Samuel Phillips (c.1625 - 1696) MP

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Nicknames: "Rev. Samuel Phillips"
Birthplace: Boxted, Essex, England
Death: Died in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Occupation: second minister at Rowley, Essex County, Massachusetts
Managed by: Ned Reynolds
Last Updated:

About Samuel Phillips

SAMUEL PHILLIPS [#990], b. probably Boxtead, Suffolk, England abt. 1625, d. Rowley, MA 22 Apr 1696,[4] m. Oct 1651 SARAH APPLETON (dau. of Samuel Appleton and Judith Everard), b. Reydon, England abt. 1629, d. Rowley, MA 15 Jul 1714, "age 86".[4]

Samuel Phillips was the oldest child of Reverend George Phillips, the first minister of Watertown. He was born about 1625, probably in Boxtead, Suffolk, England. At the age of five he embarked for New England aboard the Arabella with his family and fellow passengers. The Arabella was one ship of the "Winthrop Fleet" that embarked from Yarmouth, England 20 Apr 1630 and arrived at Salem in the Massachusetts Bay June 12.[2]

On 1 Jul 1644 Samuel's father died, leaving him a double portion as his share of the estate. His step-mother died in 1681 and left "to son Samuel all Latin, Greek, and Hebrew books now in the house". Cotton Mather stated, the Watertown Church "testified their Affection to their deceased Pastor, by a Special Care to promote and perfect the Education of his eldest son, whereof all the country, but especially the town of Rowley, have since reaped the benefit".[2]

Samuel entered Harvard College where he graduated with an M.A. in 1650, and the following year in June 1651 he settled on a salary varying from 50 to 90 pounds, according to the expenses of living, as teacher of the church at Rowley, MA. Reverend Ezekiel Rogers was the pastor there until his death in January 1660-1. Soon after Rogers' death his widow accused Phillips of receiving and retaining five pounds which she claimed as her due, but which the Selectmen had ordered to be paid to Samuel in consideration of his carrying on the entire work of the ministry during Rogers' illness. The controversy continued for some time and even went to court after the widow's death in early 1679. In her will, dated July 22, 1679, after stating that she has not received the five pounds, says, "Therefore I would earnestly desire Mr. Sammuell Phillips and Deacon Jewet that they would not ronge me in this particular, least it be a greefe to them at the apearinge of Jesus Christ". While Samuel was thus annoyed, the church in Barnstable invited him to succeed the Reverend Thomas Walley as their pastor. In reply to GovernorThomas Hinckley's letter on the subject, Samuel wrote: "Yours of the 6th of June [1679] came to hand on the 15th instant, and was read before the church in Rowley the same day, and the result is, that almost the whole church did show their dissent as to parting with their minister, and not one would show any consent to it: so that, at present, the holy providence of God doth seem to fasten me where by his mercy I have had so long continuance. The brethren that have dissented from me, and the major part of the church, as to some late transactions among us (which ere long are to be looked into by a council of our honored General Court's sending), they will yield no consent to any motion of my going from them; and did express themselves, some of them, to be utterly against my removal: and a great part of the town are of the same mind with the church. Some brethren did express themselves somewhat troubled that a letter upon such an account should come from your worship; but they did withal acknowledge that your motion to our church was so piously, wisely, and with good cautions, expressed, that there was no just matter of offence. Moreover, it seems not unworthy noting, that your godly letter, though it prevails not as to the obtaining what your worship and your good people desire (according to God) with reference to my worthless self, yet it has (so far as I can discern) been beneficial to unite our hearts more together, wherein your worship has obtained one gracious end of your writing. There has been and still is love in the body of the church, both brethren and sisters, to their weak earthen vessel; and speeches about parting has drawn it forth ... But that your worship and good people should have any thoughts toward myself (a poor shrub to have made up that breach where so fruitful a tree lately stood) is a matter of wonderment to me, especially when I consider what great ground I have to look upon myself as less than the least of all of God's saints, and also at this time under a cloud of obloquy; yet such was your charity, that you would not admit any alienting impressions upon your spirits, but even at such a time express your abundant love to me. My God and my father's God reward it to you; for you have been a comfort to me, and, as it were, companions with me in my trials. And, indeed, so affecting is your undeserved kindness herein, that the thankful sense of it will (by God's help) abide with me whilst I live. And, did Providence open a door for my leaving the place where I am, I know no other place that my heart is so much endeared to as to yourselves; and the rather that I might have the help and comfort of your worship's society, as well as the rest of God's dear people with you".[2]

Samuel Shepard was ordained pastor of the church at Rowley 15 Nov 1665, Samuel Phillips continuing to be teacher. Shepard died 7 Apr 1668, and Edward Payson was ordained teacher 25 Oct 1682 while Samuel took the office of pastor, which he continued 14 years until his death on 22 Apr 1696 at the age of about 71.

