Richard FitzGilbert de Bienfaite, Lord of Clare and of Tonbridge

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Richard FitzGilbert de Brionne, seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec

Nicknames: "De Tonbridge", "/De Tonbridge/", "Known as "de Bienfaite"", ""de Clare"", "and "de Tonbridge"", "Richard DeClare /Gilbert/", "R /FITZGILBERT/", "De Tunbridge", "de Tunbridge", "de Benefacta"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Saint-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonnière, Basse-Normandie, France
Death: Died in St Neots, Huntingdonshire, England
Place of Burial: St Neots, Huntingdonshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Gilbert de Brionne comte d'Eu; Gilbert "Crispin" Crispin de Brionne; NN wife of Gilbert de Brionne and Gunnora de Brionne
Husband of Rohese Giffard de Longueville
Father of Ronais De Tellieres; Walter FitzRichard de Clare, de Tonebruge; Rohese FitzRichard de Clare; Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke; Robert FitzRichard de Clare and 10 others
Brother of Ralph de Tellieres; Baldwin, comte de Brionne; Adèle de Brionne, comtesse d'Eu; Guillaume de Brionne and Emma

Occupation: Chief Justice of England. Earl of Buckingham, SHERIFF OF DEVON, FOUNDER OF HOUSE OF CLARE, Lord De Bienfai, Lord de Clare & Tonebridge, Earl of Clare, Sieur, de Bienfaite, d'Orbec, de Clare, de Tunbridge, de Kent, Régent, d'Angleterre, Lord of Clare
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Richard FitzGilbert de Brionne, seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec

Earl Richard "De Tonbridge" FitzGilbert - also known as de Clare - was born about 1024, lived in Bienfaite, Normandy, France and died about 1090 in St. Neots, Huntingdonshire, England . He was the son of Count Gilbert "Crispin" de Brionne and Constance d'Eu.

Earl Richard married Rochese Giffard about 1054 in England. Rochese was born about 1034 in Longueville, Normandy, France, the daughter of Walter Giffard de Bolebec and Agnes Ermentrude Fleitel. She died after 1133 .

Earl Richard was Chief Justice of England and Earl of Buckingham, and accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066. He took his new title from the fief of Clare in Suffolk. Richard acquired the earldom of Gloucester by marriage, and became the leading barons of the south-eastern March by early in the 13th century.

Nine Children (see below).

*******************

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#RichardBrionneClaredied1090B:

RICHARD de Brionne, son of GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" Comte d'Eu & his wife --- (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richard" as sons of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that he made donations to the church of Bec with his own sons[1712]. He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[1713]. Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored these properties to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[1714].

He accompanied William I King of England into England and was rewarded with 176 lordships, mainly in Suffolk (many attached to the honour of Clare) and Kent[1715]. Lord of Clare and Tonbridge. Regent of England 1075. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Richardus filius comitis Gilberti monachus nostre congregationis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in late April[1716]. The Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire records that “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti” was buried “apud sanctum Neotum”[1717].


m [as her first husband,] ROHESE Giffard, daughter of GAUTHIER Giffard & his wife Ermengarde --- (-after 1113, bur [Colchester]). Her father is named by Orderic Vitalis, who does not state her own name[1718]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Gautier-Giffard 1er" & his wife had several daughters, of whom Rohais married "Richard fils du comte Gilbert"[1719]. Rohese may have married secondly Eudes de Rie dapifer. According to the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, ”Rohesia” married secondly “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” after the death of “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti”[1720]. According to the Complete Peerage, this genealogy is “probably erroneous” but it does not explain the basis for the doubts[1721]. From a chronological point of view, the connection would be tight, assuming that the death date of Richard FitzGilbert is correctly estimated to [1090] and the birth of Rohese´s granddaughter by her alleged second marriage, Beatrix, is correctly assessed at [1105]. An alternative perspective is provided by the History of the foundation of St John´s abbey, Colchester which names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ” and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater”[1722], who would have been the daughter of this Rohese Giffard.

