Richard (Immigrant, 1638) Sisson

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Richard (Immigrant 1638) Sisson

Also Known As: "Sissons", "Sesson"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: England, UK
Death: Died in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of George Sisson; George Sisson; Mary Beale Sisson and Mary Sisson
Husband of Mary Sisson and Mary Sisson
Father of Mary Sisson; George Sisson; Anne Tripp; Elizabeth Allen; James Sisson and 7 others

Occupation: @N65@
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Richard (Immigrant, 1638) Sisson

  1. ID: I28280
  2. Name: Richard Sisson
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: 1608 in England
  5. Death: BEF 26 FEB 1683/84 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts

HintsAncestry Hints for Richard Sisson

   4 possible matches found on Ancestry.com	Ancestry.com

Marriage 1 Mary ?...? b: ABT 1610 in England

Children

  1. George Sisson b: 1644 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts
  2. Elizabeth Sisson b: ABT 1647 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts
  3. John Sisson b: ABT 1652 in Rhode Island
  4. Anne Sisson b: ABT 1654 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts
  5. James Sisson b: ABT 1656 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts
  6. Mary Sisson b: ABT 1656 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts

Sources:

Ref: RI Genealogy-Biography, Beers, 1908, Pg 2000

Descendants of Richard Sisson

Generation No. 1

1. RICHARD1 SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.) was born ABT 1608 in England (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), and died Feb 26, 1683/84 in Portsmouth, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.). He married MARY (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.) ABT 1644 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.). She was born ABT 1615 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), and died Sep 22, 1692 in Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.).

Notes for RICHARD SISSON:

The first american settler of the name Richard Sisson, came hither in the early days of the colony (RI), and was made a *Freeman in Portsmouth in 1653. He afterward resided in Dartmouth, MA, where he was made a *Freeman in 1655. That he was active in public affairs is shown by the frequency with which his name appears in the records. At one time he owned considerable interest in **Conanicut and the Dutch Islands. Born in 1608 he died in 1684. The christian name of his wife was Mary, and their children were George, Elizabeth, James, John, Anne, and Mary.

Ref: RI Genealogy-Biography, Beers, 1908, Pg 2000

The founder of the family, Richard Sisson, was born in 1608, probably in England and died in 1684, in Dartmouth, MA. He was a prominent man in both colonies and an extensive landholder, and filled numerous official positions. He was made a *Freeman in Dartmouth, May 17, 1653. In 1658 he purchased one three hundredth share in the **Conanicut and Dutch Islands, and subsequently purchased another like share, both of which he sold in 1660. In 1667 he was a grand juror at Dartmouth and surveyor oh highways June 5, 1671. He first settled in Portsmouth, RI where he had extensive land holdings which were inherited by his descendants. His will, made Oct 18,1683, was proved Feb 26, 1684, made careful provisions for his wife Mary; sic.. Bequeathed to his sons James. . . . . . House and land in Dartmouth; to daughter Anne Tripp Land; to John all his housing and land in Portsmouth; to his son George, five pounds; to daughter Eliabeth Allen, five pounds; to his indian servant, a horse; to his grandchild Mary Sisson, three cows, a bed and other property. The inventory of his estate amounted to six hundred pounds, nineteen shillings, including livestock valued at one hundred fifty-eight pounds, five shillings. His widow survived him by eight years and her will made April 15, 1690, proved December 1692, disposed of an estate of one hundred and ninety pounds, including one hundred twenty pounds in silver.

Ref: Genealogy of New England, Vol IV, pg 2313

  • Freeman: "In Colonial days this term referred to any male over twenty-one years old who owned personal property or real estate valued at a prescribed amount. He also was obliged to be a peaceful man, endorsed by a majority of the town's Freemen. Only after this vote at a semi-annual meeting of the selectmen, could the man take the Freeman's Oath. His duties were to elect deputies to the General Assembly of the colony and to elect new Freemen. He was a member of a local church and had the right to vote and pay taxes."

Ref: A to ZAX, A comprehensive dictionary for Genealogists & Historians, Barbara Jean Evans, 1995, Hearthside Press, pg 121.

  • *Conanicut Island is in southern Rhode Island, between Newport (Newport Island) and the mainland of Rhode Island.

