Richard de Vernon, seigneur de Reviers

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Richard de Vernon, seigneur de Reviers

Nicknames: "Richard de Redvers", "Richard de Reviers"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Vernon Castle, Department of Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Mosterton, Beaminster, Dorsetshire, England
Place of Burial: Abbey Of Montebourg
Immediate Family:

Son of Guillaume de Vernon, seigneur de Vernon et de Reviers and Emma fitz Osbern
Husband of Adelise (Adeliza) de Peverel
Father of Guillaume de Vernon, Baron de Nehou; 2nd Baron of Shipbrook; Baldwin de Reviers, First Earl of Devon; Hawise de Reviers; Robert de Sancte Marie Ecclesia; William de Vernon, II Baron of Shipbrook and 1 other
Brother of Adela de Cotentin (de Vernon); Hugues de Reviers; Walter de Vernon and Adelisa de Reviers

Occupation: Seigneur de Reviers, 1st Earl of Devon, Earl of Chester, Baron of Shipbrookl
Managed by: Bernard Raimond Assaf
Last Updated:

About Richard de Vernon, seigneur de Reviers

William's son Richard de Vernon, Seigneur de Reviers, Vernon, and Néhou was known to have fought at the Battle of Hastings along with his brother Walter, for which he was rewarded with lands in Cheshire under the patronage of Hugh d'Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester. Richard settled at Shipbrook, about 2 miles to the south east of Northwich and was created Baron of Shipbrooke, he was appointed as one of the eight barons under the Norman administration of Cheshire. Richard de Verno married Adzelia, the daughter of William Peverel, who was rumoured to be an illegitimate son of William the Conqueror.

He was a faithful adviser of the Conqueror's youngest son, King Henry I, and aided him in his struggle against his brother Robert Curthose for control of the English throne. He witnessed more than 20 of Henry's charters & royal writs, in several different places, and sometimes as the only witness. By the time of his death in 1107, de Vernon had risen to become one of the richest and most powerful barons in England. Henry I rewarded him with several large grants of land, these included the honours of Plympton in Devon, Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight and Christchurch in Hampshire. In addition to these he held estates in Normandy in the Cotentin and he had also acquired the manors of Crowell in Oxfordshire and Woolley in Berkshire on his marriage. Richard died on 8th September 1107 and was buried at his foundation of the Abbey of Montebourg in Normandy. Following his death his loyalty was remarked upon by the saintly Anselm of Canterbury. He left 3 sons, Badwin de Vernon, who became 1st Earl of Dorrset, William de Vernon, Lord of Vernon, who commanded a company of perhaps the first Welsh archers to be used in the Norman wars, and was later a travelling judge with County Geoffrey Plantagenet in Normandy. The third son was Hugh de Vernon, Baron of Shipbrook, from whom the Shipbrook Vernons descend. Source: http://www.cheshirenow.co.uk/vernon_family.html ________________________________________________________________

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3T-Z.htm

RICHARD de Reviers, (-8 Sep 1107, bur Abbey de Montebourg[514]). His parentage is surmised by the references to his supposed brother Hugues and the latter's parents. Seigneur de Reviers, de Vernon et de Néhou in Normandy. "…Ricardus de Rederis…" witnessed the charter dated 24 Apr 1089 under which Robert III Duke of Normandy donated property to Bayeux cathedral[515]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that Henry I King of England granted the honors of ”primo Tiverton, ac postea…Plimton…in comitemque Devon…[et] insulam Vectæ” to “Ricardo de Redveriis”[516]. Lord of Tiverton and Plimton in Devonshire, and Lord of the Isle of Wight. An undated charter of Richard´s grandson "Ricardus de Redveriis filius Baldewini comitis Exonie" donated property to the abbey of Loders, Dorset founded by "Ricardus de Redveris avus meus"[517]. The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "8 Sep" of "Ricardus de Reveriis"[518].

m ADELISE Peverel, daughter of WILLIAM Peverel of Nottingham & his wife Adeline --- ([1075/80]-after 27 May 1156). “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[519]. Her husband´s name is confirmed by another charter under which “Adeliz de Reviers” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the soul of “domini mei Ricardi de Reviers”, also undated[520]. The chronology of her descendants suggests that she must have been born not later than [1075/80]. "Adeliz de Redveris" donated property to the abbey of Loders, Dorset, for the souls of "patris mei…Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham…et matris mee Adeline", with the consent of "filiorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de ---…et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Reveris, Henrici atque Willelmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "…Stephanus de Magnevilla…Willelmus Avenel…"[521]. "Adeliza de Reviers" wrote to Goscelin Bishop of Salisbury, by charter dated to [1142/55], notifying him of her donation to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg of property which "her father William Peverel of Nottingham" gave with her to "Richard de Reviers"[522]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Ricardi de Reviers…Adelicie uxoris…concessu filiorum suorum comitis Balduini et Roberti de Sancte Marie Ecclesia…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182][523].