Richard & his wife had nine children:

1. ROGER FitzRichard (-after 1131). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Gilbert, Roger, Gautier et Robert" as sons of Richard, son of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that they made donations to the church of Bec[1723]. He is named and his parentage given by Orderic Vitalis[1724]. He succeeded his father in [1090] as Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec. He fought with Henry I King of England between 1111 and 1113, and saved the king's life at the battle of Bremulé in 1119[1725]. "Rogerius filius Ricardi cognatus regis" accompanied Mathilda, daughter of Henry I King of England, to Germany for her marriage to Emperor Heinrich V[1726]. "Comes Ricardus filius comitis Gisleberti" confirmed donations of property to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "Radulfus de Vuaterivilla et Ansuuidus apud Bosunvillam", with the consent of "Rogerii filii Ricardi et comitis Gisleberti patris mei", by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery), witnessed by "Herveio de Monte Morenci…"[1727]. He was succeeded at Bienfaite and Orbec by his nephew Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke. m ---. The name of Roger's wife is not known. Roger & his wife had one child....

2. ROHESE FitzRichard de Clare (-7 Jan 1121, bur Le Bec, Normandy[1730]). The History of the foundation of St John´s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ” and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater”, clarifying in a later passage that she was “filia Ricardi…filius Gilberti comitis, [et] Rohaisam…soror Willielmi Giffardi episcopi Wintoniæ”[1731]. According to the Genealogia Fundatoris of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, “Eudoni dapifero Regis Normanniæ” married ”Rohesia” widow of “Ricardo filio comitis Gisleberti”[1732], who would have been the mother of this Rohese (see above). m EUDES de Rie dapifer, of Colchester, Essex, son of HUBERT de Rie & his wife --- (-1 Mar 1120, bur Colchester). The History of the foundation of St John´s abbey, Colchester names “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, “pater…eius…Hubertus de Ria, qui internuntius et sequester inter ducem Normanniæ et regem Angliæ…”, his three brothers “Radulfus...custodia castelli et comitatus Notingehamiæ, Hubertus…turris Norwici…Adam…in Cantia”, and “Roasya uxor eius…Gilbertum comes, Rohaisæ frater”[1733]. The History of the foundation of St John´s abbey, Colchester records the death “pridie Kal Mar 1120” of “Eudoni…major domus regiæ”, and that “Waltherius eius nepos” brought his body for burial[1734].

3. GILBERT FitzRichard de Clare (-1114 or 1117). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Gilbert, Roger, Gautier et Robert" as sons of Richard, son of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that they made donations to the church of Bec[1735]. He is named and his parentage stated by Orderic Vitalis[1736]. He succeeded his father in [1090] as Lord of Clare and Tonbridge. During the rebellion of 1089 against King William II, he was besieged in Tonbridge by the king, but wounded and forced to surrender[1737]. Lord of Cardigan 1110. "Comes Ricardus filius comitis Gisleberti" confirmed donations of property to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by "Radulfus de Vuaterivilla et Ansuuidus apud Bosunvillam", with the consent of "Rogerii filii Ricardi et comitis Gisleberti patris mei", by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery), witnessed by "Herveio de Monte Morenci…"[1738]. The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1117 of "Gilebertus filius Ricardi"[1739]. m as her first husband, ADELISA de Clermont, daughter of HUGUES Comte de Clermont-en-Beauvaisis & his wife Marguerite de Ramerupt. Guillaume de Jumièges records that the wife of Gilbert was the daughter of the Comte de Clermont[1740]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis refers to a sister of "comes Rainaldus" as husband of "Gillebertus, filius Richardi Anglici"[1741]. “Adeliz, uxor Gilberti filii Ricardi, et Gillebertus et Walterus et Baldewinus et Rohaisia pueri Gilberti” donated property “quod Tovi dedit…et in Randa…quas Turgisius tenebat” to Thorney Monastery, by undated charter witnessed by “Gilberto filio Gilberti, Galterio, Hervæo, Baldwino fratribus eius et Rohaisia sorore eorum”[1742]. "Hadalaidis filia Hugonis de Claromonte…uxor Gisleberti de Anglia" founded an anniversary at Saint-Leu d´Esserent, like the anniversaries of "patris sui Hugonis et matris sue Margarite", by undated charter[1743]. She married secondly [Hervé] de Montmorency. Her second marriage is confirmed by the charter dated under which Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirms previous donations to Thorney, including one by “Adelidæ de Montemoraci” of “…terræ in Randa quas Turgisius tenuit et Toui prius dederat”[1744], which clearly refers back to the earlier charter quoted above. According to Duchesne, her second husband was named Hervé and was the son of Bouchard [III] Seigneur de Montmorency and his second wife, but he cites no primary source on which this statement is based[1745]. Given the date of his marriage, the suggestion appears acceptable from a chronological point of view. A charter in the Stoke-by-Clare Priory Cartulary includes the reference "Rogerus coms Clar’ Aelicie de Clermunt ave sue..."[1746]. Gilbert & his wife had eight children....