More About RICHARD SISSON and MARY:

Marriage: ABT 1644, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

    

Children of RICHARD SISSON and MARY are:

2. i. GEORGE2 SISSON, b. ABT 1644; d. Sep 07, 1718, Portsmouth, Newport, RI.

 	ii. 	  	ANNE SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), b. ABT 1647 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Jan 13, 1713/14, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); m. PELEG TRIPP, ABT 1667, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Unknown.
	More About PELEG TRIPP and ANNE SISSON:

Marriage: ABT 1667, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

 	iii. 	  	ELIZABETH SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), b. Apr 08, 1650 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. ABT 1740, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); m. CALEB ALLEN (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), Apr 08, 1670, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Unknown.
	More About CALEB ALLEN and ELIZABETH SISSON:

Marriage: Apr 08, 1670, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

 	iv. 	  	MARY SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), b. ABT 1652 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. ABT 1674, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); m. ISAAC LAWTON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), Mar 03, 1673/74, Portsmouth, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Unknown.
	More About ISAAC LAWTON and MARY SISSON:

Marriage: Mar 03, 1673/74, Portsmouth, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

 	v. 	  	JAMES SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), b. ABT 1656 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. ABT Dec 1734, Dartmouth, Bristol, MA (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); m. LYDIA HATHAWAY (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), ABT 1681, Portsmouth, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Unknown.
	More About JAMES SISSON and LYDIA HATHAWAY:

Marriage: ABT 1681, Portsmouth, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

 	vi. 	  	JOHN SISSON (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), b. ABT 1658 (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. ABT 1687, Newport, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); m. MARY (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.), ABT 1681, Newport, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.); d. Unknown.
	More About JOHN SISSON and MARY:

Marriage: ABT 1681, Newport, Newport, RI (Source: Family Group Sheets from John Sisson.)

--------------------

From the book, "One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families", by John Osborne Austin:

Portsmouth, R. I., Dartmouth, Mass.

May 17, 16??.Freeman.

July 2, 16??.He was on a jury that found in the case of Thomas Bradley (discovered dead on the highway) "that by extremity of ?????? at the said Thomas was overcome and so perished by himself in the wilderness."

1655.His name in in the list of Freeman of Portsmouth (71 in all). In this and preceding entry, he was called "Richard Sussel."

July 6, 1658.He bought of William Hall (both resident or Portsmouth) 1/300 of island of Quononoquett (Conanicut) and 1/300 of Dutch Island, and two years later he sold same to Peleg Sanford together with 1/300 he had bought of Thomas Manchester, and also 1/300 that he had in his own right.

June 5, 1667.Dartmouth. Grand Jury.

May 27, 1668.Testimony of Richard Sisson, being 60 or thereabonts--"John Archer, being at my house, did speak as followseth, and said the deed of gift made by Namumpam to John Sanford and himself was a cheat, and the intent thereof was to deceive Namumpam, squaw Sachem, of her land; and they were to have both corn and peague to secure her land, from Wamsutta or Peter Talman, and was to resign up the deed at her demand."

"And I, Mary Sisson, do testify that I heard the same words at the same time, and further, when my husband was gone out of the house, I heard them both say they were troubled in conscience they had concealed it so long, and did refuse to take part of the gratification." The above was attested upon onth before John Cooke.

June 3, 1668.Richard Sisson was sworn to this testimony before John Alden. The event occurred probably in Portsmouth, before he moved from that place to Dartmouth. (John Archer and John Sanford were both residents of Portsmouth.)

June 5, 1671.Surveyor of Highways.

October 18, 1683.Will, proved February 26, 1684. Ex., son James Sisson. Witnesses, Ebenezer Allen, John Anthony. To wife Mary, my dwelling house and movables during her life, and oe12 yearly rent; with firewood, orchard fruit, land for garden, liberty to keep poultry for her use, and also a horse to be maintained, and kept at her command to ride on; also 2 oxen, and 2 cows that I bought with money; all debts due me I give to my wife; and he also provides that she shall have a milch cow maintained for her use, with winter shelter and summer pasture during life, and 2 parts of all my swine. Also my wife shall have her corn carried to the mill and the meal brought home again sufficient for use during life, and he gives her 10 bushels of new Indian corn, 3 of rye, and half my wheat and barley. To son James all my housing and land in Dartmouth, excepting land near Pogausett Pond, and reservations to wife as aforesaid. To daughter Ann Tripp and her husband Peleg, tract of land near Pogansett Pond, and to daughter Tripp and her husband Peleg Tripp's children, all those sheep he is keeping. To son John, all my house and land in Portsmouth. To son George, oe5 in money. To daughter Elizabeth Allen, wife of Caleb Allen, oe5 in money. To Indian servant Samuel, a 2 year old mare. To grandchild Mary Sisson, 3 cows and 1 bed, etc., on the day of her marriage, and 1 pewter flagon and brass kettle which was her aunt Mary's.

