Richard Kimball, Sr.,

Is your surname Kimball?

Research the Kimball family

Richard Kimball, Sr.,'s Geni Profile

Records for Richard Kimball

535,517 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Richard Kimball

Nicknames: "Richard /Kimball/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rattlesden, Suffolk, UK
Death: Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Place of Burial: Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Kimball, IV and Johanna Kimball
Husband of Ursula Kimball; Ursula Kimball (Scott) and Margaret Dow
Father of Richard Kimball, Jr; Henry Kimball; Abigail Ursula Severance; Benjamin Kimball; Abigail Severans and 15 others
Brother of John Kimball; Frances Seir; Rachel Kemball; Thomas Kemble; Henry Kimball, V and 4 others
Half brother of Thomas Kemble

Occupation: Wheelwright, Wheelright (Came to America in 1634), Richard came from England to Boston in 1634 on the ship Elizabeth
Managed by: Michele McAffee
Last Updated:

About Richard Kimball

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s : Name: Richard Kimball Year: 1634 Age: 39 Estimated birth year: abt 1595 Place: Boston, Massachusetts Source Publication Code: 263 Primary Immigrant: Kimball, Richard

Annotation: Part 1, pp. 1-43, is a study of emigration to New England in colonial times; part 2, pp. 45-207, lists passengers and the ships they arrived on (3,600 passengers on 213 ships). From the Custom House records of English ports. Much of the information is con

Source Bibliography: BANKS, CHARLES EDWARD. The Planters of the Commonwealth; a Study of the Emigrants and Emigration in Colonial Times: To Which Are Added Lists of Passengers to Boston and to the Bay Colony; the Ships which Brought Them; Their English Homes, and the Places of Their Settlement in Massachusetts, 1620-1640. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1930. 231p. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1961. Repr. 1984.

Page: 118

_____________________________________________

Richard came to this country in the ship Elizabeth, William Andrews, master, in 1634. He appears to have gone, soon after landing, to Watertown, Mass. He settled in a different part of the town from that occupied by Henry Kemball (1). According to Bond and other writers Richard and Henry were brothers. There is but little evidence to support this supposition, and it seems to be mainly founded on the fact that they both came over on the same vessel. Richard is said on the shipping list to be thirty-nine years old, but he was probably somewhat older. He was, however, in the prime of life, and soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement.

He first settled in Watertown, and his home lot is thus given by Dr. Henry Bond: "Richard Kimball, six acres, bounded on the north by Cambridge, east by the land of W. Hamlet, south by the highway, and west by land of Edward White."

This lot was situated a long way from the centre of the town. It is now in Cambridge, which many years ago annexed the eastern part of Watertown. The lot was situated near what is now the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street, and near springs of water.

He was proclaimed freeman on 6 May 1635, and was a proprietor in 1636-7. Soon after this date he was invited to remove to Ipswich, where they were in need of a competent man to act as wheelwright to the new settlement. Here he spent the remainder of his days. The town granted him a house lot, 23 Feb 1637, "next adjoining Goodwin Simons at the west end of the town." He was also granted at the same time "40 acres Beyond the North Riuer near the land of Robert Scott." In 1639 he had liberty to pasture "two cows free." On "the last day of the last month 1641" he is mentioned as "Among the Commoners of Ipswich." He was appointed one of the seven men on 1 Mar 1645. On the "22nd day of the tenth mo. 1647" he was allowed two Pounds for killing two foxes.

His services as wheelwright were appreciated by his townspeople, for he was permitted in January, 1649, "to fell such White Oaks as he hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use."

19 Dec 1648, he contributed with others three shillings as his annual proportion toward the sum of £27, 7s, as a rate for the service of their military leader, Major David Dennison, then commander of the military forces of Essex and Norfolk counties.

In September, 1652, he was one of the appraisers of the estate of John Cross, one of the earliest settlers of Ipswich.

On the "25th day, 11 mo 1652," he and his son Richard, Wheelwrights, "for £14, seel 30 acres upland bounding on the land of Mr. John Winthrop," also another lot of land of ten acres of "medow." 1653 he was one of a committee of three to survey fences in the common fields north of the river. His brother-in-law, Thomas Scott, died Feb. 1653-4 and he was joint executor with Edmund Bridges of his will. On May 25, 1654, their official position was recognized by Thomas Scott, Jr., then a resident of Stamford, Conn.

In 1660 he was granted the right "to fell 20 white oak trees to make wheels for the townsmen their use." In 1664 he owned 43 shares in "Plumb Island."

Richard Kimball was of the parish of Rattlesden, county of Suffolk, England, as is shown by the following entry on the parish register:

   " Henry Kemball ye sonne of Richard and Vrsula his wife baptized 1615 12 of August."

Ursula Scott, Richard's first wife, and mother of all his children, was the daughter of Henry Scott of Rattlesden. The Scott family had been in Suffolk county almost as long as the Kemball family. George Scott, grandfather of Henry, was buried at Bradsfield, St. George, 30 Aug 1562. Ursula was baptised at Rattlesden 14 Feb 1596-7, and married Richard Kemball in 1613. The will of Henry Scott, Ursula's father, serves to establish the relationship between the families.

"To Abigale Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Henrie Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Elizabeth Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Richard Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21." He also mentions his wife Martha, and sons Roger and Thomas Scott. Thomas Scott came with his wife, Elizabeth (Strutt) Scott and children to this country on the same vessel as Richard and his family, and they brought Martha (Whatlock) Scott with them. Elizabeth Strutt was also of Rattlesden; her parents were probably Christopher and Anne (Waller) Strutt. She married Thomas Scott at Rattlesden, 20 Jul 1620. Among the children of Thomas Scott was Elizabeth, bapt. 18 Nov 1623, in Suffolk, and given in the shipping list as 9 years of age. This Elizabeth Scott married in Rowley, MA in 1647, John Spofford, from an ancient Yorkshire family (pre-dating 106, according to the records). John Spofford was the son of another John Spofford, who, in 1662, lost his ministery in Silkston, Yorkshire for "non-conformity." He was, of course, a Puritan. A daughter of John and Elizabeth (Scott) Spofford, Sarah Spofford, born 22 Mar 1661-2, married Richard Kimball(3). The passengers on the Elizabeth were very much an inter-related group; it also included Munnings, undoubtedly related to Richard Kimball.

Henry Scott's will was made "24 Sept. 1625 in the 21st year of James of England by Henry Scott of Rattlesden in the Co. of Suffolk and the diocese of Norwich." It was proved in the court of the Arch deacon of Sudbury 10 January 1624-5. As Thomas Scott settled in Ipswich this may have had some influence in causing Richard's removal from Watertown. Henry Scott was buried in Rattlesden 24 Dec. 1624. (Parish Register.)

