Richard 1612 Olmstead (1612 - 1687)

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Birthplace: Fairstead, Essex, England
Death: Died in Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States
Occupation: Immigrant
Managed by: Sallie Dawson
Last Updated:

About Richard 1612 Olmstead

Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) immigrated from England to New England with his Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640, widowed in 1621) in 1632. On this 1632 voyage of the "Lyon" were Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) and his brother John Olmstead (1617-1686) and his sister Rebecca Olmstead (1624-1698) and his cousin Nicholas Olmstead (son of Uncle James Olmstead) and his cousin Nehemiah Olmstead (son of Uncle James Olmstead) and his uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) who was "looking after" them all. They left England on 22 June 1632 and were at sea 12 weeks and arrived at Boston, MA on 16 September 1632. They settled first at Wollaston (now Quincy), MA near Boston, MA and then within a year moved to New Town (now Cambridge), MA at the new "Braintree Colony". Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) was on the 06 November 1632 Freeman list there and was chosen Constable there on 03 November 1634.

Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) left Cambridge, MA on 15 October 1635 and arrived at Hartford, CT on 29 October 1635 where he and Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) were among the first Hartford settlers. They are both on the Founders Monument in Hartford, CT. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) was a soldier in the 1637 Pequot War from Hartford, CT. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) married at Hartford, CT in about 1640 to Elizabeth (her last name may have been Hawes or Hough and information on her is sought) and they had 3 chidren there. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) was Constable at Hartford, CT in 1646 and Fence-Viewer there in 1649.

Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) and his family moved to Norwalk, CT in the earliest part of the 1650s. He was Deputy to the Connecticut General Court for 1653-1679 (most years), town judge/commissioner 1653-1687, Townsman in 1657, Selectman 1669-1675. He received a colonial grant of 60 acres in May of 1669 for his service. He was a sergeant on 21 May 1653 with a company of 65 men to train, a lieutenant on 19 May 1659, a soldier in King Philips War 1675-1676, muster master for Fairfield County in November of 1673, and was made a captain in 1680 with a 6-year commission. Richard Olmsted's (1612-1687) will was dated 05 September 1684 and he died at Norwalk, CT in 1687. Son James Olmstead (1647-1731) married at Fairfield, CT in 1673 to Phebe Barlow (1651-1731) and they settled at Norwalk, CT and had 5 children there. James Olmstead (1647-1731) was a judge, a Selectman, and the Town Clerk (29 years, 1678-1707, 1721) at Norwalk, CT. He was a lieutenant in the Norwalk Train Band in 1680 and later a captian. He was the Norwalk, CT representative to General Court for 1691, 1692, 1693, and 1699. James Olmstead (1647-1731) was "one of Norwalk's most eminent and influencial citizens". Grandson John Olmstead (1692-1748), son of James Olmstead (1647-1731), married at Norwalk, CT in 1717 to Mary Small (born about 1700) and they had 8 children there. Mary Small's (born about 1700) father is believed to be Robert Small (1676-1701) and information is sought on these Small ancestors. Some sources list John Olmstead's (1692-1748) death date in 1748 or 1749 and others list it as 1789.

Great Grandson John Olmstead (1729-1778), son of John Olmstead (1692-1748), married at Danbury, CT in about 1757 to Abigail Munson (1739-1806) and they had 6 children there. After John Olmstead (1729-1778) died, widow Abigail Munson Olmstead married second to James Sanford.

Great Great Grandson Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805), son of John Olmstead (1729-1778), joined the army in 1776 to serve during the War of Revolution. He was in the Continental Army in Colonel Philip Burr Bradley's battalion and was made a captain. He was taken prisoner and confined to a prison ship in New York harbor where his health was seriously undermined. However, he escaped and, after recovering his health, he reentered the Army and served until the end of the War. Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) married at Danbury, CT in about 1781 to Slience Weed (1759-1832) and they had 2 children at Danbury, CT (1783, 1785) and then 5 children after they moved to Stillwater, NY (1788, 1791, 1794, 1797, 1800). Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) at one time owned a wagon shop where he invented a carriage guarenteed to hold two people. Information is sought on Silence Weed's (1759-1832) ancestry. It was noted that "she was well-educated and remarkable for beauty, grace, and common sense". Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) and wife Silence Weed Olmstead (1759-1832) were buried in the Maltaville Cemetery at Malta, NY. This family was in the 1790 Federal Census at Stillwater, Albany, NY; hasn't yet been found in the 1800 Federal Census; was in the 1810 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with sons Zaloman and Coleman "Umpstead" (it is believed that the whole family is here); was in the 1820 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with son Coleman Olmstead (mother Silence is "45 yrs & up"); and was in the 1830 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with son Coleman Olmstead (mother Silence is "70-80 yrs. old").

