John Woodbridge, Vl (1613 - 1695)

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Birthplace: St. Quintin, Stanton, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Occupation: Teacher, Reverend
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About John Woodbridge, Vl

Reverend John Woodbridge was born in 1613 in Stanton,Wiltshire,England. He died on 17 Mar 1694/1695 in Newbury,Essex,Ma.

He married Mercy Dudley on 20 May 1639, in Northamptonshire,England. Mercy Dudley was born on 27 Sep 1621 in England. She died on 1 Jul 1691 in Newbury,Essex,Ma.

They had the following children:

		M	i	 Reverend John Woodbridge
		M	ii	 Reverend Benjamin Woodbridge

(and of course, Martha Woodbridge, who married Samuel Ruggles)

The Rev. John Woodbridge was Anne Bradstreet's brother-in-law. In 1647, he sailed to England, carrying her manuscript of poetry without her knowledge. He had it published in London as "The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up into America, by a Gentlewoman in such Parts".[1] [2]

The purpose of the publication appears to have been an attempt by devout Puritan men (i.e. Thomas Dudley, Simon Bradstreet, and himself) to show that a godly and educated woman could elevate the position held by a wife and mother, without necessarily placing her in competition with men.[3]

The publication was unauthorized, and reportedly, on the publication of Anne Bradstreet's The Tenth Muse(1650), he wrote: "I feare the displeasure of no person in the publishing of these Poems but the Author's, without whose knowledge, and contrary to her expectation, I have presumed to bring to publick view what she resolved should never in such as manner see the Sun."[4]

He married Mercy Dudley the daughter of Gov. Thomas Dudley on May 20 1639 in Andover, MA.

[edit]

References

1. ^ Woodlief, A. (n.d.). Biography of Anne Bradstreet Retrieved September 1, 2006. from http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/Bradstreet/bradbio.htm

2. ^ White, Elizabeth (1971). Anne Bradstreet: "The Tenth Muse". New York: Oxford University Press, 255-6. ISBN 9780195014402.

3. ^ Ezell, Margaret (1999). Social Authorship and the Advent of Print. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 49. ISBN 9780801861390..

4. ^ Ezell, Margaret (1999). Social Authorship and the Advent of Print. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 45. ISBN 9780801861390..

--------------------

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=haruspex&id=I000092

He was a Minister, ORDN: 24 OCT 1645 Andover, Essex Co., MA.

He migrated in 1634, departing from Southampton 24 March, 1634, on the Mary & John. 
He "was brought by his uncle, The Rev. Mr. Thomas Parker, whose living was at Newbury."
   He attended Oxford University and came to New England in 1634, settling in Newbury, MA as a planter. (Farmer, p. 328) He served as town clerk of Newbury from 1634 to 1638.
   Minister. He was at first a husbandman or farmer. About 1642, Thomas Dudley, his father-in-law, advised him to become a teacher, or minister, which advice he followed. He was a Deputy to the General Court, 1639-40-41. In 1643 he kept school in Boston; he was ordained over the church in Andover, 24 October 1645. (Mather says 16 September 1644.) (Farmer, p. 328)
   He returned with his family to England in 1647, where, among other situations, he became a minister at Andover, Hants. and Barford Saint Martin, Wiltshire, from which place he was ejected at the Restoration. 

In 1662 he was driven from a school in Newbury, England (?DBR, 1999) by the Bartholomew Act, and in 1663 he returned to New England. He was Assistant of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1683-1684.

   He became assistant to his uncle Parker, whose sister Sarah his father had married but was dismissed 21 November 1670 because of church dissensions. He died in Newbury, Massachusetts 18 March 1694, aged 84. (BiblioDesiderata, 1871, page 25.)
   See NEHG Register 32:292.
   The Rev. Mr. John Woodbridge was born in England, 1613,. He studied at Oxford University but left, refusing to take the oath of conformity. 

