Richard Ingersoll

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Richard Ingersoll

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
Death: Died in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of George A Ingersoll and Alicia Hankyns
Husband of Dorothy Moreland Morleigh and Ann Knight
Father of Deborah Larrabee; Alice Wolcott; John Ingersoll; Lieut. George Ingersoll; John Ingersoll and 8 others
Brother of John George Ingersoll; Joan Ingersoll; John William Ingersoll; Elizabeth Ingersoll; William Ingersoll and 7 others

Occupation: ferryman
Managed by: Nathan De Graw
Last Updated:

About Richard Ingersoll

http://www.ingersoll.net/Richard_Ingersoll_GMB.htm

Excerpts from Great Migration Begins

OCCUPATION: Ferryman. ("Ric[har]d Inkersoll" was allowed one penny for every person he ferried over the north river, 16 January 1636/7 [STR 1:31].)

EDUCATION: Signed his will with a mark. The will also has the annotation, made by John Endicott, that "I read this will to Richard Ingersoll & he acknowledged it to be his will."

OFFICES: On 7 July 1644, ordered to "walk forth in the time of God's worship, to take notice of such as either lie about the meeting house without attending to the word or ordinances, or that lie at home or in the fields..." (apparently on the sixth Sunday following, paired with Robert Moulton, Jr.) [STR 1:131].

ESTATE: In 1636 received eighty acres in Salem, but not in the freeman's land [STR 1:20]. Granted one acre of marsh in Salem on 25 December 1637, with a household of nine [STR 1:103].

He received two acres for a houselot 6 April 1635 and was reminded to allow room for a highway on his land [STR 1:9]. With Edward Giles and Pasco Foot, Ingersoll was considered for land by the "frost fish brook" next to Goodman Barney, 10 April 1637 [STR 1:44]. On 20 November 1639 Richard Ingersoll received ten acres of meadow in the great meadow at Salem, having already received twenty acres on 23 December 1638 [STR 1:92, 94].

In his will, dated 21 July 1644 and proved 2 January 1644/5, Richard Ingersoll of Salem gave all to "Ann my wife," except to "George Ingersoll my son six acres lying in the great meadow," to "Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcel of ground with a little frame thereon" (unless Nathaniel dies without issue, in which case the land should be divided equally among "John Ingersoll my son and Richard Pettingell and William Haines my sons-in-law"), to "Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cows", and to "my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland & meadow after my wife's decease"; witnessed by Townsend Bishop [NEHGR 9:157] (What appears to be a different version of this will refers to both Bathsheba and Alice as youngest daughter, which is clearly impossible [EPR 1:43; EQC 1:76]. Without examining the originals of these documents we cannot tell whether the error was made by the seventeenth-century or the nineteenth-century copyist.)

The inventory, taken 4 October 1644 by Townsend Bishop and Jeffrey Massey, totalled £213 19s., of which £47 10s. 10d. was real estate: a farm, 80 acres, meadow, 20 acres, £14 3s. 4d.; another farm, 75 acres, £7; and 26 acres, 2 houses, 2 acres [and] a quarter of salt marsh, £26 7s. 6d. [EPR 1:458; EQC 1:76].

On 10 April 1668 Anne Knight deeded eighty acres at Royalside, bequeathed to her by her late husband "Richard Ingerson," to their sons "John and Nathaniel Ingerson" with the consent of her now husband John Knight Sr. of Newbury [EQC 4:109].

COMMENTS: 28 May 1629 letter of instruction from Massachusetts Bay Company to John Endicott: "There is also one Richard Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, hired for the Company with their families, who we pray you may be well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves" [MBCR 1:401; SLR 1:xvi].

In the 1636 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll appears in that portion of the list which included "non-freemen," which in Salem tells us clearly that he was not a member of the church. In the 1637 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll is shown with a family of nine. Seven of his children were living at that date, but his eldest daughter Alice was already married to William Walcott and would have been included in her husband's household. Thus, there may have been an additional child otherwise unrecorded, but this child in turn must have died before 1644; alternatively there may have been a more distant relative or a servant living with the Ingersolls that year.

