James Noyes, Sr (1608 - 1656) MP

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Birthplace: Cholderton, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Newbury Old Towne, Essex Co, MA
Occupation: Minister
Managed by: Ethel Johanna Myers
Last Updated:

About James Noyes, Sr

Reverand Noyes was the father of Benjamin9?) Noyes, chief prosecutor of the Salem Witch trials.

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Rev. James Noyes, the immigrant ancestor of our branch of the numerous Noyes family in this country, was born in Choulderton, Wiltshire, England, in 1608, came to New England in 1634, and died in Newbury, Mass.. October 22, 1656, in the forty-eighth year of his age.

His father, Rev. William Noyes, was rector of the parish of Choulderton, situated between Amesbury and Andover, near the great Salisbury Cathedral, built in 1220, whose lofty tower overlooks the dead Roman city of Sarum and "Stonehenge" the ruins of the wonderful prehistoric temple of the ancient Celtic Druids, in the midst of Salisbury Plain.

The register of the diocese shows that he officiated in the parish from 1602 to 1621, when he resigned and was succeeded by Rev. Nathan Noyes, possibly a son or nephew. The wife of Rev. William and mother of our immigrant ancestor, was sister of Rev. Robert Parker, a learned Puritan divine and a graduate of Oxford, who was driven to Holland for non-conformity. Our ancestor, Rev. James, married in 1634 Sarah, eldest daughter of Mr. Joseph Brown, of Southampton, England, and in March of that year embarked for New England, in company with his brother Nicholas and his cousin Thomas Parker, in the ship "Mary and John," of London. He preached first at Medford, Mass., where he was made a freeman September 3, 1634 ; then for a time officiated at the Watertown church, and in 1635 he went to Newbury, where he preached until his death. His will was dated October 17, 1656, five days before his death, the inventory showing a good estate. His widow survived until September 13, 1691.

source: Noyes' Genealogy by Horatio Nathaniel Noyes

______James NOYES71,72,73,74 was born on 22 Oct 1608 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.31,75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83 Noyes-Gilman gives full birthdate. He was educated Brasenose College, Oxford, England on 22 Aug 1627.84,85,86,87,88,89 Matriculated; did not graduate, being called to teach at Newbury, Berkshire, England. He emigrated on 23 Mar 1633/34 from Southampton, Hampshire, England.90,91 Sailed on ship Mary & John of London, Robert Sayres, Master, on 23 Mar. 1633/34. He immigrated in May 1634 to Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.92 He resided in May 1634 in Medford, Middlesex, Massachusetts.93,94 Medford was first known as Mistick. He resided about 1635 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.95 He signed a will on 17 Oct 1656 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.96,97,98,99,100 Gave all his real estate and personal property to his wife. In the inventory, filed in the Probate Office in Salem, mention is made of a house with seven acres of land adjoining, and an orchard all valued at 100 pounds.

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James came to Ipswich about 1634.

James' will, dated 7 Oct 1656, proved 26 Nov 1656, mentions his wife Sara and children, brother Deacon Nicholas Noyes and cousin Rev. Thomas Parker. Inventory of the estate amounted to 657

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Name Prefix: Rev.

!http://noyes.rootsweb.com/wga85.html#I21930

Website based on "Genealogical Record of Some of the Noyes

Descendants of James, Nicholas and Peter Noyes", published in

1904 by Col. Henry E. Noyes.

Although this entire work is included in this database, nearly 700 additional sources have been added over the years with literally thousands of citations to these various sources.

Savage, Vol 3: JAMES, Newbury, one of the two first min. b. 1608, at Choulderton, in Wilts, near the edge of Hants, betw. Amesbury in W. and Andover in H. s. of Rev. William, who was instit. I find by the registry of that diocese, in 1602 as rector, but in 1621, resign. in favor of Nathan Noyes. His mo. was sis. of Robert Parker a very learned Puritan, driv. to Holland for his

heterodoxy a. forms; and he was bred at Brazen Nose, Oxford, as his nephew, Rev. Nicholas in his acco. for Magn. III. cap. 25, Append. writes, and was call. away by his cous. Thomas Parker to assist him at the sch. of Newbury, in Berksh. He m. 1634, Sarah, eldest d. of Mr. Joseph Brown of Southampton, and in Mar. of that yr. emb. for N. E. in co. with his br. Nicholas and cous.

