Ragnvald Eysteinsson, Mørejarl

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Ragnvald Eysteinsson, Mørejarl

Nicknames: "Røgnvald", "Rǫgnvaldr Mœrajarl", "son Eysteins glumru", "den Rådsnare", "Ragnvald Øysteinsson", "Rognvald I Eysteinsson", "Rognvald the Mighty", "The Wise", "Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl", ""The Wise"", "Ragnvald I", "the Wise", "Jarl of North and South More", "and of Ramsdal in Norway", "..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Vestfold, Norway or, Åre Municipality, Jämtland County, Sweden
Death: Died in Giske, Møre og Romsdal, Norway
Place of Burial: Giske, Møre og Romsdal, Norway
Immediate Family:

Son of Eystein Ivarsson «the Noisy» Glumra and Ásdís (Ascrida) Ragnvaldsdóttir
Husband of Ragnhild 'Hild' Hrólfsdóttir Nefia
Partner of NN Frille of Ragnvald Mørejarl, mother of Hallad
Father of Hrollaug Ragnvaldsson Eyjafjörður, Íslands; 'Torf' Einarr Rǫgnvaldsson, Orkneyjarl; Hallad Ragnvaldsson Orkneyjarl, .; Gange-Hrólfr 'Rollo' Ragnvaldsson de Normandie; Thore 'The Silent' and 3 others
Brother of Sigurd I Eysteinsson, Jarl of Orkney; Malahulc / Haldrick Eysteinsson and Svanhild (Svanhildi) Eysteinsdotter

Occupation: Mørejarl, Earl of Møre and Romsdal, Earl of More and Romsdal, Earl of More, also "The Wise", Earl of Shetland and Orkney, Count of Maer, Jarl of North and South More and Of Ramsdal, Jarl á Mæri., Jarl á Mæri
Managed by: Harald Tveit Alvestrand
Last Updated:

About Ragnvald Eysteinsson, Mørejarl

Rǫgnvaldr Mörejarl, son Eysteins glumru. Earl of Møre and father of Gange-Hrolf Rollo of Normandie.

Basics

  • Father: Eystein "Glumra" Ivarsson
  • Mother: Asdis (Ascrida) (undocumented)
  • Concubines: Names unknown
    • Son: Hallad
    • Son: Hrollaug, who settled in Iceland
    • Son: Torf-Einar, who settled in Orkney
  • Wife: Ragnhild (also called Hild) Hrolfsdatter
    • Son: Gange-Rolf, who settled in Normandie
    • Son: Ivar, killed in battle
    • Son: Tore Teiande, who became a jarl in Norway

LInks and notes

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORWEGIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#Ragnvalddied894A http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_M%C3%B8rejarl http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_Eysteinsson http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=&emne=nor&person=Ragnvald%20%D8ysteinsson ----------------- Død omkring 892. Han var sønn av Øystein Glumra. Ragnvald var gift med Hild Rolvsdatter. De hadde barna: 1. Gange-Rolv Ragnvaldson av Normandie. Født mellom 860 og 866. Død 931. 2. Tore Teiande Ragnvaldson Mørejarl. Født omkring 862. Død mellom 938 og 940.

I henhold til Orknøyingenes saga går Ragnvalds ætt tilbake til «Heite Gors sønn var far til Sveide sjøkonge, far til Halvdan den gamle, far til Ivar Opplendingejarl, far til Øystein Glumra, far til Ragnvald jarl den mektige og den rådsnare». Den samme sagaen strekker hans ætt tilbake til en mytologisk opprinnelse til skikkelse ved navn Fornjot fra Finland eller Kvenland.

Ragnvald levde på Harald Hårfagres tid, og ble av ham forlenet med Nordmøre, Romsdal og Sundmøre i 865. Han var av sine samtidige høyt ansett for sin klokskap og ble kalt «den mektige». Det var han som klipte Haralds hår, som da ikke var klippet på 10 år. ----------------------------- RAGNVALD "the Wise", son of [EYSTEIN "Glumra/Clatterer" Jarl in Norway & his wife ---] (-[894]). Orkneyinga Saga names “Eystein the Clatterer, father of the wise counsellor Earl Rognwald the Powerful…”, adding that “Earl Rognwald campaigned with King Harald Fine-Hair who gave him charge of North More, South More and Romsdale”[141].

Snorre names "Ragnvald Earl of More, a son of Eystein "Glumra" when recording that he had become a supporter of King Harald who had invested him with the districts of North More and Raumsdal[142]. Snorre records that he was created Jarl of North and South Möre and of Raumsdal in Norway by Harald I "Hårfagre" King of Norway after his victory at Solskiel [869] against Hunthiof King of Möre and Nokve King of Raumsdal[143].

Orkneyinga Saga and Snorre both record that King Harald granted Shetland and Orkney to Ragnvald in compensation for the death of his son Ivar[144]. The Historia Norwegie records that "principi Rogwaldi" crossed the Solund Sea, destroyed the peoples of the Orkney islands, in the days of "Haraldi Comati regis…Norwegie"[145].

Orkneyinga Saga records that “Halfdan Long-Leg and Gudrod Gleam, King Harald´s sons by Snæfrid” attacked “Earl Rognvald of More, killed him and assumed his authority”[146].

Snorre records that Ragnvald was ambushed in his hall and burned alive by Halfdan Haaleg and Gudred Liomi, two of King Harald's sons[147].

m [RAGNHILD, daughter of HROLF “Nevja/Nose” & his wife ---. Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Rognwald” married “Ragnhild the daughter of Hrolf Nose”[148]. Snorre names "Hild, a daughter of Rolf Nefia" as the wife of "Earl Ragnvald"[149].]

[Ragnvald & his wife had three children:]

1. [IVAR (-killed in battle either Hafrsfiord [872] or Orkney [874]). Orkneyinga Saga names “Ivar and Thorer the Silent” as the two other sons of “Earl Rognwald” and his wife “Ragnhild the daughter of Hrolf Nose”, adding that Ivar was killed in battle fighting with Harald I "Hårfagre" King of Norway in Scotland[150]. Snorre names "Ivar, a son of Ragnvald Earl of More" when recording his death in battle during a Viking campaign against the Scottish islands[151]. The Complete Peerage dates the appointment of Sigurd (Ivar´s reported paternal uncle) as Jarl of Orkney to [875][152], which means that Ivar must have been killed shortly before this date. However, as explained below this causes considerable chronological difficulties with the reported events in the career of Turf-Einar, Ivar´s youngest illegitimate half-brother, so should be considered as extremely approximate.

2. [ROLLO [Hrolf "Ganger/the Walker"] (-[928]). Orkneyinga Saga names “Hrolf who conquered Normandy” as son of “Earl Rognwald” and his wife “Ragnhild the daughter of Hrolf Nose”, adding that he was so big that no horse could carry him, giving rise to his name “Göngu-Hrolf”[153]. Snorre names "Rolf and Thorer" as the two sons of "Earl Ragnvald" and his wife Hild, recording that Rolf was banished from Norway by King Harald and travelled to the Hebrides, settling first in Orkney before moving southwards through Scotland, and eventually conquering Normandy[154]. The Historia Norwegie records that, after Orkney was conquered by "principi Rogwaldi" and his followers, "de quorum collegio…Rodulfus" captured Rouen in Normandy, commenting that he was known as "Gongurolfr" because he was obliged to walk as he was too large to travel on horseback[155]. This source makes no reference to any blood relationship between Rollo and "principi Rogwaldi". According to Dudo of Saint-Quentin, Rollo arrived in northern France in 876[156], although there is some debate about [900] being a more likely date[157]. William of Jumièges records that Rollo was chosen by lot to be leader of the Viking colonists[158]. Viking raids intensified in northern France. Although they were defeated after raiding Chartres [911], Charles III "le Simple" King of the West Franks granted the Normans land around Rouen in which to settle[159]. The uncertain nature of the demise was the source of future problems between the French crown, which claimed that it was an enfeofment for which the ruler owed allegiance, and the later Dukes of Normandy who claimed it was an unconditional allod for which no allegiance was owed. A charter dated 14 Mar 918 which granted land to the monastery of Saint-Germain-des-Prés "except that part…which we have granted to the Normans of the Seine, namely to Rollo and his companions"[160]. He was later known as ROBERT I Comte [de Normandie].]

3. [THORE Ragnvaldsson "Tause/the Silent". Orkneyinga Saga names “Ivar and Thorer the Silent” as the two other sons of “Earl Rognwald” and his wife “Ragnhild the daughter of Hrolf Nose”[161]. Snorre names "Rolf and Thorer" as the two sons of "Earl Ragnvald" and his wife Hild[162]. He succeeded his father in [894] as Jarl of Möre, having dispossessed Gudrod "Ljome", son of King Harald, who had seized Möre on the death of Jarl Ragnvald[163].

m ([890]) ALOF "Aarbod/Season-bettering", daughter of HARALD I "Hårfagre/Harfagri/Fairhair" King of Norway & his second wife Gyda of Hordaland. Snorre records that King Harald gave Jarl Thore his daughter "Alof, called Arbot" after the king confirmed him as Jarl of Möre[164].] [Thore & his wife had one child:]

a) [BERGLJOT Thoresdatter. The Historia Norwegie names "Bergliota filia Thoris Tacentis", from "nobilissima Morensium ac Halogensium comitum prosapia", as the wife of "Siwardo"[165]. Snorre names "Bergljot, a daughter of Earl Thorer the Silent" & his wife as the wife of Sigurd[166].

m SIGURD Jarl, son of HAAKON Grjotgardson Jarl of Haalogaland & his wife -- (-murdered Oglo 962).]