Ursula (Scott) Kimball apparently died in Ipswich 1 Mar 1660, although another record gives her death as 17 June 1656. Richard Kimball married second, 23 Oct 1661, Margaret (Cole) Dow, widow of Henry Dow of Hamptom, New Hampshire. There were no children from this marriage, although, from his will, Richard evidently held Margaret Dow's children from her first marriage in great affection. (NEW&GR), (Hotten), (Spofford)

--------------------

source of burial place, birthdate and death date and place also come from the website:

http://halefam.org/FamilyHistory/individual.php?pid=I3483&ged=halefamgen.ged

added by mike kiraly

--------------------

I have that he was born between 1591 and 1595.

--------------------

arrived in America aboard the Elizabeth which had embarked from Ipswich, Suffolk England on 10 Apr 1634, William Andrews, master. Included on the passenger list were Richard, age 39, wife Ursula and children Henry age 15, Elizabeth age 13, Richard age 11, Mary age 9, Martha age 5, John age 3 and Thomas age 1. The family apparently came with Richard's brother Henry Kimball and Ursula's mother (Martha) and brother's family (Thomas and Elizabeth, both age 40).


Worked as a mechanic and wheelwright in Suffolk. They settled in Watertown MA before moving to Ipswich, MA about 1637. Richard was listed as a freeman in Watertown in 1635. He was a selectman for Ipswich in 1645 and the surveyor of fences in 1653. He later moved back to Watertown.

--------------------

Wheelwright. His English home was in Rattlesden, Suffolk. He came to this country in the ship "Elizabeth" in April 1634 and settled in Watertown, Mass. Where he was a freeman in 1635 and proprietor in 1637. Of Ipswich in 1638, selectman, 1645.

--------------------

Richard Kimball was born in England; he came with his family from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, England to America on the ship "Elizabeth", arriving April 10, 1634. He arrived at Boston, Mass., and went to Watertown. His land is now a part of Cambridge. He was proclaimed a Freeman May 6, 1635. He was a landed proprietor 1636-1637. Shortly after, he was invited to move to Ipswich, MA, where they were in need of a competent wheelwright for the new settlement. Here he lived the rest of his life.

His wife was Ursula Scott, the daughter of Henry Scott of Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England. Their children were baptized here. On Oct. 23, 1661, he married a second wife, Margaret Dow.