Samuel was married in the autumn after his ordination as teacher at Rowley. "Att the request of Mr. Phillipps, of Rowley, who hath been published accordinge to law, Mr. Wm Hubbard, of Ipswich, in the absence of a magistrate, is [by the General Court, at its session 14 Oct 1651] hereby empowered to marry him". His wife was Sarah Appleton, who died 15 Jul 1714, aged 86, having outlived him more than 18 years.[2] Her funeral sermon was preached by her grandson Reverend Samuel Phillips of South Andover, in which he says, "She was an early seeker of God, and spent much of her time daily in reading the word and in prayer ... She took care of her children's souls ... She was always humble and penitent, and as she lived, so she died, depending on Christ for righteousness and salvation".[3] The remains of Samuel and Sarah repose in the ancient burying ground at Rowley.[2]

REF: [1] The History of Newbury - Joshua Coffin, 1845 (pgs.80,104-109)

    [2] Harvard Graduates - John Sibley, 1873 (Class of 1650, pg.221)
    [3] Genealogy of Reverend George Phillips - A.M. Phillips, 1885
        (pg.12)
    [4] Vital Records of Rowley, Massachusetts to the end of the
        Year 1849 - The Essex Institute, 1931 (Phillips births
        vol 1 pgs.161-162; marriages pgs.370-371; deaths pg.505)
    [5] Records of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, 1911

-------------------- Of the eleven children of the Reverend George Phillips several survived him --- the most important being the eldest, Samuel Phillips, born in Boxted, England, in 1625. After the father's death the members of his congregation, according to generally accepted tradition, undertook to educate this boy, and through their efforts Samuel was sent to Harvard College, where he graduated in 1650. A year later he became the minister of Rowley, near Newburyport, and remained there until his death, April 22, 1696. His estate was appraised at nine hundred and eighty-nine pounds. Of his character we can discover little, except that he had "piety and ability" of no common order. In 1678 he was awarded the honor of preaching the election sermon before the General Court of the province, and in 1687 he was imprisoned for a brief period on the charge of having called the royalist agent, Edward Randolph, a "wicked man." In 1651, at the very beginning of his ministry, he married Sarah Appleton, and he left behind him three of the eleven children born to her. She survived him until July 15, 1714, her funeral sermon being preached by her grandson, the Reverend Samuel Phillips, of Andover.

http://www.ourstory.info/library/5-AFSIS/Fuess/school1.html Samuel Phillips, born in Boxted, England, in 1625. After the father's death the members of his congregation, according to generally accepted tradition, undertook to educate this boy, and through their efforts Samuel was sent to Harvard College, where he graduated in 1650. A year later he became the minister of Rowley, near Newburyport, and remained there until his death, April 22, 1696. His estate was appraised at nine hundred and eighty-nine pounds. Of his character we can discover little, except that he had "piety and ability" of no common order. In 1678 he was awarded the honor of preaching the election sermon before the General Court of the province, and in 1687 he was imprisoned for a brief period on the charge of having called the royalist agent, Edward Randolph, a "wicked man." In 1651, at the very beginning of his ministry, he married Sarah Appleton, and he left behind him three of the eleven children born to her. She survived him until July 15, 1714, her funeral sermon being preached by her grandson, the Reverend Samuel Phillips, of Andover.

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Rev. Samuel Phillips's Timeline

1625
December 22, 1625
Boxted, Essex, England
1651
October 14, 1651
Age 25
Rowley, Essex, MA
1651
Age 25
Graduate of Harvard Colleg
1653
1653
Age 27
1654
March, 1654
Age 28
Rowley, Massachusetts
1655
February 7, 1655
Age 29
Rowley, Massachusetts
1657
1657
Age 31
Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts
1659
November 23, 1659
Age 33
Rowley, Essex County, MA
1661
November 16, 1661
Age 35
Rowley, Massachusetts
1662
February 12, 1662
Age 36
Rowley, Massachusetts