Raoul d'Ivry, comte d'Ivry et de Bayeux

Is your surname d'Ivry?

Research the d'Ivry family

Raoul d'Ivry, comte d'Ivry et de Bayeux's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Raoul d'Ivry, comte d'Ivry et de Bayeux

Nicknames: "Long Sword", "Ralph", "Raoul", "Rodulf"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Ivry, Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Asperling (Eperling) de Vaudreuïl, I and Sprota (Adela) de Senlis
Husband of Aubree Albérède Eremburge de Caux
Father of Mahaut / Albérade d'Ivry; Emma d'Ivry et de Bayeux, Countess d'Ivry; Jean d'Avranches, Bishop of Avranches, Archbishop of Rouen; Raoul d'Ivry and Hugues d'Ivry
Brother of several Daughters de Pitres
Half brother of Richard I, 'The Fearless', Duke of Normandy

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Raoul d'Ivry, comte d'Ivry et de Bayeux

Raoul/Rodulf of Ivry

From Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodulf_of_Ivry

Rodulf of Ivry (Rodolf, Raoul, comte d'Ivry) (died c. 1015)[1] was a Norman noble, and regent of Normandy during the minority of Richard II.[2]

Life

Rodolf was the son of Eperleng, a rich owner of several mills at Vaudreuil, and of his wife Sprota, who by William I, Duke of Normandy had been mother of Richard I of Normandy, making Rodolf the Duke's half-brother.[3][4]

When Richard died in 996, Rodulf took effective power during the minority of his nephew, Richard II of Normandy,[5] alongside the boy's mother, Gunnor.

According to William of Jumièges he had to quell dual rebellions in 996, of peasants and nobility; against the former he cut off feet and hands.[6] He arrested the chief aristocratic rebel Guillaume, comte d'Exmes.

Count

The counts of the duchy of Normandy were in place from around the year 1000; Rodulf is the first whose title can be attested by a document (of 1011).[7] Pierre Bauduin following David Bates[8] states that territorial designations for these titles came in only in the 1040s.[9] Contemporary sources, and Dudon de Saint-Quentin, speak only of Rodulf as "count", never "of Ivry"; this is found only in later writers. Ordericus Vitalis, for example, calls him count of Bayeux. Historians now consider this erroneous, following the later Robert de Torigni, who makes Rodulf count of Ivry.

In strategic terms, Ivry was on the boundary of the duchy of Normandy, by an important crossroads on a roman Road, by the valley of the River Eure. Over some decades the Normans had struggled there against the forces of the county of Blois, after its control had reached Dreux. This position mattered for the assertion of domination of the south-east of the Évrecin.

Consistently, the duchy may have conceded to the county in the direction of the county of Hiémois and towards Lieuvin (forêt du Vièvre).

Family

He married Aubrée de Canville, who died before 1011.[3][10] His children were:

  • Hugues, bishop of Bayeux (c. 1011-1049)[10]
  • Jean d'Ivry, bishop of Avranches (1060–1067) then archbishop of Rouen (1067–1079)[10]
  • Emma, who married Osbern de Crépon (Osbern the Steward), mother of William FitzOsbern[10]
  • Raoul[10]
  • Daughter of unknown name, who married Richard de Beaufou[10]

References

  1. ^ Eleanor Searle, Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066 (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1988), p. 292 n. 8
  2. ^ Francois Neveux. A Brief History of The Normans (Constable and Robinson, London, 2008), p. 74
  3. ^ a b Eleanor Searle, Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066 (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1988), p. 108
  4. ^ The Normans in Europe, ed. & trans. Elisabeth van Houts (Manchester University Press, 2000), p. 57
  5. ^ François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, Ouest-France, Rennes, 1998, p.65
  6. ^ Guillaume de Jumièges, Histoire des ducs de Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, interpolating Robert de Torigni and Ordericus Vitalis, p.111-114
  7. ^ David C. Douglas, 'The Earliest Norman Counts', The English Historical Review, Vol. 61, No. 240 (May, 1946), p. 131
  8. ^ David Bates, Normandy before 1066, p.114
  9. ^ Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xeme-XIeme siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, p.200
  10. ^ a b c d e f Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue folge, Band III Teilband 4, Das Feudale Frankreich und Sien Einfluss auf des Mittelalters (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1989) Tafel 694A

--------------------------------------

Born before 945. Charles Cawley gives his dates as birth between 942 and 950 and death sometime after 1011.

