René L'Jeune Landry

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René le jeune Landry

Also Known As: "Le Jeune (young) or le Cadet (cadet)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: L'Oudon, Lower Normandy, France
Death: Died in Port-Royal (Acadie), Nova Scotia, Canada
Place of Burial: Acadie, Canada, Port Royal, Acadia
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown (Not Jehan-Claude Landry) and Unknown (Not Marie Sallé)
Husband of Marie Bernard
Father of Antoine Landry, I; René Landry, II; Claude Landry; Madeleine Landry; Cécile Landry and 11 others

Occupation: Farmer
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About René L'Jeune Landry

!!!!!!!!!!!!!! MERGE WARNING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is René (le cadet / lejeune) should not to be confused with René l'Aîné.

Contact the manager for clarification on proper relationships. I'd be happy to help you merge your tree into the proper places.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!! MERGE WARNING !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

9-17-2009 from Mimi ARCALA:

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  • **Rene (L'aine) born 1618. Rene (LeJeune) born 1634. Many people have these two mixed up or listed as brothers - they're not.

Rene L'aine was married to Perrine BOURG.

Rene LeJeune was married to Marie BERNARD / BENARD / BESNARD.

René l'Aîné is not the Father of René (le cadet)

René l'Aîné is not the Brother of René (le cadet)

René l'Aîné is not the son of Jean-Claude and Marie

The son of René l'Aîné, Claude was married to Marguerite Landry only and he died in 1740 (not to be confused with René le cadet son Claude born on the same year but died in 1747 and was married to three women).

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Rene LeJeune was married to Marie BERNARD / BENARD / BESNARD.

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The family of René le jeune LANDRY and Marie BERNARD

[10514] LANDRY, René le jeune (..), born about 1634 (rec. 1686) La Chaussée (Vienne : 860069), France, died Port-Royal (bim) (Acadie)

  • married about 1659, from .. (France)

BERNARD, Marie (.. & Andrée GUYON [84214]), born about 1645 (rec. 1686, rec. 1693) or 1644 (rec. 1699), buried 1719-01-11 Port-Royal (Acadie)

1) Abraham, married prob. Port-Royal (Acadie) 1701 Marie GUILBAULT

2) Anne, married about 1700 René BLANCHARD

3) Antoine, married about 1681 Marie THIBODEAU

4) Catherine, married after census 1700 Jacques LEBLANC

5) Cécile, married about 1685 Pierre THÉRIAULT, married Grand-Pré (Saint-Charles-des-Mines) (Acadie) 1725-08-12 Étienne RACOIS dit DEROSIER

6) Charles, married Port-Royal (Acadie) 1708-10-29 Catherine BROUSSARD

7) Claude, married about 1684 Marie Catherine THIBODEAU, married about 1725 Marie BABIN, married Grand-Pré (Saint-Charles-des-Mines) (Acadie) 1741-05-15 Jeanne CÉLESTIN dit BELLEMÈRE

8) Germain, married about 1694 Marie MELANÇON

9) Jean, married about 1687 Cécile MELANÇON

10) Jeanne, married about 1692 Jean THÉRIAULT

11) Marguerite, married about 1686 Pierre RICHARD

12) Marie, married about 1686 Martin DUPUIS

13) Pierre, married Port-Royal (Acadie) 1704-01-07 Madeleine BROUSSARD

14) René, married about 1691 Anne THÉRIAULT

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/010/010514.php

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This is René "le Jeune". See the following links:

http://www.blupete.com/Genealogy/LandryOA.htm

http://www.landrystuff.com/Le'jeune.htm

http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/ACADIAN-CAJUN/2001-03/0984254095

   For many of us researching the Landry family, "Jean-Claude Landry" is the focal point of much debate!  He represents our connection between the Old World and the New World.  Wishful thinking has many people believing accounts that he is that connection while others insist on verification before accepting that claim.  The uncertainty is increased due to the lost of some Acadian church records kept back in the 1600's which were destroyed during a fire in the early 1700's.  Mention has been given to this topic in one of our other sections, but we feel that the subject is important enough to merit its' own section!
   A recent newspaper article published in certain areas of Louisiana and Canada made reference to the fact that Jean-Claude Landry was indeed the progenitor of this particular line of Landrys.  Dr. Don Landry of Metaire, Louisiana, Historian for the Landry Family Association, has written the following rebuttal to these articles in the hope of answering the question.....myth or progenitor?

