Richard E Stout, Sr.

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Richard E Stout, Sr.

Also Known As: "Richard", "Squan Dick"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Burton Joyce Parish, Nottinghamshire, England
Death: Died in Middletown, Monmouth, Province of New Jersey
Immediate Family:

Son of John Stout and Elizabeth Stout
Husband of Penelope Van Printzen (Stout) and Penelope Stout (van Princis), The Mother of Middletown
Father of Jonathan Sr Stout; John Stout; Mary Penelope Bowne; Jonathan Stout; James B. Stout, Sr. and 7 others

Occupation: British sailor, tobacco farmer, landowner, founder of Middletown NJ, slave owner
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Richard E Stout, Sr.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=53227537

Richard E. Stout Emigrated in 1644 from Nottinghamshire, England to New Netherlands.

Timeline

  • "Ran away from home and joined or was pressed into the British Navy where he served for seven years. At New Amsterdam left his ship and through bearing arms, became a Netherlands subject (and eligible for the Huguenot Society.)
  • 1643 Owned plantation #18 at Gravesend.
  • 1664 With eleven others patented a large section of New (East) Jersey by Gov. Nichols in the vicinity of Monmouth.
  • 1667 Held lot #6 and upland country at Middletown.
  • 1669 Overseer. Illiterate.
  • 1675 Deeded 1800 acres to his heirs.
  • 1677 Received 745 acres by patent.
  • Will proved 23 October 1705 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Lib. 1, p 120, N. J. wills."

Had 9 recorded children:

  • 1. John 1645-1724
  • 2. Richard 1646-1717
  • 3. James 1648
  • 4. Mary 1650
  • 5. Peter 1654-1703 *
  • 6. Sarah 1656
  • 7. Johnathan 1660-1722 (Jonathan)
  • 8. David 1667
  • 9 Benjamin 1669-1734

Above information from (p. 1) Stout and Allied Families: Volume One, 1951, Harold F. Stout, The Eagle Press, Dover, Ohio

---

Alice 1650 included in list of 10 children : http://www.solavirtusnobilitat.com/pedigree/individual.php?pid=I2621&ged=19%20jan%2008.ged

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Below from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brookefamily/stoutrichard.htm

Another story coming down through the family is that the original Richard Stout was born in England about 1615 and after a disagreement with his father, John, about the choice of a wife he signed on a sailing ship for seven years. After serving his term he journeyed to the new world. There he met and married the incredible Penelope Van Princin. Her story of survival is recorded in New Jersey history books and has been documented as true.

---

The Will of Richard Stout

Know all men by these presents that I, Richard Stout of Middletown, in the county of Monmouth, in East Jersey, being of Sound Mind and disposing memory, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament which is as followeth:

I will that all my just debts be paid; I give and devise unto my loving wife, during her natural life, all my orchard and that part or room of the house she now lives in, with the cellar, and all the land I now possess. I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, all my horse kind, excepting one mare and colt. My son Benjamin is to have for keeping my cattle last year.

I give unto my sons John, Richard, James, Johnathan, David and Benjamin, one shilling each of them.

I give unto my daughters, Mary, Alice and Sarah, each of them one shilling.

I give to my daughter-in-law Mary Stout and her son John one shilling each of them.

I give and bequeath unto my kinswoman Mary Stout, the daughter of formerly Peter Stout, one cow, to be paid within six days after my wife's death.

All the remainder of my personal estate whatsoever, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, and to this, my last will and testament, I make my son John and my son Johnathan my executors to.

For this my will performed, in witness hereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal, June the ninth day, in the year one thousand seven hundred and three.

Richard X Stout

Mark

Signed, sealed and published in the presence of us:

  • Richard Hartshorne
  • John Weekham
  • Peter Vandervere

Proved before Lord Cornbury, Governor, Captain General, & E tc. 23 October 1705 at Perth Amboy.

(Recorded in LiberI, p 120, of Wills at Trenton, N.J.)

--------------------

Source:

http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/stout.htm

The History of the Stout Family: First Settling in Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey

By Nathan Stout, 1823. Second printing by H.G. McCarter, "Herald" Office, Hopewell, N.J., 1878 with additions by Mrs. Sarah Weart, Third printing in 1906 by Joab B. Stout, with additions and corrections. Fourth printing in 1929 by George A. Chandler, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

The History of the Stout Family

Richard Stout, the first of the name in America was born in Notinghamshire, in Old England, and his father's name was John. The said Richard, when quite young paid his addresses to a young woman that his father though below his rank, upon which account some unpleasant conversation happened between the father and the son, on account of which, the said Richard left his father's house; and in a few days engaged on board a ship of war, where he served about seven years, after which time he got a discharge at New Amsterdam, now called New York, in America.

About the same time a ship from Amsterdam, in Holland, on her way to the said New Amsterdam, was driven on the shore that is now called Middletown, in Monmouth County, in the State of new Jersey, which ship was loaded with passengers, who with much difficulty got on shore. But the Indians not long after fell upon them and butchered and killed the whole crew, as they thought, but soon after the Indians were gone, a certain Penelope Van Princes, whose husband the Indians had killed, found herself possessed of strength enough to creep to a hollow tree, where she remained some days.

An Indian happening to come that way, whose dog coming to the tree, occasioned him to examine the inside of the tree, where he found the said Penelope in a forlorn, distressed condition. She was bruised very severely about the head, and her bowels protruded from a cut across her abdomen; she kept them in with her hand. She had been in this fearful condition seven days when the Indian found her. In his compassion he took her out of the tree and carried her to his wigwam where he treated her kindly and healed her wounds, and in a short time conveyed her in his canoe to New Amsterdam, where he sold her to the Dutch, who then owned that city, now called New York.