[Ragnvald had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:]

4. [HALLAD . Orkneyinga Saga names “Hallad, Hrollaug and the youngest Einar” as “natural sons” of “Earl Rognwald”[167]. Snorre names "Hallad, the second Einar, the third Hrollaug" as the three sons of "Earl Ragnvald" by concubines, adding that they were all "grown men" when their legitimate brothers were still children[168]. Orkneyinga Saga records that Ragnvald sent “his son Hallad west to the islands” after hearing of the death of his brother and nephew, and that Harald I "Hårfagre" King of Norway gave “the title of earl” to Hallad who “came to Orkney and took up residence on Mainland”[169]. Snorre records that Earl Ragnvald installed his son Hallad as Jarl of Orkney after the death of his brother Sigurd, but that he resigned the earldom and returned to Norway[170]. Orkneyinga Saga records that, following complaints by farmers about Viking raids, Hallad “tiring of his rule, gave up the earldom and went back to Norway as a common landholder” which “made him a laughing stock”[171].

5. [HROLLAUG . Orkneyinga Saga names “Hallad, Hrollaug and the youngest Einar” as “natural sons” of “Earl Rognwald”[172]. Snorre names "Hallad, the second Einar, the third Hrollaug" as the three sons of "Earl Ragnvald" by concubines, adding that they were all "grown men" when their legitimate brothers were still children[173].

Orkneyinga Saga records that Ragnvald told his son Hrollaug that “your fate will take you to Iceland [where] you´ll have plenty of descendants”[174]. His alleged descendants in Iceland shown below are as stated in Thorstein Side-Hallum's Saga and Flatey-book's St Olaf's Saga[175] but the accuracy of this information, which has not been corroborated in other sources, is unknown. m ---. The name of Hrollaug´s wife is not known.] [Hrollaug & his wife had one child:]

a) [JON Ozur . m ---. The name of Jon´s wife is not known.] [Jon & his wife had one child:]

i) [THOREY . m ---. The name of Thorey´s wife is not known.] [Thorey & his wife had one child:]

(a) [HALL of Sida . m ---. The name of Hall´s wife is not known.] [Hall & his wife had two children:]

(1) [THORSTEIN . Aged 20 at the battle of Clontarf 1014.

(2) [THORDIS . Orkneyinga Saga records that “the mother of…Ospak was Thordis, daughter of Hall of Sida”[176]. m ---. The name of Thordis´s husband is not known.] Thordis & her husband had one child:

a. USPAK . Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Erlend Thorfinnson” married “Thora, the daughter of Sumarlidi Ospaksson”, adding that “the mother of…Ospak was Thordis, daughter of Hall of Sida”[177]. m ---. The name of Uspak´s wife is not known. Uspak & his wife had one child:

(i) SOMERLED . Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Erlend Thorfinnson” married “Thora, the daughter of Sumarlidi Ospaksson”[178]. m ---. The name of Somerled´s wife is not known. Somerled & his wife had one child:

(a) THORA . Orkneyinga Saga records that “Earl Erlend Thorfinnson” married “Thora, the daughter of Sumarlidi Ospaksson”, adding that “the mother of this Ospak was Thordis, daughter of Hall of Sida”[179]. Orkneyinga Saga records that “his mother was married…to a man called Sigurd” when her son Magnus returned to Orkney, adding that she and her second husband had a son “Hakon Karl…[and] a farm at Paplay”[180]. m firstly ERLEND Thorfinsson Jarl of Orkney, son of THORFINN "the Black" Jarl of Orkney & his wife Ingibjörg Finnsdatter (-in prison Nidaros 1098, bur Nidaros). m secondly SIGURD of Paplay .

b) [HALLBERA . m ASBIORN, son of HRAFUNKEL of Steinrodar-Stadir in Iceland.]

6. [EINAR "Turf-Einar” . Orkneyinga Saga names “Hallad, Hrollaug and the youngest Einar” as “natural sons” of “Earl Rognwald”[181]. Snorre names "Hallad, the second Einar, the third Hrollaug" as the three sons of "Earl Ragnvald" by concubines, adding that they were all "grown men" when their legitimate brothers were still children[182].

Orkneyinga Saga records that Ragnvald sent his “youngest son Einar” to “the islands” after his brother Hallad returned to Norway and that Harald I "Hårfagre" King of Norway gave “the title of earl”, adding that his mother was “slave-born on each side of her family”, and stating that he killed “Thorir Tree-Beard and Kalf Scurvy” and succeeded in imposing his authority in Orkney where “he was the first man to dig peat for fuel…at Tarbat Ness in Scotland”, and that he “was tall and ugly…and…one-eyed”[183]. It should be noted that there are considerable chronological difficulties with the career of Turf-Einar and his sons, as reported in Orkneyinga Saga.

The starting point for the analysis of these problems is the date of the battle in Northumbria in which Turf-Einar´s two oldest sons were killed, which can with reasonable accuracy be placed in the early 950s. If these two sons were at least in their late thirties or forties when they died (a difficult assumption to make considering that they had no reported direct heirs), their births could not be placed before [905/15] at the earliest. The likelihood would then be that their father, Turf-Einar, was not born much earlier than [975/95]. The difficulty is that this date is completely incompatible with (a) the fact that the illegitimate sons of Ragnvald were reported as “grown men” when their legitimate half-brothers were children, and (b) that the date when Ivar, the oldest legitimate son, was killed is estimated to [874].

----------------------------- Snorre Sturlason: Harald Hårfagres saga: «10. ... Ragnvald Mørejarl, sønn til Øystein Glumra, var blitt kong Haralds mann da om sommeren. Kong Harald satte ham til høvding over disse to fylkene, Nordmøre og Romsdal, og ga ham rett til hjelp både av stormenn og bønder, likeså skip nok til å verge landet for ufred. Han ble kalt Ragnvald jarl den mektige eller den rådsnare, og de sier at begge navnene var sanne. Kong Harald var i Trondheimen vinteren som fulgte.»

«23. Kong Harald var i gjestebud på Møre hos Ragnvald jarl; da hadde han lagt hele landet under seg. Da gikk kongen i bad der. Og nå lot kong Harald håret sitt greie, og Ragnvald jarl skar håret hans; da hadde det ikke vært skåret eller kjemmet på ti år. Før kalte de ham Harald Luva, men nå ga Ragnvald jarl ham nytt navn, og kalte ham Harald Hårfagre. Alle som så ham, sa at det var virkelig et sant navn, for han hadde et hår som var både stort og vakkert.»

Ragnvald ble innebrent på sin gård sammen med 60 mann av Halvdan Hålegg og Gudrød Ljome, to av Haralds sønner, som vill være jarler over Møre. 1)

1). Snorre Sturlason: Harald Hårfagres saga, avsnitt 10, 23-24. Snorre Sturlason: Olav den helliges saga, avsnitt 96. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 278. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 50, 76. ----------------------------------------------- Ragnvald's life is described by Snorri Sturluson in The Saga of Harald Hårfagre (Fairhair): http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=no&emne=asatru&person=&list=&vis=s_e_harald_harfagre#43 --------------------------------------- About the name Ragnvald in various versions: http://www.nordicnames.de/pojk_r/Ragnvald.html -------------------- Ragnvald Øysteinsson Mørejarl (norrønt Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl) (circa 830 - 892) var en jarl på nordvestlandet i Norge på midten av 800-tallet, tilsvarende det området som i dag heter Møre og Romsdal.

Ragnvalds ætt Ragnvald var sønn av Øystein Ivarsson som ble kalt for Øystein Glumra. I henhold til Orknøyingenes saga går Ragnvalds ætt tilbake til «Heite Gors sønn var far til Sveide sjøkonge, far til Halvdan den gamle, far til Ivar Opplendingejarl, far til Øystein Glumra, far til Ragnvald jarl den mektige og den rådsnare». Den samme sagaen strekker hans ætt tilbake til en mytologisk opprinnelse til skikkelse ved navn Fornjot fra Finland eller Kvenland.

Snorre Sturlasson skriver i Harald Hårfagres saga i Heimskringla: «Ragnvald Mørejarl var den kjæreste venn kong Harald hadde, og kongen satte ham høyt. Ragnvald jarl var gift med Hild, datter til Rolv Nevja; deres sønner var Rolv og Tore. Ragnvald jarl hadde noen frillesønner også; en het Hallad; en annen Einar og en tredje Rollaug; de var voksne da de ektefødte brødrene deres var barn ennå. Rolv var en stor viking; han var så svær til vekst at ingen hest kunne bære ham, derfor gikk han til fots overalt. Han ble kalt for Gange-Rolv. Han herjet ofte i austerveg.»

Ragnvald var således far til sagnomsuste Gange-Rolf som i sagalitteraturen er blitt identifisert som den nordbo som franskmennene kaller for «Rollo» og som grunnla et jarldømme i Normandie. Dette har imidlertid aldri blitt historisk dokumentert. Via sønnen Torv-Einar ble Ragnvalds ætt giftet inn i det skotske kongehuset.