REBUTTAL OF THE JEAN-CLAUDE LANDRY MYTH AND THE SUPPOSED ORIGIN OF LANDRY FAMILY

   Sometime during February and March, 1998, a two part series on the Landry Family appeared in the Lafayette, Louisiana "Daily Advertiser" and again on Sunday March 16th and Sunday March 23rd the same, or similar article appeared in Damon Veach's column, "Louisiana Ancestors" which is a more widely spread genealogy column, and is published in the editions of the New Orleans TimePicayune, Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, the Lafayette and possibly the Lake Charles,Alexandria and Shreveport newspapers. According to the articles, the information on the genealogy and origin of the Landry Family of Acadia was received from a Paul Surrette, historian and genealogist from Moncton, New Brunswick; Brian Comeaux, of the committee for the Congres Mondial Acadiennes-Louisiana, 1999 and Ray Landry, a member of the Landry Family Association. Unfortunately the articles appear to be merely a paraphrasing of Father Léopold Lanctôt, o.m.i.'s account of the "The Landrys in Acadia" in tomes I et II, Éditions du Libre-Échange ISBN 2-89412-003-6 and L'Acadie des origines Léopold Lanctôt, o.m.i. Éditions du Fleuve, Montréal, 1988, which unfortunately are filled with errors, presented as documented facts.
   For the past 8 to10 years, since I have been doing genealogical research into the Landry family, I have run across researchers and documents written by researchers that hold to the theory that the parents of René Landry, le Jeune married to Marie Bernard was Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé.
   On more that one occasions noted genealogists, including Stephen A. White, genealogist and historian at the University of Moncton's Centre d'Etudes Acadiennes in Moncton New Brunswick and Father Clarence J. d'Entremont, Middle West Pubnico - Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia, have more than adequately rebutted this theory. They and the others theorize that this error was caused by the early censuses of Acadia, which enumerated Marie Salé as the "widow of Jean Claude" in the cenuses of 1671 and 1678, and then in the 1686 census, no mention was made of her deceased husband Jehan Claude, Marie Salé was enumerated as 86 years old and living between René Landry, le Jeunne and René Landry's oldest son Antoine Landry. This caused noted genealogist, Archange Godbout, to leap to the conclusion, that since Marie Salé was living in close proximity to René Landry, le Jeune, then she was the mother of René Landry, le Jeune. And still a greater leap was made to conclude that if Marie Salé was the widow of Jean Claude, then Jean Claude was the father of René Landry, le jeune and Jean Claude, in fact was actually Jean-Claude Landry, father of René Landry, le jeunne.  I am sure that most researchers understand the importance of having all of the information documented, and I am sure that they assume that, since the information they received was from credible sources, that it was documented and factual genealogical and historical data. What I am afraid of is that since this error was so widely published throughout Louisiana, especially in south Louisiana, where the majority of the Louisiana Acadian population resides, these errors will be perpetuated for a long time to come. And just as the errors of Fathers Archange Godbout, Leopold Lanctot and Adrien Bergeron, Bona Arsenault and countless others, have been believed to be documented facts, these errors will also be believed to be the documented facts, just because they were printed in a reputable column.
   Probably prompted by the above census entry, the writings of Adrien Bergeron in his "Le Grand Arrangement des Acadiens au Quebec" vol IV p.283, says that Marie Salé is married to Jean-Claude Landry and had two sons René Landry, the elder and René Landry, the younger. And in a more elaborate extension of this error, Leopold Lanctot, o.m.i., in his publication "Familles Acadiennes", makes the following suggestions as to the beginnings of the Landrys in the New World, when he states on page 7: "It all began in the year 1640 or 1641 when a group of 10 from the Landry family came to Port Royal, Acadia from France. The Landry family was originally from La Ventrouze, near Mortagne-au-Perche. Department of Orne, France. They were encouraged to come to Acadia by Marguerite Landry, daughter of Jean-Claude Landry and Marguerite's husband Robert Martin, who had been in Acadia for several years. The group of 10 consisted of Jean-Claude Landry and his second wife, Marie Salée (40 years) with their son René Landry, dit le jeune (6 ans) and three children of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage: twins, René Landry dit l' aisne (22 years) and Antoinette Landry (22 years), Perrine Landry (29 years) with her husband Jacques Joffriau. Also in the group were three of Marie Salée's children from her first marriage to Martin Aucoin. These children were: Michelle Aucoin (22 years), Francois Aucoin (18 years) and Jeanne Aucoin (8 years). The group probably settled near the Saint-John River in the Cape Sable area. They later moved to Port Royal. Please note that there were two named René in this group, René Landry, the elder (son of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage) and René Landry, the younger (son of Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé). René, the elder married Perrine Bourg, widow of Simon Pelletret, in 1645. Perrine had 2 children from her first marriage: Henriette Pelletret (4 years)and Jeanne Pelletret (2 years). "On page 9 Leopold Lanctot, in discussing the 1686 census, mentions" "Marie Salé age 61 ans, widow of Jean Claude" but he adds the surname LANDRY in parentheses "(Landry)". He like all the others before him, suggests, on page 11, that René Landry, l'aine and René Landry, le jeune are half brothers, and again adds, in parentheses, "(le jeune, demi-frere de René Landry, l'ainse)" behind René Landry, the younger's name.  And again adding, in parentheses "(mere de René Landry, le jeune)" behind Marie Salé's name.  Leopold Lanctot suggests, on page 15, in a chapter on René Landry, dit le jeune, and Marie Bernard, again suggests that René Landry, le jeune is the son of "Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé" but notice that the hyphen between Jean and Claude has been added and the surname Landry is not placed in parentheses. The placing of the earlier assumptions such as the surname Landry and Marie Salé being the mother of René in parentheses, which were later presented with out the parentheses, and the addition of a hyphen between Jean Claude's name, show the gradual progression of these errors into what is now believed by many to be documented facts. These errors are also found on pp 623-624 of "Histoire et Genealogie des Acadians" by Bona Arsenault, where Arsenault states:- "Jean-Claude Landry bn. 1593 and Marie Salé bn. 1600 daughter of Jean Denys Salé and Francoise Arnaud, were married in Department of Orne in France, in 1633. This was the second marriage for both. One child was born from this marriage, Rene, born 1643. Jean Claude died in 1671 in Mortagne-Au-Perche, France. The name of Marie Salé, age 86, appears in the 1686 Census of Acadia, living with her son René"