Richard & his wife had four children:

1. BALDWIN de Reviers ([1090/1100]-1155). The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names ”Baldwinum” as first son of “Ricardo de Redveriis”[524]. “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[525]. "Baldwin earl of Exeter" confirmed the donations to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg by "his father Richard de Reveriis" by charter dated to [1142/55][526]. Earl of Devon 1141. - EARLS of DEVON.

2. WILLIAM de Vernon (-[16 Jun] after Sep 1151). “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[527]. Seigneur de Vernon. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Willo de Vernun" in Dorsetshire, Wiltshire[528]. "Baldwin earl of Exeter" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg with the consent of "his sons Richard, Henry and his brothers William de Vernone and Robert de Sancte Marie Ecclesia" by charter dated to [1142/55][529]. "…Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [1147] under which "Henricus ducis Normannorum et comitis Andegavorum filius" confirmed the rights of the abbey of Saint-Ouen[530]. "…Willelmus de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [end 1150/early Sep 1151] under which "H. dux Normannorum" granted privileges to the citizens of Rouen[531]. "…Willelmo de Vernone…" witnessed the charter dated to [Sep 1151/Jan 1153] under which "Henricus dux Norm et comes Andeg" confirmed the foundation of the abbey of Fontenay at the request of "Jordani Taxonis"[532]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[533]. [The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "16 Jun" of "Guillelmus de Vernone ultimus"[534].] m LUCY de Tancarville, daughter of GUILLAUME de Tancarville & his wife Mathilde d'Arques. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. William & his wife had six children:

a) RICHARD de Vernon (-[3 Jul] after 1195). Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[535]. The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Richardus de Vernone" with 10 knights "de honore de Nehashou" and 30 knights "in Constentino" in his own service[536]. "…Ricardo Vernone…" subscribed the charter dated [1172/78] under which Henry II King of England confirmed the freedoms of the city of Rouen[537]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Willelmi de Vernone et Ricardi filii eius…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182], signed by "…Ricardo de Vernone…"[538]. "Ricardo de Vernone…Willelmo de Vernone juniore" subscribed the charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182] under which Henry II King of England granted duty exemptions to the abbey of Montebourg[539]. “Ricardus de Vernone pater et Ricardus filius meus" denied their oath to Richard I King of England and recognised the suzerainty ot Philippe II King of France over "Vernonem cum castellania" by charter dated Jan 1195 (maybe O.S.)[540]. [The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "3 Jul" of "Ricardus de Vernone"[541].] m LUCY, daughter of --- (-26 Jul ----). The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "26 Jul" of "Lucia uxor Ricardi de Vernone"[542]. Richard & his wife had one child:

i) RICHARD de Vernon (-after 1195). “Ricardus de Vernone pater et Ricardus filius meus" denied their oath to Richard I King of England and recognised the suzerainty ot Philippe II King of France over "Vernonem cum castellania" by charter dated Jan 1195 (maybe O.S.)[543]. m ELIZABETH, daughter of --- (-14 Aug ----). The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "14 Aug" of "Elizabeth uxor Ricardi de Vernone"[544].

b) BAUDOUIN de Vernon (-young). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

c) HUGH . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. A cleric.

d) DROGO . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

e) JULIANA (-[21 May ----]). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. [The necrology of Mont-Bourg records the death "21 May" of "Juliana de Vernone"[545].] m WILLIAM de Venoix .

f) [MATILDA . Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Blanchelande, including donations by "…Ricardus de Haya et Matildis uxor eius, predicte ecclesie fundatores, et Radulfus de Haya Ricardi nepos, et Willelmus de Vernone et Ricardus eius filius…" by charter dated 1157[546]. This charter does not specify that Richard´s wife was the daughter of Guillaume de Vernon but this appears to be a likely possibility. Henry II King of England confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Lessai, including donations by "Ricardus de Haia et Matildis uxor sua", by charter dated [1185/Jan 1188][547]. m RICHARD de la Haye, son of ROBERT de la Haye & his wife Muriel --- (-1169, bur Blanchelande abbey).

