Rev. Chadd Browne

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Chadd Browne

Nicknames: "Chad", "Chaddus", "Chaddeus"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England
Death: Died in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island
Place of Burial: North Burial Ground, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island
Immediate Family:

Son of Arthur Browne and Dorothy Browne
Husband of Elizabeth Brown
Father of Rev John Brown, Sr.; Jeremiah Brown; Unknown Williams; Phoebe Brown; James Brown and 8 others
Brother of Rev John Browne

Occupation: Minister, Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Providence, RI., surveyer, minister, arrived from Englan on ship "Martin" 1638, Reverend, Rev., Pastor of First Baptist Church, Providence 1643-1663
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Chadd Browne

Came to America in 1638, was minister of the Baptist Church in Rhode Island after Roger Williams. Brown University is named after him. Reverend. First Baptist Church at Providence RI, oldest Bap. ch in America. Parents believed to be Arthur and Dorothy Brown, however, this is NOT proven and should not be relied upon.

Rev. Chad Brown, immigrant ancestor and founder of the family, came from England in the ship “Martin,” which arrived in Boston, in the Massachusetts Colony, in July, 1638. He brought with him his wife Elizabeth, son John, then eight years old, and perhaps younger children. A fellow passenger died on the voyage, and Chad Brown witnessed the will soon after his arrival. He did not remain long in the Massachusetts Colony, probably because of his religious views, but soon removed to Providence, where he became at once a leader and one of the most valued citizens of the colony.

That same year, 1638, he and twelve others signed a compact relative to the government of the town. His work in settling the serious difficulties which had arisen between the original thirteen proprietors of Providence, and the later settlers, is thus referred to by Roger Williams: “The truth is, Chad Browne, that wise and godly soul (now with God), with myself brought the remaining aftercomers and the first twelve to a oneness by arbitration.” Chad Brown was soon afterward appointed in the capacity of surveyor on a committee to compile a list of the home lots of the first settlers of the “Towne Street,” and the meadows allotted to them. His own home lot fronted on “Towne Streete,” now South Main street and Market Square, with the southern boundary to the southward of College and South Main streets. The college grounds of Brown University now comprise a large portion of this lot.

In 1640 Chad Brown served as member of a committee with others in regard to the disputed boundary between Providence and Pawtuxet. In the same year he, with Robert Cole, William Harris and John Warner, formed the committee of Providence Colony to report their first written form of government, which wad adopted and continued in force until 1644, in which year Roger Williams returned from England with the first charter. Chad Brown was the first of the thirty-nine signers of this agreement. In 1642 Mr. Brown was formally ordained as the first settled pastor of the Baptist church of Providence. At this time, and for more than a half century afterward, the church had no meeting house, but met for worship in a grove or orchard, and in unpleasant weather in the houses of its members. Rev. Chad Brown remained at the head of his church until his death, which occurred about the year 1665.

He seems to have been the first pastor of the First Baptist Church in Providence, the connection of Roger Williams having been of so brief duration, and of so informal a character, as to forbid that he should be recognized as its firs pastor. The venerable John Howland says: “On the question among the founders of Rhode Island College on what lot to place the building--University Hall--they decided on the present site because it was the home lot of Chad Brown, the first minister of the Baptist Church.” Throughout his life in Rhode Island he was classed among those men of culture an ability who were chosen to represent the colony on official business. He was a saintly character, and his influence went far toward establishing and keeping peace among the early settlers. His remains, which were originally interred in a lot not far from where the court house, on the corner of College and Benefit streets, now stands, were removed in 1792 to the North Burying Ground.

Rev. Brown was a valued citizen and leader. He was surveyor for the town and served on the committee for the first written government. His name heads the list of thirty nine signers. He held considerable property much of which was bought back in later years by his descendants and turned over to the University of Rhode Island founded in 1764, but now bears the name of Brown University.

CHAD1 BROWN was born in England. He married ELIZABETH in England.

