם תלמידי חכמים מובהקים: הראשון ר' חיים, תלמיד המהרש"ל, וחבירו ובעל הפלוגתא של הרמ"א, שגם השיג על הרמ"א בספרו "ויכוח מים חיים". השני סיני, אב"ד ניקלשבורג, שהיה גם רבו של תלמיד המהר"ל ר' דוד גאנץ, והשלישי ר' שמשון אב"ד קרמניץ. המהר"ל היה אוטודידקט ולא למד בישיבה, אלא מספרים ובאופן עצמאי. לעומת אחיו, חיים בן בצלאל מפרידברג, שלמד בישיבתו של רבי שלום שכנא מלובלין, לא ידוע שלמד מרב גדול כלשהו, ובאופן יוצא דופן הוא אינו מזכיר בכתביו שום אדם כמורו. בגיל 32 נשא לאישה את פרל, בתו הנמרצת ורבת פעלים של אחד מעשירי העיר, שלהם נולדו שש בנות ובן.

לפי מקור אחר - "ויקיגניה" - המהר"ל נישא בנישואים ראשונים לבתו של הגאון רבי אברהם חיות, אביו של רבי יצחק חיות בעל ה"אפי רברבי" (מקור: נפתלי אהרון וקשטיין, "ויתילדו" מספר 69). מנישואין אלה נולדו שתי בנות: לאה, שנישאה לרבי יצחק ב"ר שמשון כ"ץ, ופייגלה, שנישאה אף היא לרבי יצחק כ"ץ לאחר פטירת אחותה. לאה נפטרה בטרם נולדו לה בנים. בהיותו בן 32, המהר"ל נישא [בשנית?] לפרל לבית שמלקס (נולדה 1552 ;נפטרה בפראג 1610) ונולדו להם: 1. בצלאל חריף לאוו - נולד 1555 בפראג; נפטר בקלן ב 1600. 2. בן לאוו - שם לא ידוע. 3. בן לאוו - שם לא ידוע. 4. גיטלה לאוו - נפטרה 1635 - נישאה לשמעון ברנדיס. 5. רחל לאוו - נולדה 1539 פראג; נפטרה בפראג 1633 - נישאה לאברהם הלר פרנקל מפראג .1565-1591. 6. טילה לאוו - נישאה לצבי הירש סבטקה אשר נולד בפראג. 7. ראלינה לאוו - נישאה לחיים ואהל מפראג ובמקור נוסף כתוב שנישאה לחיים לאוו. הערה: מקורות שונים אשר התבססו על מגלת יוחסין, מזכירים את הבנות לאה ופייגלה כבנות האשה השניה, ואולי לא כך הוא.