   However, throughout this time, Professor Stephen A. White, historian and genealogist with the Centre d'etudes Acadiennes at the University of Moncton in Moncton, New Brunswick, and his fellow historian, genealogist and author, Father Clarence d'Entremont from Middle West Pubnico, Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia have steadfastedly held that the theory that René Landry's parents were Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé, was false. As Father Clarence d'Entremont states in a letter of November 23rd: "NOWHERE in any census or other documents is to be found an Acadian by the name of Jean-Claude Landry. So, who was the father and mother of René Landry? I do not know, nor does anybody know.... Thus the descendants of René Landry, in my humble opinion, cannot go further up in their Landry genealogy, as we do not know who the parents of René Landry le Jeunne were, nor where in France he was born".
   "Jean-Claude Landry is effectively fictitious. There is no record showing that such a person ever existed. The husband of Marle Sallé is simply called Jean (or Jehan) Claude in the censuses of 1671 and 1678. According to archives, Marie Salé was married to Jean Claude; if she is to be called the mother of René Landry, necessarily we have to give her husband a name of Jean Claude LANDRY. But, I repeat, the name Jean Claude Landry is not to be found anywhere in the history of Acadia at the time; plus that the husband of Marie Salé was Jean Claude, PERIOD. He was a Micmac Indian. The Indians with the name Claude used to be quite numerous in Nova Scotia, The name became Glaude; in my young days I knew a number of them, who would write their name Glode (In French "au" is pronounced "o"). . His name occurs twice in the Port Royal Church Registers, ALWAYS as Jehan Clause, NEVER given as family name "Landry". As a matter of fact, if Clause had not been his family name, it would mean that the register gives him his first and SECOND name. Moreover, the registers of Port Royal ALWAYS give the WHOLE name of persons; but the fact is that Jehan Clause has his name given thus, NEVER with another name added to those two.  If the family name had been omitted in the registers, it would be the only time that such a thing occured in any register. Thus CLAUDE was the family name."
   An enthusiastic and overly imaginative researcher added Landry to this individual's name in an effort to explain why Marie Sallé resided between the younger René Landry and his son Antoine Landry in 1686.  He supposed that this was the same Marie Sallé who married Martin Aucoin at La Rochelle in 1632, which does seem quite possible, and through that marriage she was related to Michelle Aucoin, with whose daughter she resided in 1671 and 1678, which is also possible. But the only way this researcher could connect Marie Sallé with the younger Rene Landry was in guessing that her Jean Claude was really a Landry and further that he must have been the younger René's father. This is merely wishful thinking. The other difficulty with the younger René Landry concerns his absence from the 1671 census. Some researchers have thought that this signified that he had not yet immigrated to Acadia by that time, but it can be shown that the 1671 census is incomplete, and thus the omission of anyone from it does not prove that that person only arrived in Acadia after that date.  Indeed the records of the LeBorgne family in series E of the Archives des colonies (dossier E 277) mention transactions involving the younger René Landry's wife's brother-in-law, Guyon Chaisson, between 1668 and 1674, so we know for certain that the Chiassons were at "Mouchecoudabouet" during those years. It is my opinion quite likely that the younger René Landry and his family lived in close proximity with the Chiassons in  "Mouchecoudabouet", around that time. As Bona Arsenault has indicated, for the elder René Landry to have been called "l'Aine" in the 1671 census presupposes that another René Landry must have lived somewhere in Acadia at the same time.  As Father Archange Godbout mentions in his Dictionaire des Acadiens, the younger René "came from France with his wife". This quotation is lifted from several of the depositions of the Acadians at Belle-Ile-en-Mer.  As Father Godbout pointed out in the Memoires de la Societé généalogie canadienne- française (vol. V. p. 5), this expression on those depositions means simply that both the husband and wife were born in France, but does not necessarily mean that they came to Acadia together, much less already married to one another. So all we can say is that  René Landry was born in France about 1634. We do not know whether he came to Acadia alone or with other relatives.  As I have explained above, however, we do know that he was not nearly related to any of the other Landrys in Acadia."
   It is further stated by both Father d'Entremont and Professor White that it is very doubtful that two different census takers at two different times would have omitted the last name Landry when referring to the deceased husband of Marie Salé and if the family name had been omitted in the church and other public registers, it would be the only time that such a thing occured in any register. Therefore they both conclude that the addition of the surname Landry to Jean Claude is an error.
   In a letter witten in early 1998, Stephen A. White, Genealogist, Centre d'etudes Acadiennes writes: "What can I tell you about "Jean-Claude Landry" that I have not already said? Not much, I can assure you. No one has brought forward any new information to show that two different census takers, at two separate times, both forgot to put the name Landry in the entries pertaining to the widow Marie Sale.  No one has discovered a cache of passenger lists for any of the vessels mentioned by Father Lanctot to show, as he maintains, that "Jean-Claude Landry" arrived in Acadia on a certain date, at the head of a group of a specific number of family members,  In these circumstances, serious researchers must agree that nothing supports the contention that there ever was a "Jean-Claude Landry" in early Acadia." "No one really knows how the Landrys came to Acadia, how many of them came together, if indeed they did come in a group, or if and how they were related, beyond the simple fact that Rene Landry l'aine and Antoinette Landry were brother and sister. We certainly have no documentation to show that Rene and Antoinette were twins!  Even though Rene and Antoinette are said to have both been fifty-three years old in the 1671 census, no experienced genealogist would read that as meaning that they necessarily born at the same time, because such records are rarely strictly accurate. After all, fifteen years later, in 1686. Antoinette is said to have been eighty!  And by 1693 she had regressed to seventy-six.  Such records are merely guides; they do not admit strict interpretation.  To go further, without additional proofs, is to indulge in the creation of romantic fiction". "It is most regrettable that Father Lanctot chose to present his account of the history of our early Acadian families as though all of his points were based on documented facts. And it is reprehensible that a publisher saw fit to distribute such an admixture of truth and fantasy, as though it were serious history.  The result is particularly invidious insofar as those people who have little or no means to consult the original records are concerned. They are left to suppose that Lanctot's work is a reliable piece of research, where as it is in fact treacherously misleading, because there are some extremely good information mixed in with the bad."
   Stephen A. White writes:  "Regarding the origin and parents of René Landry, le Jeunne there is probably no other Acadian family about whose background there has been so much speculation and wishful thinking. The result is that what we actually know about the Landry families who immigrated from France to Acadia, has come to be regrettably enshrouded in a dense fog of error and confusion."