In 1634 he came to America in the ship Mary and John with his uncle, the The Rev. Mr. Thomas Parker, settled at Newbury, Mass., he became town clerk, 1634-38, and surveyor of arms, 1637. He married in 1639, Mercy, daughter of Gov. Thomas Dudley. He was ordained minister at Andover, Oct. 24, 1645.

In the year 1647 he returned to England with his wife and three children, was chaplain to the parliamentary commissioners who treated with King Charles at the Isle of Wight, minister at Andover, Hampshire, and Barford St. Martin, Wiltshire, until he was ejected at the restoration.

In 1663 he returned to America, having resided sixteen years in England, settled at Newbury, where he was assistant minister until he resigned, 1670, assistant of the colony, 1683, died at Newbury, March 17, 1695, his wife having died in 1691.

He was the son of The Rev. Mr. John Woodbridge, d. Dec. 9, 1637, rector of Stanton, near Highworth, Wiltshire, and his wife Sarah, dau. of Mr. Robert Parker, an English divine. (See Woodbridge Record, 1883; Savage's Gen. Dict.; Cotton Mather's Magnalia.)

   Cochichawicke, as early as 1634, was settled by Puritans, many of whom came from Rowley, Ipswich and Newbury. Six of its first landowners were Mr. Bradstreet, a minister from Ipswich, John Osgood, John Stevens, William Ballard, John Lovejoy and Thomas Chandler. 

In 1643, Massachusetts was divided into four counties, Essex county consisted of eight towns or settlements all south of the Merrimack River; Salem, Lynn, Evon (now Wenham), Ipswich, Rowley, Newbury and Cochichawicke.

   The Indian town of Cochichawicke was sold by the Indians to Mr. John Woodbridge for £6 and a coat and incorporated as Andover in 1646. Colonists who settled here first allotted land for the church as well as for the minister's house and for a burying ground. Level ground was then set aside for a common where flocks and herds could be pastured and guarded. 

Then, near the meeting house, home lots of from four to ten acres each were allotted. Proportionate amounts of meadow, tillage and woodlands in more remote areas of the township were awarded depending upon the settler's wealth and position, as this was by no means a complete democracy.

Indentured servants, who were numerous, had no share in the communal arrangements. The first buildings were wooden huts with thatched roofs. On May 26, 1647, the General Court appointed John Osgood and Thomas Hale to lay out a road from Andover to Haverhill. Another road went from Andover to Reading.

   The first settlers lived in peace with the Indians, showing justice and kindness in their dealings with them. Peaceful relations were maintained with Massasoit and his older son Alexander, permitting the English settlers to pursue their business safely with little interference for more than thirty years. 

Then Massasoit's younger son, filled with hatred for the English owing to unfortunate experience with them brought on the Indian attack in 1675 which made garrison houses necessary for refuge and defence. These houses were built of heavy timber, at times filled with bricks between the studs. At the corners logs were halved and lapped together, then treenailed with long wooden pins. A second story sometimes extended out over the lower, and the whole was surrounded with a palisade, a watch being kept night and day.

The first violence in Andover came April 19, 1676. A second Indian war on the English came in 1688, with Andover suffering more this time. Lieutenant John Stevens, Benjamin Lovejoy and others died in battle. The worst Indian attack on Andover occurred March 5, 1698, when 30 to 40 Indians killed five settlers, burned two houses and two barns.

Until 1725, settlers were harassed constantly, their crops destroyed and cattle driven off. During this period, there was a garrison house in every neighborhood in different sections of town, and men went armed into the fields to work.