4. ROBERT FitzRichard de Clare (-[1134], bur Priory of St Neot). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Gilbert, Roger, Gautier et Robert" as sons of Richard, son of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that they made donations to the church of Bec[1775]. He is named and his parentage given by Orderic Vitalis, who lists him after his brother Walter[1776]. Henry I King of England granted him the fiefdom of Little Dunmow, Essex[1777]. - FITZWALTER.

5. WALTER Fitz Richard de Clare (-1138). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Gilbert, Roger, Gautier et Robert" as sons of Richard, son of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that they made donations to the church of Bec[1778]. He is named and his parentage stated by Orderic Vitalis, who names him before his brother Robert[1779]. Lord of Netherwent, with the castle of Strigoil, later known as Chepstow. He founded Tintern Abbey in 1131. He was succeeded by his nephew Gilbert FitzGilbert de Clare, later Earl of Pembroke. [m ISABELLE de Tosny, daughter of RALPH de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon (-after [1158]). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.]

6. AVICE de Clare . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. "Radulfus Filogerensis et uxor eius Avicia" donated property to Sainte-Trinité de Fougères by undated charter[1780]. m RAOUL [I] de Fougères, son of MEEN [II] de Fougères & his wife Adelaide --- (-1124).

7. RICHARD Fitz Richard de Clare (-16 Jun 1107). He is named and his parentage given by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he was a monk at Bec and was appointed abbot of Ely by Henry I King of England[1781]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1114 of "Ricardo filio Ricardi filii comitis Gisleberti monacho Beccensi" specifying that he was the last abbot of Ely[1782].

8. ADELISA Fitz Richard de Clare (-[1125/35] or after). She is called "Adelidem filiam Ricardi de…prosapia Gifardorum" by Orderic Vitalis, who also records her marriage[1783]. Her identification as the daughter of Richard de Clare was first made by Round[1784]. "Adelissa [mater Gauterii filii Gauterii Tirelli]" donated property to the abbey of Saint-Martin de Pontoise by charter dated [1125/35] which states that the donation was made after the death of her son and the latter was buried at the abbey. The same charter also records a later donation by "Gauterius Tirellus pater memorati Gauterii iuvenis" witnessed by "Ada uxore Hugonis Tirelli, Gauterius Tirelli et Hugonis filii eius"[1785]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Adeliz uxor Walti Tirelli" in Essex in relation to "eisde plac de La Wingeha"[1786]. m GAUTHIER [II] Tirell, son of GODRICH & his wife Aremburgis --- (-Jerusalem after [1140]).

9. daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that one of the two unnamed daughters of Richard married "Rodolphe de Tilliers", and that they were parents of "Fransvalon, Henri et Robert Giffard"[1787]. m RAOUL Seigneur de Tillières, son of GILBERT Seigneur de Crespin & his wife ---.


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Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, Earl of Clare; Lord of Bienfaite, Orbec and Tonbridge.

Born in 1035

Died in 1090

Richard FitzGilbert de Clare was most probably present at the Battle of Hastings. Richard

married Rohese Giffard, daughter of Walter Giffard (died 1084), Lord of Longueville who was

most certainly present at the Battle of Hastings. (See Normandy, Generation Ten)

Richard and Rohese had the following children:

· Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare, mentioned next.

· Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent

· Roger FitzRichard de Clare

· Richard FitzRichard de Clare, Abbot of Ely

· Robert FitzRichard de Clare, Baron of Baynard and Dunmow, who married Maud de Saint Liz, daughter of Simon de Saint Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton. (See Fitz Walter) Robert FitzRichard died between 1134 and 1136, and Maud then married to Saher de Quincy.

  • Adelize de Clare

· Rohese de Clare

--------------------

Richard FitzGilbert de CLARE Lord of Clare & Tonbridge (1035-1090) [Pedigree]

Son of Gilbert de BRUINE Count of Brionne, Normandy Count of Brionne, Eu (-1040) and Gunnora

      REF AR7. Seigneur of Bienfaite & Orbed, Normandy & of Clare, Suffolk.
   b. 1035
   r. Brionne, Normandy, France
   d. ABT 1090
   d. 1095, of Tunbridge, Essex, Eng.
   bur. St. Neots, Huntingdon, Eng.