The man and woman, Richard & Penelope Van Princes, from whom the whole race of Stouts descended, got into the city of New Amsterdam, where they became acquainted with each other and were married. And, not withstanding, it may be thought by some, that they conducted themselves with more fortitude than prudence, they immediately crossed the bay and settled in the above said Middletown, where the said Penelope had lost her first husband by the Indians and had been so severely wounded herself. There was at that time but six white families in the settlement, including their own, (which was in the year 1648), where they continued until they became rich in prosperity and rich in children.

They had together seven sons and three daughters, viz: John, Richard, Jonathan, Peter, James, Benjamin, David. The daughters were - Deliverance, Sarah, Penelope. All of which sons and daughters lived to raise large families.

--------------------

Richard Stout, one of the first settlers of Gravesend, New Netherlands in 1643, was born in 1615, died in 1705, the son of John Stout and his wife Elisabeth Bee, whom he married on November 13, 1609, the marriage recorded in the parish register of Burton Joyce Parish, Nottinghamshire, England.

Richard Stout married Penelope Kent (or Lent) Van Princen, who was born 1622 and died in 1732. Richard Stout ran away from home and joined, or was pressed into, the British Navy where he served seven years, left his ship at New Amsterdam and became a subject of the New Netherlands. He was allotted plantation-lot No. 18, in 1646, in Gravesend, according to town records, having resided there since about 1643. He also bought on April 5, 1661, plantation lot No. 26, from Edward Griffen.

With a number of his neighbors he left Gravesend and settled at Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey, where he was one of the patentees and original purchasers from the Indians. In 1664, he with 11 others patented a large section of East Jersey, the patents granted by Governor Nicholas in the vicinity of Monmouth. In 1667, he held lot No. 6, and upland country at Middletown. In 1669, he was an overseer.

In 1675, he deeded 1,800 acres to his heirs. In 1677, he received 745 acres by patent. Richard Stout was a member of the first General Assembly composed of deputies and patentees and convened at Portland Poyot, New Jersey, in 1671, and he was also an Indian commissioner. Because of these offices held by Richard Stout, descent from him is a qualification for the Society of the Colonial Dames of New Jersey. Descent from Richard Stout is also a qualification for membership in the Huguenot Society.

The will of Richard Stout, Sr., dated 9 June 1703, in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, New Jersey, described him as of Middletown (Monmouth County), New Jersey. No wife is mentioned. Mentioned are his sons John, Richard, James, Jonathan, David, Benjamin; daughters Mary, Alicia, Sarah; daughter-in-law Mare Stout and her son John; and kinswoman Mary Stout, daughter of Peter Stout. He left real and personal property. Executors were his sons John and Jonathan. Witnesses were Richard Hartshorne, John Weekham and Peter Vandevandeter. It was proved 23 October 1705, records Lib. 1, p. 120, Monmouth Wills.

An inventory of personal estate was made 6 October 1705, by Obadiah Bowne and James Hubbard, and totaled 64 pounds, comprising mostly livestock.

--------------------

from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bdollar/p42.htm :

Richard Stout was born in England about 1615 and after a disagreement with his father, John, about the choice of a wife he signed on a sailing ship for seven years. After serving his term he journeyed to the New World. There he met and married the incredible Penelope Van Princin. Her story of survival is recorded in New Jersey history books and has been documented as true.

Richard Stout, first of the name in America, was born in Nottinghamshire, England, son of John Stout, a gentleman of good position. Richard Stout paid his addresses to a young woman whom his father disapproved, whereupon he left home, enlisted in the British navy, served seven years on a man-of-war, receiving an honorable discharge in New Amsterdam, New York, where he remained until 1668.

He became one of the original proprietors of Middletown, Monmouth county, New Jersey. He continued to reside in Middletown until his decease at an advanced age. Longevity is characteristic of the Stout family.

He married, at New York, a widow whose maiden name was Penelope Van Princess, born at Amsterdam, Holland, in 1602, died at Middletown, New Jersey, 1712, aged 110 years (hard to believe! I have left her death at 1712, but who knows, she is such a legend). She crossed the ocean with her first husband on a vessel that was wrecked upon the Jersey coast near Sandy Hook. All reached the shore in safety and proceeded by land to New York.

Her husband was overcome by illness and was left behind with his wife. They were discovered by the Indians and her husband was killed. She was left for dead, but recovered consciousness and concealed herself in a hollow log, where for several days she subsisted in part upon the excresences that grew upon it, until discovered by an old Indian to whose kindness and crude knowledge she was indebted for the recovery of her health and restoration to her friends in New Amsterdam. (See Smith's History of New Jersey, published 1765, Appendix VI [i.e., Samuel Smith's The History of the Colony of Nova-Caesaria, or New Jersey]).

In New Amsterdam she became acquainted and married John Stout. They settled in Middletown, New Jersey, where their children were born. At her decease in 1712, she was said to have had five hundred and two descendants. Richard and Penelope (Van Princess) Stout had nine children:

--------------------

The Stouts bore several coats of arms. Richard was granted arms by the French Hugenots (Protestants). The German Stouts were granted several coats of arms, some of them indicating they were members of the Crusades.

Richard ran away from home while still a young boy and was "Shanghied" into the English Navy, where he served for seven years. He finally jumped ship and landed in Amsterdam, Holland, where he met and married Penelope Van Princin. She was born Penelope Kent in England in 1622. Her parents fled to Holland with the Pilgrims and there she met and married a Hollander named VanPrincin. She was a widow when she met and married Richard Stout.

Just what year Richard and Penelope came to America isn't clear. In 1644, with eleven others, he patented a large section of New (East) Jersey by Gov. Nichols in the vicinity of Manmouth. He could not read nor write. In 1675, he deeded 1800 acres to his heirs.

He was killed and scalped by Indians in 1705 and his wife, Penelope was nearly killed. She was left for dead, but managed to seek refuge in a hollow tree. She was eventually rescued and lived to be 110 years of age, leaving 502 decendants. She died in 1732.

Richard's will "was proved" October 23, 1705, at Perty, Amboy, New Jersey.