כעבור 9 שנים נתמנה המהרל כאב בית דין בניקלשבורג ורבן של כל קהילות מוראביה. 20 שנה כיהן שם כרב ובהן תיקן תקנות רבות, חלק גדול מהן עוסק בהגבלת השימוש במותרות. חתנו ר' יצחק בר שמשון כ"ץ, שהיה נשוי לשתיים מבנותיו של המהר"ל לאה (ופיגלה לאחר שנפטרה לאה) שימש כר"מ ואב"ד בניקלשבורג. בשנת 1573 עזב את הרבנות בניקלשבורג ועבר להתגורר בפראג כאיש פרטי. כעבור זמן קצר ייסד ב"קלויז", אחד משני בתי הכנסת המרכזיים של פראג, בית מדרש גדול שבמכוון לא קרא לו ישיבה, כדי להדגיש את שיטתו השונה בלימוד, שדחתה בחריפות את שיטת הפלפול ששלטה בישיבות אשכנז. עוד בטרם נתמנה לרב או לדיין בפראג כבר ייסד חברה קדישא וכתב את תקנותיה שאחר כך היוו דוגמה לתקנות ה"חברה קדישא" בכל אירופה. ספרו הראשון של המהר"ל "גור אריה" על פירוש רש"י למקרא, נדפס בשנת 1578 (של"ח), בבית דפוס הגרשוני בפראג. בשנת 1583 נפטר רבה של פראג והמועמד הברור להחליפו היה המהר"ל, שאף הוזמן לדרוש בבית הכנסת המרכזי שבעיר, ה"אלטנוישול". בכל זאת, בעקבות דרשתו שתקפה את ראשי הקהילה וההתנגדות לו בקרב חסידי הפלפול נתמנה לרב העיר רבי יצחק חיות, אחיה החורג של אישתו, שתמך בשיטת הפלפול. לאור אי מינויו חזר המהר"ל לעירו פוזנן וכיהן בה כרב ארבע שנים. במהלך שנים אלו גברו הסכסוכים הפנימיים בקהילה בפראג עד שאילצו את רבי יצחק חיות לעזוב את העיר. לאחר שעזב את העיר, חזר המהר"ל לפראג וטען בדרשתו בבית הכנסת המרכזי שהמחלוקת נובעת מהניכור שבין המעמדות הכלכליים והחברתיים השונים. הוא דרש שהעשירים יתמכו בעניי הקהילה. באותה דרשה גם תקף את מוסד "ראש הקהל" וטען שיש לבטלו. במשך שלוש השנים הבאות חי המהר"ל בפראג ללא תואר רשמי, אך נחשב למעשה למנהיגם של יהודי פראג. בסוף התקופה הוזמן המהר"ל לחצרו של הקיסר רודולף השני שעל אף חינוכו הישועי היה כאביו מקסימיליאן השני בעל יחס טוב ליהודים. על מאורע זה, שנעטף באגדות רבות מספרים תלמידו‏‏ וחתנו של המהר"ל, אך אינם מפרטים ואינם מוסרים את הסיבה להזמנה, שהייתה קשורה, ככל הנראה, למצב היהודים או לחילופין לשאיפותיו המדעיות של הקיסר שהזמין אליו מלומדים רבים כדוגמת טיכו ברהה. ידוע גם כי קפלר, ראשון האסטרופיזיקאים, היה בקשר עם המהר"ל דן איתו על תגליותו החדשות, ואף קרא לאחד ממכתשי הירח אותו מיפה ר' לוי, על שמו. לאחר הראיון, בשנת 1592, חזר המהר"ל שוב לעיירת הולדתו וכיהן בה כרבה של פולין רבתי, אב בית דין וראש הישיבה במקום. בתפקידים אלו כיהן 5 שנים. בשנת 1597 חזר המהר"ל לפראג בפעם השלישית והאחרונה, והפעם התמנה סוף סוף רשמית לאב בית הדין ולראש הישיבה במקום. כעבור שנתיים התפטר מתפקיד ראש הישיבה. בנו יחידו של המהר"ל, בצלאל שהיה תלמיד חכם חריף, לא התקבל על ידי הקהילה להיות ממלא מקום אביו המהר"ל כאשר זקן, והיגר לקהילת קולין, ושם נפטר ונקבר בשנת 1600, כעשור לפני מות המהר"ל. בשנת 1604, בגיל 92, התפטר המהר"ל מתפקיד אב בית הדין. רבי שלמה אפרים מלונטשיץ החליף אותו בשני התפקידים. בי"ח באלול שס"ט (22 באוגוסט 1609), נפטר המהר"ל בשיבה טובה. קהילת פראג הקימה על קברו ועל קבר פרל אשתו, שנפטרה כשלוש וחצי שנים לאחר מותו, מצבה גדולה. לידם בחלקת הקבר שיועדה על ידי המהר"ל לבנו, נקבר לאחר שנים, נכדם ר' שמואל מבנם בצלאל.

