Resolveert William Waldron (1610 - 1690)

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Nicknames: "Barron Rosaluld Waldron", "Resolved Waldron"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Holland
Death: Died in Horn's Hook, New Harlem, Manhattan, New York
Occupation: Book printer, RESOLVED CAM WITH PETER STUYVESANT AND SETTLED NEW AMSTERDAM IN THE AREA NOW KNOWN AS WALL STREET IN NYC
Managed by: Jocelynn Oakes
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About Resolveert William Waldron

The Waldron Family, Film #1,206.432 in the Mormon Library, states Rudolph Van Waldron was made a baron in 1128 and granted a coat of arms by the Dutch government. Another publication states this was an English family, the name of repute from the time of the Conquest. Inthe "Domesday Book", Waldron was companion of Robert, Earl of Moretaine, in Normandy.The Waldrons were an influential family in England and were among the nobility as early as the 16th century. During the Thirty Years War between Spain and the Netherlands, many adventurous, young Englishmen went to the aid of Holland. For this and for business reasons in 1570, several members of the Waldron family left their homeland and went to Amsterdam.The Waldrons were an English Puritan family, intermarrying with the Dutch and remaining in Holland for several generations. The name was known in England as early as the time of William the Conqueror and is also splled Walden, and comes from a village in Warwickshire, England. It is the home of the Walderne family who often lost their "r" in early records, and finally became Waldron. Walden is also found in the County Dorset.

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Resolved received a grant of a large tract of land on both sides of the Harlem River in New York. A suit was brought in about 1903 by the descendants in 26 States of the Union of Baron Waldron' (in the name of Colonel Samuel Waldron who lived on the disputed lands) to recover $20,000,000 or possession of the lands.

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Came to America 1654.

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http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rodohu10&id=I1088

http://www.surnameguide.com/hoffman/waldron_ancestry.htm

. Resolved Waldron was born in Amsterdam, Holland, May 10, 1610, and became a book printer. The family were English and the name was known in England as early as the time of William the Conqueror.

Resolved and his brother Joseph, being born and raised in Holland, acquired the characteristics of Hollanders and had married sisters of Dutch citizens.

Resolved Waldron married first, Rebecca Hendricks, daughter of Hendrick Koch, a respectable Amsterdam burgher. He married second, May 10, 1654, Tanneke, born 1624, daughter of Barent Nagel, deceased, of Groningen. At that time he was living in the Teerketelsateeg, a short street just north of the Dam, but in the same year sailed with his family for America, where his brother had preceded him by two years.

They were received into fellowship of the Dutch church in New Amsterdam and in April, 1655, he and his brother purchased a house on Broadway, near Wall Street. Both entered public service and Resolved was made "Overseer of the Workmen." On April 17, 1657, he applied for a burgher right, which was granted him on May 3, Being found efficient, the Director and Council, on May 25, 1658, appointed him Deputy to the Schoutfiscael, and on October 28 he was recognized as Deputy Sheriff. In 1660 he was made Sheriff of the Dutch Towns on Long Island, but Director General Stuyvesant wished that he be retained in New Amsterdam, and he served as the Governor's favorite officer while his rule lasted.

On the occupation by the English, he retired to private life in Harlem, but was soon called upon to serve the Government, and on June 15, 1665, was elected Constable of New Harlem, a position of importance in those early days. He was one of the five patentees named in the Nicoll's Patent, and was also an Elder in the Dutch church. He died in 1690, his inventory being taken on May 17 of that year.

Issue by first wife: William, Rebecca, Aeltie; by second wife: Barent, Ruth, Cornelia, Johannes, Samuel.

2. Rebecca Waldron, daughter of Resolved and Rebecca (Hendricks) Waldron, was born in Amsterdam, Holland, in 1649, and married first, August 27, 1670, Jan Nagel, who died in 1689, and on May 15, 1690, she married second, Jan Dyckman, then of Spuyten Duyvel, by whom she had two children.

