Rev. James Noyes, ll

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James Noyes, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Stonington, New London, Connecticut, United States
Place of Burial: Wequeteqouck Burial Ground, Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Reverend James Noyes, Sr and Sarah Noyes
Husband of Dorothy Stanton
Father of Dorothy Treat; James Noyes, III, MD; Capt. Thomas Noyes; Anne Noyes; Deacon John Noyes and 2 others
Brother of Dea. Joseph Noyes; Rev. Moses Noyes; John Noyes; Capt. Thomas Noyes; Rebecca Knight and 2 others

Managed by: David Lee Kaleita
Last Updated:

About Rev. James Noyes, ll

   Graduate Harvard 1659. Savage, Vol. 3: Began to preach in Stonington, Connecticut in 1664, residing in the family of Thomas Stanton, yet was not ordained before 10 September 1674, the day before he was married to Dorothy. The meeting house in which he preached was a short distance southwesterly of the present residence of Henry M. Palmer (1905). Mr. Noyes made his home on a large tract of land which he bought of Samuel Willis, of Hartford, on the road to Wequetequock. Preached 55 years. He served as a soldier and volunteer against the Indians in the Narraganset war and received land for services rendered in what became Voluntown, Conn. (Bodge's Soldiers of King Philip's war, page 443, Narraganset Register, Vol. 1, p. 144).Chief sachem of Narragansett Indians. Much honor attached to his name for so long faithfully fulfilling his ministry, as is shown in a most judicious funeral sermon by Adams of New London. Equally so, for service in the foundation of Yale College standing there as the first on the list of Fellows.
   He was, in his day, one of the leading ministers of the colony, greatly respected for his wisdom and his piety. He was a distinguished preacher, carrying uncommon fervor and Heavenly zeal into all of his public performances. His ordinary conversation breathed a spirit of that world to which he was endeavoring to guide his fellow men. In ecclesiastical controversies he was eminently useful. He was a counsellor in civil affairs at some critical periods. He was selected to be one of the first trustees of the college (Yale); for though he was then an old man, and in a remote corner of the colony, his influence was deemed essential to the success of the undertaking.
   (From Wheeler's History of Stonington, Conn.)
   Rev James Noyes came to Stonington to preach on an invitation of the town in 1664. The meeting house in which he preached was a short distance southwesterly of the present residence of Mr. Henry M. Palmer, west of Montauk Avenue. Traditionally, we learn that he resided in the family of Thomas Stanton, Sr., until he was ordained, Sept. 11, 1674, and the next day he was married to Miss Dorothy, daughter of Thomas and Ann (Lord) Stanton. He made his permanent place of abode upon a large tract of land in Stonington, which he purchased of Samuel Willis of Hartford, Conn., where he erected him a dwelling house on the site of the present first house south of Anguilla, on the highway from there to Wequetequock, which became the first parsonage of the First Congregational Church of Stonington, where he lived the remainder of his life, dying Dec. 30, 1719. For the first ten years of his ministry he preached as a licentiate, and the last forty-five years as an ordained clergyman. He was Chaplain with Capt. George Denison's expedition that captured Canonchet, chief sachem of the Narragansett Indians, April, 1676.
   Noyes-Gilman Ancestry
   ""He was but 16 and his brother Moses but 13 when together they entered Harvard in 1656. His father died not long after his admission. Their father's friends and parishioners contributed to give the boys the best education then obtainable while they worked their way through college. After graduation in 1664 he went to Stonington, Conn. where he was invited by the town to become their minister and took the freeman's oath October 5, 1669. He received as a gift from the town a grant of 250 acres of land, called Musqueta, and later known as Noyes' Point, Westerly, R.I. which remained in the family for several generations..
   (From La Verne W. Noyes' "Noyes and Allied Families")
   "In April, 1697, upon the motion of the Honorable Lieut. Governour Stoughton, and information that the enemy, Indians, intended to scatter into small companies, to do mischief upon His Majestie's subjects, the Governour and Councill also being moved by the worshipful Captain Samuel Mason and the Reverent Mr. James Noise, ordered a letter sent to Capt. Samuel Mason and Mr. James Noise desiring them to promote of raising twentie or thirtie men, English and Indians, furnished with arms, ammunition and provision, to range the woods between Nashua (now in N.H.) and Deerfield, Mass., and near Mamerrimack River, and between Hadley and Marlburrough as they shall judge best. And the Governour and Councill being informed that the enemy, Indians, intended to scatter and to sett upon the small towns upon the river that were secure. Warrants were sent to the several constables of the towns in danger to see that due watch and ward be kept." (Conn. Col. Record, Vol. 4, p.196). Appointed by Assembly one of a committee to settle differences regarding division of land in Quinnebaug. In 1708 he was granted 200 acres of land.
   The remains of Rev. James Noyes are buried in the ancient burying-place ground, upon a sloping hill on the east side of Wequetequock Cove, midway between Stonington, Conn., and Westerly, R.I. A light brown stone covers the remains and upon it is cut the Coat of Arms of the family.
   The epitaph was written by Reverend Eliphalet Adams who graduated from Harvard College in 1694 and who died in 1753, and who was in 1720, pastor of the First Congregational Church of New London, Conn.
   The original draft of the epitaph was in 1889, in the Sunday School Library Room of the First Congregational Church of Stonington, Conn.
   His body was interred 1719 Stonington, Conn, old Wetequequock burying ground. The pier slab that for over a century has been over the grave of Rev. James Noyes of the old Wetequequock burying ground, Stonington, Conn., was relettered at Doty's marble works in the 1890s. The following is the inscription on it: "In expectation of a joyful resurrection to eternal life here lyeth interred the body of the Rev. Mr. James Noyes aged 80 years who after a faithful living of the Church of Christ in this place for more than 55 years deceased Dec. ye 30, 1719-20. Majesty, meekness and humilty here meet in one with greatest charity. He was first pastor of the Road Church and Society." Graduated at Harvard College and was ordained as pastor of the church in Stonington the day before his marriage. He was one of the founders of Yale College. He drew Cedar Swamp lots for Indian war service.
   (Hist. of First Cong. Church)
   On Aug. 28, 1692 he baptised Chimham, an Indian who he then raised. 

spouse: Stanton, Dorothy (1652 - 1743)

- m. 11 SEP 1674 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut

----------child: Noyes, Dorothy (1676 - 1714)

----------child: Noyes, James (1677 - 1718)

----------child: Noyes, Thomas (1679 - 1755)

----------child: Noyes, Anne "Anna" (1682 - 1694)

----------child: Noyes, John (1685 - 1751)

----------child: Noyes, Joseph (1688 - 1761)

----------child: Noyes, Moses (1692 - 1692)

Grave Inscription: In expectation of a joyful resurrection to eternal life here lyeth interred the body of the Rev. Mr. James Noyes aged 80 years who after a faithful living of the Church of Christ in this place for more than 55 years deceased Dec. ye 30, 1719-20. Majesty, meekness and humilty here meet in one with greatest charity. He was first pastor of the Road Church and Society

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Rev. James Noyes, ll's Timeline

1639
March 11, 1639
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
1659
1659
- present
Age 19
Harvard College
1674
September 12, 1674
Age 35
Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
1675
June 22, 1675
Age 36
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
August 2, 1675
Age 36
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut Colony
1679
August 15, 1679
Age 40
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
1682
April 16, 1682
Age 43
Stonington, New London, CT
1685
January 13, 1685
Age 45
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
1688
October 16, 1688
Age 49
Stonington, New London County, Dominion of New England (Present Connecticut), (Present USA)
1691
March 19, 1691
Age 52
Stonington, New London, CT