Son of Esperleng de Pîtres, son of --- and Sprota, daughter of --- . From Brittany. Sprota was previously the concubine or wife of Guillaume I Comte [de Normandie].

Raoul married Aubree de de Caville/Cacheville. Her parents are unknown. She was murdered, possibly by her husband. She is also named as Eranberge by other sources. It appears that he had only one wife: Aubree / Eranberge.

Raoul d'Ivry and his wife had five children:

  1. Hugues d'Ivry who died in October 1049
  2. Emma d'Ivry who married Osbern de Crepon
  3. an unnamed daughter who married Richard de Beaufour (de Belfage)
  4. Raoul d'Ivry who died after 1020/30
  5. Jean d'Ivry who died in 1079 and was Bishop of Avranches 1061 and Archbishop of Rouen in 1069

Sources and Notes

[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc279557199]

Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Sprota and "Asperleng" who owned the mills in the valley of la Risle[742]. Esperling & his wife had [four or more] children.

RAOUL d'Ivry ([942/50]-after 1011). Guillaume de Jumièges names Raoul as uterine brother of Richard Comte [de Normandie], specifying that the latter consulted him about arrangements for the succession in Normandy when dying[743]. It is assumed that he was born after the death of Comte Guillaume I, but it is unlikely that he was born much later than 945 if it is correct that the birth of his older half-brother Richard can be dated to [1032] (see the document NORMANDY DUKES). Comte [de Bayeux]. m AUBREE [de Caville/Cacheville], daughter of --- (-murdered ----). Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Raoul and "Eranberge…née dans une certaine terre du pays de Caux que l'on appelle Caville ou Cacheville"[744]. She is named as wife of Raoul by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she built the castle of Ivry, executed the architect Lanfred to prevent him from completing a similar construction elsewhere, and attempted to expel her husband from the castle, but was killed by him[745]. Comte Raoul & his wife had five children:

i) HUGUES d'Ivry (-Oct 1049). Guillaume de Jumièges names Hugues bishop of Bayeux as son of comte Raoul, when recording that the castle of Ivry was confiscated from him by Robert II Duke of Normandy[746]. Seigneur d'Ivry. Bishop of Bayeux 1015. Hugues had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses:

- see below.

ii) EMMA d'Ivry . Guillaume de Jumièges records that one of the daughters of Raoul & his wife married Osbern de Crepon[747]. "Willelmus et frater eius Osbernus" donated "terram…Herchembaldus vicecomes et Turoldus, comitissæ Gunnoris camerarius" and revenue from land received by "Croco et Erchembaldus filii eiusdem Erchembaldi vicecomitis" to the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen, with the consent of "matre eorum Emma", for the soul of "patris sui Osberni cognomento Pacifici", by charter dated to [1035/60], signed by "…Godeboldi, Daneboldi, Ansfredi filii Osberni, Gisleberti filii Turgisii…"[748]. "Osberni frater eius [Willelmi]" witnessed a charter dated 1038 or after[749]. After her husband died, she became abbess of St Amand at Rouen[750]. m OSBERN de Crepon, son of HERFAST & his wife --- (-murdered [1040]).

iii) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the other (unnamed) daughter of Raoul & his wife married Richard de Belfage, naming their son Robert and recording that one of their several daughters married Hugues de Montfort[751]. m RICHARD de Beaufour, son of ---. Richard & his wife had [four or more] children:

(a) ROBERT . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the other (unnamed) daughter of Raoul & his wife married Richard de Belfage, naming their son Robert and recording that one of their several daughters married Hugues de Montfort[752].

(b) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the wife of "Hugues le second…[fils de] Hugues de Montfort dit le Barbu" was "la fille de Richard de Belfage"[753]. m as his first wife, HUGUES [II] de Montfort, son of HUGUES [I] de Montfort-sur-Risle & his wife --- (-1088 or after).

(c) daughters . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the other (unnamed) daughter of Raoul & his wife married Richard de Belfage, naming their son Robert and recording that one of their several daughters married Hugues de Montfort[754].

iv) RAOUL d'Ivry (-after [1020/30]). "Hugo Baiocassine urbis episcopus et Rodulfi quondam comitis filius" donated property to Jumièges by charter dated to [1020/30][755]. It is assumed that the donors were brothers although this is not certain.