Married Rohese GIFFARD (-1113)

Children:

  1. Rohaise de CLARE (1055-1121) m. Eudo de RIE (-1120)
  2. Avoye de CLARE
  3. Robert FITZRICHARD Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex (-1134) m. Maud de ST.LIZ Lady Bradham (1094-1140)
  4. Adeliza de CLARE
  5. Avice de CLARE m. Robert de STAFFORD (-1088)
  6. Gilbert FitzRichard de CLARE 2nd Earl of Clare (1066-1114) m. Adelaide de_Clermont (1074-) 

Sources:

1. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

        to America before 1700",
        Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
        The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
        sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"

2. "Europaische Stammtafeln",

        Isenburg.

3. "The Complete Peerage",

        Cokayne.

4. "Ancestors of Deacon Edward Converse".

5. "Some Early English Pedigrees",

        Vernon M. Norr.

6. "Royal Ancestors of Some American Families",

        Michel L. Call, 1972.

7. "Plantagenet Ancestry",

        Turton.

8. "The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants",

        Gary Boyd Roberts, 1993.

9. "Magna Charta Pedigrees (Portland East LDS Stake Gen. Lib.)".

10. "Ancestors of American Presidents",

        Gary Boyd Roberts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Fitz_Gilbert

--------------------

Richard FitzGilbert (c. 1030 - 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He was the founder of the English noble family, the de Clares.

Victor at Hastings

Known as "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and "de Tonbridge", he accompanied his reputed kinsman William, Duke of Normandy into England. He served at the Battle of Hastings, and assisted William in subduing the Anglo-Saxons.

Rewards

He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard Fitz Gilbert took the name Earl of Clare from one of his lordships in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.

He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.

Rebel Baron

On William's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain , William fitzOsbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.

Death and succession

He died in St. Neot's Priory in 1090. His land was inherited by his son, Gilbert Fitz Richard.

Family

He was the son of Gilbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne.

Richard's great grandfather was Richard I of Normandy. Richard's father is also sometimes listed as Robert I "the Devil", father of William the Conqueror. Sources as far back as the Annals of the Four Masters claim that Richard's great-grandson, Richard "Strongbow", was the direct descendant of Robert "the Devil". Gilbert "Crispin" was a descendant of Robert's cousin, but not Robert himself.

Name Birth Death Notes

By Rohese Giffard, married 1054, (ca. 1034-aft. 1113), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, and Agnes Flaitel.

Miss (Fitz Gilbert) de Clare 1055 Normandy, France

Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent 1058 1138

Ronais Fitz Gilbert 1060 Unknown

Richard Fitz Richard de Clare, Abbot of Ely 1062 1107

Roger Fitz Richard de Clare 1064 1131

Gilbert Fitz Richard 1065 1115 Succeeded his father as Earl of Clare.

Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard 1064 1136

Rohese de Clare 1067 1121 m. (ca. 1088), Eudo de Rie.

Adelize de Clare 1069 1138 m. Walter Tirel

The modern Irish county of County Clare was historically part of the North Munster Gaelic kingdom of Thomond, dominated by the O'Briens, Kings of Thomond. The region was granted to the De Clare family in 1275 and they became Lords of Thomond. When the boundaries of the modern County Clare were fixed by Sir Henry Sidney in 1565, it was named after the De Clares.

Surrey

Richard's Surrey lands had a value of £241: 30% of the value of his English lands. Within Surrey, Richard Fitz Gilbert owned manors in the following places: Albury, Beddington, Bletchingley, Buckland, Chelsham, Chessington, Chipstead, Chivington, Effingham, Apps in Elmbridge, Farleigh, Immerworth (Kingston upon Thames), Long Ditton, Mickleham, Molesey, Ockley, Old Malden, Shalford, Streatham, Tandridge, Tolworth, Tooting, Walton-on-Thames, Warlingham, Tillingdon, and Woldingham.

--------------------

In Normandy, Richard was Lord of Bienfaite and Orbee. He accompanied William the Conqueror to England, and was rewarded with 127 Lordships, of which 95 were attached to the Honour of Clare. He got the Castle of Clare and the Castle of Tonbridge in Kent, During the King's absence, he was Joint Chief Justiciar and as such, suppressed the revolt of 1075.

--------------------

Richard FitzGilbert (1030 - 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He was the founder of the English noble family, the de Clares.

Victor at Hastings

Known as "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and "de Tonbridge", he accompanied his reputed kinsman William, Duke of Normandy into England. He served at the Battle of Hastings, and assisted William in subduing the Anglo-Saxons.

Rewards

He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard Fitz Gilbert took the name Earl of Clare from one of his lordships in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.

He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.

Rebel Baron

On William's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain , William fitzOsbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.