3. ROBERT . “Adeliz de Redveriis” donated property to “abbatie sancte Marie Monteburgi”, for the souls of “patris mei Willelmi Pevrel et matris mee Adeline”, with the consent of “filiorum meorum Baldewini et Willelmi de Vernone et Roberti de sancte Marie ecclesia et fratris mei Willelmi Pevrel de Notingeham et nepotum meorum Ricardi de Redveriis Henrici atque Willelmi” by undated charter[548]. "Baldwin earl of Exeter" donated property to the abbey of Sainte-Marie, Montebourg with the consent of "his sons Richard, Henry and his brothers William de Vernone and Robert de Sancte Marie Ecclesia" by charter dated to [1142/55][549]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of the abbey of Montebourg, including donations by "…Ricardi de Reviers…Adelicie uxoris…concessu filiorum suorum comitis Balduini et Roberti de Sancte Marie Ecclesia…", by charter dated to [Oct 1174/1182][550].

4. HAWISE . A manuscript detailing the descendants of the founders of Twinham Priory names “Hadwysam de Rumara comitissam Lincolniæ” as daughter of “Ricardus de Radvers comes Devoniæ…ex Adeliza comitissa uxore sua”[551], although other sources do not show that her father bore the comital title. “Willielmus de Romara comes de Lincolnia et Willielmus filius eius et Hawdewissa comitissa uxor eius” founded Revesby abbey by undated charter[552]. m WILLIAM de Roumare, son of ROGER FitzGerold de Roumare & his wife Lucy --- ([1096]-before 1161). He was created Earl of Lincoln 1141 by King Stephen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_de_Redvers

birth date often given as 1060. But if he came to England with William the Conqueror, this date is too late.

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From http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/VERNON.htm#Richard%20De%20VERNON%20(Seigneur%20De%20Reviers)1 (near the top of the page)

Notes: the Shipbrook Vernons of Cheshire had risen to the top of the Cheshire aristocracy, Sir Richard de Vernon having been chosen the second baron in the ranks of Earl Hugh Lupus, cousin of the Conqueror, among the Earl's original establishment in 1087 A.D. Four barons were chosen. The first in rank was Sir William de Venables. The third was Sir Hugh de Malbank. Later, these families intermarried.

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Richard d'Auveranche de Redvers, Baron of Oakhampton, created Earl of Devon, d. 1137; m. Lady Adeliza, daughter of William Fitz-Osborne, Count of Bretoille, lieutenant and steward in Normandy, created Earl of Hereford

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[jweber.ged]

Richard de Reviers, Lord of Reviers, Vernon, and Nehou (all in Normandy). [Burke's Peerage. p. 832]

Richard; feudal Lord of Vernon and holder of many manors at the time of the Domesday Survey 1086; enjoyed a local prominence in the County Palatine of Chester as Baron of Shipbrooke (a subinfeudatory rank (but not a peerage title) conferred by Hugh d'Avranches or Lupus (ie. "Wolf", so-called from his ferocity and acquisitiveness), Earl of Chester with quasi-regal powers, so created 1071 in the reign of his great-uncle of the half blood William I ("The Conqueror"). [Burke's Peerage, p. 2884 on the Barony of Vernon]

Note: Burke's does not document that Richard was made an Earl of Devon.

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RICHARD DE REVIERS, Seigneur de Reviers, Vernon, and Néhou, in Normandy. His parentage is unknown, but he has been conjectured to have been son and heir of William DE VERNON (a). In Domesday he appears as the possessor of a single Manor Mosterton in Dorset. It has been erroneously considered that he was created Earl of Devon by Henry I. The authorities for this are the statements made in two monastic chronicles. There is, however, abundant charter evidence that he never styled himself an Earl, that his wife in her widowhood never styled herself a Countess, and that none of their children, nor their grandchildren, ever so styled them. He was the founder (in the technical sense of the word) of the Abbey of Montebourg.