Thomas Parker, in the Mary and John of London, preach. some short time at Medford, was freem. 3 Sept. 1634, and invit. to Watertown ch. but in 1635 went to Newbury, and tho younger than his collea. cous. d. first, 22 Oct. 1656. His will, made five days bef. ment. w. Sarah and ch. br. Rev. Nicholas N. and cous. Rev. Thomas Parker; the inv. show. good est. We owe gratitude to Mather for rare modesty in being content with the faithful and judic. contrib. of the Salem kinsman, of wh. in our day Eliot's Biogr. Dict. has well abbrev. the charact. Descendants of Reverend William Noyes: James Noyes Rev. Born, 1608, in Cholderton, Wilts, England. Died, 22 Oct 1656, in Newbury, Massachusetts. He married Sarah Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown, 1633. Matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford University, 22 Aug 1627, but was not graduated. In Mar 1633, he and his wife Sarah, brother Nicholas, and cousin Thomas Parker, with others, took the oath of "Supremacy and Allegiance", to pass for New England, in the "Mary and John", of London, Robert Sayres, master.

In 1633-34 he preached in Mystic, now Medford, Massachusetts and was made freeman 3 Sep 1634, was invited to Watertown but declined and with his brother Nicholas and cousin Thomas Parker, was among the first settlers of Newbury, Massachusetts in May 1634 or 35. Rev. Mr. Parker and Rev. Mr. Noyes began, almost immediately, to form a church. The first meeting was on the Sabbath and held in the open air, under a tree. Rev. Mr. Parker was chosen pastor "in the waye of church discipline which he then preached for, the congregational waye" (Newbury, p.17). Mr. James Noyes was, at the same time, chosen teacher of the church and remained so for more than 20 years. Will made 17 Oct 1656, five days before his death, and proved 26 Nov 1656. In it he mentions wife Sara and children, brother Deacon Nicholas Noyes and cousin Rev. Thomas Parker. Inventory of estate amounted to £657, 11 shillings, 4 penney.

On IGI as parents, but no marriage is recorded here James is listed as being born of "Godly parents". His own father was a minister of "the same town". One of James' sons was one of the founders of Yale University. James married Sarah Brown not long before coming to New England in 1634. He was married to Sarah BROWN before 1634 in England. Rev. Nicholas Noyes' Account of His Uncle Rev. James Noyes Mather's "Magnolia" "Mr. James Noyes was born in 1608, in Choulderton, Wiltshire, of Godly parents. His father was a Minister of the same town - a very learned man, - the school-master of Mr. Robert Parker, and he had much of his education and tutorage under Mr. Thomas Parker.

He was called by him from Brazen Nose College in Oxford, to help him in teaching the Free School at ______ REV. JAMES NOYES. Rev. James Noyes came to this country as narrated in the first chapter of Volume I, and after a short stay in Mystic (where Medford. now is), moved with some friends to New- bury, going by the water route via. the passage between Plum Island and the main land, to Parker river, where they landed, not far from its mouth.

When the pastor of the Old North Church, Boston (the Rev. Cotton Mather), was preparing his ecclesiastical history of New England (which he called " Magualia Christi Americana "), he wrote to Rev. Nicholas Noyes, then minister in Salem, asking him for some account concerning a person so nearly related to him (Rev. James Noyes, his uncle); and " was favored with the following relation ; and although he were pleased in his letters to tell me ' that he had sent me only a rude, immethodical jumble of things, intending that I should serve my occasions out of them for a composition of my own:' yet 1 find that I shall not give my readers a better satisfaction, anyway, than by transcribing the words of my friend. The account in his own words, is too elegant, and expressive to need any alteration."

Rev. Nicholas Notes' Account Of His Uncle,

Rev. James Noyes.

Mr. James Noyes was born in 1608, in Choulderton, Wiltshire, of Godly parents. His father was a Minister of the same town,—a very learned man,—the school-master of Mr. Robert Parker, and he had much of his education and tutorage under Mr. Thomas Parker.

He was called by him from Brazen Nose College in Oxford, to help him in teaching the Free School at Newbury, where they taught school together till the time they came to- New England.

He was converted in his youth by the ministry of Dr- Twiss and Mr. Thomas Parker, and was admired for his piety, and his virtue, in his younger years. The reason of his coming to New England was because he could not comply with the ceremonies of the Church of England.