Ingersoll had the usual problems with fences and encroachment on land, but the land grant next to Jacob Barney was a problem. Ingersoll sued Jacob Barney at the September Term, 1639, probably regarding land [EQC 1:13]. Barney sued him back over feeding cattle in his marsh, September Term, 1640, and won a verdict of "[t]wo loads of hay at water side as convenient as his own was" [EQC 1:21]. Joshua Verrin sued Ingersoll at the same term over maintenance of a fence and was countersued immediately [EQC 1:22, 29].

For some of the larger and more expensive farm implements noted in Ingersoll's inventory, it is stated that he owned one third of each item. This would indicate that he shared ownership with one or two other husbandmen in the neighborhood, or, as seems more likely, with two of his sons. In depositions at the June 1678 Essex Quarterly Court, the brothers George, John and Nathaniel "Ingerson" gave evidence regarding events in the 1640s. George deposed that "living apartner with his father Richard Ingerson upon the farm that the said Rich[ar]d Ingerson hired of Mr. Chickering which the said Chickering had bought of Mr. Townsend Bishop," demonstrating that the Ingersolls were in a cooperative family enterprise and placing them on Mr. Chickering's farm.

Richard Ingersoll found the Salem miller lacking and in September 1640 took grandjuryman Lawrence Leech with him to the mill to prove that the grists were "much short of weight" [EQC 1:20]. His neighbors found his cattle and the cattle of a dozen other men offensive in the common cornfields and Ingersoll paid the court's fine [EQC 1:49, 56].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE:

There is an excellent treatment of Richard Ingersoll in "The Ancestry of Abel Lunt" ... by Walter Goodwin Davis (pp. 63-68), and details may be found there of the marriages and later lives of Richard's children.

Mrs. William C. Clark, "The Parents of Jonathan Haynes of Newbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts, and Some of Their Descendants" [TAG 27:129-34], provides extensive documentation on the fate of some of Richard Ingersoll's children and property.

John B. Threlfall also published an account of this family in 1993 [GMC26 141-48].

_______________________________

  • Richard Ingersoll
  • M, #34604, b. 10 March 1588, d. 21 July 1644
  • Father George Ingersoll b. 1562
  • Mother Alicia Hankin1 b. c 1566
  • Richard Ingersoll was born on 10 March 1588 at Edworth, Bedfordshire, England. He married Ann Langley, daughter of Thomas Langley and Ann, on 20 October 1611 at Sandy, Bedfordshire, England. Richard Ingersoll immigrated on 15 May 1629 to Plymouth, Plymouth, MA; On the Mayflower.2 He died on 21 July 1644 at Salem, Essex, MA, at age 56.
  • Family Ann Langley b. 1590, d. 30 Jul 1677
  • Children
    • Alice Ingersoll+ b. 12 Dec 1612, d. b 1643
    • Sarah Ingersoll+ b. c 1623, d. c 1719
    • Joanna Ingersoll+3 b. 3 Mar 1625, d. 1693
  • Citations
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 132.
  • [S40] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  • [S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, Family History Archives, SLC.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1152.htm#i34604

_____________

  • LANGLEY, Ann
  • b. ABT 1598
  • d. 30 JUL 1677
  • Family:
  • Marriage: 20 OCT 1616 Sands, England
  • Spouse: INGERSOLL, Richard
  • b. ABT 1595 Bedfordshire, England
  • d. 1644
  • Children:
    • INGERSOLL, Alice
    • INGERSOLL, George
    • INGERSOLL, Sarah
    • INGERSOLL, John
    • INGERSOLL, Joanna
    • INGERSOLL, Bathshua
    • INGERSOLL, Nathaniel
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_221.htm#64