Inventory, oe600, 19s., viz.: House and lands at Dartmouth, oe240. House and lands at Rhode Island, oe60. Cattle and horse kind, oe113, 15s. Swine, oe30. Sheep, oe14, 10s. Beds, etc., oe50. New cloth, wool yarn, hemp and flax, oe13. One negro servant, oe28. One Indian servant, oe10. Money, oe12.

April 15, 1690.Will, proved December 1, 1692. Widow Mary. Ex., son James. Witnesses, Joseph Tripp, George Cadman, John Anthony. To son George, oe35 silver money of New England, and a bible. To grandchildren John and Mary (children of son John) oe35 to be divided equally. All beds, bedding, brass, pewter, iron, linen and woollen, milk vessels, etc., to be divided in three parts. To daughter Elizabeth, wife of Caleb Allen, one of said parts, and also oe6, 5s. and a chest and wheel. To daughter Ann, wife of Peleg Tripp, one part and oe6, 10s., chest and wheel. The other part to granddaughter Mary, daughter of George Sisson, and to her oe5, 5s. Inventory, oe190, including oe120 in silver money, 29 cheeses, etc. "

--------------------

   Richard SISSON seems to have been born about 1608 in England, judging  from his age given in a deposition many years later [JnD think the deposition may have been quoted in Lucius R. Paige’s List of Freemen of Massachusetts 1630-1691. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978. page number?)] He died in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, and his will was probated on 26 February 1684.
   Some sources have claimed that Richard's wife was a Mary “Freeman,” born in 1619. We have found no documentation for that idea. Joan and David Sisson, family historians, authors of The Descendants of Richard and Mary Sisson, have said that the name could have arisen from confusion over something like “Richard, a freeman,” i.e., a person eligible to vote in town meetings.
   In 1998, David and Joan Sisson, the diligent Sisson-family historians, obtained an affidavit from the Vicar of Snaith, Yorkshire, citing the parish register of the Priory Church of Snaith. The affidavit states that the marriage of a Richard Sissons (note the final S) and a Mary Atkinson took place there on 14 February 1632. Mary was of nearby Hecke, Yorkshire, probably modern Great Heck or Little Heck.
   The 2000 Sisson Gathering began an effort to fund research for Richard and/or Mary Sisson in British records. A genealogist, Ken Smallbone, was hired. He found two records for a Richard Sisson in Saxton-on-Elnet. The first showed that Richard had been christened there in 1615, and the second was a duplicate recording of the marriage of a Richard Sissons and Mary Atkinson. (Contributions toward that search may be sent to Dr. David S. Martin, 10 Colonial Farm Circle, Marstons Mills, MA 02648.)
   Helen Whittle, a second genealogist hired to search British records, found a second record of Richard’s christening in 1615 in Saxton-on-Elnet, this time adding that he was a son of Ralph Sisson and Anne Burdsall who had married in April 1615.
   Other records show that Ralph's father was John Sisson who died at some time after 1561. John’s parents, Ralph's grandparents, were Robert and Isabel Sisson. Isabel was originally from Shadwell, Yorkshire. Robert died before 1541 and Isabel between 1548 and 1553.
   We cannot – unfortunately – be certain that this information applies to the Richard Sisson who came to New England. We hope someday to find confirmation in a record that ties Richard as known in New England with this (or another) Richard in England.
   One clue to the identity of the English Richard and Mary with the American Richard and Mary has emerged: the seeming similarity of the names of their English and their American children. Rob Sisson posted a message on the Sisson email list:
   “Another tip towards Richard and Mary of Snaith is that the names of their children match very closely those of Richard and Mary of Rhode Island. Researchers with whom I spoke at the Society of Genealogy in London surmise that the few names that don't match were possibly older children left in England or who died prior to emigration and that others were born in the colony.”
   However Joan Sisson wrote in December 2007 that she and David “are a bit doubtful that Richard of Snaith is ‘our’ Richard, mostly because of the [names of the] children.” Joan took notes of the baptism and death dates of children born to Richard and Mary (Atkinson) Sissons of Snaith. The known children of “our” Richard and Mary of New England must be compared with that list.