Dr. Donald Landry Dr. Donald Landry

Metaire, Louisiana [ 7 ] Metairie, Louisiana

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There is little information on some first Acadian settlers. For Landry, there were also two of the first settlers of Rene. The first said the elder René (# 3) married Perrine Bourg. The second Rene Cadet (# 5) wife Mary Bernard.

The oldest document available, the census of 1671 (ref. 12) indicates the presence of the elder René, but no mention of Rene Cadet. Both will be present, however, the census of 1678. (Arsenault, ref.: 2.2 page 623). In the census of 1671, there also Antoinette Landry (# 7) and Perrine Landry (# 5935).

In ref.: 12, The dialects of French Acadia Genevieve Massignon 1962, underlines the great possibility that many Acadians came to France from the region of Loudun in France. The Landry among others of the pavement near Loudun. Thus, it states on page 45, note (4) "The name of the" Rene Landry appears in 1638 in Reg. By. La Chaussée (Vienna), as sponsor of Girouard. "

Arsenault, in ref.: 2.2 page 612, quoting Genevieve Massignon vol. 1 p. 54 (probably top 45, see above), it indicates the elder René, from The Causeway.

In Arsenault, ref.: 2.2 page 624, citing a manuscript of Father Archangel Godbout, Dictionary of the Acadians, it indicates that the mother of Rene Cadet Marie Salé. But in the Census 1671, there is a Marie Salé widow of Jean Claude. Some have completed the name to read Jean-Claude Landry! See more details about Marie Sallé (# 2925).

It also indicates (2.2 page 612) that Perrine Bourg, wife of Rene is the elder sister of Antoine Bourg, husband of Antoinette Landry. Stephen White shows the contrary they are not brother and sister. I retain the latter information.

We concluded that Antoinette was the sister of the elder René and Perrine also likely. (White)

In summary, it is possible that the elder René (# 3) and / or Rene Cadet (# 5) are from La Chaussée near Loudun, Vienne department in France. But there is no proof yet. Thus Robert Larin (# 489 page 302) concerning the origin of the Acadians says "In my opinion, this possibility remains highly unlikely though very hypothetical. In reality, we know nothing of the origin of the Acadian population of 1671 .. ..

In conclusion, the elder René Antoinette and Perrine are brother and sisters. They are not related to 2nd degree with Rene younger. We do not know where in France they come. The second husband of Marie Sallé is Jean Claude and we do not know if Native American or French.

  1. White, SA Genealogical Dictionary of Acadian families, Moncton, NB, 1999.

Page 915

Notes S. A. White

i. The waiver of the fourth degree of consanguinity given during the marriage of Charles Belliveau, great-grand-son of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, Marguerite Granger, great-granddaughter of the elder René Landry and Perrine Bourg ( Rg GP November 3, 1717), shows René and Antoinette were brother and sister, as the lack of exemptions in the marriage of great-grand-children of Simon Pelletret and Perrine Bourg with those of Antoine Bourg and d 'Antoinette Landry eliminates the possibility that Antoine Bourg and Perrine Bourg are brother and sister. See Family Village (between 1 and 2) of SA White notes about Antoine Bourg and Perrine Bourg.