______________

  • Anne Langley Knight
  • Birth: 1592 Sandy, Bedfordshire, England
  • Death: Jul. 30, 1677 Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
  • Anne Knight was the daughter of Thomas and Anne Langley of Sandy, England. She was first married to Richard Ingersol at St. Swithins Church in Sandy England Oct. 10, 1611. Richard and Anne sailed to America 25th April 1629, on the Mayflower ( not THE MAYFLOWER) arriving 29th June. They settled at Salem Mass.
  • After Richard's death in 1644 she married John Knight of Newbury Mar. 20 1645.
  • Family links:
  • Spouse:
  • John Knight (1595 - 1670)
  • Children:
    • Bathsheba Ingersol Knight (1630 - 1705)*
  • Burial: Unknown
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 114706269
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114706269

______________

  • Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of the ..., Volume 4 By William Richard Cutter, William Frederick Adams
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=FM8UAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA2632&lpg=PA2632&dq=John+Ingersoll+1615&source=bl&ots=P_Up4sbkNV&sig=VQ38H9fMUUIQotJpfPKRmkB0kLo&hl=en&ei=ejMgTJ7XOqjrnQeC88Vt&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAjgU#v=onepage&q=John%20Ingersoll%201615&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/genealogicaland01adamgoog
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogicaland01adamgoog#page/n669/mode/1up
  • Pg.2631
  • In the year 1629, in the reign of Charles I, Richard Ingersoll and his brother John came from Bedfordshire, England, and settled in Salem, Massachusetts. Richard, the elder brother, brought with him to the new continent his wife Ann and a family of two sons and four daughters. A third was born in Salem about 1632. Richard Ingersoll died in Salem in 1644. Ann, his widow, married for a second husband John Knight, of Newbury. He was the father of John Knight Jr., who married Richard's youngest daughter, Bathsheba. Ann was his second or third wife. Children of Richard Ingersoll: 1. Lieutenant George, born in England in 1618, consequently was eleven years of age when he arrived in America; he died in 1694, leaving two sons, George and Samuel. 2. John, born in England in 1623 ; he was a mariner, and was admitted a freeman at Salem, April 29, 1668;
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogicaland01adamgoog#page/n670/mode/1up
  • he married Judith Felton, and died in 1716. 3. Alice, born in England, married Josiah Walcott. 4. Joanna, born in England, married Richard Pettingell in 1643. 5. Sarah, born in England, married William Haines, of Salem, in 1644, and for a second husband, Joseph Houlton, of Danvers. 6. Bathsheba, born in England, married John Knight Jr., of Newbury, in 1647. 7. Deacon Nathaniel, born in Salem about 1632 ; was admitted a freeman at Salem, March 22, 1689 ; he married Hannah Collins; he died in 1719.
  • John Ingersoll, younger brother of Richard Ingersoll, was born in England in 1615, and therefore was about fourteen years of age when he left England to come to America with his brother's family. For a time he lived with his brother Richard at Salem. We next hear of him in Hartford, Connecticut, in which place he settled after his brother's death. In 1651 he married Dorothy, daughter of Thomas Lord, one of the first settlers of Hartford. At the time of his marriage he was thirty-six years old, and his wife about twenty-two. The first two children by this marriage were born in Hartford: 1. Hannah, born in 1652. 2. Dorothy, born in 1654. In 1655 John and his family removed to Northampton, Massachusetts, in which place another daughter was soon born: 3. Margery, born in January, 1656 (Northampton records). Mrs. Ingersoll was but twenty-six years old at the time of her death. On December 12, 1657, about one year after the death of his wife, John Ingersoll married Abigail, daughter of Thomas Bascom, one of the first settlers in Windsor, Connecticut, but who afterwards removed to Northampton, Massachusetts. The children by this marriage, four daughters, were all born in Northampton (Northampton records). 4. Abigail, born January 11, 1658. 5. Sarah, October 30, 1660. 6. Abiah, August 24, 1663. 7. Hester, September 9, 1665. In 1666 John removed with his family to Woronoco, which was the Indian name by which Westfield, Massachusetts, was then known. In April of the same year, and soon after his arrival in Woronoco, his wife Abigail died, leaving four more daughters for John to care for. During the following year, 1667, he married Mary, daughter of John Hunt, and a sister of Jonathan Hunt, of Northampton. The name of Mary Hunt's mother previous to her marriage was Mary Webster, daughter of John Webster, one of the first settlers of Hartford, and the fifth governor of the colony of Connecticut, chosen in 1656. It is recorded in the town book of Westfield that in the year 1666 land was granted to John Ingersoll and others, and that he settled there in that year. By his wife Mary there were born in Westfield eight children, seven sons and one daughter, and their names and dates of birth may be found in the town records of Westfield. 8. Thomas, born March 28, 1668. 9. John, October 20, 1669. 10. Abel, November 11, 1671. 11. Ebenezer, October 15, 1673. 12. Joseph, October 16, 1675. 13. Mary, November 17, 1677. 14. Benjamin, November 15, 1679. 15. Jonathan, May 10, 1681. John Ingersoll died in Westfield, September 3, 1684 (Westfield records), in the seventieth year of his age, and his grave may be found in the old Westfield cemetery. His widow Mary died in Westfield, August 18, 1690 (Westfield records).
  • (II) Thomas, eldest son of John and Mary (Hunt) Ingersoll, was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, March 28, 1668. .... etc.