_____

   [Carelton-Stickney.FTW]
   The common ancestor of the great majority of Kimball's in this
   country was Richard Kimball, who with his family embarked at
   Ipswich, in the county of Suffolk, England, 10 April 1634, in the
   ship Elizabeth, William Andrews, master. After braving
   the dangers of the ocean voyage he arrived in Boston harbor and from
   thence went to Watertown, Massachusetts. He had left the comforts
   and ties and oppressions of old England to find for himself and
   children a home in the New World. It was to him a land of promise, a
   land of religious and political liberty, a land to which the longing
   eyes of the dwellers in old Suffolk were turning as fondly as did
   the eyes of the ancient Hebrews turn ill their captivity to the
   promised land of Canaan. As the Israelites passed through the
   "Wilderness" and through the deep waters of affliction to reach
   their haven of rest, so these sturdy Puritans, with their families,
   with undaunted hearts, broke loose from the ties of friendship, left
   the graves of their forefathers, passed over the wilderness of
   waters and reached the Canaan of their hopes. An ocean now rolled
   between them and their early home, and in a new and savage country,
   and in another hemisphere, they started a new home. They helped to
   make the beginnings of a New England and lay the foundations of a
   rival to the Old England across the sea. They were of that Puritan
   stock which has in its turn made New England the mother of the great
   West, the sturdy stock which only needs to be convinced that it is
   right in order to do and dare all that is noblest. A stock that
   found a wilderness peopled with a few savages, a climate that would
   have killed a less hardy race, a soil that is far from fertile, and
   yet out of these untoward circumstances wrested success. They came
   when the throes of revolution were agitating the mother country,
   when the conflict between the adherents of the Established Church
   and the Puritans, between the King and the people, was at its
   height, and when the principles of civil rights and religious
   liberty were struggling for existence in England.
   James I, after a feeble reign, had expired 27 March 1625. His son,
   the ill-starred Charles I, had succeeded him. Fires were smoldering
   in England which would soon burst forth into devouring flames. In
   1629 Charles I dissolved the last of three Parliaments, and for the
   next eleven years attempted to rule England by his absolute power.
   In 1634 the king made his journey to Scotland, in order to hold a
   Parliament, and by a statute compel the Scottish people to worship
   by Episcopal rule. A very difficult task, which no king, though
   backed by the power of the church, could accomplish. He made William
   Laud Archbishop of Canterbury, whose office was an object of
   aversion to the Puritans. Under his authority every corner of the
   kingdom was subjected to a minute inspection, and every little band
   of Separatists or Puritans, as their adversaries called them, was
   tracked out and broken up, even the religious ceremonies of private
   families did not escape the vigilance of his spies. Deadly hatred of
   the Established Church and of the king as its head was thus
   engendered in thousands of homes.
   These acts rendered England so uncomfortable that the Puritans were
   compelled to seek a home elsewhere. They, therefore, sought a
   dwelling place in the wilderness of the new world, and they called
   their new home, in loving remembrance of the old home from which
   they came, New England. Here they sought the right to worship God
   unmolested by bishops. There was but little opposition to the first
   emigration, but three years later, in 1637, by an order of the king
   and council, eight vessels lying in the Thames and ready to sail,
   freighted with Puritans, were detained. In these vessels were
   embarked Sir Arthur Hazelrig, John Hampden, John Pym, and Oliver
   Cromwell, the Great Protector, who afterwards signed the death
   warrant of King Charles, in 1649. Such was the condition of affairs
   in England, and such the insults, persecutions, and wrongs heaped
   upon the Puritans in 1634, which the proud spirits of many could not
   brook, but in the wilds of New England they sought out a home in
   which they might be free.
   The leaders in the exodus were many of them men of influence in
   England, and they brought with them many men of the middle classes,
   who were also tired of the tyranny and exaction's to which they were
   subjected. To this class belonged the sturdy wheelwright, Richard
   Kemball. He had a trade, which would be eminently useful in the new
   colony. His services were in such request that he was soon called to
   leave his first settlement at Watertown and go to Ipswich, where he
   was given a house lot, and other privileges, on condition that he
   should be the town wheelwright.
   RICHARD KIMBALL
   Richard Kemball came to this country in the ship Elizabeth, William
   Andrews, master, in 1634. He appears to have gone, soon after
   landing, to Watertown, Massachusetts. He settled in a different part
   of the town from that occupied by Henry Kemball. According to Bond
   and other writers Richard and Henry were brothers. There is but
   little evidence to support this supposition, and it seems to be
   mainly founded on the fact that they both came over on the same
   vessel. Richard is said on the shipping list to be thirty-nine years
   old, but he was probably somewhat older. He was, however, in the
   prime of life, and soon became a prominent and active man in the new
   settlement.
   He first settled in Watertown, and his home lot is thus given by Dr.
   Henry Bond: Richard Kimball, six acres, bounded on the north by
   Cambridge, east by land of West Hamlet, south by the highway, and
   west by land of Edward White.
   This lot was situated a long way from the center of the town. It is
   now in Cambridge, which many years ago annexed the eastern part of
   Watertown. The lot was situated near what is now the corner of Huron
   avenue and Appleton street, and near springs of water.
   He was proclaimed freeman in 1635, 6 May. Was a proprietor in
   1636-7. Soon after this date he was invited to remove to Ipswich,
   where they were in need of a competent man to act as wheelwright to
   the new settlement. Here he spent the remainder of his days. The
   town granted him a house lot, 23 Feb. 1637, next adjoining Goodwin
   Simons at the west end of the town. He was also granted at the same
   time "40 acres Beyond the North River, near the land of Robert
   Scott." In 1639 he had liberty to pasture 'two cows free.' On 'the
   last day of the last month 1641' he is mentioned as 'Among the
   Commoners of Ipswich.' He was appointed one of the seven men 1 March
   1645. On the 22d day of the tenth mo. 1647 he was allowed two Pounds
   for killing two foxes.
   His services as wheelwright were appreciated by his townspeople, for
   he was permitted in January 1649, "to fell such white Oaks as he
   hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use."
   19 December 1648, he contributed with others three shillings as his
   annual proportion towards the sum of £27, 7s, as a rate for the
   services of their military leader, Major David Dennison, then
   commander of the military forces of Essex and Norfolk counties.
   In September 1652, he was one of the appraisers of the estate of
   John Cross, one of the earliest settlers of Ipswich.
   On the 25, day 11 mo 1652, he and his son Richard, Wheelwrights,
   'for £14. sell 30 acres upland bounding on land of Mr. John
   Winthrop,' also another lot of land of ten acres of 'medow'.
   In 1653 he was one of a committee of three to survey fences in the
   common fields north of the river. His brother-in-law Thomas Scott
   died Feb. 1653-4 and he was joint executor with Edmund Bridges of
   his will. On 25 May 1654, their official position was recognized by
   Thomas Scott, Jr., then a resident of Stamford, Connecticut.
   In 1660 he was granted right 'to fell 20 white oak trees to make
   weels for the townsmen their use. In 1664 he owned 43 shares in
   Plumb Island.
   Richard Kimball was of the parish of Rattlesden, county of Suffolk,
   England, as is shown by the following entry on the parish register:
   Henry Kemball ye sonne of Richard and Vrsula his wife baptized 1615
   12 of August.
   Ursula was the daughter of Henry Scott of Rattlesden, as appears
   from the following extract from Henry Scott's will: "To Abigale
   Kemball my grandchild twentie shillings to be paid at 21 to Henrie
   Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Elizabeth
   Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Richard
   Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21." He also
   mentions his wife Martha, and sons Roger and Thomas Scott. Thomas
   Scott came with his wife and children to this country in the same
   vessel as Richard and his family, and they brought Martha Scott with
   them. This will was made 24 Sept. 1625 In the 21st year of James of
   England by Henry Scott of Rattlesden in the Co. of Suffolk and
   diocese of Norwich. It was proved in the court of the Archdeacon of
   Sudbury 10 January 1624-5. As Thomas Scott settled in Ipswich this
   may have had some influence in causing Richard's removal from
   Watertown. Henry Scott was buried at Rattlesden, 24 Dec. 1624.
   (Parish Register.)
   Richard Kimball married second, Oct.23, 1661, Margaret Dow, widow of
   Henry Dow of Hampton, New Hampshire.
   [:BOLD]WILL OF RICHARD KIMBALL
   [Ipswich Deeds, vol. IV, p.12.]
   The last will and Testament of Richard Kimball senr of Ipswich in
   Essex in new England who although weake in body yet of prfect memory
   doe dispose of my lands & estate in maner & form as followeth.
   To my Loveinge wife my will is that she shall dwell in my house and
   have the Improvement of my ground and meadow belonging thereto with
   the use and increase of my whole stock of cattle, one whole yeare
   after my decease, and then at the years end, the forty pound due to
   her acording to contract at marriage to be payd her and that
   hous-hold stuff she brought with her. And to have liberty to live in
   the parlor end of the house, the roome we now lodge in: and liberty
   for her necessary vse of some part of sellar: also the liberty of
   one cow in the pasture, the executors to provide winter meate for
   the same, and to have a quarter part of the fruit of the orchard,
   and firewood as long as she lives ther., And if she desire to remove
   to her owne house, then to be sett in it with what she have by my
   executors and to be alowed forty shillings yearly as long as shee
   lives. And to my Eldest son Henry, my will is to give him three
   score and ten pounds to bee payd Twenty pounds, a year & half after
   my decease, & the remaining part in the two years following after
   that.
   To my son Richard I give fforty pounds.
   To my son John I give twenty pounds.
   To my son Thomas I give Twenty five pounds to bee payd two years and
   a halfe after my decease, and to his children I give seaven pounds
   to be devided equally among them and paid as they come of age or at
   day of marriage. provided if any dye before then their share to be
   distributed equally amongst the rest.
   And to my son Benjamin, besides the two oxen, allready received I
   give the sum of twenty five pounds, ten pound to be payd a yeare and
   halfe after my decease. The rest the two years ffollowing, also to
   his children I give five pounds, equally to be devyded, and payd, as
   they come of age, or at day of marriage, in case any dye before,
   that part to be equally divided to the rest.
   And to my son Caleb I give that peace of land knowne by the name of
   Tings lott, and all my land att Wattells neck with my marsh at the
   hundreds knowne by the name of Wiatts marsh, and all my working
   tools exsept two axes, all to be delivered present after my discease
   also I give fourteene pounds to his seaven children equally to be
   devided, to be payd as they come of age or at Day of manage and if
   any dye before, that part to be equally devided amongst the rest.
   To my son-in-law John Severns, I give ten pounds to be pay'd two
   yeares & a halfe after my decease. And to my Daughter Elizabeth, I
   give thirty pounds, ten pound to be payd, a year & halfe after my
   decease, and the other two parts, the two following years after
   that.
   To my Daughter Mary I give ten pounds, five pound to be payd a year
   & halfe after my decease, the other five pound the year after that.
   To my daughter Sarah I give forty pound, five pound to be payd the
   yeare & halfe after my decease and the rest five pound a yeare till
   it be all payd, also to her children I give seaven pounds ten
   shilhngs to be payed to them as they come of age or at day of
   marriage, if any dye before, that part to be equally devyded to the
   rest.
   And to my daughter Sarah above sd; I also give the bed I lye on with
   the furniture after one years use of it by my wife.
   To my wives children viz. Thomas, Jerimiah, and Mary.
   To Thomas and Mary I give forty shillings apeece to be payd a yeare
   & halfe after my decease, and to Jerimiah I give fifteene pounds to
   be payd at the age of one & twenty. I give also eight pounds to the
   two Eldest daughters of Gyes Gowes (that he had by his first wife)
   to be payd and equally devided to them at the age of sixteene, if
   either of them dye before then the whole to be given to that that
   remaines.
   I also give four pounds to my couzen Haniell Bossworth, And doe
   ordaine & apoynt my two sons above sd. Richard and John Kimball to
   be my lawfull and sole executors. And my Couzen Haniell Bosworth
   above sayd to be my overseer that this my last will and Testament be
   duely and truly performed And thus I conclude with setting too my
   hand and seale the fifth of march 1674-5. Richard Kemball & a mark
   and a seale.
   Signed & sealed after the enter-
   This will is proved in court lining (and firewood) in the
   held at Ypswich the 28th of seventh line in the originall
   Sept: 1675. by the oaths of yn the presence of
   Deacon Pengry And Aron Moses Pengry Senr.
   Pengry to be the last will of Aron Pengry Ser.
   Richard Kimball to the best of yr knowledge and that they know of
   noe other.
   Attest Robert Lord cler.
   Moses and Aaron Pengry were prominent citizens of Ipswich. The
   marriage settlement of Sarah Pengry, daughter of Moses, is on record
   at Salem, Massachusetts. She married John, son of Robert Day, and
   three of her children married three children of Benjamin Kimball of
   Bradford, Massachusetts.
   Having thus made his will he waited for the coming of the messenger
   who would sunder all earthly ties and take him on his eternal
   journey. The angel delayed not long his coming. On the twenty-second
   of the following June the earthly pilgrimage of Richard Kimball
   ended, and, aged more than eighty years, he joined the great
   majority.
   His wife did not long survive him, but died the succeeding spring, 1
   March 1676. Richard Kimball was well to do for those early days. The
   inventory of his estate, which was taken 12 July 1675, and returned
   to court 28 Sept. 1675, amounted to £737 3s. 6d. He had already
   given to his children at their marriages.
   He had a houselot granted to him in Ipswich, February 23, 1637,
   adjoining goodman Simons, "att ye west end of ye town." He was a
   commoner, 1641; one of Major Denison's subscribers, 1648; had a
   share and a half in Plum Island, &c., 1664. He had a farm in the
   northerly part of the town, near Prospect Hill, having the farm
   which Thomas Emerson sold to Joseph Jewett on the northwest. He
   also possessed a lot on the Town Hill. The inventory of his
   property, June 17, 1676, amounted to £986, 5; of which his house
   with 132 acres of land valued at £370.