Great Great Great Grandson John M. Olmstead (1791-1845), son of Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805), married at Malta, NY in 1818 to Suzannah Bates (1800-1831) and they had 5 children there. After Suzannah Bates Olmstead (1800-1831) died, widow John M. Olmstead (1791-1845) married second at Schuylerville, NY (I wonder why they married there?) in 1833 to his first wife's sister Sarah Bates and they had 4 children at Malta, NY. Information is sought on this Bates ancestry, please. This family is believed to have been listed with brother Coleman Olmstead (1785-1835) for the 1820 and 1830 Federal Censuses; it is in the 1840 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with John M. Olmstead (1791-1845); it is in the 1850 and 1860 and 1870 Federal Censuses listed with Sarah Olmstead (and the children); it is listed with James Lamb (husband of John M. Olmstead's and Sarah Bates Olmstead's daughter Susan Olmstead born 1838) where mother-in-law Sarah Olmstead is 78 years old and "aunt" Hannah Bates (sister or sister-in-law to Sarah Bates?) is 76 years old and sister-n-law Ellen Olmstead (born 1840) is 40 years old.

Great Great Great Great Granddaughter Elisabeth Olmstead (1819-1866), daughter of John M. Olmstead (1791-1845), married at Maltaville, NY in 1839 to Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) and they had 4 children together. They lived in Michigan and New York and Canada. They were in Canada in 1866 when Elisabeth Olmstead Hulin (1819-1866) died [she was buried at Salisbury Cemetery at Stillwater, NY] and widower Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) married second at Rosendale, WI in 1867 to Julia (widow of Joshua Seaman who died in 1863, mother to Mary Seaman born 1847). Wife Julia Hulin died at Malta, NY in January of 1889 and widower Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) died in February of 1889 at Easton, MI and was buried at Easton Cemetery. This family was in the 1840 Federal Census at Milton, Cass, MI; was in the 1850 Federal Census at Milton, Saratoga, NY; was in Canada during the 1860 Federal Census (therefore, not listed in the FC); was in the 1870 Federal Census at Bushnell, Montcalm, MI; and hasn't yet been found for the 1880 Federal Census.

Sources: Olmstead Genealogy (2 page paper found in family Bible) by Margaret Gulick; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 by Torrey; Genealogical Dictionary of New England by Savage, 1860; New England Families by W. R. Cutter; Genealogy of the Olmstead Family in America by H. K. Olmstead, 1912; Hulin Family Bible (published 1847) kept by Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889)

Richard immigrated to Boston on the ship Lyon in 1632, arriving on 16 September, and his name appears on the Founder's Monument of Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, where he removed in the summer of 1636. He removed to Norwalk in 1650/1651.

"Richard Olmstead, nephew of James Olmstead, was born about 1612. He was married twice. Richard came with his Uncle James to America in 1632 and was, with his uncle one of the original proprietors of Hartford, Connecticut, in 1639. In 1651 he moved to "Norwalke", Connecticut, where he became one of the most respected and honored men. With other men from Hartford, he was a purchaser of the township from Roger Ludlow, of Fairfield, June 19, 1650, and he was first in the town in military command. In the records of Norwalk his name has the oldest date. He was the surveyor for the new town, and the first street to be laid out by him seems to have been Town Street, and on this street all of the early planters built. Before the founding of the town, his name, with those of James, Nicholas and John Olmstead., was on the list "of all persons holding land in Hartford, in February, 1639," and in 1650 he signed his name on the petition for the planting of Norwalk; his name was in the deed of the Indian chiefs on Feb 15, 1651 for the western section of town.. He received four acres as a home lot, on the east side of Town Street. He served in several public offices, and was the first town clerk for Norwalk. He was forty-two years of age when he came to Norwalk, with his two sons, James and John. In 1653 he was representative to the general assembly, May session, and also served in twelve more sessions until 1679. He also served as commissioner of the peace, or town judge. He served in the Pequot War in 1637 and King Philip's War in 1675."

Genealogy of the Olmstead Family in America by Henry King Olmsted, George Kemp Ward

from Genealogy of the Olmstead family in America

" . . . the family of our honored relative, James Olmsted, who, together with two sons, Nicholas and Nehemiah, two nephews, Richard and John, and a niece, Rebecca, arrived in New England, on the Lord's Day, Sept. 16,1632, in the ship Lyon, under Capt. Pierce, after a voyage of 12 weeks from Braintree, England. There were 123 passengers, of whom 50 were children."

" They settled first at Mount Wallaston, now Quincy, near Boston, but in the course of the year, 'by order of the Court,' they removed to Newtown, now Cambridge."

" The recent settlers of Newtown," says Holmes, "had, while in England, attended the ministry of the Reverend Thomas Hooker, who, to escape fines and imprisonment for his non-conformity, had now fled into Holland." So, as Mather, another contemporary, remarks, " immediately after their settlement at Newtown, they expressed their earnest desires to Mr. Hooker that he would come over into New England and take the pastoral charge of them. At their desire he left Holland, and, having obtained Mr. Samuel Stone .... as an assistant in the ministry, took his passage for America, and arrived at Boston, Sept. 4, 1633." He proceeded at once to Newtown, to take up the duties of his pastorate. There the Braintree Colony, as it was termed, abode until the summer of 1636, when, dissatisfied by the form of government of the colony of Massachusetts and tempted by the charm of this pleasant Connecticut valley, of which they had heard reports,1 they "took their departure from Cambridge," and, in the words of Trumbull, " travelled more than a hundred miles through a hideous and trackless wilderness, to Hartford. They had no guide but their compass; made their way over mountains, through swamps, thickets, and rivers, which were not passable but with great difficulty. They had no cover but the heavens, nor any lodgings but those which simple nature afforded them. They drove with them a hundred and sixty head of cattle, and by the way, subsisted on the milk of their cows. Mrs. Hooker (who was ill) was borne through the wilderness upon a litter. The people generally carried their packs, arms, and some utensils. They were nearly a fortnight on their journey."