Concordance: # 3: the elder René Landry, # 4: Perrine Bourg, # 8: Antoine Bourg, # 7: Antoinette Landry.

ii. The absence of waivers relatives at weddings of John Daigre, great-grand-son of Antoinette Landry with Madeleine Landry, daughter of Claude Rene Landry Young (R GP November 6, 1721), François Landry, son of Pierre Rene Landry young, Dorothee Bourg, great-granddaughter of Antoinette Landry (Rg GP November 21, 1731) and Joseph Landry, son of Antoine Rene Landry young, with Marie-Josephe Bourg, sister Dorothea above (Rg GP 11 Jan 1745), means that the younger René Landry was not a brother or nephew of Antoinette.

Concordance: # 5: Rene Landry Young, # 7: Antoinette Landry. [8]

  1. White, SA Genealogical Dictionary of Acadian families, Moncton, NB, 1999.

page 916

Note S. A. White

After a review of exemptions granted to the descendants of marriages Landry, it appears that the first two Rene Landry Acadia may not be of kinship closer than second to third degree. See, for example, the lack of exemptions at weddings Germain Dupuis, son of Mary to the young Rene Landry, with Mary Granger, granddaughter of Mary the elder René Landry (Rg GP November 3, 1717) and Charles Lanoue, little son of Mary the elder René Landry, Marie-Josephe Landry, daughter of Charles Rene Landry Young (R GP June 12, 1729).

Concordance: # 3: the elder René Landry, # 5: Rene Landry young. [8]

Message # 18 October 2007 on Acadian Roots Club Dr. Donald Landry

For many of us researching the Landry family, "Jean-Claude Landry" is the focal point of much debate! He represents our connection between the Old World and the New World. Wishful thinking has many people believing that he is accounts that connection while others insist on verification before accepting that claim. The uncertainty is increased due to the lost of some Acadian church records kept back in the 1600's Which were destroyed during a fire in the early 1700's. Mention has been given to this topic in one of our other sections, but we feel that the subject is important enough to merit its' own section!

A recent newspaper article published in certain areas of Louisiana and Canada made reference to the fact that Jean-Claude Landry was indeed the progenitor of this particular line of Landry. Dr. Don Landry of Metairie, Louisiana, Historian for the Landry Family Association, has written the following rebuttal to these articles in the hope of answering the question ..... myth or progenitor?

REBUTTAL OF THE JEAN-CLAUDE LANDRY Supposed MYTH AND THE ORIGIN OF LANDRY FAMILY

Sometime during February and March, 1998, a two part series on the Landry Family Appeared in the Lafayette, Louisiana Daily Advertiser "and again on Sunday March 16th and Sunday March 23rd the same, or similar article Appeared in Damon Veach's column," Louisiana Ancestors "which is a more widely spread genealogy column, and is published in the editions of the TimePicayune New Orleans, Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, the Lafayette and possibly the Lake Charles, Alexandria and Shreveport newspapers. According to the articles, the information on the genealogy and origin of the Landry Family of Acadia was received from a Paul Surrette, historian and genealogist from Moncton, New Brunswick, Brian Comeaux, of the committee for the Congres Mondial Acadian-Louisiana, 1999 and Ray Landry, a member of the Landry Family Association. Unfortunately the articles appear to be Merely a paraphrasing of Father Léopold Lanctôt, omi's account of the "The Landry in Acadia" in Volumes I and II, Publishing Free Trade ISBN 2-89412-003-6 and Acadia of origins Leopold Lanctot, omi Oxford University Press, Montreal, 1988, Which unfortunately are filled with errors, documented facts as presented.

For the past 8 to10 years, since I have been doing genealogical research into the Landry family, I have run across researchers and papers written by researchers that hold to the theory that the parents of René Landry, le Jeune married to Mary was Jean-Bernard Claude Landry and Marie Salé.

On more that one occasion Noted genealogists, including Stephen A. White, genealogist and historian at the University of Moncton's Acadian Center for Studies in Moncton, New Brunswick and Father Clarence J. d'Entremont, Middle West Pubnico - Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia, have more than Adequately Rebutted this theory. They and the others theorization that this error was caused by the early censuses of Acadia, Marie Salé Which enumerated as the "widow of Jean Claude" in the CENUSA of 1671 and 1678, and then in the 1686 census, no mention was made of her deceased husband Jehan Claude Marie Salé was enumerated as 86 years old and living between René Landry, the Jeunne and René Landry's oldest sound Antoine Landry. This caused Noted genealogist, Archangel Godbout, to leap to the conclusion that since Marie Salé was living in close proximity to René Landry, the younger, then she was the mother of René Landry, le Jeune. And Still a great leap was made to conclude that if Marie Salé was the widow of Jean Claude, Jean Claude was then the father of René Landry, the young and Jean Claude, in fact was actually Jean-Claude Landry, father of René Landry the jeunne. I am sure that most researchers understand the importance of having all of the information documented, and I am sure that they assume that, since the information they received was from credible sources, that it was documented and factual genealogical and historical data. What I am afraid of is that since this error was so widely published throughout Louisiana, especially in south Louisiana, where the Majority of the Louisiana Acadian population resides, these errors will be Perpetuated for a long time to come. And just as the errors of Fathers Archangel Godbout, Leopold Lanctot and Adrien Bergeron, Bona Arsenault and countless others, have been Believed to be documented facts, these errors will also be Believed to be the documented facts, just because they were printed in a reputable column.