Notes on Rev., Chad Brown

Rev. CHAD BROWN, not related so far as known to the three Brown Brothers of Lynn, Mass., came as we learn from his deposition to New England with his wife Elizabeth , and their son John, in the good ship Martin, and landed in Boston, Mass., in the year 1638. He located himself and family in Salem, Mass., where he did not long reside. Entering religious and political sentiment in sympathy with Roger Williams, he went to reside with him in Providence, R. I. Mr. Brown soon rose to prominence in Providence Plantation, where he merited and enjoyed the confidence of his fellow townsmen to an unlimited extent, recieving some of the highest positions of honor and trust in their power bestow upon him. Having previiously studied for the ministry, he was called to be the pastorate of the First Baptist Church of Providence, where he was ordained in 1642 as the first settled minister of that church, (a disputed point by some, who claim that Roger Williams was the first minister of that church). Be that as it may, it is very evident that their labors with and for the church were harmonious ans their ministry may have been an idea, dual, coadjuting pastorate.

Children of Chad Brown and Elizabeth are:

i. PHEBE2 BROWN, b. England; m. (1) THOMAS LEE; m. (2) GREENFIELD LARRABEE.

2. ii. JAMES BROWN, b. England; d. 1683.

3. iii. JEREMIAH BROWN, b. England; d. 1690.

iv. CHAD BROWN, d. May 10, 1663.

4. v. DANIEL BROWN.

5. vi. JOHN BROWN, b. 1630, England; d. 1706.

"The truth is, Chad Browne, that wise and godly soul (now with God), with myself brought the remaining aftercomers and the first twelve to a oneness by arbitration." Chad Brown was soon afterward appointed in the capacity of surveyor on a committee to compile a list of the home lots of the first settlers of the "Towne Street," and the meadows allotted to them. His own home lot fronted on "Towne Streete," now South Main street and Market Square, with the southern boundary to the southward of College and South Main streets. The college grounds of Brown University now comprise a large portion of this lot. In 1640 Chad Brown served as member of a committee with others in regard to the disputed boundary between Providence and Pawtu×et. In the same year he, with Robert Cole, William Harris and John Warner, formed the committee of Providence Colony to report their first written form of government, which was adopted and continued in force until 1644, in which year Roger Williams returned from England with the first charter. Chad Brown was the first of the thirty-nine signers of this agreement.

In 1642 Mr. Brown was formally ordained as the first settled pastor of the Baptist church of Providence. At this time, and for more than a half century afterward, the church had no meeting house, but met for worship in a grove or orchard, and in unpleasant weather in the houses of its members. Rev. Chad Brown remained at the head of his church until his death, which occurred about the year 1665. He seems to have been the first pastor of the First Baptist Church in Providence, the connection of Roger Williams having been of so brief duration, and of so informal a character, as to forbid that he should be recognized as its firs pastor. The venerable John Howland says: "On the question among the founders of Rhode Island College on what lot to place the building--University Hall--they decided on the present site because it was the home lot of Chad Brown, the first minister of the Baptist Church." Throughout his life in Rhode Island he was classed among those men of culture an ability who were chosen to represent the colony on official business.

He was a saintly character, and his influence went far toward establishing and keeping peace among the early settlers. His remains, which were originally interred in a lot not far from where the court house, on the corner of College and Benefit streets, now stands, were removed in 1792 to the North Burying Ground.

Chad BROWN was born about 1610 in England. He died before 1650 in Providence, Providence Co., Rhode Island.

ETHAN & CAROLINE ROWLEY BABCOCK, Compiled by Mark W. Adair, Jr. B. Adair, & Harry N. Craner, Jr., 1967, DAR Library, page 15.

Chad Brown with his wife, Elizabeth Sharperrowe and son John (and perhaps some younger sons) came from England on the ship "Martin". They arrived in Boston in July, 1738. It is said that he was exiled from Salem soon after. He went to Providence, RI, where in 1638 he with twelve others signed the compact. Roger Williams brought the charter from England in 1644 and Chad Brown was one of the committee of four to report a written form of government. His was the first of thirty-nine signatures to the written form.