There was bitterness and hatred, and certainly injustice and cruelty, as in any war in history, the antagonists, both red and white, struggling for supremacy in a primitive wilderness. (A Genealogical History of the Clark and Worth Families, pp. 371-372)

--------------------

John Woodbridge (1613-1696), brother of Benjamin, was born at Stanton, near Highworth, in 1613. He was partially educated at Oxford, but, objecting to the oath of conformity, left the university and studied privately till 1634, when he went to America. Woodbridge took up lands at Newbury in New England, acted as first town clerk till 19 Nov. 1638, and in 1637, 1640 and 1641 as deputy to the general court. He was ordained at Andover on 24 Oct. 1645, and chosen teacher of a congregation at Newbury. In 1647 he returned to England, and was made chaplain to the commissioners treating with the king in the Isle of Wight. He settled in New England in 1663, and succeeded his uncle Thomas Parker as minister at Newbury in 1677. Disagreeing with his congregation on some points of church discipline, he gave up his post and became a magistrate of the township. He died on 17 March 1696. He married in 1630, Mercy (1621-1691), daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley, by whom he had twelve children. Dudley Woodbridge, judge-advocate of Barbados and director-general of the Royal Assiento Company, who died on 11 Feb. 1720-1, and whose portrait was painted by Kneller, was probably his son

--------------------

Laurel Logan:

from http://www.members.tripod.com/animegrabs/famtree/ind00523.htm

July 2008

John Woodbridge

Born: 1613

Died: 17-Mar-1694 b Stanton, Wiltshire, England

d Newbury, Essex Co., MA

He "was brought by his uncle, the Rev. Thomas Parker, whose living was at Newbury."

He attended Oxford University and came to New England in 1634, settling in Newbury, MA as a planter. (Farmer, p. 328) He served as town clerk of Newbury from 1634 to 1638.

Minister. He was at first a husbandman or farmer. About 1642, Thomas Dudley, his father-in-law, advised him to become a teacher, or minister, which advice he followed. He was a Deputy to the General Court, 1639-40-41. In 1643 he kept school in Boston; he was ordained over the church in Andover, 24 October 1645. (Mather says 16 September 1644.) (Farmer, p. 328)

He returned with his family to England in 1647, where, among other situations, he became a minister at Andover, Hants. and Barford Saint Martin, Wiltshire, from which place he was ejected at the Restoration. In 1662 he was driven from a school in Newbury, England (?DBR, 1999) by the Bartholomew Act, and in 1663 he returned to New England. He was Assistant of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1683-1684.

He became assistant to his uncle Parker, whose sister Sarah his father had married but was dismissed 21 November 1670 because of church dissensions. He died in Newbury, Massachusetts 18 March 1694, aged 84. (BiblioDesiderata, 1871, page 25.)

See NEHG Register 32:292.

The Rev. John Woodbridge, born in England, 1613, studied at Oxford University but left, refusing to take the oath of conformity, in 1634 came to America in the ship Mary and John with his uncle, the Rev. Thomas Parker, settled at Newbury, Mass., town clerk, 1634-38, surveyor of arms, 1637, married in 1639, Mercy, dau. of Gov. Thomas Dudley, ordained minister at Andover, Oct. 24, 1645. In the year 1647 he returned to England with his wife and three children, was chaplain to the parliamentary commissioners who treated with King Charles at the Isle of Wight, minister at Andover, Hampshire, and Barford St. Martin, Wiltshire, until he was ejected at the restoration, in 1663 he returned to America, having resided sixteen years in England, settled at Newbury, where he was assistant minister until he resigned, 1670, assistant of the colony, 1683, died at Newbury, March 17, 1695, his wife having died in 1691; he was the son of Rev. John Woodbridge, d. Dec. 9, 1637, rector of Stanton, near Highworth, Wiltshire, and his wife Sarah, dau. of Mr. Robert Parker, an English divine. (See Woodbridge Record, 1883; Savage's Gen. Dict.; Cotton Mather's Magnalia.)

Cochichawicke, as early as 1634 was settled by Puritans, many of whom came from Rowley, Ipswich and Newbury. Six of its first landowners were Mr. Bradstreet, a minister from Ipswich, John Osgood, John Stevens, William Ballard, John Lovejoy and Thomas Chandler. In 1643, Massachusetts was divided into four counties, Essex county consisted of eight towns or settlements all south of the Merrimack River; Salem, Lynn, Evon (now Wenham), Ipswich, Rowley, Newbury and Cochichawicke.