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Resolved Waldron came to America from Amsterdam, Holland, about 1645. He was the son of Baron Johannes Waldron of Waldron Hall, Amsterdam, and was one of the original patentees of the Harlem land patents under Governors Nichols and Thomas Dongan, under dates of 1666, 1667 and 1668, and as shown by the official records in the office of the secretary of state at Albany, New York.

Burial: After 17 May 1690 Hornshook, Harlem, New York

Emigration: 1650 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Occupation: Deputy Sheriff 1654 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Occupation: Constable 1665 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Occupation: Overseer 1668 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Occupation: Assessor 1683 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Residence: his home on Broadway near Wall Street From 1654 To 1664 New Amsterdam, New York Co., New York

Will proved 17 May 1690 New Harlem, New York Co., New York

His home, Waldron Hall, was located north of 86th street and east of Avenue A in Harlem, NY. Built in 1685, It was demolished in 1870 due to fire. Waldron Hall, Horne Hook, East River, NY

Having the misfortune to lose his wife, he married again, on May 10th, 1654, a lady of thirty years, living near the West India House, Tanneke Nagel, daughter of Barent Nagel, deceased, of Groningen. Resolved was living at this time in the Teerketelssteeg, a short street just north of the Dam; but the same year sailed with his family for America."); pp. 691-709 ("On the accession of the English, Waldron took the oath of allegiance (October, 1664), but retired to private life at Harlem with the disappointment of one whose interests, as well as sympathies, all lay with the former government. It was still a pleasure to correspond with kindred in Holland. Mortien Govert, of Amsterdam, writing to Resolved, April 12, 1666, says, 'Brother: Tall Anna has gone over with the supercargo who lived in Nicholas Carmen's house.' Waldron had secured some property at Harlem, and was soon called to public office, from which he seldom had a respite for the rest of his life. He was one of the five patentees named in Nicholls' patent, and also served in the eldership.

He died in 1690; his inventory taken that year, May 17, embraced lands, slaves, farmstock, etc.

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Resolved’s second marriage was to Tanneke Nagels in the New Church in Amsterdam, May 10, 1654. At the time Tanneke was 30 years old and from Groningen, Holland. Her parents were deceased by then.

As mentioned above, the brothers Joseph and Resolved Waldron immigrated to New Amsterdam during the last half of 1654 or possibly early in 1655. On April 3, 1655 they bought a house on Broadway near Wall Street. On May 3, 1657, Resolved Waldron was made a burgher of New Amsterdam, and on May 25, 1658 he was made provost and deputy sheriff.

He continued as deputy sheriff until 1664. At the time of the British conquest of New Amsterdam in 1664, he signed an oath of allegiance to the British. Later he moved to the village of Harlem, in upper Manhattan, where he held several public offices. He was a magistrate there in 1673 at the time of the Dutch reconquest at which time he signed the oath of allegiance to the Dutch. He was a patentee of Harlem in 1686.

He died in 1690. An inventory of his estate being taken on May 17, 1690. Tanneke Nagels survived, and died after November 25, 1690.

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Very exact in carrying out his orders and in enforcing the laws, he was charged by the

Quakers, some of whom he arrested, with being " hard-hearted."

HARLEM (CITY OF NEW YORK): ITS ORIGIN AND EARLY ANNALS.

http://www.google.com/books?id=iK1J8ESty44C&printsec=frontcover

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The Children of Resolved and his wife Tanneke (NAGLES) WALDRON, were:

4. Ruth, baptized on May 10, 1657. She married 1st John Delamater on August 11, 1678. They had nine children. 2nd she married Hendrick Bogert on September 15, 1703.

5. Barent, bapt in New Amsterdam, in 1659. He married Jannetie Jans on September 25, 1687 and they had six children.

6. Cornelia, baptized on February 30, 1659. She married Peter Van Oblienis on June 8, 1685.

7. Johannes, born in Harlem on September 12, 1665. He married Anneken Jans on April 25, 1690. They had seven children. He died in 1753.