The children of Richard and Penelope Stout: John, Richard, James, Mary, Peter, Sarah, Jonathan, David, Benjamin

Richard died at age 90.

--------------------

The STOUT FAMILY OF DELAWARE states that "Richard Stout was the most prominent of the founders of the new colony at Middletown." The records show that Richard and his sons owned 780 acres.

He was born about 1615 in Nottinghamshire, England. He emigrated in 1622 from Long Island, New York. Richard Stout of Nottingham, England, (son of John Stout), settled in Long Island about 1622, in which year he was one of 39 original patentees of Gravesend.

He was Testified on 13 Oct 1643. October 13, 1643, Richard Aestin, Ambrose Love and Richard Stout made declaration that the crew of the Seven Stars and of the Privateer landed at the farm of Anthoney Jansen of Sallee (New Utrecht) in the bay and took off 200 pumpkins and would have carried off a lot of hogs from Coney Island had they not learned they belonged to the Lady Moody.

He resided in 1648 in Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey.

He was Lawsuit on 8 Oct 1663 in Gravesend, Long Island, New York. In the Town Court, of Gravesend, October 8, 1663, "It is said Richard Stout declareth that Nathaniel Brittain had slandered him; that he had sold wine to the Indians. The said Nathaniel denieth it, but said that the Indians told his wife that they had bought wine of Stout." The Court, however, ordered Nathaniel to pay costs of prosecution.

He owned Purchased tract of land from Indian Chief Papomore on 25 Jan 1664 in Gravesend, Long Island, New York. In 1664, January 25th, Richard Stout, John Bowne, John Tilton, Jr. and others bought a tract of land of Papomore, Chief of Indians, the deed of which is recorded at Albany, also other tracts from other Indians, April 7th, 1665 and June 5th, 1665.

He was Original Patentee of New Jersey in 1665 in Monmouth Co., NJ. Richard was one of the twelve patentees of New Jersey.

He was Member of General Assembly in 1671 in Portland Point, New Jersey. Richard Stout, member of first General Assembly (composed of Deputies and Patentees), convened at Portland Point, New Jersey, 1671. Indian Commissioner.

He signed a will on 4 Jun 1703 in Middletown, Royal Colony of New Jersey. 1703 June 9. Stout, Richard, senior, of Middletown; will of. Wife ______. Sons - John, Richard, James, Jonathan, David, Benjamin; daughters - Mary, Alse, Sarah; daughter-in-law Marey Stoute and her son John, kinswoman Mary Stoute, daughter of Peter Stout. Real and personal property. Executors - sons John & Jonathan. Witnesses - Richard Hartshorne, John Weepham and Peter VanDevandeter (?). Proved Oct 23, 1705. Lib. I, p. 120 & Monmouth wills.

He died about 1705 in Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey. He had an estate probated on 6 Oct 1705 in Middletown, Royal Colony of New Jersey.

1705 Oct 6. Inventory of personal estate (64.8/0 pounds, mostly hogs, cattle, horses and sheep); made by Obadiah Bowne and James Hubbard. He resided in Squan, New Jersey.

He was also known as Squan Dick.

He owned Land purchase in Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey. In the early days after his removal to Middletown, Richard became one of the purchasers of the Monmouth Tract of land embraced between the Raritan and Sandy Point.

"Richard Stout, the first name in America was born in Notinghamshire, in Old England, and his father's name was John. The said Richard, when quite young paid his addresses to a young woman that his father thought below his rank, upon which account some unpleasant conversation happened between the father and the son, on account of which, the said Richard left his father's house, and in a few days engaged aboard a ship of war, where he served about seven years, after which time he got a discharge at New Amsterdam, now called New York, in America.

About the same time a ship from Amsterdam, in Holland, on her way to the said New Amsterdam, was driven on the shore that is now called Middletown, in Monmouth County, in the State of New Jersey, which ship was loaded with passengers, who with much difficulty got on shore. But the Indians not long after fell upon them and butchered and killed the whole crew, as they thought, but soon after the Indians were gone, a certain Penelope Van Princes, whose husband the Indians had killed, found herself possessed of strength enough to creep to a hollow tree, where she remained some days. An Indian happening to come that way, whose dog coming to the tree, occasioned him to examine the inside of the tree, where he found the said Penelope in a forlorn, distressed condition. She was bruised very severely about the head, and her bowels protruded from a cut across her abdomen, she kept them in with her hand. She had been in this fearful condition seven days when the Indian found her. In his compassion he took her out of the tree and carried her to his wigwam where he treated her kindly and healed her wounds, and in a short time conveyed her in his canoe to New Amsterdam, where he sold her to the Dutch, who then owned that city, now called New York. 



The man and woman from whom the whole race of Stouts descended, got into the city of New Amsterdam, where they became acquainted with each other and were married. And not withstanding, it may be thought by some, that they conducted themselves with more fortitude than prudence, they immediately crossed the bay and settled in the above said Middletown, where the said Penelope had lost her husband by the Indians and had been so severely wounded herself. 

There was at that time but six families in the settlement, including their own (which was in the year 1648), where they continued until they became rich in prosperity and rich in children.

"Richard appears to have come to New Amsterdam about 1640. He became a 
subject of the Netherlands & remained in the area untill the British came. He & a few others went to New Jersey & purchased land that was to becme the settlement of Monmouth. Upon his death he had become the largest landed proprieter in the area. In 1668 he & his wife helped to organize the first Baptist church of New Jersey. Richard's will was proved in October of 1705. He was married to Penelope VAN PRINCISS about 1644 in Gravesend, Long Island, New York.