בשנת 1917, עם בניית בניין חדש למועצה העירונית, הציב הפסל לדיסלאוס שלווין אנדרטה למהר"ל באחת מפינות המבנה. בשנת 2007 הכיר ארגון אונסק"ו של האומות המאוחדות בחגיגות לזכרו. בכך הפך המהר"ל ליקיר אונסק"ו

רבי יהודה ליווא בן בצלאל (1520-1609~‏‏), המוכר בכינויו המהר"ל (מורנו הגדול רבי ליווא) מפראג (בספרות הגרמנית כונה "רבי לעוו הגבוה"), רב, פוסק הלכה, מקובל והוגה דעות דתי יהודי, מגדולי ישראל הבולטים בעת החדשה.

המהר"ל, שיצר גשר בין הגות ימי הביניים להגות הרנסאנס, נולד כשני עשורים בלבד לאחר גירוש ספרד והגעת קולומבוס לאמריקה, בתקופה שבה פרחה הקבלה בארץ ישראל. שימש כאב בית הדין וראש ישיבה בעיר פראג שבצ'כיה.

המהר"ל היה איש אשכולות, בעל ידיעות יוצאות דופן בתלמוד, בקבלה, בפילוסופיה ובמדעים של תקופתו. כמו כן, היה מנהיג רוחני-פוליטי של הקהילה ובעל מהלכים אצל רודולף השני, קיסר האימפריה הרומית הקדושה. תורתו השפיעה רבות הן על תנועת החסידות והן על תנועת ההתנגדות, שקמו למעלה ממאה שנים לאחר מותו, ואישיותו המרתקת שימשה כר פורה לאגדות כגון זו על הגולם שיצר.

על שמו קרוי היישוב כרם מהר"ל שבמועצה אזורית חוף הכרמל.

המהר"ל נולד ככל הנראה בפוזנן שבפולין. הוא היה אוטודידקט ולא למד בישיבה, אלא מספרים ובאופן עצמאי. לעומת אחיו, חיים בן בצלאל מפרידברג, שלמד בישיבתו של רבי שלום שכנא מלובלין, לא ידוע שלמד מרב גדול כלשהו, ובאופן יוצא דופן הוא אינו מזכיר בכתביו שום אדם כמורו. נשא לאישה את בתו של אחד מעשירי העיר בגיל 32 וכעבור 9 שנים נתמנה כאב בית דין בניקלשבורג ורבן של כל קהילות מוראביה. 20 שנה כיהן שם כרב ובהן תיקן תקנות רבות, חלק גדול מהן עוסק בהגבלת השימוש במותרות.

בשנת 1573 עזב את הרבנות בניקלשבורג ועבר להתגורר בפראג כאיש פרטי. כעבור זמן קצר ייסד ב"קלויז", אחד משני בתי הכנסת המרכזיים של פראג, בית מדרש גדול שבמכוון לא קרא לו ישיבה, כדי להדגיש את שיטתו השונה בלימוד, שדחתה בחריפות את שיטת הפלפול ששלטה בישיבות אשכנז.

עוד בטרם נתמנה לרב או לדיין בפראג כבר ייסד חברה קדישא וכתב את תקנותיה שאחר כך היוו דוגמה לתקנות ה"חברה קדישא" בכל אירופה. בשנת 1583 נפטר רבה של פראג והמועמד הברור להחליפו היה המהר"ל, שאף הוזמן לדרוש בבית הכנסת המרכזי שבעיר, ה"אלטנוישול". בכל זאת, בעקבות דרשתו שתקפה את ראשי הקהילה וההתנגדות לו בקרב חסידי הפלפול נתמנה לרב העיר רבי יצחק חיות שתמך בשיטת הפלפול.

לאור אי מינויו חזר המהר"ל לעירו פוזנן וכיהן בה כרב ארבע שנים. במהלך שנים אלו גברו הסכסוכים הפנימיים בקהילה בפראג עד שאילצו את רבי יצחק חיות לעזוב את העיר. לאחר שעזב את העיר, חזר המהר"ל לפראג וטען בדרשתו בבית הכנסת המרכזי שהמחלוקת נובעת מהניכור שבין המעמדות הכלכליים והחברתיים השונים. הוא דרש שהעשירים יתמכו בעניי הקהילה. באותה דרשה גם תקף את מוסד "ראש הקהל" וטען שיש לבטלו. במשך שלוש השנים הבאות חי המהר"ל בפראג ללא תואר רשמי, אך נחשב למעשה למנהיגם של יהודי פראג.