   For example, the English couple had a son George whose baptism is recorded in the Hecke parish register. He was born on 17 July 1636. If this is the George Sisson of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, there is some disparity since the American George seems to have been born in 1644. It is possible that the English George died young and that the American records indicate a second son of that name.
   We can speculate on the basis of what we now know of the possible identity of Richard and Mary of Snaith with Richard and Mary of New England, though we cannot know definitively. We can probably agree that a Yorkshire origin is the most promising line of inquiry, but we cannot state it absolutely. Many researchers have tried to find Richard and  Mary’s English origin, and are also tempted by older research that favored origins in other  northern English counties, eastern or southern counties, and even southern Scottish counties. One theory even posits Welsh roots.
   In the introduction to their "Descendants of Richard and Mary Sisson" (page x) David and Joan Sisson say that "records of a Richard Sisson in the town of Greystoke, Cumbria, England, were found in the early 17th century, among other Sissons in the Penrith area."
   An interesting site on the Internet
   www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Snaith/index.html
   quotes a description of Snaith from the 1820s and links to sites about “Great Heck” and “Little Heck.” This is the 1820s description of Snaith:
   "SNAITH, a market and parish-town, in the wapentake of Osgoldcross, liberty and bailiwick of Cowick and Snaith; … 23 [miles] from York, 175 from London. Market, Thursday. Fairs, last Thursday in April, for horned cattle, sheep, and woollen cloth, Aug. 10, for horned cattle, woollen cloth, line, cheese, and quills; and the last Thursday in Sept. which is chartered but not now attended. Principal Inns, Blue Bell, Black Lion, Bell and  Crown, and Green Dragon. Pop. 834. The Church (see Churches for photograph), peculiar, is a perpetual  curacy, dedicated to St. Mary, in the deanry of Pontefract. Patron, Henry Yarburgh, Esq. The town of Snaith is situated on a gently rising ground, about half a mile south of the river Aire, and within five miles of the junction of the Ouse with the rivers Derwent and Aire. In the Church, which is a neat Gothic structure, is the family vault of Lord Viscount Downe, in which his ancestors lay interred. At the west end of the town stands an old Hall, formerly the residence of the Yarburghs. The country round is extremely flat and uninteresting, but abundantly fertile. Flax is much cultivated in the neighbourhood." Modern atlases show Great Heck and Snaith about twenty miles south of the city of York and about four miles apart, Snaith east of Great Heck. Saxton-in-Elnet (not  “on-Elnet” in Internet sites) is north-west of these villages, between the cities of York and Leeds, about twelve miles from each city but slightly south of the direct line between the cities. Any map site on the Internet, such as Mapquest or Google, can give maps of Great Heck, Snaith, and Saxton-in-Elnet.
   A little review of English history might be in order: In the 1640's, England became embroiled in a civil war between King Charles I and his loyalist supporters on one hand and the Puritan-controlled Parliament and its army under Oliver Cromwell on the other. Neither the Established Church of England, of which Charles was Head, nor the Puritans tolerated Quakers. If indeed Richard and Mary were Quakers (a rather shaky theory since The Society of Friends was not formally organized until 1650), they might very well have wanted to flee England. Indeed, after the capture, trial, and execution of Charles in 1649, the persecution of Quakers increased under the new Commonwealth of England. Whether or not Richard and Mary were Quakers, they were certainly Protestants and Non-Conformists of some kind, and they probably did not agree with either the Church of England or its Puritan wing. It was not legal to be a Quaker in England. Quakers were hanged both in England and in Boston, Massachusetts. That probably explains why Richard and Mary came to Rhode Island where the Baptist church under Roger Williams, remembering its own persecution in Massachusetts, was prepared to welcome Quakers.
   It has been reported that Richard and Mary came to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, in 1639, but it has never been confirmed, nor has evidence been found yet for the birth places of the first three children: George, Anne, and Elizabeth (unless George was indeed the child born in 1636 in Snaith, Yorkshire).
   Richard and Mary may have brought three of their children with them from England when they immigrated.