--------------------

Source: Stilwell"s "Genealogy of the Stout Family", vol . # 4

Immigrant: Stout , Richard

  • Name of Ship: ?
  • Arrival Date: abt. 1643
  • Origin of Immigrant: Nottinghamshire, England
  • Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1615, Nottinghamshire, England
  • Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: Oct 1705, Middletown, Monmouth Co.
  • NJ Immigrant's Spouse: Penelope VanPrincin

Immigrant's Children:

  • 1. John Stout, 1645 Gravesend L.I. New Netherlands, m. Elizabeth Crawford, d. 1724 NJ
  • 2. Richard Stout, 1646 -- 1717, m Frances Heath, Mary Seymour
  • 3. James Stout, 1648 - ? , m Elizabeth Truax
  • 4. Mary Stout, 1650 - ? , m Judge James Bowne 1665
  • 5. Alice Stout, 1652 - ? m John Throckmorton 1670
  • 6. Peter Stout, 1654- 1703, m Mary Bollen, then Mary Bowne
  • 7. Sarah Stout, 1656 - ? m John Pike
  • 8. Johnathan Stout, 1660 - 1723, m Anne Bollen 1685

All the above were born in Gravesend Long Island

  • 9. David Stout, 1667 - ? b in Middletown NJ, m Rebecca Ashton 1688
  • 10. Benjamin Stout, 1669-1734, m Mary Leonard, then Agnes Truax

Notes: Married in Gravesend, Long Island in 1644, a member of Lady Deborah Moody's anabaptist settlement. He accompanied her from Massachusetts.

In 1664 he moved his family from NY to NJ and was an original patentee of Middletown, Monmouth Co. NJ. (records in the NJ Archives)

Source:"Stout and Allied Families", by Herald F. Stout, vol. 1, 1951 edition, pg. xxii

----------------------

From Doug Gordon's Family History:

http://history.wdgordon.com/gedcom/p11.htm#i302

Richard Stout[1]

  • b. circa 1615,
  • d. 1705

Richard Stout was born circa 1615 in Nottinghamshire, England.[2] He was the son of John Stout and Elizabeth Bee.[2]

Richard Stout married Penelope Kent in 1644.[1],[2]

He left England as a naval sailor before being discharged in New Amsterdam (N.Y.). He was one of the founders of Gravesend, on Long Island, N.Y., and was also an early settler in Monmouth Co., N.J. near Middletown.[1]

Richard Stout died in 1705 in Monmouth Co., New Jersey.[2]

Children of Richard Stout and Penelope Kent

  • 1. John Stout [1]
    • b. 1645,
    • d. 1724
  • 2. Richard Stout [1]
    • b. 1646,
    • d. 1717
  • 3. James Stout+ [1]
    • b. 1648,
    • d. 1701
  • 4. Mary Stout [1]
    • b. 1650
  • 5. Alice Stout [1]
    • b. 1652
  • 6. Peter Stout [1]
    • b. 1654,
    • d. 1703
  • 7. Sarah Stout [1]
    • b. 1656
  • 8. Jonathan Stout+ [1],[2]
    • b. 1660,
    • d. 24 Nov 1722
  • 9. David Stout [1]
    • b. 1667,
    • d. 1706
  • 10. Benjamin Stout [1]
    • b. 1669,
    • d. 1734

Citations

1. [S35] Nathan Stout, The History of the Stout Family, First Settling in Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey (Hopewell, New Jersey: H. G. McCarter, 1878). Hereinafter cited as History of the Stout Family.

2. [S36] Herald F. Stout, Stout and Allied Families, Second Edition (San Diego, California: Self published, 1970). Hereinafter cited as Stout and Allied Families.

-----------------

From the Find A Grave page for Richard Stout:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=45166321

Birth: 1615 - Nottinghamshire, England

Death: 1705 - Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA

The fleet arrived at New Amsterdam in August, 1664, and that place and all the New Netherlands were surrendered by Governor Stuyvesant, to the English, on the 27th day of the same month. This English company of Puritans, living on Long Island and in New England, having obtained permission of Governor Stuyvesant to settle on the banks of the Raritan River, commenced their negotiations with the Indian sachems December 5, 1663; and concluded the first Indian purchase of land, which was made from Poppomora, chief of the Navesink Indians to John Bowne, James Hubbard, William Golding, Richard Stout, Samuel Spicer, & John Tilton, Jr, all of Gravesend, Long Island, by deed dated January 25, 1664 — the original record of which is at Albany, New York, and copies are also recorded at Perth Amboy and Trenton, New Jersey.

Having purchased the land, John Bowne, Richard Stout and three others, with their families, five families in all, came and made their settlement in the spring or summer of 1664 - nearly a year before the patent was issued.

Having already complied with the first conditions of Governor Nicolls' proclamation, the company made application to the Governor for a grant to cover the purchase already made and others which they intended to make. This grant embraced all of the present county of Monmouth, and a part of Ocean & Middlesex Counties. It is dated April 8, 1665. It is known as the famous "MONMOUTH PATENT"

Family links:

Spouse:

  • Penelope Van Princis Stout (1622 - 1732)

Children:

  • Mary Stout Bowne (1650 - ____)*
  • Alice Stout Throckmorton (1652 - 1703)*
  • Sarah Stout Pike (1656 - 1714)*
  • James Stout (1658 - 1715)*
  • Jonathan Stout (1660 - 1722)*
  • David Stout (1667 - 1732)*

Burial: Unknown


Created by: Sue McDuffe:)

  • Record added: Dec 06, 2009
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 45166321

---------------------------

From Stories of New Jersey: The Story Of Penelope Stout By Frank R. Stockton (with reference to Richard Stout)

This Web version, edited by GET NJ, referenced at: http://www.getnj.com/storiesofnewjersey/sojpg57.shtml

Originally published in 1896

A year or two after Penelope had gone back to New Amsterdam, being then about 22, she married an Englishman named Richard Stout, who afterwards became an important personage. He, with other settlers, went over to New Jersey and founded a little village, which was called Middletown, not far from the Indian camp where Penelope had once been a prisoner.