-------------------- One of 13 Signers of the Compact, Providence Plantations -------------------- Arrived, on the ship "Martin", in Boston, MA, early in July 1638 with wife Elizabeth and 8 year old son John. Proceded to Providence, RI, where he was associated with Roger Williams. Was called a surveyor. In 1642 was ordained as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence.

Arrived by July 13, 1738, when he gave oath concerning the will of Sylvester Baldwin. Went to Providence the same year. Signer of compact that denied religious interference in civil affairs. -------------------- 1638- Immigrated from England to Boston, MA in the ship "Martin" with his wife and 8 year old son John. They arrived on 13 July in Boston, MA and then settled in Providence, RI that same year. He signed the Providence Compact, which prohibited religious interference in civil matters.


1642- Ordained Pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence, RI.

Resided on the corner of present Market Square and College Street in Providence, RI.

He was buried on his own property originally, but removed in 1792 to the North Burial Ground, Providence, RI. His gravestone erected circa 1792 is inscribed:

"In memory of Chad Brown Elder of the Baptist Church in this town. He was one of the original Proprietors of the Providence Purchase Having exiled from Massachusetts for Conscience Sake He had five sons John, James, Jeremiah, Chad, and Daniel Who have left a numerous proterity. He died about A.D. 1665. This monument was erected by the Town of Providence." -------------------- Came to America on the ship Martin with his wife and son around 1638. They landed in Boston. -------------------- Chad Brown, a Baptist minister, was born about 1600 in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. The names of his parents are unknown.

Elizabeth Sharparowe was born about 1604 in Melchbourne, Bedfordshire, England.

They probably married about 1629 based on the known birth dates of their sons:

• John Brown, born in 1630

• James Brown

• Jeremiah Brown, born in 1634

• Judah Brown

• Daniel Brown

Chad, Elizabeth and some or all of the boys came to America in July 1638 on the ship “Martin” which arrived in Boston. The same year, Chad was one of the original signers of the pact that organized Providence, Rhode Island. In 1642, he became minister of the Baptist church there; in 1644, he was the first signer of the town’s charter.

Rhode Island’s Brown University is named for Nicholas Brown, a descendant of this family through son James.

Elizabeth Brown is listed as a widow in September 1650 so Chad Brown must have died prior to that although an exact date is not known. It is also not known when Elizabeth died but both were buried in an orchard on their property where the county courthouse now stands. Their remains were moved to the Nicholas Brown lot of the North Burial Ground in 1792. -------------------- Elder of the Baptist Church in this town. He was one of the original Proprietors of the Providence Purchase, having been exiled from Massachusetts for conscience sake. He had five sons, John, James, Jeremiah, Chad & Daniel, who have left a numerous posterity. He died about A.D. 1665. -------------------- SOURCE: Abby Isabel Brown Bulkley, The Chad Browne Memorial, Consisting of Genealogical Memoirs of a Portion of the Descendants of Chad and Elizabeth Browne (Brooklyn, N.Y., 1888), p. 7-9.

IMMIGRATION: "Came from England in the ship 'Martin,' which arrived in Boston, Mass., July 1638.

RESIDENCES: One of the original signers of the pact that organized Providence, Rhode Island, in 1638; the first signer of the charter of Providence, 1644.

DEATH: "It is evident that he died some years earlier than has been supposed, as the name of his widow occurs in a tax list of Sept. 2, 1650."

BURIAL: "Chad and Elizabeth Browne were buried in an orchard on his Home Lot, College Street, corner of Benefit, where the County Court House now stands. Their remains were removed in 1792 to the Nicholas Brown lot in the North Burial Ground."