He was married in England to Miss Sarah Brown, of South Hampton, not long before he came to New England, which was in 1634.

In the same ship came Mr. Thomas Parker, Mr. James- Noyes, and a younger brother, Nicholas Noyes, who was then. a single man ; Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes, and others that came over with them, fasted and prayed together many times before they undertook this voyage; and on the sea Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes preached or expounded, one in the forenoon, and the other in the afternoon, every day during the voyage, unless some extraordinary thing inter- vened ; and were abundant in prayer.

When they arrived, Mr. Parker was first called to preach at Ipswich, and Mr. Noyes at Mistick, at which places they continued nigh a year. He had a motion made unto him to- be Minister at Watertown ; but Mr. Parker and others of hi& acquaintance, settling at Newbury, and gathering a tenth of the churches in the colony, and calling Mr. Noyes to be teacher of it, he preferred that place, being loth to be separated from Mr. Parker and brethren that had so often fasted and prayed together, both in England and on the Atlantic sea. So he became the teacher of that church, and continued, painful and successful in that station something abovetwenty years, without any considerable trouble in the church.

Notwithstanding his principles as to Discipline were something differing from many of his brethren, there was such condescension on both parts, that peace and order was not interrupted.

He was much loved and honored in Newbury,—his memory is precious there to this day, and his Catechism (which is a publick and standing testimony of his understanding, and orthodoxy in the principles of religion), is publicly and privately used in that town hitherto. He was very learned in the Tongues, and in the Greek, excelled most. He was much read in the Fathers and the Schoolmen, and much esteemed in the Ministry.

His conversation was so unquestionably Godly, that they who differed from him in the smaller matters as to discipline, held a most amicable correspondence with him, and had an high estimate of him. * * * He was as religious at home as abroad, in his family and in secret, as he was publickly ; and they that best knew him, most loved and esteemed him. * * * He had a long and tedious sickness, which he bore patiently and cheerfully ; and he died joyfully, in the forty- eighth year of his age, Oct. 22, 1656. He left six sons and two daughters, all of which lived to be married and have children, though since one son and one daughter be dead. He hath now living, fifty-six children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren ; and his brother that came over with him a single man, is, through the mercy of God, yet living, and hath of children; grandchildren, and great grand-children, above an hundred ; which is an instance of divine favor, in making the families of his servants in the wilderness like a Flock."

Extract Fhom J. J. Currier's " Ould Newbury."

Rev. James Noyes' first residence in Newbury was at the Lower Green ; but on the removal of the meeting house, in 1646 to the Upper Green, lie built a house on what is now known as Parker street, and lived there until his death.

In the " Proprietors' Book " it is recorded that, " In consideration of Mr. James Noyes his resigning up unto the towns hands four acres by the river side, Two acres in Richard Kent's Island & four acres in the Neck behind the great Swamp, they granted him eight acres by the New Pond at the New Town to continue in his and his heyrs for ever."

There is no date to this record, but it is probable that the grant did not take effect until 1646, as the commissioners appointed in 1642 to lay out the new town, ordered " that in respect of the time for the inhabitants removing from the place they now inhabit, to that which is laid out and appointed for their new habitations, each inhabitant shall have their house lotte foure years from the day of the date of the commission."

The house Whs built about this time, and the two cousins, minister and teacher, lived there in pleasant companionship for nearly ten years, when Mr. Noyes died, Oct. 22, 1656, aged forty-eight. Mr. Parker, writing of him, says : " Mr. James Noyes, my worthy colleague in the Ministry of the Gospel, was a man of singular qualifications,—in piety, excelling, and implacable to all heresy and schism,—a most able warrior against the same. He was of a reaching and ready apprehension,—a large invention,—a most profound judgment,—a rare and tenacious comprehensive memory,—fixed and unmovable in his grounded conceptions, sure in words and speech,—without rashness,—gentle and mild in all expressions, without passion or provoking language. And as he was a noble disputant, so he would never provoke his adversary, saving by the short knocks, and heavy weight of arguments.

He was of so loving, and compassionate, and humble carriage, that I believe never any were acquainted with him, but did desire the continuance of his society and acquaintance.

The north room, on the right of the entrance, has been divided into three apartments, each as large as the average rooms in a dwelling of our time. Much of the plastering on the ceilings is over 200 years old, and is as firm as ever. To enumerate the articles of antique furniture which this house contains would require more space than we can devote to the purpose.