   In The Descendants of Richard and Mary Sisson (page 2) David and Joan Sisson say, "There are two schools of thought on the immigration of Richard to New England. The first is that he immigrated to Dartmouth, Massachusetts [then in Plymouth Colony] in 1639 and later to Rhode
   Island. The second is that he immigrated directly to Rhode Island before 1653. In either case Richard was received as inhabitant of Portsmouth June 16, 1651, admitted as a freeman in Dartmouth May 17, 1653 ("age 45") and admitted as a freeman in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, in 1655. Whether he arrived in Portsmouth from Massachusetts or England is not stated in the record. … To the best of our knowledge, no records exist indicating Richard's presence in New England prior to 1651. This seems unusual in view of the many records that exist after 1653. If on the other hand, the family immigrated in 1651, his marriage and the birth of his first three children would have occurred in England."
   In his Sisson Family in 4 Parts, John Locke Martin said, "At a town meeting held in Portsmouth June 16, 1651 'Richard Sisson is received inhabitant amongst us and hath given his engagement'. . . . He was enrolled a freeman on May 17th, 1653, and in the same year 'Goodman Sisson' was chosen Constable, an office in which he must have been efficient, since he was repeatedly re-elected."
   Martin goes on to say that at a "Meeting of the Inhabitants of portsm:o [i.e., Portsmouth, Rhode Island] November 30th, 1657" it was ordered that the following ten men should be given planting land on Hog Island (in Mount Hope Bay between Portsmouth and Bristol) for seven years:
   "Edward ffisher, Richard Sison [sic], John Tripp [whose son married Richard and Mary's daughter], John Anthony, ffrancis Brayton, Thomas Ginings, Ralph Earll junr:, John Archar [sic], Samuell [sic] Wilson, & John Baslie."
   Further Portsmouth records show that in August 1653, Richard served as a juror. On July 6, 1658, he bought 1/300th of Quonaquett Island and 1/300th of Dutch Island. In 1660 he sold both plus an additional 1/300th to Peleg Sanford. John L. Martin says "About 1667 he moved to Dartmouth, Mass., as in that year [on June 5, 1667] he was chosen on the Grand Jury, and thereafter his name appears occasionally on the Dartmouth records, although he held no office.
   Richard had a large farm on the west bank of the Coakset River [Dartmouth] at the “Head.” His house was probably near what is now the corner of the “road leading southerly from the Head of Westport to South Westport, and the “Rhode Island Way” leading westerly between Sandy Pond and Stafford Pond to the Sakonnet River. The location was known as “Sisson's,” and James Sisson, his son, kept a tavern in the old homestead, which was so used for nearly two centuries. . . . This part of Dartmouth became a part of the town of Westport in 1787. At a town meeting on June 5th, 1671, Richard Sisson was elected town surveyor of highways [for Portsmouth], and no further records of him are found, till his death in 1684."
   Martin continued, "On May 27th, 1668, Richard Sisson being 60 or thereabouts, gave the following testimony: 'John Archer, being at my house did speak as followeth, and said the deed of gift made by Namumpan to John Sanford and himself was a cheat, and the intent thereof was to deceive Namumpan, squaw Sachem of her land: and they were to have both corn and peague to secure her land from Wamsutta or Peter Tallman, and was to resign up the deed at her demand.’ Mary also spoke: ‘And I, Mary Sisson, do testify that I heard the same words at the same time, and further, when my husband was gone out of the house, I heard them both say they were troubled in conscience they had concealed it so long, and did refuse to take part of the gratification.' The above was attested upon oath before John Cooke. On June 3rd, 1668 Richard Sisson was sworn to this testimony before John Alden. The event probably occurred in Portsmouth, before he moved from that place to Dartmouth. John Archer and John Sanford were both residents of Portsmouth."
   “We have never found any indication of a formal occupation. Some have called Richard a surveyor, but he held that title as an appointee of the town of Dartmouth, and it is unlikely that he did much actual surveying as a profession.”