SOURCE (for the following): Information obtained from the Rhode Island Historical Society

The Progenitor of the Brown family in America; Reverend Chad Brown (or Chaddus Browne) arrived at Boston in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in July of 1638 aboard the ship "Martin" with his wife Elizabeth and young son John. Chaddus Browne was born in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England around 1600. He married Elizabeth Sharparowe of Melbourne, Bedfordshire, England on September 11, 1626. Chad Brown and his family moved to Providence, Rhode Island shortly after arriving in Boston, where along with Roger Williams and others he was a signer of the Rhode Island Compact which denied religious interference in civil affairs.

In 1642 Chad Brown was ordained as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence. There has been some controversy as to whether Chad or Roger Williams was the first pastor of the church, however Reverend Brown was most certainly the first ordained minister of the church. The oldest authority available; "The History of the Baptists in America" published in 1772 by Morgan Edwards states, "Williams was pastor from the establishment of the church until he left the colony for England in 1643, and he then resigned it to Messers. Brown and Wickenden. Mr. Chad Brown died between 1660 and 1665 leaving the church in charge of his colleague."

Chad Brown's home was located at the corner of Market Square and College Street, (Brown University now occupies a portion of this property). He was originally buried on his own property and his remains were later relocated to the North Burial Ground in 1792. The inscription on his tombstone reads as follows:

"In Memory of Chad Brown Elder of the Baptist Church in this town. He was one of the original Proprietors of the Providence Purchase Having been exiled from Massachusetts for Conscience Sake. He had five sons John, James, Jeremiah, Chad and Daniel who have left a numerous Posterity. He died about A. D. 1665. This Monument was erected by the Town of Providence."

The oldest authority available is the "History of the Baptists in America" by Morgan Edwards, compiled about 1772. The author says , "Williams was pastor from the establishment of the church until he left the Colony for England in 1643, and he then resigned it to Messrs Brown and Wickenden. Mr. Chad Brown died between 1660 and 1885, leaving the church in charge of his colleague". For a brief summary of Chad Browne's character one can do no better than to quote the remarks of Hague in his "Historical Discourse" delivered at the church. "Contemporary with Roger Williams, he possessed a cooler temperament, and was happily adapted to sustain the interests of religion just where that great man failed. "

MORE INFORMATION: "New England Families: Genealogical and Memorial...." by William Richard Cutter "The Chad Brown Memorial" by Abbey Isabel Brown Buckley

Chad was one of the original signers of the pact that organized Providence, Rhode Island. In 1642, he became minister of the Baptist church there; in 1644, he was the first signer of the town’s charter. Rhode Island’s Brown University is named for Nicholas Brown, a descendant of this family through son James.

Elizabeth Brown is listed as a widow in September 1650 so Chad Brown must have died prior to that although an exact date is not known. It is also not known when Elizabeth died but both were buried in an orchard on their property where the county courthouse now stands. Their remains were moved to the Nicholas Brown lot of the North Burial Ground in 1792. SOURCE: “A Genealogical Record of the Early Settler of New England…” by James Savage, first published in Boston, 1860

Chad Brown’s original burial site was on his own property in Providence. It was located on land that became part of Brown University, first, and is now occupied by the Court House in downtown Providence. His remains were moved in 1792 to the North Burial Ground, and a monument to him was erected there. -------------------- Sailed to Boston Mass on 7/13/1638 on The Martin -------------------- Biography

 Chad Brown and his family came from England in the ship "Martin", which arrived in Boston in July of 1638. He did not remain long in the Massachusetts Colony, probably because of his religious views, but soon moved to Providence, RI. That same year, 1638, he and twelve others signed a compact relative to the government of the town. His work in settling the serious difficulties between the original thirteen proprietors of Providence and the later settlers is referred to by Roger Williams: "The truth is, Chad Browne, that wise and godly soul (now with God), with myself brought the remaining aftercomers and the first twelve to a oneness by arbitration."Chad Brown was appointed as surveyor on a committee to compile a list of the home lots of the first settlers of the" Towne Street" and the meadows allotted to them. His own home lot fronted on "Towne Streete," now South Main street and Market Square, with the southern boundary to the southward of College and South Main streets. The college grounds of Brown University now comprise a large portion of this lot.
   In 1640 Chad Brown served on a committee about the disputed boundary between Providence and Pawtuxet. In the same year he, with Robert Cole, William Harris and John Warner, formed the committee of Providence Colony to report their first written form of government, which was adopted and continued until 1644 when Roger Williams returned from England with the first charter. Chad Brown was the first of the thirty-nine signers of this agreement. In 1642 Mr. Brown was formally ordained as the first settled pastor of the Baptist church of Providence. At this time, and for more than a half century afterward, the church had no meeting house, but met for worship in a grove or orchard, and in unpleasant weather in the houses of its members. Rev. Brown remained at the head of his church until his death.