The chimney was formerly about four yards square at the bottom, and extended nearly to the back wall of the house. About twenty years ago the bricks began to fall out at the back, owing to the large amount of sand in the mortar. It was then decided to make the chimney smaller, and to create a small kitchen between the two large rooms in the main part of the house. The brick and mortar taken away made 20 wagon loads; and hidden away in a comer of the chimney, the workmen discovered a secret closet, the existence of which had never been suspected. It was probably used to hide valuables in case of Indian raids.

The rough, unfinished garret, extends the whole length of the house, and is stored with treasures of a bygone age. Here we find three old guns, nearly six feet long and Calling to pieces "with extreme age. There we discover two swords, one an army weapon of antique pattern and the other a gentleman's rapier, such as dangled by the side of the gallants of old, ready to spring forth in a flash to defend an honored name, to resent an insult, or to strike a blow for church and country.

The later years of Mr. Noyes and Mr. Parker were darkened by a church controversy which began in 1645 and continued for nearly 30 years, attracting the attention of people throughout the colony. It originated in the opposition of the claims of Mr. Parker, the minister, and Mr. Noyes, the teacher, to exclusive authority in church government and discipline. At different times the civil authorities were invoked and interposed with little avail. The contest ended only with the lives of the principal contestants.

Mr. Noyes and Mr. Parker lived in this old house the rest of their lives, and died there. The estate then passed to Mr. Noyes' son, Danid Noyes, grandson of the builder, and son of the second owner, who went to the Madeira islands about 1703, where he established himself in business as a merchant and acquired confsiderable wealth. His wife is supposed to have died there, leaving no children. In 1728 Daniel Noyes died. He made a will, and after donating a small sum to the poor, and much more to the gentlemen named as his executors, left the rest to his father."

Rev. James Noyes was the author of quite a number of works on religious subjects; copies of the title pages of two being given :—

( Copy of Title Paye. )

THE TEMPLE MEASURED:

or

A brief Survey of the Temple Mystical, Which is the Instituted CHURCH OF CHRIST, Wherein are solidly and modestly discussed MOST of the MATERIAL QUESTIONS touching the CONSTITUTION And Government Op The Visible Снивсн Militant Here On Earth. together with

The solution of all sorts of OBJECTIONS, which are usually framed against the Model and Platform of Ecclesiastical Policy, which is here asserted and maintained.

In particular here are debated,THE POINTS of so much CONTROVERSIE, touching theUnity of the Church, The Members of the Church, theForm of the Church, and Church Covenant, ThePower of the Church, The Officers of the Church, and their Power in Church Government, The Power of Magistrates about the Church, and someChurch Acts, as Admissionof Members and other things set downin the Table before the Book.

By JAMES NOYES Teacher of the Church at

Newbury in New England.

Printed for Edmund Paxtun, and are to be sold at his shop in Pauls chain, over against the Castle Tavern near to the Doctors Commons 1647.

(From J. J. Currier's History of Neicbury.)

It was a coincidence that each of the two brothers, James and Nicholas, should have had six sons; and although all married except one of the sons of Nicholas (Rev. Nicholas), his Noyes descendants (and probably in the female line also) are far more numerous than those of his brother James. This was also apparent as early as the beginning of the fourth generation, as Rev. Nicholas says in his letter to Rev. Cotton Mather that Nicholas then had over a hundred descendants, and James only fifty-six.

Considering the subject of intermarriage among relatives, which is supposed to diminish the birth rate, it is noticeable that there have been twice as many in Nicholas' branch as in that of James, although the percentage of the total number may be about equal. If it were not, the total number in both branches is so small, compared with the total of all the marriages in both branches, that no theory on the subject cun be confirmed or refuted.

Comparing the families in the two branches, it is readily seen that Nicholas' branch has the majority of the large families; and noticeably so among those in Maine. If the whole family could be represented in the familiar form of a " family tree," a grand trunk would be the base forking just above the ground, in two unequal trees, one at least twice as large as the other ; the undivided tree representing William (the father), the larger fork for Nicholas, and the smaller one for James. On the Nicholas fork there would be five branches for the second generation ; these would put out eighteen for the third, and these would sub-divide into about fifty for the fourth, and a hundred and twenty-five branches for the fifth generation. In a similar manner the other fork has divided and sub-divided, but not quite so extensively.