Death and succession

He died in St. Neot's Priory in 1090. His land was inherited by his son, Gilbert Fitz Richard.

Family

He was the son of Gilbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne.

The reference listed below states that Richard's Great Grandfather was Richard I of Normandy. Richard's father is also sometimes listed as Robert I "the Devil", father of William the Conqueror. Sources as far back as the Annals of the Four Masters claim that Richard's great-grandson, Richard "Strongbow", was the direct descendant of Robert "the Devil". Gilbert "Crispin" was a descendant of Robert's cousin, but not Robert himself.

Issue

By Rohese Giffard, married 1054, (ca. 1034-1133), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, and Agnes Flaitel.

Miss (Fitz Gilbert) de Clare 1055 Normandy, France

Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent 1058 1138

Ronais Fitz Gilbert 1060 Unknown

Richard Fitz Richard de Clare, Abbot of Ely 1062 1107

Roger Fitz Richard de Clare 1064 1131

Gilbert Fitz Richard 1065 1115 Succeeded his father as Earl of Clare.

Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard 1064 1136

Rohese de Clare 1067 1121 m. (ca. 1088), Eudo de Rie.

Adelize de Clare 1069 1138 m. Walter Tirel

The modern Irish county of County Clare was historically part of the North Munster Gaelic kingdom of Thomond, dominated by the O'Briens, Kings of Thomond. The region was granted to the De Clare family in 1275 and they became Lords of Thomond. When the boundaries of the modern County Clare were fixed by Sir Henry Sidney in 1565, it was named after the De Clares.

Surrey

Richard's Surrey lands had a value of £241: 30% of the value of his English lands. Within Surrey, Richard Fitz Gilbert owned manors in the following places: Albury, Beddington, Bletchingley, Buckland, Chelsham, Chessington, Chipstead, Chivington, Effingham, Apps in Elmbridge, Farleigh, Immerworth (Kingston upon Thames), Long Ditton, Mickleham, Molesey, Ockley, Old Malden, Shalford, Streatham, Tandridge, Tolworth, Tooting, Walton-on-Thames, Warlingham, Tillingdon, and Woldingham.[1]

References

The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal ancestors of 300 American Families By Michel L. Call ISBN 1-933194-22-7 (chart 1696)

^ Surrey Domesday Book

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps06/ps06_349.htm

Richard was Lord of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy and Lord of Clare of Tonbridge; Chief Justice of England; kinsman and companion of William the Conqueror. He founded the House of Clare during the Conquest, and played a major role in suppressing the revolt of 1075. His wife Rohese Giffard brought him the great estates of her family. Their son Walter founded Tintern Abbey.

RICHARD FITZGILBERT, a lawyer and Chief Justice of Eng, bornbef 1035, was the founder of the House of Clare in England. He was the eldest son of Gislebert [insert Crispin,] Count of Eu, and Brionne, a descendant of the Emperor Charlemagne, see Ch 29 (p 182). He accomp Duke Wm into Eng, and later held one hunderd seventy-six lordships or manors. One of these lordships was that of Clare, in co./ Suffolk which, becoming his chief seat, caused him to be styled Richard de Clare, and his d escendants known as Earls of Clare. He fell in a skirmish with the Welsh in 1090. He md Rohese, dau of Walter Giffard de Bolebec, and had... a son

He was also Seigneur de Orbec et Bienfaite, Normandy; Lord of Clare & Tonbridge j.u. When his father was assassinated in 1040, Richard and his brother and Baldwin, were forced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, count of Flanders. When cousin William the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter, he restored Gilbert's sons to Normandy, although he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title. William granted the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec to Richard fitz Gilbert, and Le Sap and Meules to

Baldwin. Richard and Baldwin fitz Gilbert took part in the Norman conquest of England, and both assumed important positions in the Conqueror's reign. Richard was regent of England jointly with William de Warenne during the Conqueror's absence in 1075, and he served in

various other important capacities for the King. King William rewarded his cousin well, granting him one of the largest fiefs in the territorial settlement. The lordship centered on Clare (obviously the origin of the Clare family name), Suffolk, which had been an important stronghold in Anglo-Saxon times. The bulk of Richard fitz Gilbert's estates lay in Suffolk, Essex, Surrey, and Kent, but comprised holdings in various other counties in the southern and eastern parts of the kingdom as well. In addition, King William arranged for Richard's marriage to Rohese, sister of Walter Giffard, later earl of Buckingham, and her dowry, consisting of lands in Huntingdon and Hertford, became absorbed in the family

inheritance. After Richard's death, his extensive properties in Normandy and England were divided between his two eldest sons. -------------------- Richard was also called Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare--and Richard de Bienfaite. He was a descendant of Alfred the Great and of Charlemagne.