Den rådsnare Ifølge Snorre satte Harald Hårfagre Ragnvald til å være jarl over Nordmøre og Romsdal (og etter hvert Sunnmøre). Kongen gav ham rett til hjelp av både stormenn og bønder, likeså skip nok til å verge landet for ufred. Ragnvald ble også kalt Ragnvald jarl den mektige eller den rådsnare, og det ble sagt at begge navnene var sanne.

Kongen skal ha betraktet Ragnvald som en av sine viktigste menn og legenden sier at Ragnvald var den som klippet kongens hår da han etter ti år var blitt konge over alle i Norge. Før ble kongen kalt for «Harald Luva» (Lurvehode), men etter at håret var skåret, ga Ragnvald ham et nytt navn, «Hårfagre».

Orknøyene Snorre forteller at Ragnvald sendte sønnen Hallad vestover etter at broren Sigurd var blitt drept, men han ble så plaget av vikinger og ransmenn at han ble lei og kom tilbake. Faren ble da sint og skjelte ham ut for ikke å ligne på forfedrene sine. Den andre sønnen, Einar, lovte da at han kunne reise til Orknøyene og aldri komme tilbake til Norge mer. Ragnvald jarl skal da ha sagt at det var like greit om han aldri kom tilbake igjen: «For jeg har ikke større håp om at dine frender får ære av deg, for alle i morsætta di er trellbårne».

Ragnvald utstyrte sønnen med skip og mannskap og lot ham dro vestover hvor han kom i kamp med vikinger og drepte dem. På Orknøyene ble han kalt for Torv-Einar for han lot skjære torv som brensel for det vokste ikke trær der. Han ble jarl på Orknøyene og en mektig mann, enøyd og stygg å se på.

Innebrent Da Harald Hårfagre tok til å eldes ble sønnene hans Halvdan Hålegg og Gudrød Ljome stadig mer misfornøyd med at de selv ikke hadde noe rike mens faren hadde innsatt jarler rundt om i fylkene. De besluttet da å ikke vente mer på odelen sin. Snorre skriver at «de dro ut med en stor flokk og kom uventet over Ragnvald Mørejarl, kringsatte huset hans og brente ham inne med seksti mann.»

Da kongen hørte dette dro han med en stor hær mot Gudrød som overga seg og ble sendt til Agder. Kongen innsatte så Tore Teiande, sønn av Ragnvald Mørejarl, som ny jarl og giftet ham med datteren Ålov. Kongsdatteren ble siden kalt «Årbot». Halvdan Hålegg dro derimot over til Orknøyene, kom uventet på Torv-Einar som måtte flykte, men samme høst kom Torv-Einar tilbake og overrasket Halvdan og fikk ham drept. -------------------- Original text: Snorri, Heimskringla, Haralds saga hins hárfagra: "Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl, son Eysteins glumru, hafði þá um sumarit gerzt maðr Haralds konungs. Haraldr konungr setti hann höfðingja yfir þessi tvau fylki, Norðmœri ok Raumsdal, ok fékk honum þar styrk til bæði af ríkismönnum ok bóndum, svá ok skipakost at verja landit fyrir úfriði. Hann var kallaðr Rögnvaldr hinn ríki eða hinn ráðsvinni, ok segja menn at hvárrtveggja væri sannnefni. Haraldr konungr var um vetrinn eptir í Þrándheimi."

[...]

"12. Brenna Vemundar konungs.

Eptir þat lagði Haraldr konungr undir sik Sunnmœri. Vemundr, bróðir Auðbjarnar konungs, hélt Firðafylki ok gerðist konungr yfir. Þetta var síðla um haust, ok gera menn þat ráð með Haraldi konungi, at hann skyldi eigi fara suðr um Stað á haustdegi. Þá setti Haraldr konungr Rögnvald jarl yfir Mœri hváratveggju ok Raumsdal, ok hafði hann þá um sik mikit fjölmenni. Haraldr konungr sneri þá norðr aptr til Þrándheims. Þann sama vetr fór Rögnvaldr jarl hit iðra um Eið, ok svá suðr um Fjörðu. Hann hafði njósn af Vemundi konungi, ok kom um nótt þar sem heitir Naustdalr; Var Vemundr konungr þar á veizlu. Rögnvaldr jarl tók hús á þeim, ok brendi konung inni með níutigi manna. Eptir þat kom Berðlukári til Rögnvalds jarls með langskip alskipat, ok fóru þeir báðir norðr á Mœri. Tók Rögnvaldr jarl skip þau, er átt hafði Vemundr konungr, ok alt lausafé þat er hann fékk. Berðlukári fór norðr til Þrándheims á fund Haralds konungs ok gerðist hans maðr; hann var berserkr mikill." -------------------- Ragnvald Eysteinsson, The Wise (830-890), Earl of Sunnmøre, Nordmøre and Romsdal, was born in Maer Nord-Trøndelag, Norway and died at the Orkney Islands.

He was son of Eystein Glumra the Noisy, Earl of Oppland, and grandson of Halfdan the Old.

His second wife was Ragnhild Ragnhild Hrolfsdottir (Raghldr (Hldr) Hrolfsdóttir) daughter of Hrolfr Nefjaa. Ragnvald was the father of Hrolf Ganger, the founder of Normandy. He was also the father of Turf-Einar, the ancestor of the jarls of Orkney.

He was the direct ancestor to William I of England, Edward III of England, James I of England, and, therefore, Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He is therefore the ancestor of most of the royal families of Europe. -------------------- Ragnvald Eystemssön, allmänt kallad Mörejarl. norsk storman i 9:de årh., åtnjöt i hög grad Harald Hårfagres förtroende och styrde såsom hans jarl Mörerne (Nord- och Söndmöre samt Romsdalen). R. blef genom sin ene son. Torv-Einar, stamfader för Orkenö-jarlarna och genom den andre, Gånge-Rolf, stamfader för hertigarna af Normandie. Af sina samtida kallades han den »rådmilde» och den »mäktige». Trots sin ådagalagda trohet mot konungen överfölls och dräptes han af dennes söner omkr. 890. Y. s.

Från Nordisk Familjebok -------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.[1]

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald Orkney and Shetland. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson.[2]

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.[4]

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.[5]

The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.[6]

This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous kinfolk.

The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Pátraic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann". This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.[7]

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866,[8] and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rognvald_Eysteinsson -------------------- Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More (1) M, #104777 Last Edited=28 Oct 2002

    Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More is the son of Eystein 'the Noisy' Glumra, Jarl of the Uplanders and Ascrida Ragnvaldsdottir. (1) He died circa 890, burnt to death in his house.
    Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More gained the title of Earl of More. Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More also went by the nick-name of 'The Mighty'.

Children of Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More and Groa (?) -1. Hallad Ragnvaldsson, Earl of Orkney (1) -2. Turf-Einar Ragnvaldsson, Earl of Orkney (1) -3. Hrollaug Ragnvaldsson (1) Children of Ragnvald I 'the Wise' Eysteinsson, Earl of More and Ragnhild Hrolfsdottir -1. Ivar Ragnvaldsson (1) -2. Thori 'the Silent' Ragnvaldsson, Jarl of More+ (1) -3. Rollo Ragnvaldsson, 1st Duc de Normandie+ b. c 846, d. c 931 (1)

Forrás: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10478.htm#i104777

-------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

Contents [hide] 1 Sagas 2 Historia Norvegiae 3 Fragmentary Annals of Ireland 4 Notes 5 References


[edit] Sagas The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.[1]

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald the Orkneys and Shetlands. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson[2]

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.[4]

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.[5]

[edit] Historia Norvegiae The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.[6]

This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous sons.

[edit] Fragmentary Annals of Ireland ...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkneys. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor. The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Patráic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann". This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.[7]

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866,[8] and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier.

[edit] Notes ^ Crawford, pp. 52–53. ^ Anderson, pp. 332–334; Saga of Harald Fairhair, c. 22. ^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, cc. 4 & 23. ^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, c. 24. ^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, cc. 29–30. ^ Anderson, pp. 330–331. ^ Crawford, pp. 53–54. ^ Anderson, p. 296; Annals of Ulster, s.a. 865. ^ Crawford, p. 55–56. ^ Anderson, pp. 395–396.

[edit] References Anderson, Alan Orr. Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8 Crawford, Barbara. Scandinavian Scotland. Leicester University Press, Leicester, 1987. ISBN 0-7185-1282-0 Ó Corrain, Donnchad. "The Vikings in Scotland and Ireland in the Ninth Century", Peritia, vol 12, pp296–339. (etext (pdf) Radner, Joan N. (editor and translator). Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts. University College Cork. Retrieved on 2007-03-10. Radner, Joan N. "Writing history: Early Irish historiography and the significance of form", Celtica, volume 23, pp. 312–325. (etext (pdf)) Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80–1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7 Sturluson, Snorri. Heimskringla: History of the Kings of Norway, translated Lee M. Hollander. Reprinted University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992. ISBN 0-292-73061-6 -------------------- Ragnvald Øysteinsson Mørejarl (norrønt Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl) (circa 830 - 892) var en jarl på nordvestlandet i Norge på midten av 800-tallet, tilsvarende det området som i dag heter Møre og Romsdal.

