Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal (c.690 - 754) MP

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Nicknames: "Molwynog", "the Bald and Gray"
Birthplace: Gwynedd, Caernarvonshire, Wales
Death: Died in Gwynedd, Caernarvonshire, Wales
Occupation: King of Gwynedd
Managed by: Jon Brees Thogmartin FTDNA Mcclendon
Last Updated:

About Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal

Rhodri Molwynog, King of Gwynedd (c.690-754)

From http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/rhodrmgd.html

(Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick)

Rhodri the Bald & Grey was the son of King Idwal Iwch of Gwynedd and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany. There is an old story that Rhodri invaded or conquered Dumnonia - possibly during his youth - but he was forced to return to North Wales by the Saxons. The year of his accession in Gwynedd is variously given as AD 712, 720, 722 or 730. The earliest date seems most likely. He married an Irish princess, Margaret ferch Duplory and had one son, Cynan Dindaethwy. He died in AD 754, when the throne was seized by Caradog ap Meirion.  

-------------------- ID: I104149 Name: RHODRI MOLWYNOG AP IDWAL Prefix: KING OF GWYNEDD Sex: M Birth: 690 CE in , , Wales Death: 754 CE 1 Event: KING OF GWYNEDD Reign Between 712 and 754 CE Change Date: 9 Nov 2008 at 13:02 Note: Alias: the Bald and Grey/

Father: IDWAL LWRCH AP CADWALADR b: 664 CE in , , Wales

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown Married: Change Date: 13 Jan 2009 Children

Cynan Dindaethwy Ap Rhodri b: 745 CE
Hywel Ap Rhodri b: Abt 745 CE

Sources: Abbrev: Sutton Folk Family Tree 3175463.ged Title: Sutton Folk Family Tree Sutton Folk Family Tree 3175463.ged Author: Folk, Linda Sutton Publication: www.worldconnect.rootsweb.com -------------------- Rhodri ap Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, referred to as a king of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog.

-------------------- Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rhodri ab Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog. -------------------- Rhodri ap Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog. -------------------- Rhodri ap Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, referred to as a king of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog. -------------------- Rhodri ap Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, referred to as a king of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog. -------------------- Source:

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Great Britain' -------------------- Rhodri ap Idwal (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

Comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, King of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy.

Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodri_Molwynog_ap_Idwal for more information. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodri_Molwynog_ap_Idwal -------------------- Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rhodri ap Idwal (c. 690-c. 754; reigned from c. 720) (Latin: Rodericus; English: Roderick), also known as Rhodri Molwynog ('the Bald and Gray'), and by some contemporary historians as Rhodri I, was a king of Gwynedd, referred to as a king of the Britons by the Annals of Wales.

The son of Idwal Iwrch and his wife, Princess Angharad of Brittany, comparatively little is known of Rhodri's life or accomplishments. There is even some debate as to when he actually assumed the throne of Gwynedd, with the years 712, 720, 722 or 730 being the most probable candidates. Legend suggests that Rhodri successfully invaded and occupied Dumnonia for a time, before being expelled by the Saxons. This story may indeed be apocryphal, and others have suggested that Rhodri instead focused on strengthening the island of Anglesey, which, by this time, had become the stronghold of the kingdom. This argument is based on the understanding that Æthelbald, king of Mercia and self-styled Bretwalda, was continuing to press the kingdoms of Wales, and that Rhodri would have been far more likely to have been forced to adopt a defensive, rather than offensive, policy in dealing with incursions from Mercia and other Anglo-Saxon principalities.

Rhodri married Margaret ferch Duplory, an Irish princess, who bore him a son by the name of Cynan Dindaethwy. Because of the limited reliable information surrounding this period in Welsh history, it is not entirely clear who succeeded Rhodri upon his death, although the most likely candidate seems to be Caradog ap Meirion, a distant cousin, and not his son, who would ascend to the throne only after the death of Caradog.

Rhodri Molwynog ab Idwal, Brenin Gwynedd1,2,3

b. circa 690, d. circa 754

Father Idwal Iwrch ap Cadwaladr, Brenin Gwynedd4,2 b. circa 660, d. 712

Mother Afadda verch Alain de Bretagne1,2 b. circa 660

    Rhodri Molwynog ab Idwal, Brenin Gwynedd also went by the name of Rhodri "the Bald and Gray". He was born circa 690.1 He was the son of Idwal Iwrch ap Cadwaladr, Brenin Gwynedd and Afadda verch Alain de Bretagne.4,2,1 Rhodri Molwynog ab Idwal, Brenin Gwynedd was the successor of Idwal Iwrch ap Cadwaladr, Brenin Gwynedd; King of Gwynedd.5 King of Gwynedd at Wales between 712 and 754. Rhodri Molwynog ab Idwal, Brenin Gwynedd married Margaret of Ireland before 720.1 Rhodri Molwynog ab Idwal, Brenin Gwynedd died circa 754.1,6,2,7,8 Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur 754: "In this year Rhodri, king of the Britons, died."9

Family

Margaret of Ireland b. circa 690

Children

Cynan Dindaethwy ap Rhodri Molwynog, Brenin Gwynedd+ b. c 720?, d. 8164,10,7

Brenin Gwynedd Hywel I ap Rhodri o Gwynedd b. c 725, d. c 825

Citations

[S266] EBK, online http://freespace.virgin.net/david.ford2/

[S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Cunedda Wledig, 84.

[S492] Genealogies from Harleian MS. 3859, manuscript, probably between 954 and 988 unknown repository, 1: "Rotri map Iutguaul".

[S272] Francis Jones, Jones, F., pg. 12, Chart I, Dynasty of Cunedda (Line of Gwynedd).

[S640] History Files, online http://homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33/history.htm, CELTS OF CYMRU, GWYNEDD.

[S272] Francis Jones, Jones, F., pg 12..

[S483] Stewart Baldwin, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth's ancestors in "Baldwin-Llywelyn," listserve message Dec 1998.

[S485] Various, Annales Cambriae.

[S1383] The Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur, online www.webexcel.ndirect.co.uk/gwarnant/hanes/chronicle/chronicleintro.htm, 754.

[S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Cunedda Wledig, 85.

Rhodri (Molwynog) ap Idwal   

Rhodri, known as Molwynog, was born in 0690 in Wales.1 Molwynog's father was Idwal (Iwrch) ap Cadwaladr and his mother was Afadda verch Alain. His paternal grandparents were Cadwaladr (The Blessed, Fendigaid) ap Cadwallon and <Unknown>; his maternal grandparents were King of Brittany Alain II Hir and <Unknown>. He was an only child. He died at the age of 64 in 0754.1

Children

 Cynan (Dindaethwy) ap Rhodri

Cynan, known as Dindaethwy, was born about 0745 in Wales.2 He died in 0817.3

-------------------- Rhodri Molwynog ap Idwal (English: Rhodri the Bald and Grey, son of Idwal) was King of Gwynedd (reigned ? – 754). This era in the history of Gwynedd was not notable, and given the lack of reliable information available, serious histories of Wales, such that as by Davies, do not mention Rhodri, while that of Lloyd mentions his name in passing only to quote the year of his death given in the Annales Cambriae.

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