The Progenitor of the Brown family in America; Reverend Chad Brown (or Chaddus Browne) arrived at Boston in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in July of 1638 aboard the ship "Martin" with his wife Elizabeth and young son John. Chaddus Browne was born i n High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England around 1600. He married Elizabeth Sharparowe of Melbourne, Bedfordshire, England on September 11, 1626. Chad Brown and his family moved to Providence, Rhode Island shortly after arriving in Boston, where along with Roger Williams and others he was a signer o f the Rhode Island Compact which denied religious interference in civil affairs. In 1642 Chad Brown was ordained as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence. There has been some controversy as to whether Chad or Roger Williams was the first pastor of the church, however Reverend Brown was most certainly the first ordained minister of the church. The oldest authority available; "The History of the Baptists in America" published in 1772 by Morgan Edwards states," Williams was pastor from the establishment of the church until he left the colony for England in 1643, and he then resigned it to Messers. Brown and Wickenden. Mr. Chad Brown died between 1660 and 1665 leaving the church in charge of his colleague." Chad Brown's home was located at the corner of Market Square and College Street, ( Brown University now occupies a portion of this property). He was originally buried on his own property and his remains were later relocated to the North Burial Ground in 1792. The inscription on his tombstone reads as follows: " In Memory of Chad Brown Elder of the Baptist Church in this town. He was one of the original Proprietors of the Providence Purchase Having been exiled from Massachusetts for Conscience Sake. He had five sons John, James, Jeremiah, Chad and Daniel who have left a numerous Posterity. He died about A. D. 1665. This Monument was erected by the Town of Providence." Chad's oldest son John, who was born in England and made the voyage on the Martin to Boston with his family was born in 1630. He married Mary Holmes of Lancashire, England in 1654 in Providence, Rhode Island. Their son, James Browne, ( Elder) was born May 18, 1662 in Providence, Rhode Island. He married Mary Harris and their son Captain James Brown, Jr. was born on March 22, 1698 in Providence, Rhode Island. Captain James Brown and his brother Obadiah established the basis of the family fortune. James was the first Brown to enter the slave trade in 1 736 with his sloop "Mary" under the command of Captain John Godfrey with his younger brother Obadiah acting as the Supercargo. Obadiah raised the four sons of his brother James after he died suddenly in 1739. Those four sons later became known as the famous "Four Brothers" of Providence. They were Nicholas (Sr.), Joseph, John , and Moses. Obadiah established the firm of Obadiah Brown & Co. with Moses Brown in 1750. Nicholas, John and Joseph joined the firm later on. After Obadiah died in 1762, Nicholas and his three brothers continued in business as Nicholas Brown & Co., which became Brown and Benson when George Benson joined the firm in1783; then Brown, Benson and Ives in 17 92 and under his son Nicholas Jr.; Brown and Ives in1796 .

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Rev. Chadd Browne's Timeline

1600
1600
High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England
1626
September 11, 1626
Age 26
High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England
1627
March 9, 1627
Age 27
High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
1628
1628
Age 28
High Wycombe, Buckingham, Shropshire, England
1632
1632
Age 32
Probably England, (Present UK)
1634
1634
Age 34
Probably Massachusetts Bay Colony
1636
1636
Age 36
Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
1640
1640
Age 40
Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
1642
1642
Age 42
Providence, Providence, Rhode Island
1642
Age 42