--------------------

http://www.kim-webb.org/biohtml/kimballrichard.htm

Richard Kimball, our immigrant ancestor was born in the small village of Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England on 10 April 1595[1]. He married Ursula Scott when he was 20 years old, on 23 October 1615 at St. Nicholas Anglican Church in Rattlesden.

And so the Kimballs and their friends landed in the New World and began building a nation. Richard Kimball was a wheel right. Every day but the Sabbath, he would work with a chamfer, jarvix, jack plane, bruzz, samson and spokedog to create naves, spokes and felloes in his craft of making and repairing wagon wheels. He was essential to business in his community and a respected member of society. Today, the art of wheelrighting is all but lost, superseded by the modern complexities of steel belts and tiger-paw treads. Richard Kimball helped, literally, to turn the wheels of industry in his native Rattlesden, England for over 30 years before he and his family sailed to the Massachusetts Bay Colony to escape the religious persecution they suffered because they were Puritans being oppressed by the reigning monarch, Charles I of England and his henchman, the Archbishop of Canterbury.


Initially, the Kimballs settled in Watertown, only a few miles from Cambridge[9]. In Watertown Richard was proclaimed a Freeman[10] in 1635 and he was a proprietor from 1636 to 1637. On Feb. 23, 1637 the townspeople of Ipswich, MA invited the family to move there as they needed a competent wheelwright. They gave him a house and a lot adjoining Goodwin Simons at the west end of the town. He was also granted permission to cut the white oaks which would be need to build sturdy wagon wheels. Additionally he was granted "40 acres beyond the North Riuer, near the land of Robert Scott", and meadow privileges. In 1639 he had liberty to pasture "two cows free." On "the last day of the last month 1641" he is mentioned as "Among the Commoners of Ipswich”, and “On the 22d day of the tenth month 1647 he was allowed two Pounds for killing two foxes”.


Here he spent the remainder of his days’ in Ipswich where he and his wife, Ursula raised a large family


The following children were born to this couple:


Alexander Kimball, born 20 February 1614 at Hitcham, Suffolkshire, England.

Henry Kimball, christened 12 August 1615 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Mary Kimball, born in 1618 at Hitcham, Suffolkshire, England

Abigail Kimball, born 18 June 1618 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Ursula Kimball, born 1619 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Elizabeth Kimball, born 1621 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Richard Kimball, born 1623 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Mary Kimball, born 1625 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Martha Kimball, born 1629 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

John Kimball, born 1631 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Thomas Kimball, born 1633 at Rattlesden, Suffolkshire, England.

Sarah Kimball, born 1635 at Ipswich, Essex, MA.

Cornet Benjamin Kimball, born 12 May 1637 at Ipswich, Essex, MA.

Caleb Kimball, born 1639 at Ipswich, Essex, MA.

-------------------- Richard Kimball(1-1)

Richard came to this country in the ship Elizabeth, William Andrews, master, in 1634. He appears to have gone, soon after landing, to Watertown, Mass. He settled in a different part of the town from that occupied by Henry Kemball (1). According to Bond and other writers Richard and Henry were brothers. There is but little evidence to support this supposition, and it seems to be mainly founded on the fact that they both came over on the same vessel. Richard is said on the shipping list to be thirty-nine years old, but he was probably somewhat older. He was, however, in the prime of life, and soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement.

He first settled in Watertown, and his home lot is thus given by Dr. Henry Bond: "Richard Kimball, six acres, bounded on the north by Cambridge, east by the land of W. Hamlet, south by the highway, and west by land of Edward White."

This lot was situated a long way from the centre of the town. It is now in Cambridge, which many years ago annexed the eastern part of Watertown. The lot was situated near what is now the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street, and near springs of water.

He was proclaimed freeman on 6 May 1635, and was a proprietor in 1636-7. Soon after this date he was invited to remove to Ipswich, where they were in need of a competent man to act as wheelwright to the new settlement. Here he spent the remainder of his days. The town granted him a house lot, 23 Feb 1637, "next adjoining Goodwin Simons at the west end of the town." He was also granted at the same time "40 acres Beyond the North Riuer near the land of Robert Scott." In 1639 he had liberty to pasture "two cows free." On "the last day of the last month 1641" he is mentioned as "Among the Commoners of Ipswich." He was appointed one of the seven men on 1 Mar 1645. On the "22nd day of the tenth mo. 1647" he was allowed two Pounds for killing two foxes.