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Buried in Old Town Cemetery, Newbury, Massachusetts.

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Savage, Vol 3: JAMES, Newbury, one of the two first min. b. 1608, at Choulderton, in Wilts, near the edge of Hants, betw. Amesbury in W. and Andover in H. s. of Rev. William, who was instit. I find by the registry of that diocese, in 1602 as rector, but in 1621, resign. in favor of Nathan Noyes. His mo. was sis. of Robert Parker a very learned Puritan, driv. to Holland for his heterodoxy a. forms; and he was bred at Brazen Nose, Oxford, as his nephew, Rev. Nicholas in his acco. for Magn. III. cap. 25, Append. writes, and was call. away by his cous. Thomas Parker to assist him at the sch. of Newbury, in Berksh. He m. 1634, Sarah, eldest d. of Mr. Joseph Brown of Southampton, and in Mar. of that yr. emb. for N. E. in co. with his br. Nicholas and cous. Thomas Parker, in the Mary and John of London, preach. some short time at Medford, was freem. 3 Sept. 1634, and invit. to Watertown ch. but in 1635 went to Newbury, and tho younger than his collea. cous. d. first, 22 Oct. 1656. His will, made five days bef. ment. w. Sarah and ch. br. Rev. Nicholas N. and cous. Rev. Thomas Parker; the inv. show. good est. We owe gratitude to Mather for rare modesty in being content with the faithful and judic. contrib. of the Salem kinsman, of wh. in our day Eliot's Biogr. Dict. has well abbrev. the charact.

Descendants of Reverend William Noyes: James Noyes Rev. Born, 1608, in Cholderton, Wilts, England. Died, 22 Oct 1656, in Newbury, Massachusetts. He married Sarah Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown, 1633. Matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford University, 22 Aug 1627, but was not graduated. In Mar 1633, he and his wife Sarah, brother Nicholas, and cousin Thomas Parker, with others, took the oath of "Supremacy and Allegiance", to pass for New England, in the "Mary and John", of London, Robert Sayres, master.

In 1633-34 he preached in Mystic, now Medford, Massachusetts and was made freeman 3 Sep 1634, was invited to Watertown but declined and with his brother Nicholas and cousin Thomas Parker, was among the first settlers of Newbury, Massachusetts in May 1634 or 35. Rev. Mr. Parker and Rev. Mr. Noyes began, almost immediately, to form a church. The first meeting was on the Sabbath and held in the open air, under a tree. Rev. Mr. Parker was chosen pastor "in the waye of church discipline which he then preached for, the congregational waye" (Newbury, p.17). Mr. James Noyes was, at the same time, chosen teacher of the church and remained so for more than 20 years. Will made 17 Oct 1656, five days before his death, and proved 26 Nov 1656. In it he mentions wife Sara and children, brother Deacon Nicholas Noyes and cousin Rev. Thomas Parker. Inventory of estate amounted to £657, 11 shillings, 4 penney.

On IGI as parents, but no marriage is recorded here James is listed as being born of "Godly parents". His own father was a minister of "the same town". One of James' sons was one of the founders of Yale University. James married Sarah Brown not long before coming to New England in 1634. He was married to Sarah BROWN before 1634 in England.

Rev. Nicholas Noyes' Account of His Uncle, Rev. James Noyes in Mather's "Magnolia":

"Mr. James Noyes was born, 1608, in Choulderton, Wiltshire, of godly and worthy parents. His father was a minister of the same town, a very learned man, the school-master of Mr. Thomas Parker. His mother was sister to the learned Mr. Robert Parker, and he had much of his education and tutorage under Mr. Thomas Parker. He was called by him from Brazen-Nose College in Oxford, to help him in teaching the Free School at Newberry; where they taught school together till the time they came to New England. He was converted in his youth by the ministry of Dr. Twiss and Mr. Thomas Parker, and was admired for his piety and his virtue in his younger years. The reason of his coming to New England was, because he could not comply with the ceremonies of the Church of England. He was married in England to Mrs. Sarah Brown, the eldest daughter o Mr. Joseph Brown, of Southampton, not long before he came to New England, which was in the year 1634. In the same ship [in 1634] came Mr. Thomas Parker, and a younger brother of his, Mr. Nicholas Noyes, who was then a single man; between which there was more than ordinary endearment of affection, which was never shaken or broken but by death. Mr. Parker and Mr. James Noyes, and others that came over with them, fasted and prayed together many times before they undertook this voyage; and on the sea Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes preached or expounded, one in the forenoon, the other in the afternoon, every day during the voyage, unless some extrordinary thing intervened, and were abundant in prayer.