This brings us in our narration of the wanderings of our worthy family to the beautiful city, near which we have met today to do them honor. The family was soon to separate. Indeed, my own ancestor, Richard Olmstead, who was a youth of 20 when he arrived in America with his Uncle James, was now a young man of 24. That he was married by 1640 is more than probable, for we find that by that date he had quit his uncle's house, and was in possession of a home lot of his own. The records show that at a town meeting on the 11 th of January, 1640, a vote was passed, taking part of the lot of Richard Olmstead for a burial ground. " This is the ground in the rear of the First Church buildings on Main Street," as Walker tells us, "where so many of Hartford's early dead still repose." It contains a monument to the early settlers of this city, and is worthy of a pilgrimage, if any of you have not yet seen it. James Olmstead's lot was on Front street, not far from where the gas works now stand.

However, as I have said, the family was soon to part company. The wanderlust was upon them, and in 1651 Richard Olmstead, defying the dangers of wild beast and Indian, struck still deeper into the wilderness, and founded, with his family and with other friends, the town of Norwalk.

from Henry King Olmsted's "Genealogy of the Olmsted family in America ..."

Descendants of Capt. Richard Olmstead of Norwalk, Conn.

FIRST GENERATION

RICHARD OLMSTEAD, Norwalk, Conn. bap. at Fairsted, Essex County, England, Feb. 20,1612 ; son oí Richard Olmstead, who was son of James and Jane (Bristow) Olmstead, of Great Leighs, Essex County, England. His will is dated Sept. 5, 1684. As appears in his will, he was married twice, but the names of his wives are not known. His sons were children of the first wife. He also had a daughter who had died before the making of his will. 3954, James +. 3955, John +.

Richard Olmstead came with the family to America, and until his marriage was probably a member of his Uncle James' family; but of the date of that event we have no record. He came to Hartford in the summer of 1636, with the party from Newtown, Mass. He was one of the first settlers and proprietors of the new town. In two divisions of land, he had in the proportion of 10 and 8. His house lot was No. 49, and was on the west side of Main St., on part of which now stands the Center Church and the old burying ground (the second one in Hartford). The town bought the lot, as per record: " The 11 of January, 1640. It is further ordered that the Burying-place is appointed to be (a) parcel of Richard Olmstead's lot; and for satisfaction to Richard Olmstead for the said Buryingplace, and the fencing about it, he is to have a parcel of land lying at the North Meadow gate; (the Cow-yard: containing about an acre and a half of ground.)" " The said Richard Olmstead is to have part of John Skinner's lot, on which the said John Skinner's house stands; and the said John Skinner is to remove his dwelling house." " Richard Olmstead is to trans-sill his house that stands upon the Burying-place and then the town is to remove it to the lot, the same, Richard Olmstead receives of John Skinner." This lot of John Skinner's was No. 48, next north of Richard Olmstead's lot No. 49.

One of the first persons buried there was probably his Uncle James Olmstead. From his owning a house in Hartford, it is probable that he was married before 1640.

On June 19, 1650, articles of agreement were drawn up for the purchase of " Norwalke," from Roger Ludlow, of Fairfield, Conn., and at a session of the General Court of the Colony, the 26th of June, 1650, Nathaniel Ely and Richard Olmstead in behalf of themselves and other inhabitants of Hartford, desired the leave and approbation of the Court for (the) planting of Norwalk, to whom an affirmative answer was returned Sept. 11, 1651: " it was ordered that Norwalke should be a town."

Richard Olmstead moved to Norwalk in 1650 or 1651, as his name appears in the deed of the Indian Chiefs dated Feb. 15, 1651. The land purchased from Roger Ludlow comprised only the eastern part of the town. The purchase price was fifteen pounds with some additional considerations. The central part of Nonvalk had been originally purchased by Capt. Patrick of Greenwich, but the payment had never been completed to the satisfaction of the Indians. The amount still owing, viz.: " two Indian coates and fowre fathom of wampam " was made good to them and that part of the town also acquired. The additional land secured from the Indian chiefs, Feb. 15, 1651, " for the consideration of Thirtie Fathum of Wampum, Tenn Kettles, Fifteen Coates, Tenn payr of Stockings, Tenn Knifes, Tenn Hookes, Twenty Pipes, Tenn Muckes, and Tenn needles " comprised the western part of Norwalk. In a table of original grants of home lots to the first settlers of Norwalk, 1652, appears the name of Richard Olmsted and a description of his home lot: 4 acres and 1 rood, Lots 15 and half of 17, with 219 acres commonage. In the "estate of lands and accommodations " of Norwalk in 1655 he is credited with /219.