His services as wheelwright were appreciated by his townspeople, for he was permitted in January, 1649, "to fell such White Oaks as he hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use."

19 Dec 1648, he contributed with others three shillings as his annual proportion toward the sum of £27, 7s, as a rate for the service of their military leader, Major David Dennison, then commander of the military forces of Essex and Norfolk counties.

In September, 1652, he was one of the appraisers of the estate of John Cross, one of the earliest settlers of Ipswich.

On the "25th day, 11 mo 1652," he and his son Richard, Wheelwrights, "for £14, seel 30 acres upland bounding on the land of Mr. John Winthrop," also another lot of land of ten acres of "medow." 1653 he was one of a committee of three to survey fences in the common fields north of the river. His brother-in-law, Thomas Scott, died Feb. 1653-4 and he was joint executor with Edmund Bridges of his will. On May 25, 1654, their official position was recognized by Thomas Scott, Jr., then a resident of Stamford, Conn.

In 1660 he was granted the right "to fell 20 white oak trees to make wheels for the townsmen their use." In 1664 he owned 43 shares in "Plumb Island."

Richard Kimball was of the parish of Rattlesden, county of Suffolk, England, as is shown by the following entry on the parish register:

   " Henry Kemball ye sonne of Richard and Vrsula his wife baptized 1615 12 of August."

Ursula Scott, Richard's first wife, and mother of all his children, was the daughter of Henry Scott of Rattlesden. The Scott family had been in Suffolk county almost as long as the Kemball family. George Scott, grandfather of Henry, was buried at Bradsfield, St. George, 30 Aug 1562. Ursula was baptised at Rattlesden 14 Feb 1596-7, and married Richard Kemball in 1613. The will of Henry Scott, Ursula's father, serves to establish the relationship between the families.

"To Abigale Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Henrie Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Elizabeth Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Richard Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21." He also mentions his wife Martha, and sons Roger and Thomas Scott. Thomas Scott came with his wife, Elizabeth (Strutt) Scott and children to this country on the same vessel as Richard and his family, and they brought Martha (Whatlock) Scott with them. Elizabeth Strutt was also of Rattlesden; her parents were probably Christopher and Anne (Waller) Strutt. She married Thomas Scott at Rattlesden, 20 Jul 1620. Among the children of Thomas Scott was Elizabeth, bapt. 18 Nov 1623, in Suffolk, and given in the shipping list as 9 years of age. This Elizabeth Scott married in Rowley, MA in 1647, John Spofford, from an ancient Yorkshire family (pre-dating 106, according to the records). John Spofford was the son of another John Spofford, who, in 1662, lost his ministery in Silkston, Yorkshire for "non-conformity." He was, of course, a Puritan. A daughter of John and Elizabeth (Scott) Spofford, Sarah Spofford, born 22 Mar 1661-2, married Richard Kimball(3). The passengers on the Elizabeth were very much an inter-related group; it also included Munnings, undoubtedly related to Richard Kimball.

Henry Scott's will was made "24 Sept. 1625 in the 21st year of James of England by Henry Scott of Rattlesden in the Co. of Suffolk and the diocese of Norwich." It was proved in the court of the Arch deacon of Sudbury 10 January 1624-5. As Thomas Scott settled in Ipswich this may have had some influence in causing Richard's removal from Watertown. Henry Scott was buried in Rattlesden 24 Dec. 1624. (Parish Register.)

Ursula (Scott) Kimball apparently died in Ipswich 1 Mar 1660, although another record gives her death as 17 June 1656. Richard Kimball married second, 23 Oct 1661, Margaret (Cole) Dow, widow of Henry Dow of Hamptom, New Hampshire. There were no children from this marriage, although, from his will, Richard evidently held Margaret Dow's children from her first marriage in great affection. (NEW&GR), (Hotten), (Spofford) -------------------- Carelton-Stickney.FTW]

Ursula may have been married to Giles Cowes and had two daughters

(from will dated 5 March 1674, probated 28 September 1675).

_____

Left England for America:

On 10 April 1634, at the age of 39, Richard and Ursula embarked from Ipswich, England, on the ship Elisa taking the Oath of Allegiance and Supremacy in November 1664, at the custom house in Ipswich --------------------

Richard Kimball was born about 1595. He may be the son of Henry Kembold and Sysley — of Hitcham, Suffolk, England. Richard married first Ursula Scott. Ursula was baptized 14 February 1598 in Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, the daughter of Henry Scott and Martha Whatlock. Richard and Ursula emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, sailing from Ipswich, England, in 1634 with seven of their children, Ursula’s mother and brother Thomas Scott and his family, and Henry Kemball (probably Richard’s brother) and his family. The Kimballs settled in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Richard became a freeman there in 1635 and a proprietor in 1636/7. The family moved to Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. Richard was a wheelwright. He married second Margaret Cole (widow Dow) 23 October 1661. Richard’s will was made 5 March 1674/5 and proved 28 September 1675. Richard died 22 June 1675 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. Richard and Ursula's children are:

1. Henry Kimball, (eldest son), baptized 12 Aug 1615 in Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married 1) Mary Wyatt and 2) Elizabeth Gilbert (widow of William Rayner). 2. Abigail Kimball, possibly baptized 5 Nov 1617 (according to Walter Goodwin Davis), at Hitcham, Suffolk, England, married John Severance, died 17 Jun 1658 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. 3. Elizabeth Kimball, born about 1621 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, living in 1675. 4. Richard Kimball, born about 1623 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married 1) Mary — and 2) Mary (widow of Charles Gott), 26 May 1676 in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts. 5. Mary Kimball, born about 1625 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Robert Dutch. 6. Martha Kimball, born about 1629 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Joseph Fowler. 7. John Kimball, born about 1631 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Mary Bradstreet, died 6 May 1698. 8. Thomas Kimball, born about 1633 in England, married Mary Smith, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, died (killed by Indians) 3 May 1676 in Bradford, Essex, Massachusetts, wife and five children weretaken captive but allowed to return home 13 Jun 1676. 9. Sarah Kimball, born in 1635 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, married Edward Allen 24 Nov 1658, died 12 Jun 1696. 10. Benjamin Kimball, married Mercy (or Mary) Hazeltine in Apr 1661, died 11 Jun 1695. 11. Caleb Kimball, married Anna (or Hannah) Hazeltine 7 Nov 1660, died (killed by Indians at the Battle of Bloody Brook) 18 Sep 1675 in Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts.