Ralph or Raoul was the son of Sprota and her second husband Esperleng.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodulf_of_Ivry

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raoul_d%27Ivry

-----------------------------

Raoul, comte d'Ivry († ap. 1015), était le demi-frère du duc de Normandie Richard Ier

La tutelle de Raoul d'Ivry sur le duc de Normandie

En 996, le duc Richard Ier de Normandie meurt. Son successeur, Richard II, étant mineur, Raoul d'Ivry assure la transition en tant que demi-frère du défunt. François Neveux estime : " selon toute apparence, c'est lui qui détenait la réalité du pouvoir pendant la minorité "[1]. Une place qu'il partage sûrement avec la veuve de Richard Ier, la duchesse Gunnor.

Le chroniqueur Guillaume de Jumièges nous apprend qu'il est chargé de mater les deux rébellions qui éclatent à la fin du Xe siècle en Normandie, d'une part celle de la paysannerie et d'autre part, celle d'une partie de l'aristocratie. Contre les paysans, il emploie la manière forte en faisant couper les pieds et les mains des meneurs[2]. Contre les nobles, il dirige une expédition qui conduit à l'arrestation du principal rebelle, Guillaume, comte d'Exmes.

Le comte Raoul

Au sein du duché de Normandie, les premiers comtes apparaissent autour de l'an 1000. Raoul est le premier attesté par un acte (1011). Il possède peut-être ce titre depuis longtemps car Robert de Torigni fait remonter cette attribution au temps du duc Richard Ier (donc avant 996). Le comté qui lui fut dévolu donna lieu à un débat parmi les historiens. Comme le rappelle le chercheur Pierre Bauduin à la suite de David Bates[3], " les désignations territoriales pour les comtes apparaissent seulement dans les années 1040 "[4]. Les actes d'époque et Dudon de Saint-Quentin présentent simplement Raoul comme " le comte Raoul " et jamais comme " Raoul d'Ivry " ou " le comte d'Ivry ". Ce sont des écrivains postérieurs qui attribuent un comté précis au demi-frère de Richard Ier : Orderic Vital le désigne par exemple comme comte de Bayeux. Mais les historiens considèrent que le moine se trompe. Ils préfèrent suivre un autre chroniqueur tardif, Robert de Torigni, qui décrit Raoul comme comte d'Ivry.

Son installation revêt une importance stratégique : Ivry se situe à la limite du duché, sur un carrefour important entre une voie romaine et la vallée de l'Eure. Depuis plusieurs dizaines d'années, la région fait l'objet d'une lutte d'influence entre le duc de Normandie et le comte de Blois-Chartres qui vient de prendre pied à Dreux. En plaçant un membre de sa famille à Ivry, Richard Ier (ou Richard II) conforte son autorité sur la marge sud-est de l'Évrecin.

Cette stratégie de consolidation explique sans doute les autres concessions ducales en faveur de Raoul dans l'Hiémois et en Lieuvin (forêt du Vièvre).

Le château d'Ivry

L'actuel château d'Ivry-la-Bataille aurait été construit vers 970 par Eremberga (ou Alberède), femme de Raoul, sur les plans de l'architecte Lanfred qu'elle aurait ensuite, selon la légende, fait assassiner afin qu'il emporte avec lui ses secrets techniques. Le comte Raoul aurait tué plus tard sa femme pour garder le contrôle de la forteresse[5]. Le château, entièrement arasé en 1424 par les anglais et revenu au jour à partir de 1968 grâce à des fouilles.

Famille et descendance

Fils de Eperleng, fermier des moulins du Vaudreuil et de Sprota, veuve de Guillaume Longue Epée

Demi-frère du duc Richard Ier, fils de Sprota et Guillaume Longue-Epée

Femmes : Eremberga, morte avant 1011 puis Aubrée de Canville

Enfants

   * Hugues, évêque de Bayeux (v. 1011-1049)
   * Jean d'Ivry, évêque d'Avranches (1060-1067) puis archevêque de Rouen (1067-1079)
   * Emma qui épouse Osbern de Crépon
   * Raoul
   * Une fille dont le nom est inconnue mais qui fut mariée à Richard de Beaufou