The Indians still remained in this camp, but now they appeared to be quite friendly to the whites; and the new settlers did not consider that there was anything dangerous in having these red neighbors. The good Indian who had been Penelope's protector, now quite an old man, was very friendly and sociable, and often used to visit Mrs. Stout. This friendship for the woman whom he had saved from death seemed to have been strong and sincere.

One day this old Indian came to the house of Mrs. Stout, and, seating himself in the room where she was, remained for a long time pensive and silent. This rather unusual conduct made Penelope fear that something had happened to him; and she questioned him, asking him why he was so silent, and why he sighed so often. Then the old man spoke out and told her that he had come on a very important errand, in which he had risked his own life at the hands of his tribe; but, having saved her life once, he had determined to do it again, no matter what might happen to himself.

Then he told her that the good will of the Indians toward their white neighbors had come to an end, and that it had been determined in council that an attack should be made that night upon this little village, when every person in it – men, women, and children – should be put to death, the houses burned, and the cattle driven away. His brethren no longer wanted white people living near them.

Of course, this news was a great shock to Penelope. She had now two little children, and she could not get far away with them and hide, as she herself had once hidden from Indian foes. But the old man told her that she need not be afraid: he could not save all the people in the village, but he was her friend, and he had arranged to save her and her family. At a certain place, which he described so she could not fail to find it, he had concealed a canoe; and in that she and her husband, with the children, could go over to New Amsterdam, and there would be plenty of time for them to get away before the Indians would attack the place. Having said this, and having urged her to lose no time in getting away, the old Indian left.

As soon as he had gone, Penelope sent for her husband, who was working in the fields, and told him what she had heard, urging him to make preparations instantly to escape with her. But Mr. Stout was not easily frightened by news such as this. He pooh-poohed the whole story, and told his wife that the natives over there in their camp were as well disposed and friendly as if they had been a company of white settlers, and that, as these red men and the whites had lived together so long, trading with each other, and visiting each other with perfect freedom, there was no reason whatever to suppose that the Indians would suddenly determine to rise up and massacre a whole settlement of peaceable neighbors, who had never done them any harm, and who were a great benefit to them in the way of trading. It would be all nonsense, he said, to leave their homes, and run away from Indians so extremely friendly and good-natured as those in the neighboring camp.

But Penelope had entirely different ideas upon the subject. She thoroughly believed in the old Indian, and was sure that he would not have come and told her that story unless it had been true. If her husband chose to stay and risk his life, she could not help it; but she would not subject herself and her children to the terrible danger which threatened them. She had begged her husband to go with her; but as he had refused, and had returned to his work, she and her children would escape alone.

Consequently she set out with the little ones, and with all haste possible she reached the place where the canoe was moored among some tall reeds, and, getting in with the children, she paddled away to New Amsterdam, hoping she might reach there in time to send assistance to Middletown before the Indians should attack it.

When Farmer Stout found that his wife had really gone off, and had taken the children with her, he began to consider the matter seriously, and concluded that perhaps there might be something in the news which the old Indian had brought. He consequently called together a number of the men of the village, and they held a consultation, in which it was determined that it would be a wise thing to prepare themselves against the threatened attack; and, arming themselves with all the guns and pistols they could get, they met together in one of the houses, which was well adapted for that purpose, and prepared to watch all night.

They did not watch in vain, for about midnight they heard from the woods that dreadful war whoop which the white settlers now well understood. They knew it meant the same thing as the roar of the lion, who, after silently creeping towards his intended victim, suddenly makes the rocks echo with the sound of his terrible voice, and then gives his fatal spring.

But although these men might have been stricken with terror, had they heard such a war cry at a time when they were not expecting it, and from Indians to whom they were strangers, they were not so terrified at the coming of these red men with whom, perhaps only the day before, they had been trading buttons for venison and beans. They could not believe that these apparently mild and easy-going fellows could really be the terrible savages they tried to make themselves appear.

So Richard Stout and his companions went boldly out, guns in hand, to meet the oncoming savages, and, calling a parley, they declared that they had no intention of resting quietly, and allowing themselves and families to be slaughtered and their houses burned. If the Indians, who had so long been their good neighbors, were now determined to become bloody enemies, they would find that they would have to do a good deal of hard fighting before they could destroy the village of Middletown; and, if they persisted in carrying on the bloody job they had undertaken, a good many of them would be killed before that job was finished.

Now, it had been very seldom that Indians who had started out to massacre whites had met with people who acted like this; and these red men in war paint thought it wise to consider what had been said to them. A few of them may have had guns, but the majority were armed only with bows and tomahawks; and these white men had guns and pistols, with plenty of powder and ball. It would clearly be unsafe to fight them.

So, after discussing the matter among themselves and afterwards talking it over with the whites, the Indians made up their minds, that, instead of endeavoring to destroy the inhabitants of Middletown, they would shake hands with them and make a treaty of peace. They then retired ; and on the following day a general conference was held, in which the whites agreed to buy the lands on which they had built their town, and an alliance was made for mutual protection and assistance. This compact was faithfully observed as long as there were any Indians in the neighborhood, and Middletown grew and flourished.

Among the citizens of the place there were none who grew and flourished in a greater degree than the Stout family. Although Penelope bore upon her body the scars of her wounds until the day of her death, it is stated, upon good authority, that she lived to be 110 years old; so that it is plain that her constitution was not injured by the sufferings and hardships of the beginning of her life in New Jersey.

Not only did the Stouts flourish in Middletown, but some of them went a little southward, and helped to found the town of Hopewell; and here they increased to such a degree that one of the early historians relates that the Baptist Church there was founded by the Stouts, and that for 41 years the religious meetings were held in the houses of different members of the Stout family, while, at the time he wrote, half of the congregation of the church were still Stouts, and that, all in all, there had been at least 200 members of that name. So the Baptist Church in Hopewell, as well as all the churches in Middletown, owed a great deal to the good Indian who carried poor Penelope to his village, and cured her of her wounds.