Mr. Selleck, in his History of Norwalk (p. 24), says: "It speaks well for the new company's enterprise and loyalty that it was able to send its maiden delegate, Richard Olmsted, to Hartford, even as early as May, 1653."

"To make it personal, it is recorded that the day after the Court sat, Richard Olmsted was appointed Sergeant, and deputed to 'exercise' the Norwalk soldiers and 'to examine their arms.'

"Richard Olmstead bore the test of power well, and his first year as Representative was supplemented by a ' dozen other sessions to 1679.' " Richard Olmstead must have been living as late as July 8, 1686, for his name appears in a patent bearing that date, by which patent the original purchase of lands from the Indians for the site of Norwalk is confirmed by the Governor and General Court of Connecticut.

His Civil Services:

In 1646, Constable in Hartford. In 1649, Fence viewer in Hartford. In 1653, Deputy of Norwalk to the General Court at Hartford. In 1656, appointed by the General Court, Leather seller, for Norwalk. In 1657, chosen Townsman in Norwalk. May 19, 1659, appointed with three others to settle a difficulty between the towns of Stratford and Fairfield, with the Indians, relative to lands. May 17, 1660, he was appointed Grand Juror for Nonvalk. Oct. 4, 1660, Deputy to the General Court at Hartford. He was chosen Deputy of Norwalk to the General Court a dozen times between 1660 and 1679.

In 1654, " The Court appointed Mr. Campfield, Deacon More, Mr. Fayrechild, Mr. Hull and Lt. Olmstead a committee to ripen the business respecting the Calf in controversie between Mr. Lord and Danl. Cone who returned that they having viewed the Sayd beast, and the evidences of both sides, doe judge it to be Mr. Lord's steare. The Court confirms this determination that the stear doth belong to Mr. Lord."

At a General Court, held at Hartford, called by the Governor, July 6, 1665, it was announced that the Court has been advised by his Majesty's order, that DeRuyter is likely to assault the Colonies, and that his Majesty had made known his pleasure that the Colonies should put themselves in a posture of defense. The Court ordered that each plantation in the Colony should consider some way to discover the approach of the enemy, and appointed Committees, to act generally in this matter from each town.

Lt. Olmstead appears on the Committee appointed to represent the Colony or that part between Stratford and Rye.

Oct. 12, 1665, he was appointed to view the lands appertaining to Hastings and Rye, for a new plantation. In 1666, he was appointed to run line between Fairfield and Norwalk. In 1667, he was sent to Rye to procure a minister, and hire him for ¿¿"40 a year. May 13, 1669, he was granted 60 acres of land, where he could find it. 1669 to 1675, Selectman in Norwalk. In 1670, he was appointed to survey lands, at the charge of Norwalk, Stamford, Greenwich and Rye. Nov. 26, 1673, he was appointed Muster Master for Fairfield County. In 1675, at a meeting of the Council he was appointed one of two, to sign bills for the payment of the soldiers. (King Philip's War.) He was Commissioner for Norwalk, with magisterial powers, from 1668 to 1677.

His Military Services:

He was a soldier in the Pequot War, May, 1637, and had a grant of land for his services in the " Soldiers' Field." Appointed Sergeant. May 21, 1653, to a company of 65 men, and allowed to exercise the soldier? at Norwalk and to view the arms, and to make return to the Court of the defects. He was also appointed Sergeant to a company of 65 men to be raised in the several towns of the Colony. Lieut., May 19, 1659. He was a soldier in King Philip's War, fiom June, 1675 to 1676. Capt. in 1680, commissioned for the next 6 years.

In 1681, Capt. Richard Olmstead was appointed one of the Committee to order and dispose of the affairs of the plantation upon the Hop Ground (now Bedford, in Westchester County, N. Y.).

From all this it appears, that in conjunctions of special difficulty and danger, requiring great intrepidity, integrity and sound judgment, he had the confidence of the Colony and his townsmen to a high degree.

Richard Olmstead was in 1659 one of a Committee of four, appointed by the General Court, to lay out 80 acres on Golden Hill, in Bridgeport, Conn., as a permanent dwelling place for the Indians. His wife was in Hartford in July, 1672, being sick with fever and ague, as appears from a letter from John Winthrop, Jr., to Waite Winthrop, Esq.