The Indian town of Cochichawicke was sold by the Indians to Mr. John Woodbridge for £6 and a coat and incorporated as Andover in 1646. Colonists who settled here first allotted land for the church as well as for the minister's house and for a burying ground. Level ground was then set aside for a common where flocks and herds could be pastured and guarded. Then, near the meeting house, home lots of from four to ten acres each were allotted. Proportionate amounts of meadow, tillage and woodlands in more remote areas of the township were awarded depending upon the settler's wealth and position, as this was by no means a complete democracy. Indentured servants, who were numerous, had no share in the communal arrangements. The first buildings were wooden huts with thatched roofs. On May 26, 1647, the General Court appointed John Osgood and Thomas Hale to lay out a road from Andover to Haverhill. Another road went from Andover to Reading.

The first settlers lived in peace with the Indians, showing justice and kindness in their dealings with them. Peaceful relations were maintained with Massasoit and his older son Alexander, permitting the English settlers to pursue their business safely with little interference for more than thirty years. Then Massasoit's younger son, filled with hatred for the English owing to unfortunate experience with them brought on the Indian attack in 1675 which made garrison houses necessary for refuge and defence. These houses were built of heavy timber, at times filled with bricks between the studs. At the corners logs were halved and lapped together, then treenailed with long wooden pins. A second story sometimes extended out over the lower, and the whole was surrounded with a palisade, a watch being kept night and day. The first violence in Andover came April 19, 1676. A second Indian war on the English came in 1688, with Andover suffering more this time. Lieutenant John Stevens, Benjamin Lovejoy and others died in battle. The worst Indian attack on Andover occurred March 5, 1698, when 30 to 40 Indians killed five settlers, burned two houses and two barns. Until 1725, settlers were harassed constantly, their crops destroyed and cattle driven off. During this period, there was a garrison house in every neighborhood in different sections of town, and men went armed into the fields to work. There was bittarness and hatred, and certainly injustice and cruelty, as in any war in history, the antagonists, both red and white, struggling for supremacy in a primitive wilderness. (A Genealogical History of the Clark and Worth Families, pp. 371-372)

--Laurel Logan

Laurel Logan:

Interesting link showing a book of poetry from Anne Dudley Bradstreet (sister of John's wife) where he writes the introduction. http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/bradstreet/1678/1678.html

--Laurel Logan

--Laurel Logan

August 13, 2008

from http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~legends/woodbrid.html

Rev. John Woodbridge VI, (at right), born 1613 at Stanton, England, died 17 March 1694/1695; married Mercy Dudley, born 1621 in Northampton, England, died 1 July 1691 at Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts, daughter of Thomas Dudley, Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

Children:

Sarah, born 7 June 1640, died aboyt 1690. She was seven years old at the time of her father's return to England and twenty three years old and probably married when he returned to New England. She lived in England until her death, leaving five children.

Lucy, born 13 March 1642, died 18 June 1710; married first Rev. Simon Bradstreet, her cousin, who died 1683, by whom she had five children; married second Capt. Daniel Epps, with whom she had no children.

John, born 1644, died 13 November 1691 in Wethersfield, Connecticut; married Abigail Leete, daughter of Gov. William Leete of Connecticut Colony, with whom he had six children. He graduated from Harvard College in 1664 and was ordained a minister on 7 April 1669.

Benjamin, minister, born 1645; married first on 1 June 1672, Mary Ward, born 24 June 1649, daughter of Rev. John Ward of Haverhill, Massachusetts, granddaughter of Nathaniel Ward, author of the "Simple Cobler of Aggawan."

Thomas, born 1648, died 30 March 1681 in Newbury, Massachusetts; married Mary Jones, daughter by a previous marriage of Mrs. White, the wife of Capt. Paul White. They had five children. After his death his widow married Joseph Croker in 1695.