Sources: 1. Davis, Walter Goodwin, Massachusetts and Maine Familes in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966), Vol. II, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996. 2. Hoyt, David W., The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts, Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982. 3. Huffey, David (transcriber), Rattlesden (Suffolk, England) Baptisms—1559 to 1758 (from the Parish Register Transcripts), transcribed between 1987-1995. 4. Savage, James, A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Before 1692, Vols. 1 & 3, Boston, MA, 1860. 5. Ship's List of the Elizabeth, 1634 (H.M. State Paper Office/Public Records Office. Tepper, Michael (ed.), Passengers to America: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1977, pgs. 42-43, 45. Banks, Charles Edward, The Planters of the Commonwealth, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1961 (reprint), pgs. 117-121). 6. Post on the Massachusetts Bay Colony mailinglist (Ma-Bay-Colony), “Tid-a-bits: Burials of Ipswich’s “Ancient Burying Ground”—part 1” from Cynthia (NewEnglanders1620@samnet.net) to MA-BAY-COLONY-L@rootsweb.com, 14 June 2002, citing Essex County, Massachusetts court records. 7. Morrison, Leonard Allison & Sharples, Stephen Paschall, History of the Kimball Family in America from 1634-1897, Vol. 1, Boston: Damrell & Upham, 1897. 8. Will of Richard Kimball, (original on file in the probate office at Salem, Massachusetts), Ipswich Deeds, Vol. IV, p. 12. 9. Inventory of the Estate of Thomas Kimball of Ipswich (Salem Quarterly Court Records, vol 5, leaf 94; Essex County Quarterly Court Files, vol 25, leaf 124; Ipswich Quarterly Court records, vol 5, page 284.)

less -------------------- According to the History of Canterbury, NH, Volume 2, by James Otis Lyford; page 207: "Richard Kimball was probably the ancestor of most of the numerous families of the name of Kimball in New England. On 10 April, 1634, O.S., at the age of 39, he embarked at Ipswich, in the county of Suffolk, Old Eng., in the ship, Elisabeth, William Andrews, master, for Massachusetts, and landed at Ipswich. He first settled in Watertown, of which he was a proprietor, in 1636-37; was admitted a freeman 6 May, 1635.

    He soon removed from Watertown to Ipswich, and is first known as an inhabitant of that place, 23 Feb., 1637-38, when he was granted by the town "a house lott next adjoining to goodman Simons at the west end of ye town"; also granted him the same day "40 acres Beyond the North River near the land of Robert Scott." In 1639-40, he had "liberty to pasture two cows free." He is mentioned "the last day  of last month 1641," as among the commoners of Ipswich, and appointed, 1 March, 1645-46, as one of the "Seven men."
    His occupation was that of a wheelwright. January, 1649-50, he was granted liberty "to fell such white oaks as he hath occasion to make use of about his trade for the towns use." Also, 1660, "to fell 20 white oak trees to made weels [''sic'']for the Townsman their use." In 1653, he was of a committee of three to survey fences in the common fields north of the river.
    He m. first, Ursula, the sister of Thomas and dau. of Martha Scott, before his arrival in Ipswich; m. second, Margaret, widow of Henry Dow, of Hampton, 23 Oct., 1661. Margaret d. 1 March, 1675-76. Richard d. 22 June, 1675, leaving a will dated 1674-75. His age was 80 years. Eleven children of whom Richard was the fourth."

-------------------- Arrived in America in April 1634 on the ship “Elizabeth” in Boston harbor with his mother Ursula Scott and his Father Richard Kimball.

Kimball was originally spelled as Kemble and Kemball

Occupation: Wheelwright

A neighbor accidentally killed him with a gun in 1676.

The Elizabeth left Ipswitch, Suffolk, England mid April of 1634 with her master, William Andrewes (Andres), arriving in Massachusetts Bay.

04 Feb 1634 Henry Dade writes from Ipswitch to the Archbishop of Canterbury that the Francis and the Elizabeth with 60 men in each intend to sail for New England on about March 10 and he supposes they are debtors or persons disaffected with the established church. Note: These ships and nine others bound for New England were stayed but on 28 Feb allowed to proceed on condition that the passengers took the oath opf allegiance. Colham pg 111.

12 Nov 1634: John Cutting and William Andrews pray to be released from bonds of presentation of certificates, enclosing that passangers of the 30 May 1634 Francis and 30 May 1634 Elizabeth did not take the oaths.

21 Jan 1635: John Cuttinge, Master of the Francis and William Andrewes, Master of the Elizabeth, both of Ipswitch, have brought a list of all the passengers that went in their ships to New England in April 1634 with certificates of their having taken the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance.

The following alphabetical roll is from her departure point, not necessarily who landed.

Alphabetical with age and roll number:

Kemball Richard 39, from Rattlesden, Suffolk #15

    Born 1595, from Rattlesden, Suffolk, bound for Watertown, Ipswitch. Ref: NEGR 57/331. 36 pg 159'''

Kemball Ursula unk age, wife of Richard #16

Kemball Henry 15, child of Richard #77

Kemball Richard 11, child of Richard #78

Kemball Mary 9, child of Richard #79

Kemball Martha 5, child of Richard #80

Kemball John 3, child of Richard #81

Kemball Thomas 1, child of Richard #82

-------------------- Richard Kimball was born in 1595 in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England. He was the son of Henry Kimball (1565 in Brettenham, England) and Johan (1567 in Mistley, England). His siblings were John Kimball (1584), Frances Kimball (1587), Rachel Kimball (1589), Henry Kimball (1590), and George Kimball (1598).

He and his brother Henry Kimball, came to Massachusetts in 1634.

He was a wheelwright and a farmer. He was admitted as a freeman in Watertown, Massachusetts on May 6, 1635. Humphrey Bradstreet was made a freeman the same day. Richard became a proprietor of the town in 1636-37.

He married Ursula Scott before 1615 in England. Their children and life together are described in detail in the section on Richard and Ursula Kimball. http://www.anamericanfamilyhistory.com/Kimball%20Family/KimballRichard1595.html _________________

Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts

Rattlesden is a village in Suffolk in eastern England. St. Nicholas church dates from the 13th century. The village was a center of Puritanism in the 16th and 17th centuries.

The ship Elizabeth sailed from Ipswich, England in April, 1634 with William Andrews, Master. On board were Richard and Ursula Kimball and their children, Ursula’s mother Martha Whatlock Scott and her brothers Roger and Thomas Scott. Humphrey and Bridget Bradstreet sailed on the same ship. They arrived in July at Boston. ye is an archaic spelling of "the."

Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott married in 1611 in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England. The oldest eight children were born in England.

The family immigrated to American in April, 1634 on the ship Elizabeth.

Henry Kimball was baptized on August 12, 1615. Abigail Kimball Severens was born before 1616. Elizabeth Kimball was born in 1621. Richard Kimball, Jr. was born in 1623. Mary Kimball Dutch was born in 1625. Martha Kimball Fowler was born in 1629. John Kimball was born in 1631. Thomas Kimball was born in 1633.

The family first settled in Watertown, Massachusetts. “The home lot of Richard Kimball was six acres on the Cambridge line, now in the city of Cambridge, near the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street."

Sarah Kimball Allen was born in 1635.

They moved to Ipswich in about 1637. The town gave him a house lot and forty acres beyond the North river on February 23, 1637.

Benjamin Kimball was born in 1637. Caleb Kimball was born in 1639.