-------------------- Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) immigrated from England to New England with his Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640, widowed in 1621) in 1632. On this 1632 voyage of the "Lyon" were Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) and his brother John Olmstead (1617-1686) and his sister Rebecca Olmstead (1624-1698) and his cousin Nicholas Olmstead (son of Uncle James Olmstead) and his cousin Nehemiah Olmstead (son of Uncle James Olmstead) and his uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) who was "looking after" them all. They left England on 22 June 1632 and were at sea 12 weeks and arrived at Boston, MA on 16 September 1632. They settled first at Wollaston (now Quincy), MA near Boston, MA and then within a year moved to New Town (now Cambridge), MA at the new "Braintree Colony". Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) was on the 06 November 1632 Freeman list there and was chosen Constable there on 03 November 1634. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) left Cambridge, MA on 15 October 1635 and arrived at Hartford, CT on 29 October 1635 where he and Uncle James Olmstead (1580-1640) were among the first Hartford settlers. They are both on the Founders Monument in Hartford, CT. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) was a soldier in the 1637 Pequot War from Hartford, CT. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) married at Hartford, CT in about 1640 to Elizabeth (her last name may have been Hawes or Hough and information on her is sought) and they had 3 chidren there. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) was Constable at Hartford, CT in 1646 and Fence-Viewer there in 1649. Richard Olmstead (1612-1687) and his family moved to Norwalk, CT in the earliest part of the 1650s. He was Deputy to the Connecticut General Court for 1653-1679 (most years), town judge/commissioner 1653-1687, Townsman in 1657, Selectman 1669-1675. He received a colonial grant of 60 acres in May of 1669 for his service. He was a sergeant on 21 May 1653 with a company of 65 men to train, a lieutenant on 19 May 1659, a soldier in King Philips War 1675-1676, muster master for Fairfield County in November of 1673, and was made a captain in 1680 with a 6-year commission. Richard Olmsted's (1612-1687) will was dated 05 September 1684 and he died at Norwalk, CT in 1687. Son James Olmstead (1647-1731) married at Fairfield, CT in 1673 to Phebe Barlow (1651-1731) and they settled at Norwalk, CT and had 5 children there. James Olmstead (1647-1731) was a judge, a Selectman, and the Town Clerk (29 years, 1678-1707, 1721) at Norwalk, CT. He was a lieutenant in the Norwalk Train Band in 1680 and later a captian. He was the Norwalk, CT representative to General Court for 1691, 1692, 1693, and 1699. James Olmstead (1647-1731) was "one of Norwalk's most eminent and influencial citizens". Grandson John Olmstead (1692-1748), son of James Olmstead (1647-1731), married at Norwalk, CT in 1717 to Mary Small (born about 1700) and they had 8 children there. Mary Small's (born about 1700) father is believed to be Robert Small (1676-1701) and information is sought on these Small ancestors. Some sources list John Olmstead's (1692-1748) death date in 1748 or 1749 and others list it as 1789. Great Grandson John Olmstead (1729-1778), son of John Olmstead (1692-1748), married at Danbury, CT in about 1757 to Abigail Munson (1739-1806) and they had 6 children there. After John Olmstead (1729-1778) died, widow Abigail Munson Olmstead married second to James Sanford. Great Great Grandson Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805), son of John Olmstead (1729-1778), joined the army in 1776 to serve during the War of Revolution. He was in the Continental Army in Colonel Philip Burr Bradley's battalion and was made a captain. He was taken prisoner and confined to a prison ship in New York harbor where his health was seriously undermined. However, he escaped and, after recovering his health, he reentered the Army and served until the end of the War. Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) married at Danbury, CT in about 1781 to Slience Weed (1759-1832) and they had 2 children at Danbury, CT (1783, 1785) and then 5 children after they moved to Stillwater, NY (1788, 1791, 1794, 1797, 1800). Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) at one time owned a wagon shop where he invented a carriage guarenteed to hold two people. Information is sought on Silence Weed's (1759-1832) ancestry. It was noted that "she was well-educated and remarkable for beauty, grace, and common sense". Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805) and wife Silence Weed Olmstead (1759-1832) were buried in the Maltaville Cemetery at Malta, NY. This family was in the 1790 Federal Census at Stillwater, Albany, NY; hasn't yet been found in the 1800 Federal Census; was in the 1810 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with sons Zaloman and Coleman "Umpstead" (it is believed that the whole family is here); was in the 1820 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with son Coleman Olmstead (mother Silence is "45 yrs & up"); and was in the 1830 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with son Coleman Olmstead (mother Silence is "70-80 yrs. old"). Great Great Great Grandson John M. Olmstead (1791-1845), son of Lemuel Olmstead (1761-1805), married at Malta, NY in 1818 to Suzannah Bates (1800-1831) and they had 5 children there. After Suzannah Bates Olmstead (1800-1831) died, widow John M. Olmstead (1791-1845) married second at Schuylerville, NY (I wonder why they married there?) in 1833 to his first wife's sister Sarah Bates and they had 4 children at Malta, NY. Information is sought on this Bates ancestry, please. This family is believed to have been listed with brother Coleman Olmstead (1785-1835) for the 1820 and 1830 Federal Censuses; it is in the 1840 Federal Census at Malta, Saratoga, NY listed with John M. Olmstead (1791-1845); it is in the 1850 and 1860 and 1870 Federal Censuses listed with Sarah Olmstead (and the children); it is listed with James Lamb (husband of John M. Olmstead's and Sarah Bates Olmstead's daughter Susan Olmstead born 1838) where mother-in-law Sarah Olmstead is 78 years old and "aunt" Hannah Bates (sister or sister-in-law to Sarah Bates?) is 76 years old and sister-n-law Ellen Olmstead (born 1840) is 40 years old. Great Great Great Great Granddaughter Elisabeth Olmstead (1819-1866), daughter of John M. Olmstead (1791-1845), married at Maltaville, NY in 1839 to Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) and they had 4 children together. They lived in Michigan and New York and Canada. They were in Canada in 1866 when Elisabeth Olmstead Hulin (1819-1866) died [she was buried at Salisbury Cemetery at Stillwater, NY] and widower Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) married second at Rosendale, WI in 1867 to Julia (widow of Joshua Seaman who died in 1863, mother to Mary Seaman born 1847). Wife Julia Hulin died at Malta, NY in January of 1889 and widower Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) died in February of 1889 at Easton, MI and was buried at Easton Cemetery. This family was in the 1840 Federal Census at Milton, Cass, MI; was in the 1850 Federal Census at Milton, Saratoga, NY; was in Canada during the 1860 Federal Census (therefore, not listed in the FC); was in the 1870 Federal Census at Bushnell, Montcalm, MI; and hasn't yet been found for the 1880 Federal Census. Sources: Olmstead Genealogy (2 page paper found in family Bible) by Margaret Gulick; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 by Torrey; Genealogical Dictionary of New England by Savage, 1860; New England Families by W. R. Cutter; Genealogy of the Olmstead Family in America by H. K. Olmstead, 1912; Hulin Family Bible (published 1847) kept by Moses Hunter Hulin (1818-1889) Richard immigrated to Boston on the ship Lyon in 1632, arriving on 16 September, and his name appears on the Founder's Monument of Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, where he removed in the summer of 1636. He removed to Norwalk in 1650/1651.