   Richard and Mary's son George built a house in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on land originally owned by Richard and Mary. Possibly it was George's son Richard who built the house. The younger Richard inherited Richard and Mary’s land from his father. The house included or replaced the cellar of Richard and Mary's house. It can be seen today at 1236 East Main Road, Portsmouth, Rhode Island. About 1998 it was purchased by Roland A. Morgan, a trained historical restorer. He was planning in 1998 to open an antique shop there, though in 2007 he was living upstairs and only storing his finds on the ground floor. A house on that land may originally have been built in the 1650s, and some people think that the cellar was incorporated into the house now there.
   During the 1660s Richard and Mary lived with or near their son James, in Westport, Plymouth Colony, now in Bristol County, Massachusetts. James owned a large piece of land there. Richard and Mary returned to Portsmouth, probably before King Philip's War in 1675-1676. See
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Philip's_War for an account of that war. Richard died in Portsmouth, though later Mary returned to Dartmouth and died there.
   “Before the King Philip War it would have been venturesome to think of settling eight miles from the seashore [at Westport], and so far as is known only one made the attempt. If the information furnished by the records is complete, the first man to locate at the head of the Noquochoke River was Richard Sisson, and he was bold and hardy enough to locate his home as early as 1671 on the west side of the river and on the south side of the highway, for in that year he was elected surveyor of the Town Roads.” From Henry B. Worth. An address at Westport’s "Old Home Week," 24 August 1908. Quoted in John L. Martin's "The Sisson Family."
   "The will of Richard Sisson was dated October 18th, 1683, and was proved in Dartmouth February 26th 1684. The executor was his son James." The inventory was dated Nov. 15, 1683 (The will is listed under Richard Sison [sic] at http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/users/deetz/Plymouth/willsindex00.html).
   "To wife Mary, my dwelling house and movables during her life, and twelve pounds sterling yearly rent; with firewood, orchard fruit, land for garden, liberty to keep poultry for her use, and also a horse to be maintained and kept at her command to ride on, also 2 oxen and two cows that I bought with my money; all debts due me I give to my wife. She shall have a milch cow maintained for her use, with winter shelter and summer pasture during live and two parts of all my swine. Also she shall have her corn carried to the mill and the meal brought home again sufficient for use during life, and 10 bushels of Indian corn, 3 of Rye and half of my wheat and barley.
   “To son James, all my housing and land in Dartmouth, excepting land near Pongansett Pond and reservations to wife as aforesaid.
   “To daughter Ann Tripp and her husband Peleg, tract of land near Pongansett Pond, and to daughter Tripp and her husband Peleg Tripp's children, all those sheep he is keeping.
   “To son John, all my house and land in Portsmouth.
   “To son George, five pounds in money.
   “To daughter Elizabeth Allen, wife of Caleb Allen, five pounds.
   “To Indian servant Samuel, a two-year-old mare.
   “To grandchild Mary Sisson, daughter of George, three cows and one bed, etc., on the day of her marriage, and one pewter flagon and brass kettle which were her Aunt Mary's."
   "The inventory of the estate was Ð600/19s . viz:
   House & lands in Dartmouth Ð40
   [ditto] Rhode Island Ð60
   Cattle and horse kind Ð113/15s
   Swine Ð30
   Sheep Ð14/10s
   Beds, etc. Ð50
   New cloth, wool yarn, hemp & flax Ð13
   One Negro servant Ð28
   One Indian [ditto] Ð10
   Money Ð12"
   Useful references for Richard and his descendants are:
        * Rhodes, ed. "Colonial Families of the United States," Vol II (D&J Sisson’s  #4)
        * Austin, John O. "160 Allied Families" (Salem, Mass.) pages 120,  208-12 (D&J #5)
        * Munsell et al. "American Ancestry," (1899) Vol. 12 (D&J #6)
        * Arnold, James N. "Rhode Island Vital Records" (D&J #7)
        * Welling, B. "They Were Here, Too" (Greenwich, Washington County, NY: New York Historical Society, 1963-71) (D&J #8)
        * Paige, Lucius R. "List of Freemen of Massachusetts, 1630-1691" (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1978) (D&J #9)
        * Austin, John O. "The Genealogical Dictionary of RI," (Albany, 1887), p. 181 (D&J #10)
        * Martin, John L. "Sisson Family" (New Bedford, Mass.: typescript, 1930s; indexed by David S. Martin, 1991) Vol I, pp 10-4, 7, 17 (D&J #11)
        * Rhode Island Historical Society. "The Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth." (Freeman and Sons, 1901) (D&J #392)