Authorities:

  • "History of New Jersey." S. Smith.
  • "History of New Jersey." J. C. Raum.
  • "Historical Collections." Barber and Howe.
  • "Story of an Old Farm." A. C. Mellick.

-------------------- RICHARD2 STOUT (JOHN1) was born 1615 in Burton Joyce, Nottinghamshire, England, and died 1705 in Middleton,Monmouth,N.J.. He married PENELOPE (KENT OR LENT) VAN PRINCIS 1644 in Gravesend, LI, NY. She was born 1622 in Netherlands, and died 1712 in Middleton,Monmouth,N.J..

Notes for RICHARD STOUT: From "History of the Stout Family" by Nathan Stout, 1823

Richard Stout, the first of the name in America was born in Notinghamshire, in Old England, and his father's name was John. The said Richard, when quite young paid his addresses to a young woman that his father thought below his rank, upon which account some unpleasant conversation happened between the father and the son, on account of which, the said Richard left his father's house; and in a few days engaged on board a ship of war, where he served about seven years, after which time he got a discharge at New Amsterdam, now called New York, in America. About the same time a ship from Amsterdam, in Holland, on her way to the said New Amsterdam, was driven on the shore that is now called Middletown, in Monmouth County, in the State of new Jersey, which ship was loaded with passengers, who with much difficulty got on shore. But the Indians not long after fell upon them and butchered and killed the whole crew, as they thought, but soon after the Indians were gone, a certain Penelope Van Princes, whose husband the Indians had killed, found herself possessed of strength enough to creep to a hollow tree, where she remained some days. An Indian happening to come that way, whose dog coming to the tree, occasioned him to examine the inside of the tree, where he found the said Penelope in a forlorn, distressed condition. She was bruised very severely about the head, and her bowels protruded from a cut across her abdomen; she kept them in with her hand. She had been in this fearful condition seven days when the Indian found her. In his compassion he took her out of the tree and carried her to his wigwam where he treated her kindly and healed her wounds, and in a short time conveyed her in his canoe to New Amsterdam, where he sold her to the Dutch, who then owned that city, now called New York.

The man and woman from whom the whole race of Stouts descended, got into the city of New Amsterdam, where they became acquainted with each other and were married. And, not withstanding, it may be thought by some, that they conducted themselves with more fortitude than prudence, they immediately crossed the bay and settled in the above said Middletown, where the said Penelope had lost her first husband by the Indians and had been so severely wounded herself.

There was at that time but six white families in the settlement, including their own, (which was in the year 1648), where they continued until they became rich in prosperity and rich in children. They had together seven son and three daughters, viz: John, Richard, Jonathan, Peter, James, Benjamin, David. The daughters were - Deliverance, Sarah, Penelope. All of which sons and daughters lived to raise large families.

Source: Stilwell"s "Genealogy of the Stout Family", vol. # 4 Immigrant: Stout , Richard Name of Ship: ? Arrival Date: abt. 1643 Origin of Immigrant: Nottinghamshire, England Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1615, Nottinghamshire, England Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: Oct 1705, Middletown, Monmouth Co. NJ Immigrant's Spouse: Penelope VanPrincin Immigrant's Children: John Stout, 1645 Gravesend L.I. New Netherlands, m. Elizabeth Crawford, d. 1724 NJ Richard Stout, 1646 -- 1717, m Frances Heath, Mary Seymour James Stout, 1648 - ? , m Elizabeth Truax Mary Stout, 1650 - ? , m Judge James Bowne 1665 Alice Stout, 1652 - ? m John Throckmorton 1670 Peter Stout, 1654- 1703, m Mary Bollen, then Mary Bowne Sarah Stout, 1656 - ? m John Pike Johnathan Stout, 1660 - 1723, m Anne Bollen 1685 All the above were born in Gravesend Long Island David Stout, 1667 - ? b in Middletown NJ, m Rebecca Ashton 1688 Benjamin Stout, 1669-1734, m Mary Leonard, then Agnes Truax Notes: Married in Gravesend, Long Island in 1644, a member of Lady Deborah Moody's anabaptist settlement. He accompanied her from Massachusetts. In 1664 he moved his family from NY to NJ and was an original patentee of Middletown, Monmouth Co. NJ. (records in the NJ Archives)

Notes for PENELOPE (KENT OR LENT) VAN PRINCIS: Newspaper article - Newspaper name and time of publication unknown, author was John T. Cunningham