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raoul_d%27Ivry

--------------------

From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#EsperlengPitresMSprota

RAOUL d'Ivry (-after 1011).  Guillaume de Jumièges names Raoul as uterine brother of Richard Comte [de Normandie], specifying that the latter consulted him about arrangements for the succession in Normandy when dying[657].  Comte de Bayeux.  m AUBREE, daughter of --- (-murdered ----).  Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Raoul and "Eranberge…née dans une certaine terre du pays de Caux que l'on appelle Caville ou Cacheville"[658].  She is named as wife of Raoul by Orderic Vitalis, who says that she built the castle of Ivry, executed the architect Lanfred to prevent him from completing a similar construction elsewhere, attempted to expel her husband from the castle, and was killed by him[659].  Comte Raoul & his wife had five children:  

i) HUGUES d'Ivry (-Oct 1049). Guillaume de Jumièges names Hugues bishop of Bayeux as son of comte Raoul, when recording that the castle of Ivry was confiscated from him by Robert II Duke of Normandy[660]. Seigneur d'Ivry. Bishop of Bayeux 1015. Hugues had [two] illegitimate children by an unknown mistress or mistresses:

(a) ROGER . "Rogerius Hugonis episcopi filius" sold land in Blovilla and Novillula to Sainte-Trinité in an undated charter[661]. m ODA, daughter of ---. "Odain uxore sua" is named in the undated charter of "Rogerius Hugonis episcopi filius"[662]. Roger & his wife had two children:

(1) GUILLAUME . "Willelmo et Hugone eorum filiis" are named in the undated charter of "Rogerius Hugonis episcopi filius"[663]. "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi" purchased land from "Rodulfus de Warenna" dated 1074[664].

(2) HUGUES . "Willelmo et Hugone eorum filiis" are named in the undated charter of "Rogerius Hugonis episcopi filius"[665].

(b) [AUBREE . Chibnall speculates that the grandmother of Ascelin Goël may have been the daughter of Hugues Bishop of Bayeux, which may have provided her grandson with a claim to Ivry by inheritance[666], assuming that her illegitimacy presented no obstacle. Her two marriages are shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[667], but the primary sources which confirm them have not yet been identified. m firstly ROBERT d'Ivry, son of ---. [1060]. m secondly ALBERT de Cravent .]

ii) EMMA d'Ivry . Guillaume de Jumièges records that one of the daughters of Raoul & his wife married Osbern de Crepon[668]. After her husband died, she became abbess of St Amand at Rouen[669]. m OSBERN de Crepon, son of HERFAST & his wife --- (-murdered [1040]).

iii) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that the other (unnamed) daughter of Raoul & his wife married Richard de Belfage, naming their son Robert and recording that one of their several daughters married Hugues de Montfort[670]. m RICHARD de Beaufour, son of ---. Richard & his wife had [four or more] children:

(a) ROBERT .

(b) daughter . m as his first wife, HUGUES [II] de Montfort, son of HUGUES [I] de Montfort-sur-Risle & his wife --- (-1088 or after).

(c) daughters .

iv) RAOUL d'Ivry (-after [1020/30]). "Hugo Baiocassine urbis episcopus et Rodulfi quondam comitis filius" donated property to Jumièges by charter dated to [1020/30][671]. It is assumed that the donors were brothers although this is not certain.

v) JEAN d'Ivry (-1079). Brother of Hugues, according to Orderic Vitalis[672]. Bishop of Avranches 1061. The Chronicon S. Stephani Cadomensis records that "Joannes filius Rodulfi comitis fratris Ricardi" succeeded as Archbishop of Rouen in 1069, having been bishop of Avranches for seven years and three months; the same source records the death in 1079 of "Joannes Rothomag. Archiepiscopus"[673].

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Raoul d’Ivry + après 1011 comte de Bayeux (14) et Châtelain d’Ivry (-La-Bataille, 27) (cité dès 973) ép. 1) Auberée (Alberède) ° (Caville ou Canville, Cacheville ?, pays de Caux) + dès 1011 (ass. par son mari) elle fait édifier le château d’Ivry (dont elle aurait fait exécuter l’architecte Lanfroi) ép. 2) Eramberge (Eramburge, Erneburge)

[http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CCUQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fracineshistoire.free.fr%2FLGN%2FPDF%2FBayeux-Ivry.pdf&rct=j&q=Mahaut%20d%27Ivry&ei=dqc0Tbm1L4bfgQfJpZzzCw&usg=AFQjCNHWc4N8QsXdmThvNkHhnaKhR1RNow&cad=rja]

-------------------------------

http://royroyes.net/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I2884&tree=rr_tree -------------------- http://larryvoyer.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I7528&tree=v7_28 -------------------- See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p175.htm#i19693 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Raoul de Beaufour

-------------------- See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p175.htm#i19692 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Rodulf of Ivry From Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodulf_of_Ivry

Rodulf of Ivry (Rodolf, Raoul, comte d'Ivry) (died c. 1015) was a Norman noble, half-brother of Richard I of Normandy.