Richard married Mary about 1644 in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Mary was born about 1615. She died 22 Sep 1692 in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts.

   "The wife of Richard Sisson was Mary . . . . .  The date of her birth and marriage are not known, but she died in 1692. Her will dated April 15th, 1690 was proved in Dartmouth on December 1st, 1692, her son James being executor, and the witnesses were Joseph Tripp, George Cadman, and John Anthony." [John L. Martin. "The Sisson Family" part 1, page 3]
   The text of Mary’s will as given in “Abstracts from the first book of Bristol County [Massachusetts] Records”:
   Mary Sison of Dartmouth widow, made her will "the fifteenth day of the second month Caled aprill" 1690, "being uery ill in body.”
   [U=V in early writing. Sometimes f = s. Ð = the symbol for pounds sterling.]
   - To my loving son Georg Sison Ð35 in money and a Bible.
   - To my two grandchildren John and Mary Sison, children of my son John Sison Ð35 in money to be divided equally between them, to be paid to my son George Sison for the use of said two grandchildren.
   - All my brass, pewter, iron, linen and woolen, milk vessels and pails shall be divided into three equal parts.
        + One part I give to my daughter Elizabeth wife of Caleb Allin, also Ð5/10 [Five pounds/ten shillings] in money, one chest and a wheel.
        + Another part I give to my daughter Ann wife of Peleg Tripp, also Ð5..10 in money, a chest and a wheel.
        + The other part I give to my granddaughter Mary Sison daughter of my son George Sison, also Ð5 in money.
   - I hereby acknowledge that I have received of my son James Sison in full for all estate left me by my husband Richard Sison in his will, and acquit him of the same. Said son James to be sole executor.
   Witnessed by Joseph Tripp, George Cadman, and Jno Anthony, of whom the first two made oath at Bristol Dec. 1, 1692 before John Saffin.
        Attest
        Stephen Burton Registr.
        Entered Sept: 1693 by John Cary Registr.
   This transcript was made from the New England Historic and Genealogical Register, vol. 62 (1908), p 182.)
   The receipts for the bequests were signed and witnessed:
       Georg Sison [sic] "of Road Island in the Collony of Road Island and prouidence plantations" [U=V in early writing] received of my brother James Sison of Dartmuth the money and goods given me by my mother Mary Sison by her will. Dated “the feuenteenth of ye 10th mth Cald December 1692" and witnessed by Valentine Hudelstun and Richard Allen. Entered Oct. 10, 1693 by John Cary Registr.
   “George Sisson of Road Island gave receipt to my brother James Sisson of Dartmouth for L35 in money that my mother Mary Sisson gave by will my brother John Sisson's two children. Dated Dec. 17, 1692, and witnessed by Valentine Hudelstun and Richard Allen. Entered Oct. 10, 1693 by John Cary Registr.
   “Elizabeth Allen wife of Caleb Allen of Sandwich, Barnstable Co., has received of my brother James Sisson of Dartmouth the money and goods given me by my mother Mary Sisson in her will. Dated Dec. 17, 1692, and witnessed by Vallentine Hudlestun and Deliverance Smith. Entered
   Oct.10, 1693 by John Cary Registr.
   “Ann Tripp wife of Peleg Tripp of the Colleny of Road Island and prouidence plantations" has received of my brother James Sisson of Dartmouth, the money and goods given me by my mother Mary Sisson in her will. Dated Dec. 17, 1692 and witnessed by Vallentine Hudlestun and Richard Allen.
   “Mary Sisson daughter of George Sisson “of Road Island Colleny & providence plantations" has received of my uncle James Sisson of Dartmouth all the money and goods given me by my grandmother Mary Sisson her will. Dated Dec. 17, 1692 and witnessed by Valentine Hudlestun and Deliverance Smith.
   The house Mary lived in had probably been transferred to James. Mary's inventory was: "Ð120 in silver money, plus 29 cheeses, etc."
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Richard (Immigrant, 1638) Sisson's Timeline

1608
1608
UK
1636
July 17, 1636
Age 28
1639
June 24, 1639
Age 31
Dartmouth, Massachusetts
1644
July 17, 1644
Age 36
Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts
1645
1645
Age 37
1646
1646
Age 38
Massachusetts, United States
1647
1647
Age 39
Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Colonial America
1650
April 4, 1650
Age 42
Dartmouth, (Present Bristol County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
1650
Age 42
1650
Age 42