In September, 1649 the Essex Court admonished

   Joseph Fowler [Martha Kimball’s husband], Thomas Cooke, Thomas Scott [a cousin], and two of ye sons of Richard Kimball [John and Thomas], for goeing into ye woods, shouting and singing, taking fire and liquors with them, all being at unseasonable time in ye night, occasioning yr. wives and some other to go out to them.

Ursula died on March 1, 1659 and Richard married Margaret Cole Dow in 1661.

Richard died on June 22, 1675 in Ipswich.

Essex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643 by the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when it ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four sheires." _____________________________

Richard Kimball (son of Henry Kimball)125 was born April 10, 1595 in Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, and died June 22, 1675 in Ipswich, Essex, Mass.

Includes NotesNotes for Richard Kimball:

RICHARD KIMBALL (b: 10 Apr 1595 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 22 Jun 1675 Ipswich, Essex, Mass) married URSULA SCOTT (b: 14 Feb 1596 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 1 Mar 1676 Ipswich, Essex, Mass) daughter of HENRY SCOTT and MARTHA WHATLOCK. Their children:

1. ALEXANDER KIMBALL (b: 20 Feb 1614 Hitcham, Suffolk, England d: 17 un1658 Salisbury, Essex, Mass) 2. HENRY KIMBALL (b: 12 Aug 1615 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 12 Aug 1676 Wenham, Essex, Mass) m: (1)Mary Wyatt (2) Elizabeth GILBERT widow RAYNOR 3. (child) KIMBALL (b: 1619 Hitcham, Suffolk, England) 4. ABIGAIL KIMBALL (b: 5 Nov 1617 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 17 Jun 1658 Salisbury, Essex, Mass) m: John Severence or Severans 5. MARY KIMBALL (b: 7 Aug 1618 Hitcham, Suffolk, England d: 12 July 1686 Ipswich, Essex, MA) m: Robert Dutch 6. . URSULA KIMBALL (b: 1619 Hitcham, Suffolk, England d: 17 Jun 1658 Salisbury, Essex, Mass) 7. ELIZABETH KIMBALL (b: 1621 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 1676 Ipswich, Essex, MA) 8. JOHN KIMBALL (b: 1621/1631 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 6 May 1698 Ipswich, Essex, Mass) m: Mary Bradstreet 9. RICHARD KIMBALL (b: 1622/1623 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 16 May 1676 Wenham, Essex, MA) m: (1) @1648 Mary possibly COOLEY (probably Ipswich MA) (2) Mary GOTT 10. MARTHA KIMBALL (b: Aug 1629 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 19 May 1677 Ipswich, Essex, Mass) m: (1) Joseph Fowler (2) Ezekiel Rogers 11. THOMAS KIMBALL (b: 1633 Rattlesden, Suffolk, England d: 3 May 1676 Bradford, Essex, Mass)(by Indians in Rowley MA) m: Mary Smith 12. SARAH KIMBALL (b: 1635 Watertown, Middlesex, Mass d: 12 Jun 1690 Suffield, Hartford, Conn) m: Edward Allen 13. BENJAMIN KIMBALL (b: 12 May 1637 Ipswich, Essex, MA d: 11 Jun 1696 Bradford, Essex, MA) m: Mercy Hazeltine 14. CALEB KIMBALL (b: 1639 Ipswich, Essex, Mass d: 9 Apr 1688 Ipswich, Essex, Mass) m: Anna Hazeltine

The following is from Jana Ulrich's Research Site http://members.aol.com/janau/kimball.htm

Our first Kimball in America arrived aboard the Elizabeth which had embarked from Ipswich, Suffolk England on 10 Apr 1634, William Andrews, master. Included on the passenger list were Richard, age 39, wife Ursula and children Henry age 15, Elizabeth age 13, Richard age 11, Mary age 9, Martha age 5, John age 3 and Thomas age 1. The family apparently came with Richard's brother Henry and Ursula's mother (Martha) and brother's family (Thomas and Elizabeth, both age 40). Richard was a wheelwright by trade and as such was in great demand in the colonies. He was first at Watertown where his freeman's status is noted on the May 1635 list and where he was granted, in 1636, a homelot of 6 acres bounded on the borth by Cambridge, on the east by the land of W. Hamet, on the south by the highway and on the west by the land of Edward White. In 1637 he was "called to Ipswich" .. (my interpretation - Ipswich needed a wheelwright and they offered him a better deal than Watertown ) and on 23 Feb 1637 he was granted a homelot adjoing Goodwin Simons' land at the west end of town and 40 acres "Beynd the North River, near the land of Robert Scott". He was granted incentives to stay including, in 1640, the right to pasture "two cows free" and, in Jan 1649 the right to "fell such white Oaks as he hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use.". Similar permission was noted in 1660 where he was allowed to "fell 20 white oak trees to make wheels for the townsmen their use." Such exception to the early environmental laws is another indication of how important his trade was to the town.

Richard is included on the 28 Feb 1641 list of "Commoners of Ipswich". Other mention of him in the record includes his 1 Mar 1645 appointment as selectman. On 22 Dec 1647 he was allowed £ 2 bounty for 2 foxes. 19 Dec 1648 he pledged 3 shillings as his share of the salary of the Ipswich military leader, Major David Dennison. He was one of the appraisers of the estate of John Cross (Sep 1652) and, on 25 Jan 1652, he and son Richard, "wheelwrights, for £ 14 sell 30 acres upland bounding on land of Mr. John Winthrop" together with 10 acres of "medow". In 1653 he was appointed to the committee assigned to survey the fences in the common fields north of the river. He was an executor to the estate of his brother - in -law Thomas Scott who died Feb 1653/4. In 1664, he is noted as the owner of 43 shares in Plumb Island.

Richard's will was dated 5 Mar 1674 and probated 28 Sep 1675. The inventory of his estate totaled £ 737, 3 shillings, 6 pence. (The detailed provisions made for the widow rare a source of amazement to me. Such provision as what room of the house she was entitled to live in were common to the times and I have noticed many such wills, particularly where a second wife is involved! I can just picture Sarah throwing her step mother out of the Kimball bed at one minute past midnight on the anniversary of Richard's death!)

Last Will and Testament of Richard Kimball The last will and testament of Richard Kimball senr of Ipswich in Essex in new England who although weake in body yet of perfect memory doe dispose of my lands and estate in maner & form as followeth.

To my Loveinge wife my will is that she shall dwell in my house and have the Improvement of my ground and meadow belonging thereto with the use and increase of my whole stock of cattle, one whole yeare after my decease, and then at the years end, the forty pound due to her according to contract at marriage to be payd her and that hous-hold stuff she brought with her. And to have liberty to live in the parlor end of the house, the roome we now lodge in: and liberty for her nesessary vse of some part of sellar: also the liberty of one cow in the pasture, the executors to provide winter meate for the same, and to have a quarter part of the fruit of the orchard, and firewood as long as she lives ther. And if she desire to remove to her owne house, then to be sett in it with what she have by my executors and to be alowed forty shillings yearly as long as shee lives.