He was Justiciar of England. He might have accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066, but whether or not he fought at the Battle of Hastings is not recorded.

He took his new title from the fief of Clare in Suffolk after 28 September 1066.

Richard was in arms with William de Warenne against the rebellious lords, Robert de Britolio, Earl of Hereford, and Ralph Waher, or Guader, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, and behaved with great gallantry in 1076.

Richard died before January 1090.

Richard was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--one through his son Roger and the other through his son Gilbert, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p352.htm#i7080 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Richard* FitzGilbert de Tonebrugh DE CLARE (Ist Earl of Devon)

[439]

ABT 1030 - ABT 1090

   * TITLE: Ist Earl of Devon
   * BIRTH: ABT 1030, Brionne,Normandy,France
   * DEATH: ABT 1090, Huntingdon,England 

Father: Gilbert I* CRISPIN

Mother: Gunnora* D'AUNOU

Family 1 : Rohaise* GIFFARD

  1. +Gilbert* de Tonebrugh DE CLARE
  2.  Roger DE CLARE
  3.  Walter DE CLARE
  4. +Richard Fitz Richard DE CLARE
  5.  Robert DE CLARE
  6. +Rohaise* DE CLARE
  7. +Adeliza* DE CLARE 

Family 2 : Adeliza* FITZ-OSBORN

  1. +Baldwin* DE REDVERS 

-------------------- Richard FitzGilbert (c. 1030 - 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He was the founder of the English noble family, the de Clares.

He was the son of Gilbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne. -------------------- Descended from Godfrey, eldest natural son of Duke Richard the Fearless, of Normandy. Title: 1st Earl of Clare; Lord of Bienfaite & Orbecq, in Normandy; Joint Chief Justiciar of England; Lord of Tunbridge. Founded Tunbridge Priory. Sometimes AKA Richard de Bienfaite. Founder of the house of Clare. He was a commander in the army of the Conqueror & accompained William (The Conqueror) on the Norman invasion of England. Richard acquired vast landholdings in Suffolk Co., & in the village of Clare he built a castle, the ruins of which still exist.

Source: The book, 'The Thomas Book'. -------------------- Descended from Godfrey, eldest natural son of Duke Richard 'the Fearless', of Normandy. Title: 1st Earl of Clare; Lord of Bienfaite & Orbecq, in Normandy; Joint Chief Justiciar of England; Lord of Tunbridge. Founded Tunbridge Priory. Sometimes known as, Richard de Bienfaite. Founder of the house of Clare. He was a commander in the army of the Conqueror & accompanied William (the Conqueror) on the Norman invasion of England. Richard acquired vast landholdings in Suffolk Co. & in the village of Clare he built a castle, the ruins of which still exist.

Source: The book, 'The Thomas Book' -------------------- "He accompanied WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR on the invasion of England in 1066 and received great estates, including Clare in Suffolk, from whence the family took its name. "A Baronial Family in Medeival England: The Clares, 1217-1314; Michael Altschul; The Johns Hopkins Press, 1965: Richard FitzGilbert, styled (from his possessions) "de Bienfaite", "De Clare", and "de Tonbridge". Lord of Bienfaite, Orbec in Normandy; Clare & Tonbridge in England. Regent of England jointly with William de Warenne during the Conqueror's absence in 1075. King William granted him one of the largest fiefs in the territorial settlement. The lordship centered on Clare, Suffolk, which had been an important stronghold in Anglo-Saxon times. The bulk of Richard's estates lay in Suffolk, Essex, Surrey, and Kent, but comprised holdings in other counties in the southern and eastern parts of the kingdom as well. In addition, William (King) arranged for his marriage with Rohese, sister of Walter Giffard, later earl of Buckingham, and her dowry, consisting of lands in Huntingdon and Hertford, became absorbed in the family inheritance. "De Tonbridge", Lord Bienfaite."

Also called Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare. Also called Richard de Bienfaite. Richard fitz Gilbert, Justiciar of England was a descendant of Alfred the Great and Charlemagne. He was born in 1035. The eldest son. He was the son of Gilbert I, comte d' Eu & de Brionne. He married Rohesia Giffard, daughter of Walter I Giffard, 1st Earl of Buckingham and Ermengarde Fleitel , before 1065. He may have accompanied William the Conqueror to England, but is not recorded in the records as having fought at Hastings on 28 September 1066. He was took his new title from the fief of Clare in Suffolk after 28 September 1066. He was joined, as "Ricardus de Benefacta," William de Warren in the great office of Justiciary of England in 1073 in 6 William I. Justiciar of England in 1073. He was in arms with William de Warenne against the rebellious lords, Robert de Britolio, Earl of Hereford, and Ralph Waher, or Guader, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, and behaved with great gallantry in 1076. He died before January 1090.