______________

  • The Judge Samuel Holten House (circa 1670) is a historic house located at 171 Holten Street, Danvers, Massachusetts. It is currently owned by the Daughters of the American Revolution, and open by appointment.
  • The colonial site first belonged to Richard Ingersoll (died 1644). In 1670 his wife left the land to her second husband upon her death, and thence to his daughter Sarah, whose second husband Joseph Holten deeded the lot (and perhaps also the house) to his son Benjamin Holten. Benjamin died in 1689, and his will records both the land and a house. Given this background, it is believed that Benjamin Holten built the house circa 1670 in a typical "one-room" layout. The house has been extended six times since until 1832.
  • The house is historically interesting as the home of Sarah Holten, who in 1692 gave testimony against Rebecca Nurse which led to her death in the Salem Witch Trials. During the American Revolutionary War, it was the home of Judge Samuel Holten, who served in the Continental Congress, including as its president pro tempore, was a signer of the Articles of Confederation, and who was an early member of the United States House of Representatives (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1795).
  • The house was acquired by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1921, and has been extensively restored.
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judge_Samuel_Holten_House

__________________

_________________

Richard arrived in Salem on June 29, 1629, with Higginson. He and his family came from Bedfordshire, England. He was given 2 acres in the town area and 80 acres on the Cape Ann side. Later he was given an additional 30 acres of meadowland by the town. In 1640, his family was credited with nine persons, and they were alloted another acre. According to the town records he was to receive one "peny" for every person he ferried over the North River.

He wrote his will on July 21, 1644, and died soon after (probably). His wife, Ann, was to receive most of his estate. His son, George, was to receive 6 acres. The youngest son, Nathanie, some land as well, but if he were to die "without issue of his body lawfully begotten" the land was to be shared by George and Richard's sons-in-law. His daughter, Bathsheba was to receive two cows while his older daughter, Alice Walcott, was to get the house in town and 10 acres when her mother died. (A note followed the will stating that 7 cows were worth 34 pounds at that time.)

_____________________

1629 RICHARD INGERSOLL - from England on the Mayflower - 11th generation (S1110)

RICHARD INGERSOLL was born March 10, 1587 in Edworth, Bedfordshire, England, the son of George Ingersoll.

Richard married Ann Langley October 10, 1611 at Sandy, County of Bedford, England. Ann was born about 1576, the daughter of Thomas and Ann Langley.

Richard and Ann were the parents of eight children, three sons and five daughters. Probably all but one was born in England. Nathaniel was born in America but Bathsheba was born in 1629, the year they arrived in America.