When they arrived, Mr. Parker was at first called to preach at Ipswich, and Mr. Noyes at Medford, at which place they continued nigh a year. He had a motion made unto him to be minister at Watertown; but Mr. Parker and others of his bretheren and acquaintance, settling at Newberry, and gathering the tenth of the churches in the colony, and calling Mr. Noyes to be the teacher of it, he preferred that place; being loath to be separated from Mr. Parker, and bretheren that had so often fasted and prayed together, both in England and on the Atlantic sea. So he became the teacher of that church, and continued painful and successful in that station something above twenty years, without any considerable trouble in the church. Notwithstanding his principles, as to discipline, were something differing from many of his bretheren, there was such condescension on both parts, that peace and order was not interrupted. [Magnalia 484-85]

Noyes-Gilman: "Soon after being called to teach in the Free School at Newbury, England, Sir Richard Saltonstall, Henry Sewall, Richard and Stephen Drummer and others were organizing a colony for the purpose of stock-raising in New England, and they interested in their enterprise many Wiltshire men. These, with Rev. Thomas Parker as their spiritual guide and teacher, became the nucleus of the colony, and through their cousin, both James, then but twenty-five, and his younger brother Nicholas joined the colony. James married Sarah Brown before emigrating.

In the same ship came Mr. Thomas Parker, Mr. James Noyes, and a younger brother, Nicholas Noyes, who was then a single man; Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes, and others that came over with them, fasted and prayed together many times before they undertook this voyage; and on the sea Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes preached or expounded, one in the forenoon, and the other in the afternoon, every day during the voyage, unless some extraordinary thing intervened; and were abundant in prayer.

When they arrived, Mr. Parker was first called to preach at Ipswich, and Mr. Noyes at Mistick, at which places they continued nigh a year. He had a motion made unto him to be minister at Watertown; but Mr. Parker and others of his acquaintance, settling at Newbury, and gathering a tenth of the churches in the colony, and calling Mr. Noyes to be teacher of it, he preferred that place, being loth to be separated from Mr. Parker and brethren that had so often fasted and prayed togetheer, both in England and on the Atlantic sea. So he became the teacher of that church, and continued, painful and successful in that station something above twenty years, without any considerable trouble in the church.

Notwithstanding his principles, as to Dicipline were something differing from many of his brethren, there was such condescension on both parts, that peace and order were not interrupted.

He was much loved and honored in Newbury, - his memory is precious there to this day, and his Catachism (which is a publick and standing testimony of his understanding, and orthodoxy in the principles of religion), is publicly and privately used in that town hitherto. He was very learned in the Tongues, and in the Greek, excelled most. He was much read in the Fathers and the Schoolmen, and much esteemed in the Ministry.

His conversation was so unquestionably Godly, that they who differed from him in the smaller matters as to discipline, held a most amicable correspondence with him, and had an high estimate of him. *** He was as religious at home as abroad, in his family and in secret, as he was publickly; and they that best knew him, most loved and esteemed him. *** He had a long and tedious sickness, which he bore patiently and cheerfully; and he died joyfully, in the forty-eighth year of his age, Oct. 22, 1656. He left six sons and two daughters, all of which lived to be married and have children, though since one son and one dughter be dead. He hath now living, fifty-six children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren; and his brother that came over with him a single man, is, through the mercy of God, yet living, and hath of children; grandchildren and great-grandchildren, above an hundred; which is an instance of divine favor, in making the families of his servants in the wilderness like a Flock."

"Massachusetts & Maine Families in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis"

He also calls 'Thomas Parker' the cousin of James & William (p. 57):

"James matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford, on Aug. 22, 1627, but did not gradute, having been pursuaded by his cousin, Mr. Thomas Parker, to help him teach the free school at Newbury in Berkshire and to continue his own education with him. When the Mary and John reached Boston in New England in May, 1634, on the voyage from Southampton, these two cousins and several other kinsmen, including James's brother Nicholas, were among the passengers. Parker and Noyes took the Freeman's Oath on Sept. 3, 1634...."