Regent in Normandy

Duke Richard I died in 996. His successor Richard II of Normandy being young, Rodulf took effective power[1], alongside Richard's widow Gunnor.

According to William of Jumièges he had to quell dual rebellions in 996, of peasants and nobility; against the former he cut off feet and hands.[2]. He arrested the chief aristocratic rebel Guillaume, comte d'Exmes.

Count

The counts of the duchy of Normandy were in place from around the year 1000; Rodulf is the first whose title can be attested by a document (of 1011). Pierre Bauduin following David Bates[3] states that territorial designations for these titles came in only in the 1040s.[4]. Contemporary sources, and Dudon de Saint-Quentin , speak only of Rodulf as "count", never "of Ivry"; this is found only in later writers. Ordericus Vitalis, for example, calls him count of Bayeux. Historians now consider this erroneous, following the later Robert de Torigni, who makes Rodulf count of Ivry.

In strategic terms, Ivry was on the boundary of the duchy of Normandy, by an important crossroads on a roman Road, by the valley of the River Eure. Over some decades the Normans had struggled there against the forces of the county of Blois, after its control had reached Dreux. This position mattered for the assertion of domination of the south-east of the Évrecin.

Consistently, the duchy may have conceded to the county in the direction of the county of Hiémois and towards Lieuvin (forêt du Vièvre).

Family

He was son of Eperleng, master miller of Vaudreuil, and of Sprota, widow of William I, Duke of Normandy; he therefore shared his mother with Richard I.

He married Eremberga, who died before 1011, then Aubrée de Canville. His children were

  • Hugues, bishop of Bayeux (c. 1011-1049)
  • Jean d'Ivry, bishop of Avranches (1060-1067) then archbishop of Rouen (1067-1079)
  • Emma, who married Osbern de Crépon (Osbern the Steward), mother of William FitzOsbern
  • Raoul
  • Daughter of unknown name, who married Richard de Beaufou.

Source

Guillaume de Jumièges, Histoire des ducs de Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, avec interpolation de Robert de Torigni et d'Orderic Vital, p.111-114

References

Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xeme-XIeme siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004. François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, Ouest-France, Rennes, 1998

Notes

  1. ^ François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, Ouest-France, Rennes, 1998, p.65
  2. ^ Guillaume de Jumièges, Histoire des ducs de Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, interpolating Robert de Torigni and Ordericus Vitalis, p.111-114
  3. ^ David Bates, Normandy before 1066, p.114
  4. ^ Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xeme-XIeme siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, p.200

------------------------------

Raoul d'Ivry http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raoul_d'Ivry

Raoul d'Ivry1 († ap. 1011), fils d'Asperleng (Esperleng) de Pîtres (fermier des moulins du Vaudreuil) et de Sprota (mariée en premières noces à Guillaume Ier de Normandie), il était le demi-frère du duc de Normandie Richard Ier.

La tutelle de Raoul d'Ivry sur le duc de Normandie

En 996, le duc Richard Ier de Normandie meurt. Son successeur, Richard II, étant mineur, Raoul d'Ivry assure la transition en tant que demi-frère par sa mère du défunt. François Neveux estime : « selon toute apparence, c'est lui qui détenait la réalité du pouvoir pendant la minorité »2. Une place qu'il partage sûrement avec la veuve de Richard Ier, la duchesse Gunnor.

Le chroniqueur Guillaume de Jumièges nous apprend qu'il est chargé de mater les deux rébellions qui éclatent à la fin du xe siècle en Normandie, d'une part celle de la paysannerie et d'autre part, celle d'une partie de l'aristocratie. Contre les paysans, il emploie la manière forte en faisant couper les pieds et les mains des meneurs3. Contre les nobles, il dirige une expédition qui conduit à l'arrestation du principal rebelle, Guillaume, comte d'Exmes.