Probably prompted by the above census entry, the writings of Adrien Bergeron in his "Le Grand Arrangement des Acadiens au Quebec" Vol IV p.283, says that Marie Salé is married to Jean-Claude Landry and had two sons René Landry, the elder and René Landry, the younger. And in a more elaborate extension of this error, Leopold Lanctot, omi, in his publication "Families Acadian", makes the following suggestions as to the beginnings of the Landry in the New World, when he states on page 7: "It all began in the year 1640 or 1641 when a group of 10 from the Landry family came to Port Royal, Acadia from France. The Landry family was originally from The Ventrouze, near Mortagne au Perche. Department of Orne, France. They were Encouraged to come to Acadia by Marguerite Landry, daughter of Jean-Claude Landry and Margaret's husband Robert Martin, who had been in Acadia for several years. The group of 10 consisted of Jean-Claude Landry and his second wife, Mary Salt (40 years) with their son Rene Landry said the young (6 years) and three children of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage: twins, Rene Landry said the Aisne (22 years) and Antoinette Landry (22 years), Perrine Landry (29 years ) with her husband Jacques Joffriau. Also in the group were three of Salt Marie's children from her first marriage to Martin Aucoin. These children were: Michelle Aucoin (22 years), Francois Aucoin (18 years) and Jeanne Aucoin (8 years). The group probably settled near the St. John River in the Cape Sable area. They later moved to Port Royal. Please note that there were two named Rene in this group, René Landry, the elder (son of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage) and René Landry, the younger (son of Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé). Rene, the elder married Perrine Bourg, widow of Simon Pelletret, in 1645. Perrine had 2 children from her first marriage: Henrietta Pelletret (4 years ) and Jeanne Pelletret (2 years). "On page 9 Leopold Lanctot, in discussing the 1686 census, the terms" Marie Salé age 61, widow of Jean Claude "but he adds the surname LANDRY in parentheses" (Landry). He like all the others before him, suggests, on page 11, that René Landry, groin and René Landry, the young are half brothers, and again adds, in parentheses, "(the younger half-brother of René Landry the way) "behind René Landry, the younger's name. And again adding, in parentheses" (mother of René Landry, the younger) "behind Salé Marie's name. Leopold Lanctot suggests, on page 15, in a chapter on René Landry said the young, and Marie Bernard, again suggests that René Landry, the younger is the son of "Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé" but notice that the hyphen between Jean and Claude has been added and the surname Landry is not Placed in parentheses . The placing of the earlier assumptions such as the surname Landry and Marie Salé being the mother of René in parentheses, Which were later presented with out the parentheses, and the addition of a hyphen between Jean Claude's name, show the gradual increase of these errors into what is now Believed by many to be documented facts. These errors are also found on pp 623-624 of "History and Genealogy of the Acadians" by Bona Arsenault, Arsenault where states: - "Jean-Claude Landry bn. 1593 and Marie Salé bn. 1600 daughter of Jean Denys Salt and Francoise Arnaud, were married in Department of Orne in France, in 1633. This was the second marriage for both. One child was born from this marriage, Rene, born 1643. Jean Claude died in 1671 in Mortagne-Au-Perche, France. The name of Marie Salé, age 86, appears in the 1686 Census of Acadia, living with her son Rene "

However, throughout this time, Professor Stephen A. White, historian and genealogist with the Center for Acadian Studies at the University of Moncton in Moncton, New Brunswick, and his fellow historian, genealogist and author, Father Clarence d'Entremont from Middle West Pubnico, Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia have steadfastedly held that the theory that René Landry's parents were Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé was false. As Father Clarence d'Entremont states in a letter of November 23rd: "Nowhere in any census or other documents is found to be an Acadian by the name of Jean-Claude Landry. So, who was the father and mother of René Landry? I do not know, nor does anybody know .... Thus the descendants of René Landry, in my humble opinion, can not go further up in their Landry genealogy, as we do not know who the parents of René Landry Jeunne were, nor where In France he was born.

"Jean-Claude Landry is effectively fictitious. There is no record showing that such a person ever existed. The husband of Marle Sallé is simply called Jean (or Jehan) Claude in the censuses of 1671 and 1678. According to archives, Marie Salé was married to Jean Claude if she is to be called the mother of René Landry, necessarily we have to give her husband a name of Jean Claude LANDRY. But, I repeat, the name Jean Claude Landry is not to be found anywhere in the history of Acadia at the time, more that the husband of Marie Salé was Jean Claude, PERIOD. He was a Micmac Indian. The Indians with the name Claude used to be quite numerous in Nova Scotia, The name Became Glaude, in my young days I knew a number of them, who would write their name Glode (In French "au" is pronounced "o").. His name occurs twice in the Port Royal Church Registers, ALWAYS have Jehan Clause, NEVER given as family name "Landry" . As a matter of fact, if clause Had not been his family name, it would mean that the register gives him his first and second name. Moreover, the registers of Port Royal WHOLE ALWAYS give the name of persons; to the fact is that Jehan Clause has given his name thus, NEVER with another name added to those two. If the family name Had been omitted in the registers, it would be the only time that such a thing occurred in any register. CLAUDE Thus was the family name. "