"Mr. [James] Noyes's will, made Oct. 17, 1656, gave to his wife while unmarried the ordering of his substance, she to take counsel of cousin Thomas Parker, brother Nicholas Noyes and William Gerrish." [Essex Probate , I:245]

"Mrs. [James] Noyes cared for Mr. Parker during his years of blindness and his feeble health until his death on April 24, 1677. By his will she was given all his Newbury property, except land in possession of Nicholas Noyes, and all arrears due for his ministry." [Ibid., III:153]

Noyes Pedigree

Among his printed works are "A Catechism for Children", 1641, "The Temple Measured", 1647, "Moses and Aaron", 1661; the last two are at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Hudson and Mohawk Valleys

He had a grant of land on which he built a house, about 1645, in which he, his family, and Thomas Parker lived. This house is still standing (1910) and has never known any owner but a Noyes, and is Newbury's proudest showplace.

"Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes were excellent singers, both of them, and they were extraordinary delighted in singing the psalms. They sang four times a day in the public worship and always just after evening prayers, in the family, where reading the Scriptures, expounding and praying were the other constant exercises."

From findagrave.com:

Birth: Oct. 22, 1608 Marlborough, England Death: Oct. 22, 1656 Newbury Old Town Essex County Massachusetts, USA

son of Rev. William Noyes

husband of Sarah (Brown) Noyes

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James was born in 1608, in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England, the son of William Noyes and probably Ann Stephens. William was the rector of the diocese of Cholderton. James attended Brasenose, Oxford College, but did not graduate. He was asked to leave school and help teach at the Free School in Newbury, Berkshire, England, by his cousin Thomas Parker, which he did. He married, about 1632, Sarah, the oldest daughter of Joseph Brown of Southampton, England. In 1633, James, his wife, his brother Nicholas and Thomas Parker, among others, took the oath of allegiance, allowing them to leave for New England. They were non-conformists, unhappy with the "popish" ceremonies of the Church of England. In March 1634, they sailed on the "Mary & John", arriving in May at Boston.

In 1634, James was in Mystic, now Medford, Massachusetts, he preached there and was made freeman on September 3, 1634. He was invited to become the preacher at Watertown, but declined, instead becoming one of the first settlers of Newbury, Massachusetts, the settlement being named after the town in England where they founded the school. Noyes was granted eight acres, and built a house. He and Parker formed a church in Newbury. Parker was named pastor and Noyes was made "teacher of the church". James served in that capacity for over twenty years. He wrote a Catechism that was used in the church for many years, and was esteemed and honored in the town. Even though there was some sort of church controversy between the two cousins, Parker, who never married, lived with Noyes and his family. After a long illness, James Noyes made his will on October 17, 1656, five days before his death, and it was proved on November 26. Rev. James Noyes is buried in the First Burial Ground of the Church he helped to establish. Parker continued to live in the home, as an honored member of the family, until his death in 1677.

At a later date, Nicholas Noyes, son of James' brother Nicholas, wrote that of James' six sons and two daughters, there were 56 total children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, even though one son and one daughter had since died. James' wife Sarah lived in Newbury until her death on September 13, 1691. The Noyes home, built between 1640 and 1650, was used by many generations, and the last occupant, Mary Coffin Noyes, died there in 1895. Once, when there was some remodeling to be done, it was discovered that there was a secret closet built into the massive chimney, accessable only from the cellar. It was obviously constructed to provide a safe hiding place for valuables in case of Indian raids.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Sarah Browne Noyes*

Children:
 Joseph Noyes (1637 - 1717)*
 James Noyes (1640 - 1719)*
 Moses Noyes (1643 - 1729)*
  • Calculated relationship
 

Burial: First Parish Burying Ground Newbury Old Town Essex County Massachusetts, USA


Created by: Paul Noyes Record added: Mar 28, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 35286148 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=35286148

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Reverend James Noyes, Sr's Timeline

1608
October 22, 1608
Cholderton, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
1627
August 22, 1627
Age 18
Brasenose coll., Oxford
1627
Age 18
1633
March 26, 1633
Age 24
on Mary and John
1633
Age 24
England
1634
March, 1634
Age 25
1634
Age 25
Ipswich, Essex, MA
1634
Age 25
Massachusetts, USA
1637
October 14, 1637
Age 28
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
1639
March 11, 1639
Age 30
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States