בסוף התקופה הוזמן המהר"ל לחצרו של הקיסר רודולף השני. על מאורע זה, שנעטף באגדות רבות מספרים תלמידו וחתנו של המהר"ל, אך אינם מפרטים ואינם מוסרים את הסיבה להזמנה, שהייתה קשורה, ככל הנראה, למצב היהודים או לחילופין לשאיפותיו המדעיות של הקיסר שהזמין אליו מלומדים רבים כדוגמת טיכו ברהה. ידוע גם כי קפלר, ראשון האסטרופיזיקאים, היה בקשר עם המהר"ל דן איתו על תגליותו החדשות, ואף קרא על שמו את אחד ממכתשי הירח אותו מיפה.

לאחר הראיון, בשנת 1592, חזר המהר"ל שוב לעיירת הולדתו וכיהן בה כרבה של פולין רבתי, אב בית דין וראש הישיבה במקום. בתפקידים אלו כיהן 5 שנים.

המהר"ל נולד בפוזנן שבפולין לרבי בצלאל, כבן הצעיר במשפחה של ארבעה בנים. אחיו היו גם הם תלמידי חכמים מובהקים: הראשון ר' חיים, תלמיד המהרש"ל, וחבירו ובעל הפלוגתא של הרמ"א. ר' חיים השיג על הרמ"א בספרו "ויכוח מים חיים". השני סיני, אב"ד ניקלשבורג, שהיה גם רבו של תלמיד המהר"ל ר' דוד גאנץ, והשלישי ר' שמשון אב"ד קרמניץ.

המהר"ל היה נשוי לפרל, אישה נמרצת ורבת פעלים, ולזוג נולדו שש בנות ובן. חתנו ר' יצחק בר שמשון כ"ץ, שהיה נשוי לשתיים מבנותיו של המהר"ל לאה (ופיגלה לאחר שנפטרה לאה) שימש כר"מ ואב"ד בניקלשבורג. בנו יחידו של המהר"ל, בצלאל שהיה תלמיד חכם חריף, לא התקבל על ידי הקהילה להיות ממלא מקום אביו, כאשר המהר"ל זקן, והיגר לקהילת קולין, ושם נפטר ונקבר בשנת 1600, כעשור לפני מות המהר"ל. פרל אישתו נפטרה כשלוש וחצי שנים לאחר מותו ונקברה עימו. לידם בחלקת הקבר שיועדה על ידי המהר"ל לבנו, לאחר שנים נקבר, נכדם ר' שמואל מבנם בצלאל.

בתקופת המהר"ל התעורר באזורו גל של עלילות דם כנגד היהודים, שהעמיד אותם בפני סכנת גירוש. המהר"ל התייצב מול גל זה והתווכח עם כמרים על שקריות ההאשמות. לא ברור אם נערך ויכוח בכתב עם ארבע מאות כמרים כפי שמתאר הספר נפלאות המהר"ל, אבל הדים של הויכוח נשתמרו בכתביו של המהר"ל עצמו . בסופו של דבר קיבל הקיסר את דעתו, ושלל את הטענה שיהודים מכינים את מצות הפסח שלהם מדם אנושי.

למהר"ל יוחסו כוחות מיסטיים. האגדה מספרת שיצר את הגולם בעל הכוחות העל-אנושיים, שנוצר כדי להגן על הקהילה היהודית מרדיפות. סביב מיתוס זה נכתבו ספרים, צולמו סרטים, וקמה תעשיית תיירות משגשגת בעיר פראג.