"Richard Olmstead, nephew of James Olmstead, was born about 1612. He was married twice. Richard came with his Uncle James to America in 1632 and was, with his uncle one of the original proprietors of Hartford, Connecticut, in 1639. In 1651 he moved to "Norwalke", Connecticut, where he became one of the most respected and honored men. With other men from Hartford, he was a purchaser of the township from Roger Ludlow, of Fairfield, June 19, 1650, and he was first in the town in military command. In the records of Norwalk his name has the oldest date. He was the surveyor for the new town, and the first street to be laid out by him seems to have been Town Street, and on this street all of the early planters built. Before the founding of the town, his name, with those of James, Nicholas and John Olmstead., was on the list "of all persons holding land in Hartford, in February, 1639," and in 1650 he signed his name on the petition for the planting of Norwalk; his name was in the deed of the Indian chiefs on Feb 15, 1651 for the western section of town.. He received four acres as a home lot, on the east side of Town Street. He served in several public offices, and was the first town clerk for Norwalk. He was forty-two years of age when he came to Norwalk, with his two sons, James and John. In 1653 he was representative to the general assembly, May session, and also served in twelve more sessions until 1679. He also served as commissioner of the peace, or town judge. He served in the Pequot War in 1637 and King Philip's War in 1675."

Genealogy of the Olmstead Family in America by Henry King Olmsted, George Kemp Ward

from Genealogy of the Olmstead family in America

" . . . the family of our honored relative, James Olmsted, who, together with two sons, Nicholas and Nehemiah, two nephews, Richard and John, and a niece, Rebecca, arrived in New England, on the Lord's Day, Sept. 16,1632, in the ship Lyon, under Capt. Pierce, after a voyage of 12 weeks from Braintree, England. There were 123 passengers, of whom 50 were children." " They settled first at Mount Wallaston, now Quincy, near Boston, but in the course of the year, 'by order of the Court,' they removed to Newtown, now Cambridge." " The recent settlers of Newtown," says Holmes, "had, while in England, attended the ministry of the Reverend Thomas Hooker, who, to escape fines and imprisonment for his non-conformity, had now fled into Holland." So, as Mather, another contemporary, remarks, " immediately after their settlement at Newtown, they expressed their earnest desires to Mr. Hooker that he would come over into New England and take the pastoral charge of them. At their desire he left Holland, and, having obtained Mr. Samuel Stone .... as an assistant in the ministry, took his passage for America, and arrived at Boston, Sept. 4, 1633." He proceeded at once to Newtown, to take up the duties of his pastorate. There the Braintree Colony, as it was termed, abode until the summer of 1636, when, dissatisfied by the form of government of the colony of Massachusetts and tempted by the charm of this pleasant Connecticut valley, of which they had heard reports,1 they "took their departure from Cambridge," and, in the words of Trumbull, " travelled more than a hundred miles through a hideous and trackless wilderness, to Hartford. They had no guide but their compass; made their way over mountains, through swamps, thickets, and rivers, which were not passable but with great difficulty. They had no cover but the heavens, nor any lodgings but those which simple nature afforded them. They drove with them a hundred and sixty head of cattle, and by the way, subsisted on the milk of their cows. Mrs. Hooker (who was ill) was borne through the wilderness upon a litter. The people generally carried their packs, arms, and some utensils. They were nearly a fortnight on their journey." This brings us in our narration of the wanderings of our worthy family to the beautiful city, near which we have met today to do them honor. The family was soon to separate. Indeed, my own ancestor, Richard Olmstead, who was a youth of 20 when he arrived in America with his Uncle James, was now a young man of 24. That he was married by 1640 is more than probable, for we find that by that date he had quit his uncle's house, and was in possession of a home lot of his own. The records show that at a town meeting on the 11 th of January, 1640, a vote was passed, taking part of the lot of Richard Olmstead for a burial ground. " This is the ground in the rear of the First Church buildings on Main Street," as Walker tells us, "where so many of Hartford's early dead still repose." It contains a monument to the early settlers of this city, and is worthy of a pilgrimage, if any of you have not yet seen it. James Olmstead's lot was on Front street, not far from where the gas works now stand. However, as I have said, the family was soon to part company. The wanderlust was upon them, and in 1651 Richard Olmstead, defying the dangers of wild beast and Indian, struck still deeper into the wilderness, and founded, with his family and with other friends, the town of Norwalk. from Henry King Olmsted's "Genealogy of the Olmsted family in America ..."