Innhold [skjul] 1 Ragnvalds ætt 2 Den rådsnare 3 Orknøyene 4 Innebrent


[rediger] Ragnvalds ætt Ragnvald var sønn av Øystein Ivarsson som ble kalt for Øystein Glumra. I henhold til Orknøyingenes saga går Ragnvalds ætt tilbake til «Heite Gors sønn var far til Sveide sjøkonge, far til Halvdan den gamle, far til Ivar Opplendingejarl, far til Øystein Glumra, far til Ragnvald jarl den mektige og den rådsnare». Den samme sagaen strekker hans ætt tilbake til en mytologisk opprinnelse til skikkelse ved navn Fornjot fra Finland eller Kvenland.

Snorre Sturlasson skriver i Harald Hårfagres saga i Heimskringla: «Ragnvald Mørejarl var den kjæreste venn kong Harald hadde, og kongen satte ham høyt. Ragnvald jarl var gift med Hild, datter til Rolv Nevja; deres sønner var Rolv og Tore. Ragnvald jarl hadde noen frillesønner også; en het Hallad; en annen Einar og en tredje Rollaug; de var voksne da de ektefødte brødrene deres var barn ennå. Rolv var en stor viking; han var så svær til vekst at ingen hest kunne bære ham, derfor gikk han til fots overalt. Han ble kalt for Gange-Rolv. Han herjet ofte i austerveg.»

Ragnvald var således far til sagnomsuste Gange-Rolf som i sagalitteraturen er blitt identifisert som den nordbo som franskmennene kaller for «Rollo» og som grunnla et jarldømme i Normandie. Dette har imidlertid aldri blitt historisk dokumentert. Via sønnen Torv-Einar ble Ragnvalds ætt giftet inn i det skotske kongehuset.

[rediger] Den rådsnare Ifølge Snorre satte Harald Hårfagre Ragnvald til å være jarl over Nordmøre og Romsdal (og etter hvert Sunnmøre). Kongen gav ham rett til hjelp av både stormenn og bønder, likeså skip nok til å verge landet for ufred. Ragnvald ble også kalt Ragnvald jarl den mektige eller den rådsnare, og det ble sagt at begge navnene var sanne.

Kongen skal ha betraktet Ragnvald som en av sine viktigste menn og legenden sier at Ragnvald var den som klippet kongens hår da han etter ti år var blitt konge over alle i Norge. Før ble kongen kalt for «Harald Luva» (Lurvehode), men etter at håret var skåret, ga Ragnvald ham et nytt navn, «Hårfagre».

[rediger] Orknøyene Snorre forteller at Ragnvald sendte sønnen Hallad vestover etter at broren Sigurd var blitt drept, men han ble så plaget av vikinger og ransmenn at han ble lei og kom tilbake. Faren ble da sint og skjelte ham ut for ikke å ligne på forfedrene sine. Den andre sønnen, Einar, lovte da at han kunne reise til Orknøyene og aldri komme tilbake til Norge mer. Ragnvald jarl skal da ha sagt at det var like greit om han aldri kom tilbake igjen: «For jeg har ikke større håp om at dine frender får ære av deg, for alle i morsætta di er trellbårne».

Ragnvald utstyrte sønnen med skip og mannskap og lot ham dro vestover hvor han kom i kamp med vikinger og drepte dem. På Orknøyene ble han kalt for Torv-Einar for han lot skjære torv som brensel for det vokste ikke trær der. Han ble jarl på Orknøyene og en mektig mann, enøyd og stygg å se på.

[rediger] Innebrent Da Harald Hårfagre tok til å eldes ble sønnene hans Halvdan Hålegg og Gudrød Ljome stadig mer misfornøyd med at de selv ikke hadde noe rike mens faren hadde innsatt jarler rundt om i fylkene. De besluttet da å ikke vente mer på odelen sin. Snorre skriver at «de dro ut med en stor flokk og kom uventet over Ragnvald Mørejarl, kringsatte huset hans og brente ham inne med seksti mann.»

Da kongen hørte dette dro han med en stor hær mot Gudrød som overga seg og ble sendt til Agder. Kongen innsatte så Tore Teiande, sønn av Ragnvald Mørejarl, som ny jarl og giftet ham med datteren Ålov. Kongsdatteren ble siden kalt «Årbot». Halvdan Hålegg dro derimot over til Orknøyene, kom uventet på Torv-Einar som måtte flykte, men samme høst kom Torv-Einar tilbake og overrasket Halvdan og fikk ham drept.

Forgjenger:

-  Jarl av Møre

(865–892) Etterfølger:

Tore Teiande  

Hentet fra «http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_M%C3%B8rejarl»

-------------------- Rognvald Eysteinsson "the Wise" Earl of More (830-) [Pedigree]

Son of Eystein Glumra Ivarsson Jarl of Hedemarken (810-) and Aseda Rognvaldsdottir (812-)

      REF RFC. A Norwegian viking.
      Jarl of More
   b. ABT 830, Maer, Norway
   b. Abt 0857
   r. Upland, Denmark
   d. 890, Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland
   d. ABT 890, Maer, Norway

Married first Rognhild (Hildir) Hrolfsdotter (848-892)

Children:

  1. Rollo the Dane 1st Duke of Normandy (-927) m(1) Poppa de_Valois Duchess of Norway (872-) 

Married second Ermina

Children:

  1. Hrollager Rognvaldsson (874-) 

Sources:

1. "Royalty for Commoners",

        Roderick W. Stuart, 1992, 2nd edition.
        This book lists all of the known ancestors of John of Gaunt,
        which amounts to most of the Medieval royalty of Europe. Also
        see the following article: "A Mediaeval Miscellany:
        Commentaries on Roderick W. Stuart's Royalty for Commoners,"
        The American Genealogist 69 (April 1994)

2. "Europaische Stammtafeln",

        Isenburg.

3. "Plantagenet Ancestry",

        Turton.

-------------------- Ragnvald I Eysteinsson , 1st Earl of Orkne

B: abt 0825 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway S: Rognvald Mere-Earl and Ragnvald "the wise" S: abt 0872 as Jarl of More and 1st Earl of Orkney D: 0894 Orkney Islands, Orkney, Scotland M: abt 0852 -------------------- http://www.geneajourney.com/nrmndy.html

Eystein Glumra, Jarl of the Upplands, b abt 803, of Norway. The identity of his wife is not known. Known children of Eystein Glumra were: • Ragnvald I, the Wise, Jarl of North and South More and of Ramsdal, b abt 832. • Swanhild b abt 846, of Norway. She md Harald I, "Fairhair, 1st King of Norway, abt 866, son of Halfdan, "the Black, King of Vestfold, and Ragnhild. Ragnvald I, "the Wise", Jarl of North and South More and of Ramsdal, b abt 832, Norway, d 890. He md Hiltrude abt 850, daughter of Hrolf Nefia. She was b abt 834. Child of Ragnvald the Wise and Hiltrude was: Rollo/Robert I of Normandy [a], 1st Duke of Normandy, aka Ganger Rolf, b abt 855, Norway, d abt 927-931, prob Normandy, France. He md Poppa of Bayeux abt 886, daughter of Berenger,Count of Bayeux. She was b abt 876.

-------------------- Ragnvald var jarl i Möre, Norge, och är nog inte lika omtalad som flera av sina söner. En son är sannolikt 'Gånge-Rolf', som blev stamfader för hertigar och kungar i Normandie, Frankrike, och det engelska kungahuset samt den som skapade hertigdömet Normandie. En annan son 'Torv-Einar' blev jarl på Orkneyöarna liksom hans broder Hallad. Ragnvald var gift med med Ragnhild Rolfsdotter, men hade också barn med frillan Groa. Ragnvalds syster Svanhild blev gift med Harald 'Hårfager'. Ragnvald (Mörejarl) blev mördad (innebränd) av Harald 'Hårfagers' söner Halvdan 'Hålegg' og Gudröd 'Ljome'. Jarl, död ca 890. Ragnvald var jarl på Möre. Hans far skall ha varit Öystein 'Glumra'. Han levde på Harald Hårfagers tid, och blev av honom förlänad med Nordmöre, Romsdal og Sundmöre år 865. Han var av sina samtida högt ansedd för sin klokskap och blev kallad 'den mäktige'. Det var han som klippte Haralds hår, som då icke varit klippt på 10 år.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Källor

1)  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England 
 
 

-------------------- Ragnvald Øysteinsson Mørejarl (norrønt Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl) (circa 830 - 892) var en jarl på nordvestlandet i Norge på midten av 800-tallet, tilsvarende det området som i dag heter Møre og Romsdal.

Ragnvald var sønn av Øystein Ivarsson som ble kalt for Øystein Glumra. I henhold til Orknøyingenes saga går Ragnvalds ætt tilbake til «Heite Gors sønn var far til Sveide sjøkonge, far til Halvdan den gamle, far til Ivar Opplendingejarl, far til Øystein Glumra, far til Ragnvald jarl den mektige og den rådsnare». Den samme sagaen strekker hans ætt tilbake til en mytologisk opprinnelse til skikkelse ved navn Fornjot fra Finland eller Kvenland.