An overly enthusiastic and imaginative researcher Landry added to this individual's name in an effort to explain why Marie Sallé resided between the younger René Landry and his son Antoine Landry in 1686. He supposed that this was the same Marie Sallé who married Martin Aucoin at La Rochelle in 1632, Which does seem quite possible, and through that marriage she was related to Michelle Aucoin, with Whose daughter she resided in 1671 and 1678, Which is also possible . But the only way this researcher Marie Sallé could connect with the younger Rene Landry was in her guessing that Jean Claude was a really Landry and further that he must have been the younger René's father. Merely this is wishful thinking. The other difficulty with the younger René Landry concerns his absence from the 1671 census. Some researchers have thought that this signified that He Had not yet immigrated to Acadia by that time, but it can be shown that the 1671 census is incomplete, and Thus the failure of anyone from it does not prove that that person only arrived in Acadia after that date. Indeed the records of the family in LeBorgne E series of the Archives of colonies (file E 277) mention transactions involving the younger René Landry's wife's brother-in-law, Guyon Chaisson, between 1668 and 1674, so we know for certain that the Chiasson were at "Mouchecoudabouet" During those years. It is my opinion quite Likely that the younger René Landry and his family lived in close proximity with the Chiasson in "Mouchecoudabouet" around that time. As Bona Arsenault has indicated, for the elder René Landry to have been called "the elder" in the 1671 census another presuppose that René Landry must have lived somewhere in Acadia at the same time. As Father Archangel Godbout entries in his Dictionary of the Acadians, the younger René "came from France with his wife. This quotation is lifted from several of the depositions of the Acadians at Belle-Ile-en-Mer. Father Godbout As pointed out in the Memoires de la Societe French-Canadian Genealogy (vol. V. p. 5), this expression is simply Those depositions means that both the husband and wife were born in France, but does not necessarily mean that they came to Acadia together, much less already married to one another. So all we can say is that René Landry was born in France about 1634. We do not know Whether he came to Acadia alone or with other relatives. As I have explained above, however, we do know that he was not nearly related to any of the other Landry in Acadia. "

It is further stated by both Father d'Entremont and Professor White that it is very doubtful that two different census takers at two different times would have omitted the last name Landry when referring to the deceased husband of Marie Salé and if the family name Had been omitted in the church and other public registers, it would be the only time that such a thing occurred in any register. Therefore they both conclude that the addition of the surname Landry to Jean Claude is an error.

In a letter witten in early 1998, Stephen A. White, Genealogist, Acadian Studies Center writes: "What can I tell you about" Jean-Claude Landry "that I have not already said? Not much, I can assure you. No one has brought forward any new information to show that two different census takers, at two separate times, both forgot to put the name Landry in the entries pertaining to the widow Marie Sale. no one has discovered a cache of passenger lists for any of the vessels mentioned by Father Lanctot to show, as he maintains, that "Jean-Claude Landry" arrived in Acadia on a certain date, at the head of a group of a specific number of family members, In these circumstances, serious researchers must agree that nothing supports the contention that there ever was a " Jean-Claude Landry "in early Acadia." "No one really knows how the Landry came to Acadia, how many of them came together, if indeed they did come in a group, or if and how they were related, beyond the simple fact that Rene Landry groin and Antoinette Landry were brother and sister. We certainly have no documentation to show that Rene and Antoinette were twins! Even though Rene and Antoinette are both said to have been fifty-three years old in the 1671 census, no experienced genealogist would read that as meaning that they necessarily born at the same time, Because such records are rarely strictly accurate. After all, fifteen years later, in 1686. Antoinette is said to have been eighty! And by 1693 Had she regressed to seventy-six. Such records are Merely guides, they do not admit strict interpretation. To go further, without additional proofs, is to indulge in the creation of romantic fiction. "It is most regrettable that Father Lanctot chose to present his account of the history of our early Acadian families as though all of his points were based on documented facts. And it is reprehensible that a publisher saw fit to distribute such an admixture of truth and fantasy, as though it were serious history. The result is Invidious Insofar as Particularly Those people who have little or no means to consult the original records are concerned. They are left to suppose that Lanctot's work is a reliable piece of research, where did it is in fact treacherously misleading, Because there are some extremely good information mixed in with the bad. "

Stephen A. White writes: "Regarding the origin and parents of René Landry, the Jeunne there is probably no other Acadian family about Whose background there has been so much speculation and wishful thinking. The result is that what we actually know about the Landry families who immigrated from France to Acadia, has come to be regrettably Enshrouded in a dense fog of error and confusion. "