על-פי המקובל, יחוסו המשפחתי הגיע עד דוד המלך (דרך האי גאון בן שרירא גאון), והוא ראה בעצמו ממשיך דרכו. פרשנותו ל"לא יסור שבט מיהודה", על בסיס דברי חז"ל, לפיה אפילו בגלות עומדים לישראל מנהיגים מהשבט, כנראה רומזת לעצמו. כינויו החילופי היה "ליווא" או "ליוואי" שמשמעותו בגרמנית אריה. על פי המסורת היהודית האשכנזית, לחלק מהשמות היה שם חילופי על פי ברכות יעקב בספר בראשית, כך יהודה שמתואר בברכת יעקב כגור אריה, ולכן הוצמד השם ליוואי לשמו הפרטי יהודה, כסמל שבט יהודה שהיה אריה.

המהר"ל הותיר אחריו הגות יהודית מרשימה, שמסודרת בעיקר לפי המועדים: ספר גבורות ה' על פסח ספר תפארת ישראל על מתן תורה* ספר נצח ישראל על תשעה באב והגאולה* ספר נר מצוה על חנוכה * ספר אור חדש על פורים* חידושי אגדות, שורת ספרים לביאור הגותי על האגדות בתלמוד* גור אריה, ביאור לפירוש רש"י בחמישה כרכים לתורה החורג מעבר לו* ספר נתיבות עולם שני כרכים על מאפייני המידות הטובות* ספר דרך החיים פרשנות למסכת אבות* ספר באר הגולה מאמרים להגנת היהדות* חיבור דברי נגידים - על הגדה של פסח* חיבור דרשות המהר"ל - על התורה, שבת תשובה ושבת הגדול*

ספריו "נתיבות עולם" נחשבים לקלים יותר, ולכן יש הממליצים ללומדם תחילה

  • "המהר"ל מפראג", בעברית;

רבי יהודה ליווא בן בצלאל (1525-1609~), המוכר בכינויו המהר"ל (מורנו הגדול רבי ליווא) מפראג, רב, פוסק הלכה, מקובל והוגה דעות דתי יהודי, מגדולי ישראל הבולטים בעת החדשה.

המהר"ל, שיצר גשר בין הגות ימי הביניים להגות הרנסאנס, נולד כשני עשורים בלבד לאחר גירוש ספרד והגעת קולומבוס לאמריקה, בתקופה שבה פרחה הקבלה בארץ ישראל, וחי בעיר פראג שבצ'כיה במשך רוב ימי חייו.

המהר"ל היה איש אשכולות, בעל ידיעות יוצאות דופן בתלמוד, בקבלה, בפילוסופיה ובמדעים של תקופתו. כמו כן, היה מנהיג רוחני-פוליטי של הקהילה ובעל מהלכים אצל רודולף השני, קיסר האימפריה הרומית הקדושה.

תורתו השפיעה רבות הן על תנועת החסידות והן על תנועת ההתנגדות, שקמו למעלה ממאה שנים לאחר מותו, ואישיותו המרתקת שימשה כר פורה לאגדות כגון זו על הגולם שיצר.

О {profile::pre} (Русский)

родословие Магарала на Гени

view all 22

Yehuda ben Betzalel Loew [Maharal of Prague] המהר״ל מפראג's Timeline

1512
April 10, 1512
Poznan (Posen), Poland
1516
1516
- 1609
Age 3
Poznan, Poland & Prague, Czechoslovakia
1532
1532
Age 19
or born ca. in 1551
1544
1544
Age 31
Prague
1544
Age 31
Prague, Czechoslovakia
1545
1545
Age 32
Prague, Czechoslovakia
1550
1550
Age 37
1553
1553
- 1573
Age 40
Mikulov (Vikolsburg), Moravia, Czechoslovakia
1553
- 1573
Age 40
Landesrabbiner of Moravia in Mikulov (Vikolsburg)
1554
1554
Age 41
Prague, Hlavní město Praha, Hlavní město Praha, Czech Republic