-------------------- Biography

According to the medieval chronicler Gerald of Wales, the first of this great family, Richard de Clare, was the eldest son of Gilbert, surnamed Crispin, Count of Brionne, in Normandy. This Richard fitz-Gilbert came into England with William the Conqueror, and received from him great advancement in honour and possessions.[3] The Dictionary of National Biography and other sources are vague and sometimes contradictory about when the name de Clare came into common usuage, but what we do know is that Richard fitz Gilbert (of Tonbridge), the earliest identifiable progenitor of the family, is once referred to as Richard of Clare in the Suffolk return of the Domesday Book.[4] [edit]Rewards

He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard fitz Gilbert received the lordship of Clare, in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.[5] He was thus Lord of Clare. Some contemporaneous and later sources called him Earl of Clare, though many modern sources view the title as a "styled title". He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075. [edit]Rebel Baron

On William's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain, William fitz Osbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.[6] [edit]Death and succession

He was buried in St. Neot's Priory in 1091. His widow was still living in 1113. His lands were inherited by his son, Gilbert fitz Richard. -------------------- Richard Fitz Gilbert

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'Richard Fitz Gilbert, Lord of Clare, Bienfaite, Orbec and Tonbridge'

Born bef. 1036

Normandy, France

Died 1090

St. Neot's Priory, Huntingdonshire, England

Richard FitzGilbert (c. 1030 - 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He was the founder of the English noble family, the de Clares.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Victor at Hastings
   * 2 Rewards
   * 3 Rebel Baron
   * 4 Death and succession
   * 5 Family
   * 6 Surrey
   * 7 References

[edit] Victor at Hastings

Known as "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and "de Tonbridge", he accompanied his reputed kinsman William, Duke of Normandy into England. He served at the Battle of Hastings, and assisted William in subduing the Anglo-Saxons.

[edit] Rewards

He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard Fitz Gilbert took the name Earl of Clare from one of his lordships in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.

He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.

[edit] Rebel Baron

On William's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain , William fitzOsbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.

[edit] Death and succession

He died in St. Neot's Priory in 1090. His land was inherited by his son, Gilbert Fitz Richard.

[edit] Family

He was the son of Gilbert "Crispin", Count of Brionne.

The reference listed below states that Richard's great grandfather was Richard I of Normandy. Richard's father is also sometimes listed as Robert I "the Devil", father of William the Conqueror. Sources as far back as the Annals of the Four Masters claim that Richard's great-grandson, Richard "Strongbow", was the direct descendant of Robert "the Devil". Gilbert "Crispin" was a descendant of Robert's cousin, but not Robert himself.

Name Birth Death Notes

By Rohese Giffard, married 1054, (ca. 1034-aft. 1113), daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, and Agnes Flaitel.

Miss (Fitz Gilbert) de Clare 1055 Normandy, France

Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent 1058 1138

Ronais Fitz Gilbert 1060 Unknown

Richard Fitz Richard de Clare, Abbot of Ely 1062 1107

Roger Fitz Richard de Clare 1064 1131

Gilbert Fitz Richard 1065 1115 Succeeded his father as Earl of Clare.

Robert Fitz Richard, Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard 1064 1136

Rohese de Clare 1067 1121 m. (ca. 1088), Eudo de Rie.

Adelize de Clare 1069 1138 m. Walter Tirel

The modern Irish county of County Clare was historically part of the North Munster Gaelic kingdom of Thomond, dominated by the O'Briens, Kings of Thomond. The region was granted to the De Clare family in 1275 and they became Lords of Thomond. When the boundaries of the modern County Clare were fixed by Sir Henry Sidney in 1565, it was named after the De Clares.