Snorre Sturlasson skriver i Harald Hårfagres saga i Heimskringla: «Ragnvald Mørejarl var den kjæreste venn kong Harald hadde, og kongen satte ham høyt. Ragnvald jarl var gift med Hild, datter til Rolv Nevja; deres sønner var Rolv og Tore. Ragnvald jarl hadde noen frillesønner også; en het Hallad; en annen Einar og en tredje Rollaug; de var voksne da de ektefødte brødrene deres var barn ennå. Rolv var en stor viking; han var så svær til vekst at ingen hest kunne bære ham, derfor gikk han til fots overalt. Han ble kalt for Gange-Rolv. Han herjet ofte i austerveg.»

Ragnvald var således far til sagnomsuste Gange-Rolf som i sagalitteraturen er blitt identifisert som den nordbo som franskmennene kaller for «Rollo» og som grunnla et jarldømme i Normandie. Dette har imidlertid aldri blitt historisk dokumentert ettersom kildene spriker i alle retninger, en av dem som stiller seg bak de tidligere nevnte tradisjonene er Jón Viðar Sigurðsson i boken Norsk Historie 800 - 1300 (Det Norske Samlaget, 1999). Via sønnen Torv-Einar ble Ragnvalds ætt giftet inn i det skotske kongehuset.

Den rådsnare

Ifølge Snorre satte Harald Hårfagre Ragnvald til å være jarl over Nordmøre og Romsdal (og etter hvert Sunnmøre). Kongen gav ham rett til hjelp av både stormenn og bønder, likeså skip nok til å verge landet for ufred. Ragnvald ble også kalt Ragnvald jarl den mektige eller den rådsnare, og det ble sagt at begge navnene var sanne.

Kongen skal ha betraktet Ragnvald som en av sine viktigste menn og legenden sier at Ragnvald var den som klippet kongens hår da han etter ti år var blitt konge over alle i Norge. Før ble kongen kalt for «Harald Luva» (Lurvehode), men etter at håret var skåret, ga Ragnvald ham et nytt navn, «Hårfagre».

Orknøyene

Snorre forteller at Ragnvald sendte sønnen Hallad vestover etter at broren Sigurd var blitt drept, men han ble så plaget av vikinger og ransmenn at han ble lei og kom tilbake. Faren ble da sint og skjelte ham ut for ikke å ligne på forfedrene sine. Den andre sønnen, Einar, lovte da at han kunne reise til Orknøyene og aldri komme tilbake til Norge mer. Ragnvald jarl skal da ha sagt at det var like greit om han aldri kom tilbake igjen: «For jeg har ikke større håp om at dine frender får ære av deg, for alle i morsætta di er trellbårne».

Ragnvald utstyrte sønnen med skip og mannskap og lot ham dro vestover hvor han kom i kamp med vikinger og drepte dem. På Orknøyene ble han kalt for Torv-Einar for han lot skjære torv som brensel for det vokste ikke trær der. Han ble jarl på Orknøyene og en mektig mann, enøyd og stygg å se på.

Innebrent

Da Harald Hårfagre tok til å eldes ble sønnene hans Halvdan Hålegg og Gudrød Ljome stadig mer misfornøyd med at de selv ikke hadde noe rike mens faren hadde innsatt jarler rundt om i fylkene. De besluttet da å ikke vente mer på odelen sin. Snorre skriver at «de dro ut med en stor flokk og kom uventet over Ragnvald Mørejarl, kringsatte huset hans og brente ham inne med seksti mann.»

Da kongen hørte dette dro han med en stor hær mot Gudrød som overga seg og ble sendt til Agder. Kongen innsatte så Tore Teiande, sønn av Ragnvald Mørejarl, som ny jarl og giftet ham med datteren Ålov. Kongsdatteren ble siden kalt «Årbot». Halvdan Hålegg dro derimot over til Orknøyene, kom uventet på Torv-Einar som måtte flykte, men samme høst kom Torv-Einar tilbake og overrasket Halvdan og fikk ham drept.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_M%C3%B8rejarl -------------------- ROGNVALD I ~

Rognvald , The Wise, Jarl (Earl) of More, Norway, the first Jarl of Orkney and a near relative of King Harold Fairhair.

The house of Rognvald was one of the oldest lines of rulers in Norway. -------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald Orkney and Shetland. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson.

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway, and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay. -------------------- Ragnvald Øysteinsson Mørejarl (norrønt Rögnvaldr Mœrajarl) (circa 830 - 892) var en jarl på nordvestlandet i Norge på midten av 800-tallet, tilsvarende det området som i dag heter Møre og Romsdal.

Ragnvald var sønn av Øystein Ivarsson som ble kalt for Øystein Glumra. I henhold til Orknøyingenes saga går Ragnvalds ætt tilbake til «Heite Gors sønn var far til Sveide sjøkonge, far til Halvdan den gamle, far til Ivar Opplendingejarl, far til Øystein Glumra, far til Ragnvald jarl den mektige og den rådsnare». Den samme sagaen strekker hans ætt tilbake til en mytologisk opprinnelse til skikkelse ved navn Fornjot fra Finland eller Kvenland.

Snorre Sturlasson skriver i Harald Hårfagres saga i Heimskringla: «Ragnvald Mørejarl var den kjæreste venn kong Harald hadde, og kongen satte ham høyt. Ragnvald jarl var gift med Hild, datter til Rolv Nevja; deres sønner var Rolv og Tore. Ragnvald jarl hadde noen frillesønner også; en het Hallad; en annen Einar og en tredje Rollaug; de var voksne da de ektefødte brødrene deres var barn ennå. Rolv var en stor viking; han var så svær til vekst at ingen hest kunne bære ham, derfor gikk han til fots overalt. Han ble kalt for Gange-Rolv. Han herjet ofte i austerveg.»

Ragnvald var således far til sagnomsuste Gange-Rolf som i sagalitteraturen er blitt identifisert som den nordbo som franskmennene kaller for «Rollo» og som grunnla et jarldømme i Normandie. Dette har imidlertid aldri blitt historisk dokumentert ettersom kildene spriker i alle retninger, en av dem som stiller seg bak de tidligere nevnte tradisjonene er Jón Viðar Sigurðsson i boken Norsk Historie 800 - 1300 (Det Norske Samlaget, 1999). Via sønnen Torv-Einar ble Ragnvalds ætt giftet inn i det skotske kongehuset.

Den rådsnare

Ifølge Snorre satte Harald Hårfagre Ragnvald til å være jarl over Nordmøre og Romsdal (og etter hvert Sunnmøre). Kongen gav ham rett til hjelp av både stormenn og bønder, likeså skip nok til å verge landet for ufred. Ragnvald ble også kalt Ragnvald jarl den mektige eller den rådsnare, og det ble sagt at begge navnene var sanne.

Kongen skal ha betraktet Ragnvald som en av sine viktigste menn og legenden sier at Ragnvald var den som klippet kongens hår da han etter ti år var blitt konge over alle i Norge. Før ble kongen kalt for «Harald Luva» (Lurvehode), men etter at håret var skåret, ga Ragnvald ham et nytt navn, «Hårfagre».

Orknøyene

Snorre forteller at Ragnvald sendte sønnen Hallad vestover etter at broren Sigurd var blitt drept, men han ble så plaget av vikinger og ransmenn at han ble lei og kom tilbake. Faren ble da sint og skjelte ham ut for ikke å ligne på forfedrene sine. Den andre sønnen, Einar, lovte da at han kunne reise til Orknøyene og aldri komme tilbake til Norge mer. Ragnvald jarl skal da ha sagt at det var like greit om han aldri kom tilbake igjen: «For jeg har ikke større håp om at dine frender får ære av deg, for alle i morsætta di er trellbårne».

Ragnvald utstyrte sønnen med skip og mannskap og lot ham dro vestover hvor han kom i kamp med vikinger og drepte dem. På Orknøyene ble han kalt for Torv-Einar for han lot skjære torv som brensel for det vokste ikke trær der. Han ble jarl på Orknøyene og en mektig mann, enøyd og stygg å se på.

Innebrent

Da Harald Hårfagre tok til å eldes ble sønnene hans Halvdan Hålegg og Gudrød Ljome stadig mer misfornøyd med at de selv ikke hadde noe rike mens faren hadde innsatt jarler rundt om i fylkene. De besluttet da å ikke vente mer på odelen sin. Snorre skriver at «de dro ut med en stor flokk og kom uventet over Ragnvald Mørejarl, kringsatte huset hans og brente ham inne med seksti mann.»

Da kongen hørte dette dro han med en stor hær mot Gudrød som overga seg og ble sendt til Agder. Kongen innsatte så Tore Teiande, sønn av Ragnvald Mørejarl, som ny jarl og giftet ham med datteren Ålov. Kongsdatteren ble siden kalt «Årbot». Halvdan Hålegg dro derimot over til Orknøyene, kom uventet på Torv-Einar som måtte flykte, men samme høst kom Torv-Einar tilbake og overrasket Halvdan og fikk ham drept.