Dorothy, born about 1650, died April 1723; married Nathaniel Fryer, widower. He was a mariner, who subsequently served as a representative from New Hampshire in 1777. In 1683 he serbed as a member of the Council. They had no children.

Anne, born about 1653 in England, probably in ANdover, Hampshire, during her father's tenure there, died 28 February 1701; never married. Judge Samuel Sewall gives her date of death as 4 March 1701: "Mistress Ann Woodbridge is buried at Roxbury."

Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, born 13 January 1655/1656 at Barford-St. Martin's, Wiltshire, England, died 30 April 1732 at Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut. He is documented as having three wives: He married first Mehitable Wyllys, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Wyllys and widow of both Rev. Daniel Russel and Rev. Isaac Foster. Together she and Timothy had four children. He married second around 1703, Mrs. Howell, first name unknown; Mrs. Howell is believed to have been widow of Jonathan Howell, Jr. of Southampton, Long Island, who died 1692. She had been previously married to Rev. Joseph Taylor of Southampton. He died 4 April 1682. They had two children. He married third Abigail Wilson, who was widow of both Richard Lord and John Warren of Boston. They had one child.

       He came with his parents on theri return to New England in 1663. He graduated from Harvard College in 1675 and was ordained to the ministry on 18 November 1685. In 1669 he was one of ten principal ministers of the Colony named as Trustees and authorized by the General Assembly of Connecticut Colony to found Yale College. He was a Fellow of Yale, 1700-1732. In 1732 he was offered but declined the Rectorship of the College.
       Many of Timothy's personal papers are housed in the Yale University archives today, and the present Woodbridge Hall is named in his honor. 

Joseph, born about 1657, died 17 September 1726; married Martha Rogers, daughter of

Ezekiel Rogers of Ipswich, Massachusetts, with whom he had five children. His father willed him "the homestead [as] my sonne Joseph Woodbridge hath continued with me and hath bin serviceable to out Affaires."

--Laurel Logan --------------------

Rev. John Woodbridge was born in 1613 and died March 17, 1691 . He was a student at Oxford University, but he refused to take the oath of conformity and had to leave. He came to America in 1634 on the ship "Mary and John" with his uncle, Rev. Thomas Parker , settling in Newbury, Massachusetts . He was town clerk there from 1634-38 and surveyor of arms in 1637 . In 1643 he taught school in Boston . He helped negotiat the purchase of land now the town of Andover, Massachusetts , and was ordained minister of Andover on October 24, 1645 .

In 1647 he returned to England with his wife and children, where he was chaplain of the Parliamentary commissioners who treated with the king at the Isle of Wight. he was also minister of Andover, Hants , and at Barford St. Martin in Wiltshire until he was ejected at the time of the Restoration. On July 26,1663 he came back to New England. He was made assistant to his uncle, Rev. Thomas Parker , at Newbury and remained there until November, 1670. He was assistant in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1683-84 .

John was a wealthy man, owning a farm on North street, Newbury. His wife Mercy was the daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley .

-------------------- He attended Oxford, was a town clerk and surveyor of arms for Newbury, MA. He was ordained a minister on Sept. 4, 1647 -------------------- Educated at Oxford, came to New England aboard the ship "Mary and John" in 1634. Settled in Newberry Mass and in 1639 he married Mercy, the daughter of Thomas Dudley, the Governor of Massachusetts Colony. They had 11 children. http://www.geni.com/people/Rev-John-Woodbridge/6000000002603455227

view all 33

Rev. John Woodbridge's Timeline

1613
1613
St. Quintin, Stanton, Wiltshire, England
1634
May 1634
Age 21
Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
1634
Age 21
Andover, MA
1634
- 1638
Age 21
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
1637
1637
Age 24
1642
March 13, 1642
Age 29
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
1643
1643
Age 30
Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
1644
1644
Age 31
Stanton St. Quintin, Wiltshire, England, (Present UK)
1644
Age 31
1645
June 1645
Age 32
Probably Windsor, Connecticut Colony