[edit] Surrey

Richard's Surrey lands had a value of £241: 30% of the value of his English lands. Within Surrey, Richard Fitz Gilbert owned manors in the following places: Albury, Beddington, Bletchingley, Buckland, Chelsham, Chessington, Chipstead, Chivington, Effingham, Apps in Elmbridge, Farleigh, Immerworth (Kingston upon Thames), Long Ditton, Mickleham, Molesey, Ockley, Old Malden, Shalford, Streatham, Tandridge, Tolworth, Tooting, Walton-on-Thames, Warlingham, Tillingdon, and Woldingham.[1]

[edit] References

   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal ancestors of 300 American Families By Michel L. Call ISBN 1-933194-22-7 (chart 1696)
   * A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314 by Michael Altschul (Baltimore, Johns Hopkins, 1965)
  1. ^ Surrey Domesday Book

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Fitz_Gilbert"

Categories: 1030 births | 1090 deaths | Anglo-Normans | Earls in the Peerage of England | Normans | People from Tonbridge | People from Suffolk -------------------- Richard fitz Gilbert (bef. 1035–c. 1090), was a Norman lord who participated in the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and was styled "de Bienfaite", "de Clare", and of Tonbridge "[n 1][1] from his holdings He was the son of Gilbert, Count of Brionne in Normandy.[2] Gilbert was a guardian of the young duke William and when he was killed by Ralph de Wacy in 1040, his two older sons Richard and Gilbert fled to Flanders.[4] On his later return to Normandy Richard was rewarded with the lordship of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy.[4] In 1066, Richard came into England with his kinsman William the Conqueror, and received from him great advancement in honour and possessions.[2]

The Dictionary of National Biography and other sources are vague and sometimes contradictory about when the name de Clare came into common usage, but what we do know is that Richard fitz Gilbert (of Tonbridge), the earliest identifiable progenitor of the family, is once referred to as Richard of Clare in the Suffolk return of the Domesday Book.[5]

Rewards[edit]

He was rewarded with 176 lordships and large grants of land in England, including the right to build the castles of Clare and of Tonbridge. Richard fitz Gilbert received the lordship of Clare, in Suffolk, where parts of the wall of Clare Castle still stand.[6] He was thus Lord of Clare. Some contemporaneous and later sources called him Earl of Clare, though many modern sources view the title as a "styled title".

He served as Joint Chief Justiciar in William's absence, and played a major part in suppressing the revolt of 1075.

Rebel Baron[edit]

On the Conqueror's death, Richard and other great Norman barons, including Odo of Bayeux, Robert, Count of Mortain, William fitz Osbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, led a rebellion against the rule of William Rufus in order to place Robert Curthose on the throne. However, most Normans in England remained loyal. William Rufus and his army successfully attacked the rebel strongholds at Tonbridge, Pevensey and Rochester.[7]

Death and succession[edit]

He was buried in St. Neot's Priory in 1091. His widow was still living in 1113. His lands were inherited by his son, Gilbert fitz Richard.

Marriage[edit]

Richard married Rohese Giffard, daughter of Sir Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville and Agnes Flaitel,[3] and they had the following children: Roger fitz Richard de Clare, received Norman lands and d. 1131, apparently without issue.[3] Gilbert fitz Richard, d. 1115, succeeded his father as Earl of Clare.[3] Walter de Clare, Lord of Nether Gwent, d. 1138.[3] Richard fitz Richard de Clare, Abbot of Ely.[3] Robert fitz Richard,[3] Lord of Little Dunmow, Baron of Baynard, d. 1136.[8] Alice (or Adeliza) de Clare, d. 1138. m. Walter Tirel.[3][9] Rohese de Clare, d. 1121, m. (ca. 1088), Eudo Dapifer.[3]

Notes and References[edit] Notes 1.Jump up ^ Seen in the Domesday book variously as ""de Tonebridge/Tonebrige/Tonbridge" References 1.Jump up ^ Domesday Map website - image of Betchworth's entry and transcription in summary retrieved 2012-10-30 Normally de Tonebridge in Surrey 2.^ Jump up to: a b c G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. III (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1913), p. 242 3.^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Band III Teilband 1 (Marburg, Germany: J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 156 4.^ Jump up to: a b J.H. Round, 'The Family

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Richard FitzGilbert de Bienfaite, Lord of Clare and of Tonbridge's Timeline

1024
1024
Saint-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonnière, Basse-Normandie, France
1051
1051
Age 27
Normandy, France
1054
1054
Age 30
Prior, St Neots, Huntingdonshire, England
1058
1058
Age 34
1060
1060
Age 36
Chepstow, England
1060
Age 36
Ely, Cambrideshire, England
1062
1062
Age 38
Tunbridge, Kent, England
1064
1064
Age 40
Of, Tunbridge, Kent, England
1065
1065
Age 41
Clare, Suffolk, England
1065
Age 41
Of, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, England