-------------------- Also known as Count Regnvald ("the Rich") and as "The Wise", Earl of North and South More, of Raumsdale in Norway.{"Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons," Carr P. Collins, Jr., Dallas, 1959, p.201-02, states that he died about 894. (Rogenwald = Regnvald = Rognald)}

Earl of More/Moer in Norway and Jarl of Orkney and Shetland. He had his name Gallicized to Reginald. He supported King Harold Fairhair in an attempt to unify Norway. Norr: Jarl Rognwald (Rogvald, Raonwald, Regvald, Rouis), created Earl of Moer in 885. Roll: Rognwald, Earl of Maere. Norr: Jarl Rogwald (Raowald, Regvald, Rouis), Earl of Moer 885. Married Hilder. Beyond Rognvald, things get pretty confused. Norr has about 25 generations going back to Oden. RC doesn't agree. But some RC names coming down from RC's Odin agree in the upper portion. But the dates are some 250 years different. RC and Kraentzler agree in taking Rognvald back three more generations. Russell goes way back to Olaf the Sharp-eyed, King of Rerik.

-------------------- Rognvald Eysteinsson Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

[edit] Sagas The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.[1]

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald the Orkneys and Shetlands. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson[2]

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.[4]

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.[5]

[edit] Historia Norvegiae The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.[6]

This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous sons.

[edit] Fragmentary Annals of Ireland ...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkneys. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor. The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Pátraic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann". This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.[7]

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866,[8] and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier.

-------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.[1]

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald the Orkneys and Shetlands. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson[2]

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.[4]

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.[5]

[edit] Historia Norvegiae The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.[6]

This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous sons.

[edit] Fragmentary Annals of Ireland ...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkneys. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor. The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Patraic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had been influential in later writings on Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann". This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.[7]

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866,[8] and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier.

-------------------- Earl of More -------------------- Born: abt 830 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway Died: 890 Orkney Islands, Orkney, Scotland

-------------------- Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl1,2,3 b. circa 830, d. 894 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl|b. c 830\nd. 894|p314.htm#i5205|Eysteinn Glumra, Jarl of the Uplanders|b. c 800|p6.htm#i8264|Aseda Rögnvaldsdóttir||p67.htm#i8832|Ivarr O., Jarl of the Uplanders|b. c 760\nd. a 800|p305.htm#i8265|N. N. of Throndheim|b. c 780|p67.htm#i8831|Rögnvaldr H. H. Ó., King of Vestfold||p278.htm#i9457|Thóra Sigurdsdóttir||p111.htm#i13338| Father Eysteinn Glumra, Jarl of the Uplanders4,5 b. circa 800 Mother Aseda Rögnvaldsdóttir

    Also called Jarl Ragnald I of Orkney.6 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was King Harald Fairhair's dearest friend, and the king had the greatest regard for him.4 Also called Jarl Rognvaldr of Møre.7 He was per late Icelandic sources, for which there is no good reason to believe that these generations are historical, a son of Eysteinn Glumra, son of Ívarr, son of Hálfdan the Old.7 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl also went by the name of Ragnvald "the Wise".4,5 He associated with unknown , a concubine.8 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was born circa 830 at Maer, Norway. He was the son of Eysteinn Glumra, Jarl of the Uplanders and Aseda Rögnvaldsdóttir.4,5 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl became one of Harald Fairhair's men the summer before the battle at Solskel circa August 866.4 He was a witness where Haraldr Hårfager Hálfdanarson, King of Norway laid claim to both the More and Raumsdal districts after defeating their kings in battle in 867.4 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was set as chief over the two districts, North More and Raumsdal, by Harald Fairhair, who strengthened him both with men of might and bondes, and gave him the help of ships to defend the coast against enemies in 867.4 He was given South Möre to govern as well, following the defeat of King Arnvid by Harald Hairfair, but the Firdafylke still remained in the possession of King Ardbjorns brother Vemund in 868.4 He was made Jarl of North and South Möre and of Raumsdal by King Harald Haarfagri after his victory of Solskiel over Hunthiof, King of Möre, and Nokve, King of Raumsdal circa 869.5 Jarl of Raumsdal at Norway in 869.5 Jarl of North and South Möre at Norway in 869.5 He was went over Eid, and southwards to the Fjord district. There he heard news of King Vemund, and came by night to a place called Naustdal, where King Vemund was living in guest-quarters. Earl Ragnvald surrounded the house in which they were quartered, and burnt the king in it, together with ninety men, and then took all the ships Vemund had, and all the goods he could get hold of, in 869 at the winter of.4 He married Ragnhild Hrolfsdotter of Norway, daughter of Hrólfr Nefja of Norway, before 870.8 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl married Ermina , a concubine before 870; A "more Danico" or "Danish wife."9,3 Jarl of Orkney between 874 and 875.10 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was the predecessor of Orknøyjarl Sigurdr Eysteinsson; Jarl of Orkney.10 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was given the Orkney and Shetland isles in compensation for the loss of his son Ivar in the wars of Harald Fairhair against the viking raiders in the western lands in 888.4,11 He died in 894. He was killed by two jealous sons of Harlald Fairhair. Halfdan Haleg and Gudrod Ljome set off one spring with a great force, and came suddenly upon Earl Ragnvald, earl of More, and surrounded the house in which he was, and burnt him and sixty men in it.4

Family 1 Ragnhild Hrolfsdotter of Norway b. 822 Children

   * Thórir "the Silent" Rögnvaldsson, Mørejarl+ 4
   * Ivarr Rögnvaldsson 4
   * Göngu-Hrólf Rögnvaldsson b. c 86012,4

Family 2 Ermina , a concubine b. circa 850 Child

   * Hrollaugr Rögnvaldsson+ b. c 87013,4

Family 3 unknown , a concubine Child

   * Torf-Einarr Rögnvaldsson, Orknøyjarl+ b. c 870, d. c 9204

Citations

  1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 166-36.
  2. [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 121E-17.
  3. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 295-39.
  4. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway, Harald Harfager's Saga.
  5. [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, X:App.A:3.
  6. [S592] Mike Ashley, Ashley, M., Chart 27.
  7. [S1043] Henry Project, online http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/henry.htm
  8. [S449] Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Chronicle of the Kings of Norway.
  9. [S209] Somerset Herald J.R. Planché, Planché, J.R..
 10. [S592] Mike Ashley, Ashley, M., [NB].
 11. [S603] C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 493, 888.
 12. [S482] Norman Davies, Davies, N., p. 1106.
 13. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 295-38.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_Eysteinsson -------------------- Earl of More and Romsdal -------------------- Source: Adrienne Anderson chart of Scandinavian Norman Descent of Hamblins -------------------- Según los relatos legendarios de Escandinavia, el primer varón conocido del linaje normando es Skalj Froteenson de Värmland, que nació hacia el año 420. Después de él se suceden los señores de Varmland hasta un hijo de Olav I Ingjarldsson Tretelgja de Varmland, llamado Halvdan I Olavsson Hvitbein de Vestfold (c.715). Siguen los señores de Vestfold hasta Halvdan II Oysteinsson de Vestfold, que tiene un hijo llamado Ivar Oplaendinge Halvdansson de Hedmark (c.780). Continúan los señores de Hedmark hasta Ragnvald Eysteinsson "el Sabio" de Heidmark, que es padre de Rollo ó Roberto I, primer duque de de Normandía.

-------------------- From the English Wikipedia page on Rognvald Eysteinsson: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rognvald_Eysteinsson

Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas.

Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

Sagas

The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case.

The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.[1]

In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed.

In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald Orkney and Shetland. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson.[2]

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.[4]

Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.[5]

Historia Norvegiae

The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.[6]

This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous kinfolk.

Fragmentary Annals of Ireland

...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkney Islands. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor.

The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Pátraic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann." This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.[7]

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866,[8] and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier.

Orkney inheritance

Rognvald having given his earldom to Sigurd, according to the Orkneyinga Saga, the latter died in a curious fashion after a battle with Máel Brigte of Moray. Sigurd's son Gurthorm ruled for a single winter after this and died childless.[11][12]

In addition to Hrólfr/Rollo and Turf-Einar, Rognvald had a third son called Hallad who then inherited the title. However, unable to constrain Danish raids on Orkney, he gave up the earldom and returned to Norway, which "everyone thought was a huge joke."[13]

The predations of the Danish pirates led to Rognvald flying into a rage and summoning his sons Thorir and Hrolluag. He predicted that Thorir's path would keep him in Norway and that Hrolluag was destined seek his fortune in Iceland. Turf-Einar, the youngest, then came forward and offered to go to the islands. Rognvald said: "Considering the kind of mother you have, slave-born on each side of her family, you are not likely to make much of a ruler. But I agree, the sooner you leave and the later you return the happier I'll be."[14]

His father's misgivings notwithstanding, Torf-Einarr succeeded in defeating the Danes and founded a dynasty which retained control of the islands for centuries after his death.[15]

Notes

1.^ Crawford, pp. 52–53. 2.^ Anderson, pp. 332–334; Saga of Harald Fairhair, c. 22. 3.^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, cc. 4 & 23. 4.^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, c. 24. 5.^ Saga of Harald Fairhair, cc. 29–30. 6.^ Anderson, pp. 330–331. 7.^ Crawford, pp. 53–54. 8.^ Anderson, p. 296; Annals of Ulster, s.a. 865. 9.^ Crawford, p. 55–56. 10.^ Anderson, pp. 395–396. 11.^ Thomson (2008) p. 28. 12.^ Pálsson and Edwards (1981) "A poisoned tooth". pp. 27-28. 13.^ Thomson (2008) p. 30 quoting chapter 5 of the Orkneyinga Saga. 14.^ Pálsson and Edwards (1981) "Forecasts". pp. 28-29. 15.^ Thomson (2008) p. 29.