Descendants of Capt. Richard Olmstead of Norwalk, Conn.

FIRST GENERATION RICHARD OLMSTEAD, Norwalk, Conn. bap. at Fairsted, Essex County, England, Feb. 20,1612 ; son oí Richard Olmstead, who was son of James and Jane (Bristow) Olmstead, of Great Leighs, Essex County, England. His will is dated Sept. 5, 1684. As appears in his will, he was married twice, but the names of his wives are not known. His sons were children of the first wife. He also had a daughter who had died before the making of his will. 3954, James +. 3955, John +. Richard Olmstead came with the family to America, and until his marriage was probably a member of his Uncle James' family; but of the date of that event we have no record. He came to Hartford in the summer of 1636, with the party from Newtown, Mass. He was one of the first settlers and proprietors of the new town. In two divisions of land, he had in the proportion of 10 and 8. His house lot was No. 49, and was on the west side of Main St., on part of which now stands the Center Church and the old burying ground (the second one in Hartford). The town bought the lot, as per record: " The 11 of January, 1640. It is further ordered that the Burying-place is appointed to be (a) parcel of Richard Olmstead's lot; and for satisfaction to Richard Olmstead for the said Buryingplace, and the fencing about it, he is to have a parcel of land lying at the North Meadow gate; (the Cow-yard: containing about an acre and a half of ground.)" " The said Richard Olmstead is to have part of John Skinner's lot, on which the said John Skinner's house stands; and the said John Skinner is to remove his dwelling house." " Richard Olmstead is to trans-sill his house that stands upon the Burying-place and then the town is to remove it to the lot, the same, Richard Olmstead receives of John Skinner." This lot of John Skinner's was No. 48, next north of Richard Olmstead's lot No. 49. One of the first persons buried there was probably his Uncle James Olmstead. From his owning a house in Hartford, it is probable that he was married before 1640. On June 19, 1650, articles of agreement were drawn up for the purchase of " Norwalke," from Roger Ludlow, of Fairfield, Conn., and at a session of the General Court of the Colony, the 26th of June, 1650, Nathaniel Ely and Richard Olmstead in behalf of themselves and other inhabitants of Hartford, desired the leave and approbation of the Court for (the) planting of Norwalk, to whom an affirmative answer was returned Sept. 11, 1651: " it was ordered that Norwalke should be a town." Richard Olmstead moved to Norwalk in 1650 or 1651, as his name appears in the deed of the Indian Chiefs dated Feb. 15, 1651. The land purchased from Roger Ludlow comprised only the eastern part of the town. The purchase price was fifteen pounds with some additional considerations. The central part of Nonvalk had been originally purchased by Capt. Patrick of Greenwich, but the payment had never been completed to the satisfaction of the Indians. The amount still owing, viz.: " two Indian coates and fowre fathom of wampam " was made good to them and that part of the town also acquired. The additional land secured from the Indian chiefs, Feb. 15, 1651, " for the consideration of Thirtie Fathum of Wampum, Tenn Kettles, Fifteen Coates, Tenn payr of Stockings, Tenn Knifes, Tenn Hookes, Twenty Pipes, Tenn Muckes, and Tenn needles " comprised the western part of Norwalk. In a table of original grants of home lots to the first settlers of Norwalk, 1652, appears the name of Richard Olmsted and a description of his home lot: 4 acres and 1 rood, Lots 15 and half of 17, with 219 acres commonage. In the "estate of lands and accommodations " of Norwalk in 1655 he is credited with /219. Mr. Selleck, in his History of Norwalk (p. 24), says: "It speaks well for the new company's enterprise and loyalty that it was able to send its maiden delegate, Richard Olmsted, to Hartford, even as early as May, 1653." "To make it personal, it is recorded that the day after the Court sat, Richard Olmsted was appointed Sergeant, and deputed to 'exercise' the Norwalk soldiers and 'to examine their arms.' "Richard Olmstead bore the test of power well, and his first year as Representative was supplemented by a ' dozen other sessions to 1679.' " Richard Olmstead must have been living as late as July 8, 1686, for his name appears in a patent bearing that date, by which patent the original purchase of lands from the Indians for the site of Norwalk is confirmed by the Governor and General Court of Connecticut. His Civil Services: In 1646, Constable in Hartford. In 1649, Fence viewer in