The family came to America arriving at Plymouth, Massachusetts on May 15, 1629 on the ship "Mayflower". They brought with them letters of recommendation from William Craddock which were given to Governor Endicott. Subsequently, Richard was gtanted 80 acres of land on the east side of Wooleston River and a two-acre Salem Town lot. At the time Richard was 42 years old.

Richard died July 21, 1644 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts at the age of 57. His wife, Ann, then married John Knight, a merchant sailor of Newbury, Massachusetts. John died in 1670; Ann died at Salem July 30, 1677 about 101 years old.

Will of Richard Ingersoll 21 July 1644 , Salem, Essex, Massachusetts

This is an exact wording of Richard Ingersoll's will, copied from the Salem Quarterly Court Records.

Will of Richard Ingersoll of Salem, dated July 21, 1644; proved Jan 2, 1644-45. The following abstract is from a copy made by Joshua Coffin many years ago, the original having disappeared: "I give to Ann my wife all my estate of land, goods & chattels whatsoever except as followeth, viz. I give to George Ingersoll my son six acres of meadow lying in the great meadow. Item I give to nathaniel Ingersoll, my youngest son a parcell of ground with a little frame thereon, which I bought of John P[ease?] but if the said Nathaniel dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten then the land aforesaid to be equally shared between John Ingersoll my son , & Richard Pettingel & William Haines my sons in law. I give to Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cowes. I give to my youngest daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland & meadow after my wife's decease. R (his mark) I." I read this will to Richard Ingersoll & he acknowledged it to be his wll. Jo. Endecott." Wit: Townsend Bishop.

________________

He came to New England with his family on the 2nd Mayflower in 1629. The Master of this Mayflower was the famous Capt William Pierce. The ship left Gravesend, London, England March 1629 and arrived at Plymouth, May 15, 1629. There were approximately 35 passengers including Richard Ingersall, his wife Anne and their children: George, Joanna, John, Sarah and Alice. He kept the ferry at North River.

Excerpts from Great Migration Begins

OCCUPATION: Ferryman. ("Ric[har]d Inkersoll" was allowed one penny for every person he ferried over the north river, 16 January 1636/7 [STR 1:31].)

EDUCATION: Signed his will with a mark. The will also has the annotation, made by John Endicott, that "I read this will to Richard Ingersoll & he acknowledged it to be his will."

OFFICES: On 7 July 1644, ordered to "walk forth in the time of God's worship, to take notice of such as either lie about the meeting house without attending to the word or ordinances, or that lie at home or in the fields..." (apparently on the sixth Sunday following, paired with Robert Moulton, Jr.) [STR 1:131].

ESTATE: In 1636 received eighty acres in Salem, but not in the freeman's land [STR 1:20]. Granted one acre of marsh in Salem on 25 December 1637, with a household of nine [STR 1:103].

He received two acres for a houselot 6 April 1635 and was reminded to allow room for a highway on his land [STR 1:9]. With Edward Giles and Pasco Foot, Ingersoll was considered for land by the "frost fish brook" next to Goodman Barney, 10 April 1637 [STR 1:44]. On 20 November 1639 Richard Ingersoll received ten acres of meadow in the great meadow at Salem, having already received twenty acres on 23 December 1638 [STR 1:92, 94].

In his will, dated 21 July 1644 and proved 2 January 1644/5, Richard Ingersoll of Salem gave all to "Ann my wife," except to "George Ingersoll my son six acres lying in the great meadow," to "Nathaniel Ingersoll my youngest son a parcel of ground with a little frame thereon" (unless Nathaniel dies without issue, in which case the land should be divided equally among "John Ingersoll my son and Richard Pettingell and William Haines my sons-in-law"), to "Bathsheba my youngest daughter two cows", and to "my daughter Alice Walcott my house at town with 10 acres of upland & meadow after my wife's decease"; witnessed by Townsend Bishop [NEHGR 9:157] (What appears to be a different version of this will refers to both Bathsheba and Alice as youngest daughter, which is clearly impossible [EPR 1:43; EQC 1:76]. Without examining the originals of these documents we cannot tell whether the error was made by the seventeenth-century or the nineteenth-century copyist.)

