Radagaisus of the Vandals, König der Herulii (c.335 - 406) MP

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Birthplace: Scythia (Present Ukraine)
Death: Died in Florentia (present Firenze), Tuscia et Umbria (Present regione Toscana), Roman Empire (Present Italy)
Cause of death: Executed after being tricked into surrender by Flavius Stilicho
Occupation: "14th King of the Heruli", "King of the Hasdingii Vandals"
Managed by: Marsha Gail (Kamish) Veazey
Last Updated:

About Radagaisus of the Vandals, König der Herulii

Ben M. Angel notes:

The picture on this profile, as of 11 December 2010, is actually of Flavius Stilicho, Radagaisus' nemesis.

From

From the English Wikipedia page on Radagaisus:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radagaisus

Radagaisus (died 23 August 406) was a pagan, Gothic king who led an invasion of Roman Italy in late 405 and the first half of 406.[1]

Invasion

Radagaisus's force probably consisted of about 20,000 fighting men.[2] Many of the fighters were accompanied by their families and other noncombatants, meaning that the total size of Radagaisus's group may have approached 100,000.[2]

Radagaisus invaded Italy without passing through the Balkans, which indicates that his invasion began somewhere on the Great Hungarian Plain, west of the Carpathian Mountains.[1] Archaeological finds of coin hoards, buried by residents who were apparently aware of Radagaisus's approach, suggest that his route passed through southeastern Noricum and western Pannonia. An indeterminate number of refugees fled ahead of his army as it marched over the Alps.[1]

The Western Roman Empire under Stilicho (pictured) mobilized thirty numerii (about 15,000 men) from the Italian field army in response to Radagaisus's invasion.[2][3] A second contingent of Roman troops, possibly recalled from the Rhine frontier, complemented the Italian forces.[3] In addition, they received help from Gothic auxiliaries under Sarus and Hunnic forces under Uldin.[2]

Radagaisus's army had the run of northern Italy for at least six months while the Empire mobilized its forces.[3] They eventually made their way to Florentia (modern Florence), where they blockaded the city.[3]

Capture, death, and aftermath

Stilicho's army relieved the siege of Florentia as the city was approaching the point of surrender. The Roman counterattack was extremely successful, and Radagaisus was forced to retreat into the hills of Fiesole, about 8 km away.

There, Radagaisus abandoned his followers and tried to escape, but was captured by the Romans.[3] Historian Peter Heather hypothesizes that Radagaisus's escape attempt may have been compelled by a revolt within his forces.[4]

He was executed on 23 August 406.[1] 12,000 of his higher-status fighters were drafted into the Roman army. Some of the remaining followers were dispersed, while others were sold into slavery.[2][3]

Ancient sources

History of Zosimus Chronicle of Prosper of Aquitaine Chronicle of Marcellinus Comes Augustine of Hippo, City of God

Other accounts

Edward Gibbon in the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776), Chapter 30

Further reading

Drinkwater, John F.., "The usurpers Constantine III (407-411) and Jovinus (411-413)", Britannia 29 (1998:269-98).

Michael Kulikowski, "Barbarians in Gaul, Usurpers in Britain" Britannia 31 (2000:325-345).

Notes

^ Heather, p. 194 ^ Heather, p. 198 ^ Heather, p. 205 ^ Heather, p. 206

References

Heather, Peter (2006). The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-515954-3.

----------------------

From Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology:

http://www.ancientlibrary.com/smith-bio/2973.html

Radagaisus (source Zosimus), invaded Italy at the head of a formidable host of barbarians in the reign of Emperor Honorius. The swarm of barbarians collected by him beyond the Rhine and Danube amounted to 200,000 or perhaps 400,000 men, but it matters little how many there were. This formidable host was composed of Germanic tribes, as Suevians, Burgundians, and Vandals, and also of Celtic tribes.

Jordanes calls Radagaisus a Scythian; whence we may infer that he belonged to one of those Germanic tribes which, at the beginning of the 5th century, arrived in Germany from their original dwellings north of the Euxine (Black Sea), especially as he is sometimes called a King of the Goths.

In AD 406, Radagaisus invaded Italy, destroyed many cities, and laid siege to Florence, then a young but flourishing city. The safety of Italy had been entrusted to Stilicho, who had been observing his movements with a small army, consisting of picked soldiers, and reinforced by a contingent of Huns and Goths, commanded by their chiefs Huldin and Sarus. Stillicho now approached to save Florence if possible, and to do his utmost for the preservation of Rome.

The barbarians were entrenched in the hills of Faesulae in a strong position, but Stilicho succeeded in surrounding those barren rock by an extensive line of circumvallation, 'til Radagaisus was compelled by the failure of food to issue forth and offer battle. He was driven back within his own lines, and at last capitulated on condition that his own and his people's lives should be saved.

But Stilicho violated the agreement; Radagaisus was put to death, and his warriors were sold as slaves. This miserable end of the barbarians and the fortunate delivery of Florence was attributed to a miracle.

(Zosim. v. p.331, ed. Oxon. 1679; Jornand. De Regn. Success. p. 56, ed. Lindenbrog; Oros. vii. 37; Augustin. de Civ. Dei, v. 23; Marcellin. and Prosper, Chronic.) [W.P.]

-------------------- Radagaisus (died 23 August 406) was a pagan, Gothic king who led an invasion of Roman Italy in late 405 and the first half of 406.

Invasion

Radagaisus's force probably consisted of about 20,000 fighting men. Many of the fighters were accompanied by their families and other noncombatants, meaning that the total size of Radagaisus's group may have approached 100,000.

Radagaisus invaded Italy without passing through the Balkans, which indicates that his invasion began somewhere on the Great Hungarian Plain, west of the Carpathian Mountains. Archaeological finds of coin hoards, buried by residents who were apparently aware of Radagaisus's approach, suggest that his route passed through southeastern Noricum and western Pannonia. An indeterminate number of refugees fled ahead of his army as it marched over the Alps.

The Western Roman Empire under Stilicho (pictured) mobilized thirty numerii (about 15,000 men) from the Italian field army in response to Radagaisus's invasion. A second contingent of Roman troops, possibly recalled from the Rhine frontier, complemented the Italian forces. In addition, they received help from Alan auxiliaries under Sarus and Hunnic forces under Uldin.

Radagaisus's army had the run of northern Italy for at least six months while the Empire mobilized its forces. They eventually made their way to Florentia (modern Florence), where they blockaded the city.

Capture, death, and aftermath

Stilicho's army relieved the siege of Florentia as the city was approaching the point of surrender. The Roman counterattack was extremely successful, and Radagaisus was forced to retreat into the hills of Fiesole, about 8 km away. There, Radagaisus abandoned his followers and tried to escape, but was captured by the Romans. Historian Peter Heather hypothesizes that Radagaisus's escape attempt may have been compelled by a revolt within his forces. He was executed on 23 August 406.12,000 of his higher-status fighters were drafted into the Roman army. Some of the remaining followers were dispersed, while others were sold into slavery. -------------------- Radagaisus (died 23 August 406) was a committed pagan Gothic king who led an invasion of Roman Italy in late 405 and the first half of 406.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radagaisus

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Radagaisus "the Vandal", Horde military leader's Timeline

335
335
Scythia (Present Ukraine)
350
350
Age 15
Germany
390
390
Age 55
Pannonia (present Hungary), Roman Empire
406
August 23, 406
Age 71
Florentia (present Firenze), Tuscia et Umbria (Present regione Toscana), Roman Empire (Present Italy)
????