------------ THE STORY OF PENELOPE STOUT ----------- There is cause to dispute the traditional claim that Penelope vanPrincis Stout of Monmouth County lived to a mature 110 years before she died in 1712, but no one can deny that for indomitable will to live and in number of descendants Penelope has had few equals. Penelopes's story is obscured slightly by discrepanceies in the dates of her birth and other occurrences in her life, but consider first the narrative as it is usually told. Born in Holland (in 1602 according to the usual version,) Penelope vanPrincis joined her young husband and other Dutch settlers headed for New Amsterdam in 1620. Violent storms caught their ship, drove it off course and finally wrecked it off Sandy Hook. --- ON THE BEACH --- All survived, and the passengers and crew set off for New Amsterdam on foot, leaving Penelope on the beach to nurse her desperately ill husband (whose name was never recorded by Penelope and all of the large brood she would later rear.) Indians found the Dutch couple on the beach, killed the husband and left Penelope viciously hacked. The young widow lay unconscious, her skull fractured, her left arm so mangled that it would never again be normal and her abdomen slashed open. Somehow she revived and crawled into a hollow tree, where two Indians found her several days later. ---- SHE PRAYED --- Penelope prayed that they might end her misery and the younger Indian was willing to oblige. The older Indian dissented, carried her over his shoulder to camp, and there nursed her back to health. She stayed with the Indians, working, learning their language and their ways. Some of her shipwrecked friends returned after a time and asked the Indians to give her up. Penelope's Indian benefactor said he would let the young woman decide for herself. Penelope decided to leave, "very much to the surprise of this good Indian," according to Frank Stocktons's version. About two years later Penelope met Richard Stout who had left Nottingham, England, because of parental disapproval of his love affair with a girl they considered socially inferior. He enlisted in the navy, served for seven years and left ship in New Amsterdam when his enlistment ended. Penelope vanPrincis and Richard Stout were married in 1624 (according to tradition), when she was 22 and Richard was 40. Some time after, they moved to Middletown, where through the years their family grew and prospered. Several years after the Stouts came to Middletown, Penelope's old Indian benefactor called on her to warn of an impending attack by his tribe. Penelope and her children fled in a canoe, but Richard Stout and his neighbors stood up to the Indians and argued them out of an attack. So the Stouts lived on into the 18th century. Dr. Thomas Hale Streets questioned the time sequence in a study he made of the Delaware branch of the Stout family in 1915. He said that all dates in recorded accounts were about 20 years too early, thus making the date of the shipwreck about 1640 rather than 1620 and making the date of the marriage to Richard Stout about 1644 rather than 1624. This logic seems sound. For example, there was no New Amsterdam in 1620 and certainly there was no Middletown at the time when the Stout allegedly moved over. Advancing all dates 20 years, however, makes New Amsterdam, Middletown and all else fall in line. His most telling rebuttal hinged on the known birh date of Penelope's 10th and last child, David, born in 1669. That would have made Mrs. Stout a mother at age 67 and Richard a father at 85. Speaking of the mother, Dr. Streets commented drily: "No medical man, it is safe to say, ever knew of such a case." Penelope vanPrincis Stout died in 1712, either at the age of 110, if you believe traditional accounts, or at the age of 90 if Dr. Streets is correct. Before dying, Mrs. Stout saw her seven sons and three daughters multiplied into 492 other descendants. One son, Jonathan, bought a large tract of land at Hopewell in 1706 and quickly the number of Stout descendants in and near Hopewell became almost as numerous as those in Monmouth. Today huge numbers of Stout descendants cherish a noble name; they recognize that without Penelope vanPrincis, a stout-hearted woman if ever there was one, they wouldn't be here at all.

  • * * * * * * *

12 Sep 1648":Ambrose London plaintive agt:ye wife of Tho: Aplegate defent in an action of slander for saying his wife did milke her Cowe"

"The defent saith yt shee said noe otherwise but as Penellopey Prince tould her yt Ambrose his wife did milke her Cowe"

"Rodger Scotte being deposed saith yt being in ye house of Tho: Aplegate hee did heare Pennellopy Prince saye yt ye wife of Ambrose London did milke ye Cowe of Tho: Aplegate"

"Tho: Greedye being deposed saith yt Pennellope Prince being att his house hee did heare her saye yt shee and Aplegates Daughter must com as witnesses agat: Ambrose his wife milking Aplegates Coew"

"Pennellope Prince being questationed adknowled her faulte in soe speaking and being sorrie her words she spake gave sattisfaction on both sides." source: Gravesend Town Book, vol. 1, Sept 12, 1648.

  • * * * * * * *

Excerpts from a STOUT-L posting by Linda Stout Deak:

I traveled today to Amsterdam and went to the Scheepsvaart (maritime or Ship Navigation, esp. Atlantic) Museum. It is a splendid old granite building on the water a fifteen minute walk from Amsterdam Central Station. I was looking for Penelope's name on a passenger list. I had to find the ship upon which she sailed.

107.1 Kath Hans Jelisz. (owner) Jacht (yacht or sailboat) WIC (West Indies Company) 1647 Nieuw Amsterdam voor 06-06-1647

Kreeg in Juni 1647 de opdracht tot kaapveren. November 1648 bij Sandy Hook gestrand. Did not return

This has to be Penelope's ship. I scanned the doctoral thesis (in Dutch) of a J.A. Jacobs from Leiden University on the ships sailing to the new world from Holland between 1609-1675. The average was 3.75 ships per year, about five ships per year in the period 1639-1648. It is very unlikely that a ship other than the Kath was beached at Sandy Hook.

More About RICHARD STOUT and PENELOPE VAN PRINCIS: Marriage: 1644, Gravesend, LI, NY

     

Children of RICHARD STOUT and PENELOPE VAN PRINCIS are: 3. i. JOHN3 STOUT, b. 1645, Gravesend, Long Island, NY; d. 24 Nov 1724, Middletown, Monmouth Co., NJ. 4. ii. RICHARD STOUT, b. 1646, Gravesend, LI, NY; d. 10 Jul 1717, Middletown, Monmouth, NJ. 5. iii. JAMES STOUT, b. 1648, Gravesend, Long Island, NY; d. Aft. 1714, Amwell twp, Hunterdon Co., NJ. 6. iv. MARY STOUT, b. 1650, Gravesend, Long Island, NY. 7. v. ALICE STOUT, b. 1652, Middletown, Monmouth Co., NJ. 8. vi. PETER STOUT, b. 1654, Gravesend, Kings County, NY; d. 14 Apr 1704, Middletown, Monmouth County, NJ. 9. vii. SARAH ELIZABETH STOUT, b. 1656, Gravesend, LI, NY; d. 29 Dec 1714, Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ. 10. viii. JONATHAN STOUT, b. 1658, Gravesend, LI, NY; d. Bef. 25 Mar 1723, Hopewell, Hunterdon, NJ. 11. ix. DAVID STOUT, b. 1667, Middletown, Monmouth, NJ; d. 1732, Amwell, Hunterdon, NJ. 12. x. BENJAMIN STOUT, b. 1669, Middletown, Monmouth, NJ; d. 1734, Georges Creek, Delaware.