References

Anderson, Alan Orr. Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Crawford, Barbara. Scandinavian Scotland. Leicester University Press, Leicester, 1987. ISBN 0-7185-1282-0

Ó Corrain, Donnchad. "The Vikings in Scotland and Ireland in the Ninth Century", Peritia, vol 12, pp296–339.

Pálsson, Hermann and Edwards, Paul Geoffrey (1981). Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney. Penguin Classics. ISBN 0140443835

Radner, Joan N. (editor and translator) (1978). "Fragmentary Annals of Ireland". CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts. University College Cork. http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/T100017/. Retrieved 2007-03-10.

Radner, Joan N. "Writing history: Early Irish historiography and the significance of form", Celtica, volume 23, pp. 312–325

Smyth, Alfred P. Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80–1000. Reprinted, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 1998. ISBN 0-7486-0100-7

Sturluson, Snorri. Heimskringla: History of the Kings of Norway, translated Lee M. Hollander. Reprinted University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992. ISBN 0-292-73061-6

Thomson, William P. L. (2008) The New History of Orkney, Edinburgh, Birlinn. ISBN 9781841586960

From the French Wikipedia page on Ragnvald Eysteinsson (wholly without sources): http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnvald_Eysteinsson

Ragnvald Eysteinsson, dit le Sage, jarl de Møre, né en 840 dans l'Uppland en Suède, mort en 890 aux Orcades. Il est avec son épouse Ragnhilde Hrolfsson, le père de Rollon de Normandie.

In English:

Ragnvald Eysteinsson "the Wise", Jarl of More, was born in 840 in the Uppland of Sweden, and died in 890 in the Orkney Islands. He and his wife Ragnhild Hrolfsson were the parents of Rollo of Normandy. -------------------- The manager profile is replaced with

http://www.geni.com/people/Ragnvald-Eysteinsson/6000000008731785450 -------------------- Also known as Count Regnvald ("the Rich") and as "The Wise", Earl of North and South More, of Raumsdale in Norway.{"Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons," Carr P. Collins, Jr., Dallas, 1959, p.201-02, states that he died about 894. (Rogenwald = Regnvald = Rognald)}

Earl of More/Moer in Norway and Jarl of Orkney and Shetland. He had his name Gallicized to Reginald. He supported King Harold Fairhair in an attempt to unify Norway. Norr: Jarl Rognwald (Rogvald, Raonwald, Regvald, Rouis), created Earl of Moer in 885. Roll: Rognwald, Earl of Maere. Norr: Jarl Rogwald (Raowald, Regvald, Rouis), Earl of Moer 885. Married Hilder. Beyond Rognvald, things get pretty confused. Norr has about 25 generations going back to Oden. RC doesn't agree. But some RC names coming down from RC's Odin agree in the upper portion. But the dates are some 250 years different. RC and Kraentzler agree in taking Rognvald back three more generations. Russell goes way back to Olaf the Sharp-eyed, King of Rerik. -------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland.

Sagas The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas. In the Heimskringla, Rognvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Rognvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald the Orkneys and Shetlands. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson. The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Rognvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway,[3] and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931. Earl Rognvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Rognvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay.

Historia Norvegiae The Historia Norvegiae's account of Rognvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald. In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns. This account does not associate Rognvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous sons.

Fragmentary Annals of Ireland ...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkneys. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor. The oldest account of the Rognvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Patráic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland. The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann". This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan. These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866, and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles. Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900.[9] What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900).[10] However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier. --------------------

  • Rognvald Eysteinsson "The Wise" Jarl of More and Romsdal

born about 0830 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway died 0890/94 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland

father:

  • Eystein "Glumra" Jarl of More

born about 0800 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

mother:

  • Ascrida (Aseda) Rognvaldsdatter Countess of Oppland

born about 0804 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway married about 0846 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

siblings:

  • Svanhild Eysteinsdatter born about 0850 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway
  • Malahule (Haldrick) (Malahulc) (Tresney) Eysteinsson born about 0845 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

Sigurd I "the Mighty" Eysteinsson born about 0832 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway died 0874 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland buried Ekkialsbakki, Sydero, Dornoch Firth

spouse:

  • Ragnhild (Hilda) Hrolfsdatter Countess of More

born about 0848 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland married about 0867 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

children: Thoric "The Silent" Ragnvaldsson Count of Maer

  • Rollo (Hrolf the Ganger) Duke of Normandy

born about 0846 Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway died about 0931 Notre Dame, Rouen, Nornandie, Neustria buried Notre Dame, Rouen, Nornandie, Neustria

  • Einar "Turf" Rognvaldsson Jarl of Orkney

born about 0852 Maer, More og Romsdal, Norway died 0910 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland

  • Hrollager (Hrollaug) of Iceland Ragnvaldsson

born about 0854 Maer, Norway

  • Turstan Rognvaldsson of Bastenburg

Hallad Ragnvaldsson Ivar Ragnvaldsson -------------------- Ragnvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. Sagas

The saga accounts are the best known, and the latest, of the three surviving traditions concerning Rognvald and the foundation of the Earldom of Orkney. Recorded in the 13th century, their views are informed by Norwegian politics of the day. Once, historians could write that no-one denied the reality of Harald Fairhair's expeditions to the west recounted in Heimskringla, but this is no longer the case. The Norwegian contest with the Kings of Scots over the Hebrides and the Isle of Man in the middle 13th century underlies the sagas.

In the Heimskringla, Ragnvald is Earl of Møre. He accompanies Harald Fairhair on his great expeditions to the west, to Ireland and to Scotland. Here, Ragnvald's son Ivarr is killed. In compensation King Harald grants Rognvald Orkney and Shetland. Rognvald himself returns to Norway, giving the northern isles to his brother Sigurd Eysteinsson.

The Heimskringla recounts other tales of Ragnvald. It tells how he causes Harald Finehair to be given his byname Fairhair by cutting and dressing his hair, which had been uncut for ten years on account of Harald's vow never to cut it until he was ruler of all Norway, and it makes him the father of Ganger-Hrólf, identified by saga writers with the Rollo (Hrólfr), ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, who was said to have been established as Count of Rouen by King Charles the Simple in 931.

Earl Ragnvald is killed by Harald's son Halfdan Hålegg. Ragnvald's death is avenged by his son, Earl Turf-Einar, from whom later Orkney earls claimed descent, who kills Halfdan on North Ronaldsay. Historia Norvegiae

The Historia Norvegiae's account of Ragnvald and the foundation of the Orkney earldom is the next oldest, probably dating from the 12th century. This account contains much curious detail on Orkney, including the earliest account of the Picts as small people who hid in the daytime, but it has little to say about Rognvald.

   In the days of Harald Fairhair, king of Norway, certain pirates, of the family of the most vigorous prince Ronald [Rognvald], set out with a great fleet, and crossed the Solundic sea..., and subdued the islands to themselves. And being there provided with safe winter seats, they went in summer-time working tyranny upon the English, and the Scots, and sometimes also upon the Irish, so that they took under their rule, from England, Northumbria; from Scotland, Caithness; from Ireland, Dublin, and the other sea-side towns.

This account does not associate Ragnvald with the earldom, but instead attributes it to his anonymous kinfolk. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland ...for it was not long before this that there had been every war and every trouble in Norway, and this was the source of that war in Norway: two younger sons of Albdan, king of Norway, drove out the eldest son, i.e. Ragnall son of Albdan, for fear that he would seize the kingship of Norway after their father. So Ragnall came with his three sons to the Orkneys. Ragnall stayed there then, with his youngest son. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland , FA 330. Edited and translated by Joan N. Radnor.

The oldest account of the Ragnvald and the earldom of Orkney is that found in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. The annals survive only in incomplete copies made by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh in the 17th century, but the original annals are believed to date from the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Pátraic (died 1039). The annals are known to have had an influence on later writings in Iceland.

The annals make Rognvald the son of "Halfdan, King of Lochlann." This is generally understood to mean Halfdan the Black, which would make the Rognvald of the annals the brother of Harald Finehair. However, the sagas claim that Rognvald's grandfather was named Halfdan.

These events are placed after an account of the devastation of Fortriu, dated to around 866, and the fall of York, reliably dated to late 867. However, such an early date makes it difficult to reconcile the saga claims that Harald Fairhair was involved in Rognvald's conquest of the northern isles.

Harald Finehair's victory in the Battle of Hafrsfjord, which gave him dominion over parts of Norway, is traditionally dated to 872, but was probably later, perhaps as late as 900. What little is known of Scottish events in the period from the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba would correspond equally well with Harald's attacks on Scotland in the reign of Domnall mac Causantín (ruled 889–900). However, this would not correspond with the sequence in the earliest account of the origins of the Orkney earldom, which places this a generation earlier. Orkney inheritance

Ragnvald having given his earldom to Sigurd, according to the Orkneyinga Saga, the latter died in a curious fashion after a battle with Máel Brigte of Moray. Sigurd's son Gurthorm ruled for a single winter after this and died childless.