And to my Eldest son Henry, my will is to give his three score and ten pounds to bee payd Twenty pounds a year and half after my decease, and the remaining part in the two years following after that.

To my son Richard I give fforty pounds.

To my son John I give twenty pounds.

To my son Thomas I give Twenty five pounds to bee payd two years and a halfe after my decease, and to his children I give seaven pounds to be devided equally among them and payd as they come of age or at day of marriage, provided if any dye before their share to be distributed equally amongst the rest.

And to my son Benjamin, besides the two oxen already received I give the sum of twenty five pounds, ten pounds to be payd a yeare and a halfe after my decease. The rest the two years ffollowing, also to his children I give five pounds, equally to be devyded, and payd, as they come of age or at day of marriage, in case any dye before, that part to be equally divided to the rest.

And to my son Caleb I give that peace of land knowne by the name Tings lott, and all my land att Wattells neck with my marsh at the hundreds knowne by the name of Wiatts marsh, and all my working tools exsept two axes all to be delivered present after my discease also I give fourteen pounds to his seven children equally to be devided to be payd as they come of age or at Day of mariage, and if any dye before, that part to be equally devided amongst the rest.

To my son-in-law John Severns, I give ten pounds to be payd two years & a halfe after my decease.

And to my Daughter Elizabeth, I give thirty pounds, ten pound to be payd, a year & halfe after my decease, and the other two parts, the two following years after that.

To my Daughter Mary I give ten pounds, five pound to be payd a year & halfe after my decease, the other five pound the year after that.

To my daughter Sarah I give forty pound, five pound to be payd the yeare & halfe after my decease and the rest five pound a yeare till it be all payd, also to her children I give seaven pounds ten shillings to be payd to them as they come of age or at day of marriage if any dye before, that part to be equally devyded to the rest.

And to my daughter Sarah above "sd"; I also give the bed I lye on with the furniture after one years use of it by my wife.

To my wives children viz. Thomas, Jerimiah, and Mary To Thomas and Mary I give forty shillings apiece to be payd a yeare & halfe after my decease, and to Jerimiah I give fifteene pounds to be payd at the age of one and twenty. I give also eight pounds to the two Eldest daughters of Gyes Cowes (that he had by his first wife) to be payd and equally devided to them at the age of sixteene, if either of them dye before then the whole to be given to that that remaines.

I also give four pounds to my Couzen Haniell Bossworth, and doe ordaine and apount my two sons above sd. Richard and John Kimball to be my lawfull and sole executors.

And my Couzen Haniell Bosworth above sayd to be my overseer that this my last will and Testament be duely and truly performed And thus I conclude with setting too my hand and seale the fifth of march 1674-5.

Richard Kemball & a mark & a seale.

Witnesses: Moses Pengry Senr. Aren Pengry Senr

pr. In court at Ypswich 28 Sep 1675.

Sources: History of the Kimball family in America, from 1634 to 1897 by Morrison, Leonard A. - 1897; Genealogical Record of the Descendants of John Spofford and Elizabeth Scott - 1888; Pioneers of Massachusetts by Pope, Charles - 1900; PAF - Kimball; Wason website; Churchyard / Orr - Family Museum

The following quote is from “The History of the Kimball Family” written by Leonard A. Scott:

After braving the dangers of the ocean voyage he arrived in Boston Harbor and from thence went to Watertown, Massachusetts. He had left the comforts and ties and oppressions of old England to find for himself and children a home in the New World. It was to him a land of promise, a land of religious and political liberty, a land to which the longing eyes of the dwellers of old Suffolk were turning as fondly as did the eyes of the ancient Hebrews turn in their captivity to the promised land of Canaan. As the Israelites passed through the "Wilderness" and through the deep waters of affliction to reach their haven of rest, so these sturdy Puritans, with their families, with undaunted hearts, broke loose from the ties of friendship, left the graves of their forefathers, passed over the wilderness of waters and reached the Canaan of their hopes. An ocean now rolled between them and their early home, and in a new and savage country, and in another hemisphere, they started a new home. They helped to make the beginnings of a New England and lay the foundations of a rival to the Old England across the sea. They were of that Puritan stock which has in its turn made New England the mother of the great West, the sturdy stock which only needs to be convinced that it is right in order to do and dare all that is noblest. A stock that found a wilderness peopled with a few savages, a climate that would have killed a less hardy race, a soil that is far from fertile, and yet out of these untoward circumstances wrested success. They came when the throes of revolution were agitating the mother country. . . . . . . [T]he puritans were compelled to seek a home elsewhere. They, therefore, sought a dwelling place in the wilderness of the new world, and they called their new home, in loving remembrance of the old home from which they came, New England. Here they sought the right to worship God unmolested. . . . Such was the condition of affairs in England, and such the insults, persecutions, and wrongs heaped upon the Puritans in 1634, which the proud spirits of many could not brook, but in the wilds of New England they sought out a home in which they might be free. The leaders in the exodus were many of them men of influence in England, and they brought with them many men of the middle classes, who were also tired of the tyranny and exactions to which they were subjected. To this class belonged the sturdy wheelwright, Richard Kimball. He had a trade which would be eminently useful in the new colony. His services were in such request that he was soon called to leave his first settlement at Watertown and go to Ipswich, where he was given a house lot, and other privileges, on condition that he should be the town wheelwright. On May 6, 1635 Richard Kimball earned his right to be a freeman and moved to Ipswich, Massachusetts where he lived for the rest of his life.

More About Richard Kimball: Immigration: April 10, 1634, aboard the Elizabeth . Occupation: wheelwright. Probate: September 28, 1675, Ypswich. Will: March 05, 1673/74

More About Richard Kimball and <Unnamed>: Marriage: 1613

Children of Richard Kimball are:

   +John Kimball, b. 1631, Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, d. May 06, 1698, Ipswich, Essex, Mass.
   Richard Kimball, b. Abt. 1623, Rattlseden, Suffolk, England, d. May 26, 1676, Wenham MA.
   Thomas Kimball, b. Abt. 1633, Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, d. May 02, 1676, Rowley MA.
   Henry Kimball, b. August 12, 1615, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. date unknown.
   Abigail Kimball, b., Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. June 17, 1658, Salisbury, MA.
   Elizabeth Kimball, b. 1621, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. date unknown.
   Mary Kimball, b. 1625, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. date unknown.
   Martha Kimball, b. 1629, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. date unknown.
   Sarah Kimball, b. 1635, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. June 12, 1690.
   Benjamin Kimball, b. 1637, Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, d. June 11, 1696.
   Caleb Kimball, b. 1639, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, d. 1682.
view all 69

Richard Kimball, Sr.,'s Timeline

1595
April 10, 1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, UK
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden, Suffolk, England
1595
Rattlesden,Suffolk,England