Le comte Raoul

Au sein du duché de Normandie, les premiers comtes apparaissent autour de l'an 1000. Raoul est le premier attesté par un acte (1011). Il possède peut-être ce titre depuis longtemps car Robert de Torigni fait remonter cette attribution au temps du duc Richard Ier (donc avant 996). Le comté qui lui fut dévolu donna lieu à un débat parmi les historiens. Comme le rappelle le chercheur Pierre Bauduin à la suite de David Bates4, " les désignations territoriales pour les comtes apparaissent seulement dans les années 1040 "5. Les actes d'époque et Dudon de Saint-Quentin présentent simplement Raoul comme " le comte Raoul " et jamais comme " Raoul d'Ivry " ou " le comte d'Ivry ". Ce sont des écrivains postérieurs qui attribuent un comté précis au demi-frère de Richard Ier : Orderic Vital le désigne par exemple comme comte de Bayeux. Mais les historiens considèrent que le moine se trompe. Ils préfèrent suivre un autre chroniqueur tardif, Robert de Torigni, qui décrit Raoul comme comte d'Ivry.

Son installation revêt une importance stratégique : Ivry se situe à la limite du duché, sur un carrefour important entre une voie romaine et la vallée de l'Eure. Depuis plusieurs dizaines d'années, la région fait l'objet d'une lutte d'influence entre le duc de Normandie et le comte de Blois-Chartres qui vient de prendre pied à Dreux. En plaçant un membre de sa famille à Ivry, Richard Ier (ou Richard II) conforte son autorité sur la marge sud-est de l'Évrecin.

Cette stratégie de consolidation explique sans doute les autres concessions ducales en faveur de Raoul dans l'Hiémois et en Lieuvin (forêt du Vièvre).

Le château d'Ivry

L'actuel château d'Ivry-la-Bataille aurait été construit vers 970 par Eremberga (ou Alberède), femme de Raoul, sur les plans de l'architecte Lanfred qu'elle aurait ensuite, selon la légende, fait assassiner afin qu'il emporte avec lui ses secrets techniques. Le comte Raoul aurait tué plus tard sa femme pour garder le contrôle de la forteresse6. Le château, entièrement arasé en 1424 par les Anglais a fait l'objet de fouilles à partir de 1968.

Unions et descendance7

Avec Éremburge († vers 1011):

  • Hugues, évêque de Bayeux (v. 1011-1049)
  • Emma (-1069), épouse d'Osbern de Crépon. Elle devient à la fin de sa vie abbesse de Saint-Amand de Rouen.
  • Raoul
  • Une fille dont le nom est resté inconnu mais qui fut mariée à Richard de Beaufou.

Avec Aubrée de Canville (Caville/Cacheville):

Jean d'Ivry, évêque d'Avranches (1060-1067) puis archevêque de Rouen (1067-1079)

Notes et références

  1. ↑ Généalogie de Raoul d'Ivry, fils d'Esperleng de Pîtres sur le site Medieval Lands [archive]
  2. ↑ François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, Ouest-France, Rennes, 1998, p. 65
  3. ↑ Guillaume de Jumièges, Histoire des ducs de Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, avec interpolation de Robert de Torigni et d'Orderic Vital, p.111-114
  4. ↑ David Bates, Normandy before 1066, p.114
  5. ↑ Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xe-XIe siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, p.200
  6. ↑ M. Guizot, Histoire de la Normandie, tome III. pp364 (voir source)
  7. ↑ Richard Allen, « ‘A proud and headstrong man’: John of Ivry, bishop of Avranches and archbishop of Rouen, 1060–79 », Historical Research, vol. 83, no 220 (mai 2010), p. 189-227.

Annexes

Articles connexes

Duché de Normandie

Source

Guillaume de Jumièges, Histoire des ducs de Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, avec interpolation de Robert de Torigni et d'Orderic Vital, p.111-114 - [lire en ligne] Bibliographie[modifier] Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xe-XIe siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004. François Neveux, La Normandie des ducs aux rois, Ouest-France, Rennes, 1998

view all 14

Raoul d'Ivry, comte d'Ivry et de Bayeux's Timeline

945
945
990
990
Age 45
France
995
995
Age 50
Bayeux, Calvados, Normandie, France
1006
1006
Age 61
Count of Bayeux, County of Ivry
1011
1011
Age 66
2ND Wife
1011
- 1015
Age 66
France
1015
1015
Age 70
Ivry, Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France
1995
April 1, 1995
Age 70
1997
March 26, 1997
Age 70
????