Dr. Donald Landry

Metairie, Louisiana

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The group of 10 consisted of Jean-Claude Landry and his second wife, Marie Salée (40 years) with their son René Landry, dit le jeune (6 ans) and three children of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage: twins, René Landry dit l' aisne (22 years) and Antoinette Landry (22 years), Perrine Landry (29 years) with her husband Jacques Joffriau. Also in the group were three of Marie Salée's children from her first marriage to Martin Aucoin. These children were: Michelle Aucoin (22 years), Francois Aucoin (18 years) and Jeanne Aucoin (8 years). The group probably settled near the Saint-John River in the Cape Sable area. They later moved to Port Royal. Please note that there were two named René in this group, René Landry, the elder (son of Jean-Claude Landry from his first marriage) and René Landry, the younger (son of Jean-Claude Landry and Marie Salé). René, the elder married Perrine Bourg, widow of Simon Pelletret, in 1645. Perrine had 2 children from her first marriage: Henriette Pelletret (4 years)and Jeanne Pelletret (2 years).

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Source: http://www.geocities.com/lucile_michaud/Landry/Landry_1eGeneration.html

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According to Paul Suprenant, son of Edna Landry, Rene lived in Acadia before 1755.

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Rene LANDRY 52, Marie BERNARD 42; children: Claude 23, Jean 20, Rene 18, Germain 12, Abraham 8. Pierre 6, Cecile 22, Marie 16, Marguerite 14, Jeanne 10, Catherine 4, Anne 2; 2 guns, 10 arpents, 16 cattle, 20 sheep. Source: 1686 Acadia Census.

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Nickname: dit René de la Hâve

Il y a un René Landry né en 1634 qui arriva au Canada en même temps que René fils de J-Claude. Certains document disent qu'ils sont deux frères, d'autres disent qu'ils n'ont aucun lien de parenté. Un autre dit que René est le fils de Rene né en 1640... Donc, pour ce René, les données sont incertaines. Selon Stephen White (p. 916), "Après une étude des dispenses accordées aux mariages des descendants des Landry, il apparaît que les deux premiers René Landry en Acadie ne puissent être d'une parenté plus proche que du deuxième ou troisième degré...".

-------------------- René le cadet Landry venait de France et s'est établi en Nouvelle Écosse. Nous croyons qu'il est né en arrivant en N.E. ou sur le bateau durant la traversée. On assume qu'il était sur le Mayflower. Il est le début de la lignée des Landry et nous ne trouvons pas son pere ou sa mere. D'autres recherches se poursuivent ... --------------------

   Rene Landry le'jeune , was one of the patronymes of the Landrys in Acadia, sharing that honor with another Landry of the same first name, Rene l'aine.  It is not known when he arrived in Acadia and no verifiable information exists to who his parents were and what part of France he came from.
   Records show that Rene le'jeune married Marie Bernard in 1659.  Although Rene and Marie were not enumerated in the 1671 census of Acadia, we are sure that they were in Acadia,probably established in an outlying area within distance of  Port Royal.   But in 1686, Rene le'jeune and Marie were established at Port Royal as enumerated by the 1686 census of Port Royal. The census list Rene at the age of 52 years which places his birth in 1634 and Marie at age 41 years. They had 10 arpents in cultivation, 16 cattle, 20 sheep, and 2 guns. Rene le'jeune and Marie had 15 children, 8 sons and 7 daughters who were born between 1660 and 1693. Their children married into other Acadian families creating sons-in-law and daughters-in-law with family names of Babin, Bellemeres, Blanchards, Brossard, Dupuis, Guilbauts, Leblancs, Melansons, Prejeans, Racois, Richards, Theriaults, and Thibodeaus.
   After Rene and Marie's sons married and started their own families, seven of their eight sons left Port Royal and established their families in the Minas Basin at Grand Pre' and Pigiguit. The youngest son, Charles, stayed in Port Royal and it is possible that he inherited his father's original Landry family site at Port Royal.
   Rene l'jeune died at Port Royal between 1690 and 1693, while Marie Bernard was buried in Port Royal on January 11, 1719.
   Up to the time of the Acadian Expulsion in 1755, those Landrys in Acadia with roots back to Rene l'jeune were numerous. After the Expulsion, Rene's descendants were scattered throughout Canada, France, New Enland, and eventually Louisiana. Most of southwest Louisiana's Landrys today can trace their lineage back to Rene l'jeune through one Firmin Landry, who settled in the Attakapas District of Louisiana (St. Martinville).
   Children of Rene Landry l'jeune and Marie Bernard:
   Antoine, Claude, Cecile, Jean, Rene II, Marie, Marguerite, Germain,Jeanne, Abraham, Pierre, Catherine, Anne, Charles, and Isabelle.
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René L'Jeune Landry's Timeline

1634
1634
L'Oudon, Lower Normandy, France
1634
1634
France
1653
1653
Age 19
from France to Port Royal, Acadia
1659
1659
Age 25
(ACADIE), Nova Scotia, Canada
1660
1660
Age 26
Grand Pré, Kings County, NS, Canada
1662
1662
Age 28
New Brunswick, Canada
1663
1663
Age 29
Port Royal, NS, Canada
1664
1664
Age 30
Port Royal, NS, Canada
1668
1668
Age 34
Port Royal, , Nova Scotia, Canada