8. Samuel, born in Harlem on April 10, 1670. He married Neeltje Bloodgood on March 5, 1692 and they had ten children. He died in 1737.

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On September 9, 1662, a resolution was adopted by the Council which stated, "By these presents are all Magistrates & Inhabitants of the English Townes in the Jurisdiction of New Netherlands, Ordered and Required to assist our Schout (sheriff) Resolved Waldron for to imprison all such persons which shall be found in a prohibited or unlawful meeting. Given under our hand this 9th of September Annon 1662." This resolution was directed toward [Quaker freethinker] John Bowne, even though he was not mentioned in it by name.

Two days later, on September 11, Schout Resolved Waldron went to John Bowne's house in Flushing, with a company of men with swords and guns. John was busy tending his sick wife, Hannah, and their young child, Marie. Sheriff Waldron told John he must go with him to see the Governor. He would not show John any written order. Being too late to go that date, Waldron left his men there, while he went to drinking in town. Then he came back again in the night, and brought with him the town constable, probably, John Mastine. Finally, John got to see the written order, and since he was not named in the order, he refused "to go one foot with him by virtue of that order". Waldron said he would bind his hands and feet and carry him. The next day the sheriff took him in a boat to Manhattan, and put him in jail across the street from the Governor's house.

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'Respecting the person Resolved Waldron, we may be permitted to remark that when appointed as a deputy to the fiscael, and as scout-by-nacht, in this city, he conducted himself with so much fidelity and vigilance that he gave to us and the magistrates great satisfaction so that his services both as respects the Company and the fiscael, can hardly be dispensed with, besides that he would not be so well fitted for the schrievalty of the said villages, as he cannot well wield his pen; wherefore till your further orders on this point, we shall ask his continuance in that office.'

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A list of members of the church at New Harlem, 1665, include: Jan La MONTAGNE, Jr. and Maria VERMEILLE, his wife; Jooste Van OBLINUS, Sr., and Martina WESTIN, his wife; Joost Van OBLINUS, Jr. and Maria SAMMIS, his wife; Jaques CRESSON and Maria RENARD, his wife; Pierre CRESSON and Rachel CLOOS, his wife; Isaac VERMEILLE and Jacomina JACOBS, his wife; Resolved WALDRON and Tanneke NAGEL, his wife.

James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.221n.

See also: http://www.geni.com/profile/index/6000000000278133743

http://www.geni.com/profile/index/6000000000540467633

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Late in 1654, two brothers, Joseph and Resolved Waldron, emigrated with their families from the Netherlands to New Amsterdam, New York. The older of their children were believed to be born in Amsterdam.

Resolved Waldron was first married in Amsterdam in 1645. His marriage record indicates his birth in Amsterdam was around 1620. His actual birth date is the subject of dispute by genealogists. Amsterdam records also indicate that Resolved's parents were William and Ruth Walker. (William born around September 20, 1589.)

It is generally accepted that Resolved's parents came to Amsterdam from the parish of Goodworth, Clatford in England, and that William Waldron's parents were John and Joan Waldron of Wherewell, Hampshire, England.

Ruth (Walker) Waldron, Resolved's mother, was purported to be born about 1595 in Marked Overton, Rutland, England, the daughter of Edward Walker. Ruth married William Waldron in Amsterdam August 19, 1615. It is believed that William and Ruth Waldron died prior to 1639. Their children were: 1. Joseph, b. around 1617, married (1) Aeltze Hendricks, (2) Annetze Daniels; 2. Resolved, b. around 1620, married (1) Rebecca Hendricks, (2) Tanneke Nagels.

Resolved's first marriage to Rebecca Hendricks took place in Diemen, a suburb of Amsterdam on August 20, 1645. She was baptized in Amsterdam on November 5, 1627. At the time of his marriage, Resolved's occupation was given as a book printer apprentice. Rebecca died between January 2, 1652 and April 23, 1654.