-------------------- From "History of the Stout Family" by Nathan Stout, 1823

Richard Stout, the first of the name in America was born in Notinghamshire, in Old England, and his father's name was John. The said Richard, when quite young paid his addresses to a young woman that his father thought below his rank , upon which account some unpleasant conversation happened between the father and the son, on account of which, the said Richard left his father's house; and in a few days engaged on board a ship of war, where he served about seven years, after which time he got a discharge at New Amsterdam, now called New York, in America. About the same time a ship from Amsterdam, in Holland, on her way to the said New Amsterdam, was driven on the shore that is now called Middletown, in Monmouth County, in the State of new Jersey, which ship was loaded with passengers, who with much difficulty got on shore. But the Indians not long after fell upon them and butchered and killed the whole crew, as they thought, but soon after the Indians were gone, a certain Penelope Van Princes, whose husband the Indians had killed, found herself possessed of strength enough to creep to a hollow tree, where she remained some days. An Indian happening to come that way, whose dog coming to the tree, occasioned him to examine the inside of the tree, where he found the said Penelope in a forlorn, distressed condition . She was bruised very severely about the head, and her bowels protruded from a cut across her abdomen; she kept the min with her hand. She had been in this fearful condition seven days when the Indian found her. In his compassion he took her out of the tree and carried her to his wigwam where he treated her kindly and healed her wounds, and in a short time conveyed her in his canoe to New Amsterdam , where he sold her to the Dutch, who then owned that city , now called New York.

The man and woman from whom the whole race of Stouts descended, got into the city of New Amsterdam, where they became acquainted with each other and were married. And, not withstanding, it may be thought by some, that they conducted themselves with more fortitude than prudence, they immediately crossed the bay and settled in the above said Middletown, where the said Penelope had lost her first husband by the Indians and had been so severely wounded herself.

There was at that time but six white families in the settlement, including their own, (which was in the year 1648), where they continued until they became rich in prosperity and rich in children. They had together seven son and three daughters, viz: John, Richard, Jonathan, Peter, James, Benjamin, David. The daughters were - Deliverance, Sarah, Penelope. All of which sons and daughters lived to raise large families.

Source: Stilwell's "Genealogy of the Stout Family", vol . # 4 Immigrant: Stout , Richard Name of Ship: ? Arrival Date: abt. 1643 Origin of Immigrant: Nottinghamshire, England Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1615, Nottinghamshire, England Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: Oct 1705, Middletown, Monmouth Co. NJ Immigrant's Spouse: Penelope Van Princin Immigrant's Children: John Stout, 1645 Gravesend L.I. New Netherlands, m. Elizabeth Crawford, d. 1724 NJ Richard Stout, 1646 -- 1717, m Frances Heath, Mary Seymour James Stout, 1648 - ? , m Elizabeth Truax Mary Stout, 1650 - ? , m Judge James Bowne 1665 Alice Stout, 1652 - ? m John Throckmorton 1670 Peter Stout, 1654- 1703, m Mary Bollen, then Mary Bowne Sarah Stout, 1656 - ? m John Pike Johnathan Stout, 1660 - 1723, m Anne Bollen 1685 All the above were born in Gravesend Long Island David Stout, 1667 - ? b in Middletown NJ, m Rebecca Ashto n 1688 Benjamin Stout, 1669-1734, m Mary Leonard, then Agnes Truax

Notes: Married in Gravesend, Long Island in 1644, a member of Lady Deborah Moody's Anabaptist settlement. He accompanied her from Massachusetts. In 1664 he moved his family from NY to NJ and was an original patentee of Middletown, Monmouth Co. NJ. (records in the NJ Archives)

Source:"Stout and Allied Families", by Herald F. Stout, vol. 1, 1951 edition, pg. xxii: The Will of Ric hard Stout KNOW ALL MEN, by these presents that I, Richard Stout of Middletown, in the county of Monmouth, in East Jersey, being of Sound Mind and disposing memory, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament which is as followeth: I will that all my just debts be paid; I give and devise unto my loving wife, during her natural life, all my orchard and that part of rooms of the house she now lives in, with the cellar, and all the land I now possess. I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, all my horse kind, excepting on e mare and colt. My son Benjamin is to have for keeping m y cattle last year. I give unto my sons John, Richard, James, Johnathan, David and Benjamin, one shilling each of them. I give unto my daughters, Mary, Alice and Sarah, each of them one shilling. I give to my daughter-in-law Mary Stout and her son John on e shilling each of them. I give and bequeath unto my kinswoman Mary Stout, the daughter of formerly Peter Stout, one cow, to be paid within six days after my wife's death. All the remainder of my personal estate whatsoever, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, and to this, my last will and testament, I make my son John and my son Johnathan m y executors to. For this my will performed, in witness hereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal, June the ninth day, in the year one thousand seven hundred and three. His Richard X Stout Mark Signed, sealed and published in the presence of us: Richard Hartshorne John Weekham Peter Vandervere

Proved before Lord Cornbury, Governor, Captain General, & E tc. 23 October 1705 at Perth Amboy. -------------------- Married: 1644 Penelope Kent (Van Printzen / Van Princis) in Queens County, New York

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Richard E Stout, Sr.'s Timeline

1615
1615
Nottinghamshire, England
1643
1643
- 1645
Age 28
New York, New York, New York, United States

RICHARD WAS PENELOPE'S 2nd HUSBAND

MARRIAGE IS EXPECTED TO BE SOMETIME BETWEEN THE TWO DATES

1644
1644
Age 29
1645
1645
Age 30
Gravesend, Long Island , New Netherlands
1646
March 10, 1646
Age 31
Gravesend (within present Brooklyn), (Present Kings County), New Netherlands (Present New York), (Present USA)
1648
1648
Age 33
Gravesend (within present Brooklyn), (Present Kings County), New Netherlands (Present New York), (Present USA)
1650
1650
Age 35
Gravesend, (Present Kings County, Long Island), New Netherlands (Present New York), (Present USA)
1650
Age 35
Gravesend (within present Brooklyn), (Present Kings County), New Netherlands (Present New York), (Present USA)
1652
1652
Age 37
Gravesend, Kings, New York, United States
1654
1654
Age 39
Gravesend, Long Island, New York