The inventory, taken 4 October 1644 by Townsend Bishop and Jeffrey Massey, totalled £213 19s., of which £47 10s. 10d. was real estate: a farm, 80 acres, meadow, 20 acres, £14 3s. 4d.; another farm, 75 acres, £7; and 26 acres, 2 houses, 2 acres [and] a quarter of salt marsh, £26 7s. 6d. [EPR 1:458; EQC 1:76].

On 10 April 1668 Anne Knight deeded eighty acres at Royalside, bequeathed to her by her late husband "Richard Ingerson," to their sons "John and Nathaniel Ingerson" with the consent of her now husband John Knight Sr. of Newbury [EQC 4:109].

COMMENTS: 28 May 1629 letter of instruction from Massachusetts Bay Company to John Endicott: "There is also one Richard Haward and Richard Inkersall, both Bedfordshire men, hired for the Company with their families, who we pray you may be well accommodated, not doubting but they will well and orderly demean themselves" [MBCR 1:401; SLR 1:xvi].

In the 1636 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll appears in that portion of the list which included "non-freemen," which in Salem tells us clearly that he was not a member of the church. In the 1637 Salem land grant, Richard Ingersoll is shown with a family of nine. Seven of his children were living at that date, but his eldest daughter Alice was already married to William Walcott and would have been included in her husband's household. Thus, there may have been an additional child otherwise unrecorded, but this child in turn must have died before 1644; alternatively there may have been a more distant relative or a servant living with the Ingersolls that year.

Ingersoll had the usual problems with fences and encroachment on land, but the land grant next to Jacob Barney was a problem. Ingersoll sued Jacob Barney at the September Term, 1639, probably regarding land [EQC 1:13]. Barney sued him back over feeding cattle in his marsh, September Term, 1640, and won a verdict of "[t]wo loads of hay at water side as convenient as his own was" [EQC 1:21]. Joshua Verrin sued Ingersoll at the same term over maintenance of a fence and was countersued immediately [EQC 1:22, 29].

For some of the larger and more expensive farm implements noted in Ingersoll's inventory, it is stated that he owned one third of each item. This would indicate that he shared ownership with one or two other husbandmen in the neighborhood, or, as seems more likely, with two of his sons. In depositions at the June 1678 Essex Quarterly Court, the brothers George, John and Nathaniel "Ingerson" gave evidence regarding events in the 1640s. George deposed that "living apartner with his father Richard Ingerson upon the farm that the said Rich[ar]d Ingerson hired of Mr. Chickering which the said Chickering had bought of Mr. Townsend Bishop," demonstrating that the Ingersolls were in a cooperative family enterprise and placing them on Mr. Chickering's farm.

Richard Ingersoll found the Salem miller lacking and in September 1640 took grandjuryman Lawrence Leech with him to the mill to prove that the grists were "much short of weight" [EQC 1:20]. His neighbors found his cattle and the cattle of a dozen other men offensive in the common cornfields and Ingersoll paid the court's fine [EQC 1:49, 56].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: There is an excellent treatment of Richard Ingersoll in "The Ancestry of Abel Lunt" ... by Walter Goodwin Davis (pp. 63-68), and details may be found there of the marriages and later lives of Richard's children. Mrs. William C. Clark, "The Parents of Jonathan Haynes of Newbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts, and Some of Their Descendants" [TAG 27:129-34], provides extensive documentation on the fate of some of Richard Ingersoll's children and property. John B. Threlfall also published an account of this family in 1993 [GMC26 141-48].

_____________________________

view all 56

Richard Ingersoll's Timeline

1580
1580
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England, United Kingdom
1587
March 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
March 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England, United Kingdom
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedford, England
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
May 10, 1587
Edworth,Bedford,England
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England
May 10, 1587
Edworth, Bedfordshire, England