Resolved's second marriage was to Tanneke Nagels in the New Church in Amsterdam May 10, 1654. At the time, Tanneke was 30 years old and from Groningen, Holland. Her parents were deceased by then.

As mentioned above, the brothers Joseph and Resolved Waldron immigrated to New Amsterdam during the last half of 1654 or possibly early in 1655. On April 3, 1655 they bought a house on Broadway, near Wall Street. On May 3, 1657, Resolved Waldron was made a Burgher of New Amsterdam, and on May 25, 1658, he was made Provost and Deputy Sheriff.

He continued as Deputy Sheriff until 1664. At the time of the British conquest of New Amsterdam in 1664, he signed an oath of allegiance to the British. Later, he moved to the village of Harlem, in upper Manhattan, where he held several public offices. He was a magistrate there in 1673, at the time of the Dutch reconquest, at which time he signed the oath of allegiance to the Dutch. He was a patentee of Harlem in 1686.

He died in 1690. An inventory of his estate being taken on May 17, 1690. Tanneke Nagels survived, dying after November 25, 1690.

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RESOLVED WALDRON CAME FROM THE NETHERLANDS WITH PETER STUYVESANT TO SETTLE NEW AMSTERDAM, NOW NYC. HE WAS THE SHERRIFF FOR THE DUTCH COMMUNITY AROUND WHAT IS NOW WALL STREET. -------------------- Source: History of Harlem by James Riker, page 265. "Jaques Cresson, the constable, in view of removing to New York after the first of May appeared in court April 21st and gave an account of the fines due from several parties for defective fences. Those of Wouter Gerritsen, lessee of Delavall's land, amounted to 43 gl. 10 st. Much vexed at this heavy loss Wouter's wife had scolded the magistrates and called Waldron a uytsuyper, a drunkard. Arraigned for it by Waldron and Tourneur at the same, court the afflicted still persisted that the magistrates were killing her but owned she was hasty in abusing them. She was fined for her rashness 6 gl for the poor and costs of suit.”

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Original Land Conveyance in Harlem Source: www.carnegiehillneighbors.org “What today is Carnegie Hill in Manhattan and its surrounding area became part of a large tract of farmland. The farm extended from what is now about 82nd Street to about 94th Street, and from Harlem Commons (Fifth Avenue) to the East River. The area was known as Waldron Farm after a Dutch patent conveyed the land to Baron Resolved Waldron. His son Samuel and, in turn, his grandson William became owners of the farm. The farm underwent no material change for more than 50 years until it was divided by William Waldron’s heirs after his death in December 1769. One of Waldron’s sons, Adolph Waldron, gained the bulk of the property and then, apparently, lost it all as well. Abraham Duryea, a merchant of the City of New York, bought the farm at auction for eight hundred pounds. The borders of the farm were described for the transaction in detail, following the style of the time, as: ...all that piece or parcel of land situated lying and being in Harlem division of the outward of the City of New York aforesaid on which William Waldron deceased lately lived beginning at a cleft in a large rock at the waterside, hence running south . . . to a stone marked W thence south . . . to the stump of a large chestnut tree . . . etc. etc. along the waterside to the beginning bounded northerly and westerly by the land late of the said William Waldron deceased and easterly by the sound at Hell Gate Cove or Horn’s Hook containing thirty four acres . . ."

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Resolveert William Waldron's Timeline

1610
May 10, 1610
Holland
1616
May 10, 1616
Age 6
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands
May 10, 1616
Age 6
Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands
1645
August 20, 1645
Age 35
Netherlands
1647
February 10, 1647
Age 36
Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands
1649
1649
Age 38
Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1651
1651
Age 40
Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands
1654
May 10, 1654
Age 44
New York, New York/New Church, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands
1654
Age 43
1654
- 1654
Age 43
New Netherland