Hartford. In 1653, Deputy of Norwalk to the General Court at Hartford. In 1656, appointed by the General Court, Leather seller, for Norwalk. In 1657, chosen Townsman in Norwalk. May 19, 1659, appointed with three others to settle a difficulty between the towns of Stratford and Fairfield, with the Indians, relative to lands. May 17, 1660, he was appointed Grand Juror for Nonvalk. Oct. 4, 1660, Deputy to the General Court at Hartford. He was chosen Deputy of Norwalk to the General Court a dozen times between 1660 and 1679. In 1654, " The Court appointed Mr. Campfield, Deacon More, Mr. Fayrechild, Mr. Hull and Lt. Olmstead a committee to ripen the business respecting the Calf in controversie between Mr. Lord and Danl. Cone who returned that they having viewed the Sayd beast, and the evidences of both sides, doe judge it to be Mr. Lord's steare. The Court confirms this determination that the stear doth belong to Mr. Lord." At a General Court, held at Hartford, called by the Governor, July 6, 1665, it was announced that the Court has been advised by his Majesty's order, that DeRuyter is likely to assault the Colonies, and that his Majesty had made known his pleasure that the Colonies should put themselves in a posture of defense. The Court ordered that each plantation in the Colony should consider some way to discover the approach of the enemy, and appointed Committees, to act generally in this matter from each town. Lt. Olmstead appears on the Committee appointed to represent the Colony or that part between Stratford and Rye. Oct. 12, 1665, he was appointed to view the lands appertaining to Hastings and Rye, for a new plantation. In 1666, he was appointed to run line between Fairfield and Norwalk. In 1667, he was sent to Rye to procure a minister, and hire him for ¿¿"40 a year. May 13, 1669, he was granted 60 acres of land, where he could find it. 1669 to 1675, Selectman in Norwalk. In 1670, he was appointed to survey lands, at the charge of Norwalk, Stamford, Greenwich and Rye. Nov. 26, 1673, he was appointed Muster Master for Fairfield County. In 1675, at a meeting of the Council he was appointed one of two, to sign bills for the payment of the soldiers. (King Philip's War.) He was Commissioner for Norwalk, with magisterial powers, from 1668 to 1677. His Military Services: He was a soldier in the Pequot War, May, 1637, and had a grant of land for his services in the " Soldiers' Field." Appointed Sergeant. May 21, 1653, to a company of 65 men, and allowed to exercise the soldier? at Norwalk and to view the arms, and to make return to the Court of the defects. He was also appointed Sergeant to a company of 65 men to be raised in the several towns of the Colony. Lieut., May 19, 1659. He was a soldier in King Philip's War, fiom June, 1675 to 1676. Capt. in 1680, commissioned for the next 6 years. In 1681, Capt. Richard Olmstead was appointed one of the Committee to order and dispose of the affairs of the plantation upon the Hop Ground (now Bedford, in Westchester County, N. Y.). From all this it appears, that in conjunctions of special difficulty and danger, requiring great intrepidity, integrity and sound judgment, he had the confidence of the Colony and his townsmen to a high degree. Richard Olmstead was in 1659 one of a Committee of four, appointed by the General Court, to lay out 80 acres on Golden Hill, in Bridgeport, Conn., as a permanent dwelling place for the Indians. His wife was in Hartford in July, 1672, being sick with fever and ague, as appears from a letter from John Winthrop, Jr., to Waite Winthrop, Esq.

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Richard Olmstead, Immigrant's Timeline

1612
February 20, 1612
Fairstead, Essex, England
February 29, 1612
(Fairsted), Essex, England
1632
June, 1632
- September 16, 1632
Age 20
Boston, Massachusetts, United States

When James left his home at Fairsted, he left in its burying place his wife and four of their seven children. James Olmsted, together with two sons, Nicholas and Nehemiah, two nephews, Richard and John, and a niece, Rebecca, came to New England in the ship 'Lyon,' under Capt. PIERCE, arrive at Boaston on the Lord's Day 16 September 1632, after a voyage of twelve weeks from Braintree, England. There were 123 passengers, of whom 50 were children

1640
September 28, 1640
Age 28
Hartford, CT, USA
1647
April 17, 1647
Age 35
Hartford, CT, USA
1649
December 30, 1649
Age 37
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
1687
April 20, 1687
Age 75
Norwalk, Fairfield, Connecticut, United States
April 23, 1687
Age 75
Norwalk, Fairfield Co, Connecticut
????
Fairsted, Essex, England
????