In addition to Hrólfr/Rollo and Turf-Einar, Ragnvald had a third son called Hallad who then inherited the title. However, unable to constrain Danish raids on Orkney, he gave up the earldom and returned to Norway, which "everyone thought was a huge joke." The predations of the Danish pirates led to Ragnvald flying into a rage and summoning his sons Thorir and Hrolluag. He predicted that Thorir's path would keep him in Norway and that Hrolluag was destined seek his fortune in Iceland. Turf-Einar, the youngest, then came forward and offered to go to the islands. Ragnvald said: "Considering the kind of mother you have, slave-born on each side of her family, you are not likely to make much of a ruler. But I agree, the sooner you leave and the later you return the happier I'll be." His father's misgivings notwithstanding, Torf-Einarr succeeded in defeating the Danes and founded a dynasty which retained control of the islands for centuries after his death. -------------------- In 890 he was burned alive with his bodyguards in his hall.

He had 3 sons with his Mistress:

Hallad Rognavaldsson, Jarl of Orkney, born abt 857 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway, died about 893 in Norway (abandoned his Jarldom of Orkney)

Einar I "Turf" Rognavaldsson, Jarl of Orkney, born about 858 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway, died about 920 in Orkney Islands, Scotland

Hrollaug (Hrollager) Rognavaldsson, of Eyiafiordborn about 859 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway, died in Eyiafiord, Iceland Married Emina, born about 862 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway Had a son, Rollo (Thurstan) of More, born about 885 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway He married Gerlotte of Blois

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NORSE PREDECESSORS of the EARLS of ORKNEY - subject to King of Norway until after 1379

RAGNVALD I the Wise, called the Morejarl, son of Eystein Glumra, Jarl of the Uplanders in Norway, grandson of Ivar son of Halfdan the Old, was made Jarl of North and South More and of Raumsdal in Norway by King Harald Haarfagri after his victory of Solskiel circa 869 over Hunthiof, King of More, and Nokve, King of Raumsdal. In that year he surprised Vermund, King of Fiordeland, at Notsdal and burned him in his hall with 90 men. Later King Harald married his sister Swanhilda and had issue, In (?) 874 King Harald made an expedition to the Nordreys (Orkney and Shetland) to enforce his authority over those who had fled thither in order to escape from it in Norway. Either during this expedition or previously at the battle of Hafrsfiord circa 872 Ivar, the eldest son of Ragnvald, was killed and the King gave the Orkneys and Shetlands to Ragnvald as compensation. When the King started home for Norway, (?) Spring 875, Ragnvald, who went with him, gave the islands to his brother Sigurd, and the King confirmed the transfer, Ragnvald was surprised in his hall and burned alive circa 894 by Halfdan Haaleg and Gudred Liomi, King Harald's sons by Snaefrid, dau. of Swasi.

By his wife Ragnhild, dau. of Hrolf Nefia, he had 3 sons: Ivar, who was killed in battle ut supra, Rolf the Ganger, afterwards 1st Duke of Normandy, and Thori the Silent, who was made Jarl of More in succession to his father by King Harald Haarfagri circa 894, after Gudred Liomi, who had seized More on the death of Jarl Ragnvald, had been dispossessed by the King. By an earlier union with a nameless girl, whose kindred were all slave-born, Ragnvald had 3 sons, described as bastards: Hallad, 4th Earl of Orkney, Turf-Einar, 5th Earl of Orkney, and Hrollaug, an unwarlike man, who settled at Eyiafiord in Iceland and had issue. [Complete Peerage, X:Appendix A:3-4]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rogenwald was a supporter of King Harold Harfagr, and assisted him in obtaining the mastery over the other independent Norwegian chiefs, and in establishing himself as King of all Norway. He was Earl of More and Raumdahl in Norway, and in 888, he obtained from King Harold a grant of the Orkney and Shetland islands. One of his sons, Rollo, conquered Neustria, founded the line of sovereign Dukes of Normandy, and was ancestor to William the Conqueror. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 492, Sinclair, Earl of Orkney] -------------------- Glumra, Eystein the Noisy, Jarl of the Uplanders -------------------- Rognvald "The Wise" Eysteinsson (son of Eystein Ivarsson) is the founder of the Earldom of Orkney in the Norse Sagas. Three quite different accounts of the creation of the Norse earldom on Orkney and Shetland exist. The best known is that found in the Heimskringla, but other older traditions are found in the Historia Norvegiae and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. -------------------- Earl of the North and South More.

He cut the 10 years' unshorn hair of the king Harold I of Norway turning him from "Luva" (the lousy) into "Haarfager" (fair haired). King Harold granted Ragnvald the Orkney and Shetland Islands in 888. Burnt to death in his house circa 894. -------------------- Ragnald I was burned alive with his bodygards in his hall. Earl of Sunnmore, Nordmore and Romsdal

Ragnvald was well known historically as the founder of Normandy. Earl of Sunnmore, Nordmore aand Romsdal, was born in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway and died at the Orkney Islands. He ws the son of Eystein Glumra the noisy, Earl of Oppland and grandson of Halfdan the old. His second wife was Ragnhild Hrolfsdottir, daaughter of Hrolfrr Nefjaa. Ragnvald was the father of Hrolf Ganger, the founder of Normandy. He was also the father of Turf-Einar, the ancestor of the jarls of Orkney.

He was the direct ancestor to William I of England, Edward II of England, James I of England and therefore, Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He is there fore the ancestor of most of the royal families of europe. -------------------- Also called Jarl Ragnald I of Orkney [Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings and Queens (7 Kensington Road Church Court, London W8 4SP: Robinson Publishing Ltd., 1998), Chart 27].

Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl was King Harald Fairhair's dearest friend, and the king had the greatest regard for him[Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway (London: Norroena Society, 1907), Harald Harfager's Saga].

Also called Jarl Rognvaldr of Møre.

He was per late Icelandic sources, for which there is no good reason to believe that these generations are historical, a son of Eysteinn Glumra, son of Ívarr, son of Hálfdan the Old.6 Rögnvaldr Eysteinsson, Mørejarl also went by the name of Ragnvald "the Wise." He was born circa 830 in Maer, Norway. He was the son of Jarl of the Uplanders Eysteinn Glumra Ivarsson and Aseda Rögnvaldsdóttir[Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway (London: Norroena Society, 1907), Harald Harfager's Saga George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), X:App.A:3].

He became one of Harald Fairhair's men the summer before the battle at Solskel circa August 866. He was set as chief over the two districts, North More and Raumsdal, by Harald Fairhair, who strengthened him both with men of might and bondes, and gave him the help of ships to defend the coast against enemies in 867. He was given South Möre to govern as well, following the defeat of King Arnvid by Harald Hairfair, but the Firdafylke still remained in the possession of King Ardbjorns brother Vemund in 868 [Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway (London: Norroena Society, 1907)].

He was made Jarl of North and South Möre and of Raumsdal by King Harald Haarfagri after his victory of Solskiel over Hunthiof, King of Möre, and Nokve, King of Raumsdal circa 869. Jarl of North and South Möre, Norway, 869. Jarl of Raumsdal, Norway, 869[George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), X:App.A:3].

He was went over Eid, and southwards to the Fjord district. There he heard news of King Vemund, and came by night to a place called Naustdal, where King Vemund was living in guest-quarters. Earl Ragnvald surrounded the house in which they were quartered, and burnt the king in it, together with ninety men, and then took all the ships Vemund had, and all the goods he could get hold of, in 869 in the winter of. He married Ragnhild Hrolfsdotter of Norway, daughter of Hrólfr Nefja of Norway, before 870[Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway (London: Norroena Society, 1907), Harald Harfager's Saga].

He married Ermina , a concubine before 870; A "more Danico" or "Danish wife."[Somerset Herald J.R. Planché, The Conqueror and His Companions (London, England: Tinsley Brothers, 1874) and Roderick W. Stuart, Royalty for Commoners: The Complete Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, Kings of England, and Queen Philippa (.: ., 3rd Ed., 1998), 295-39].


Jarl of Orkney, between 874 and 875 [Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of British Kings and Queens (7 Kensington Road Church Court, London W8 4SP: Robinson Publishing Ltd., 1998), Chart 27].

He was given the Orkney and Shetland isles in compensation for the loss of his son Ivar in the wars of Harald Fairhair against the viking raiders in the western lands in 888[Circa 1225 A.D. Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway (London: Norroena Society, 1907), Harald Harfager's Saga and Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 493, 888].

He died in 894. He was killed by two jealous sons of Harlald Fairhair. Halfdan Haleg and Gudrod Ljome set off one spring with a great force, and came suddenly upon Earl Ragnvald, earl of More, and surrounded the house in which he was, and bur

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Ragnvald Eysteinsson, Mørejarl's Timeline

830
830
Åre Municipality, Jämtland County, Sweden

Born 0852 in Maer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway

845
845
Age 15
Vestfold, Norway
850
850
Age 20
Sunnmøre, Norway
850
Age 20
Giske, Sunnmøre, Norway
852
852
Age 22
Europe
859
859
Age 29
Giske, Møre og Romsdal, Norway
860
860
Age 30
Maer, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway
862
862
Age 32
Norway
890
890
Age 60
Møre og Romsdal, Norge
892
892
Age 62
Giske, Møre og Romsdal, Norway