He married Adelise, daughter of William PEVEREL of Nottingham, the elder, by Adeline, his wife. He died 8 September 1107, and was buried in the Abbey of Montebourg. His widow survived her eldest son, Baldwin, and died 27 May 1156 or later. [Complete Peerage IV:309-11, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(a) It appears from a charter of Henry I to the canons of Breamore that Richard's son, Baldwin had an uncle Hugh, who (if by 'Avunnculus' is meant 'patruus') may be the Hugh de Redveris mentioned in a memorandum of La Trinite at Caen, and also the Hugh mentioned as son of William de Vernon in a document (of date about 1067) in the cartulary of La Trinite at Rouen, signed by William Vernonensis and Emma his wife. In the register of Carisbrooke it is said that Richard de Reviers was 'nepos' of William Fitz Osborn, after whose death (his sons John & Richard having dvp.) the Isle of Wight was inherited by the said Richard, 'tunc Comes Exonie.' So that this Richard may have been son of William de Vernon, by Emma, sister of William fitz Osborn. The continuator of William of Jumieges states that a niece of Gunnor the wife of Duke Richard was married to Osmund de Centumvillis, Vicomte de Vernon, and was mother of the first Fulk de Aneio and of the mother of the first Baldwin de Reviers.

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Following copied from Dave Utzinger, World Connect db=utzing, rootsweb.com:

Close advisor to Henry I.

Richards parentage has long been shrouded in confusion. Dugdale said he was the son of Baldwin de Meules, but this was based on the misconception that Ricahrd fitz Baldwin was the same person as Richard de Redvers. It has also been argued more recently that Richard was the son of a Baldwin de Redvers who is mentioned in the deathbed charter of his brother Richard in 1060.

However, it is most likely that Richard was a son of William de Vernon, lord of Vernon, Normandy who died after 1077, and probably before 1089. A charter of Richard de Vernon (grandson or great grandson of Richard de Redvers) preserved by Thomas Stapleton and dated by him to 1186 states that 'confirmo donationem quam primus Willelmus de Vernone ANTECESSOR MEUS, cujus corpus in ecclesia de Vernone jacet...' If this is taken in conjunction with the facts that WIlliam de Vernon had a son named Hugh, and that Richard's son Baldwin had an uncle named Hugh, it shows that William had two sons, Hugh and Richard.

Hope this makes sense. The Redvers and Vernon families were very closely linked, & it is difficult to make sense of it all.

Luke Potter

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Richard de Abrincis, surnamed de Redvers, having s. to the honours and possession of his father, resigned the Barony of Okehampton, the sheriffalty of Devon, and the custody of the castle at Exeter, in favour of his nephew, Robert de Abrincis, and was created Earl of Devon by King Henry I with a grant of the Isle of Wight in fee. This nobleman (who, from residing chiefly at Exeter, was generally called Earl of Exeter) m. Adeliza, dau. and co-heiress of William FitzOsborne, Earl of Hereford, and had issue,

I. Baldwin de Redvers, his successor. II. William de Redvers, surnamed de Vernon. III. Robert de Redvers. I. Hadwise, m. to William de Romare, Earl of Lincoln.

Richard de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon, d. in 1137, and was s. by his eldest son, Baldwin de Redvers. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 140, Courtenay, Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon]

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The following post-em from Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann@yahoo.com, contains some of the debate/speculation about the ancestry of Richard:

Below is way more than you probably ever wanted on this subject. I apologize in advance for its length:

Luke Potter posted to gen-medieval@rootsweb.com on 09 Jan 1998 Subject: Re: Baldwin de Reviers: Richard's parentage has long been shrouded in confusion. Dugdale said he was the son of Baldwin de Meules, but this was based on the misconception that Richard fitz Baldwin was the same person as Richard de Redvers. It has also been argued more recently that Richard was the son of a Baldwin de Redvers who is mentioned in the deathbed charter of his brother Richard in 1060. However, it is most likely that Richard was a son of William de Vernon, lord of Vernon, Normandy who died after 1077, and probably before 1089. A charter of Richard de Vernon (grandson or great grandson of Richard de Redvers) preserved by Thomas Stapleton and dated by him to 1186 states that 'confirmo donationem quam primus Willelmus de Vernone ANTECESSOR MEUS, cujus corpus in ecclesia de Vernone jacet...' If this is taken in conjunction with the facts that WIlliam de Vernon had a son named Hugh, and that Richard's son Baldwin had an uncle named Hugh, it shows that William had two sons, Hugh and Richard.

A dissenting argument on Richard's ancestry: Diana Trenchard posted privately to me on 9 Jan 1998 Subject: Re: Baldwin de Reviers . . . As you will see, my quote from Bearman (1994) comes down on the other side of the possible ancestry of the first Richard Redvers. I'll leave you to judge the evidence. . . Richard de Redvers (died 1107) was the founder of the family in England as a consequence of his support for Henry prior to his becoming King Henry I. His son Balwin was created Earl of Devon in 1141 by Matilda as a reward for his vigorous support of her against Stephen. The following is a quote from the Introduction in "Charters of the Redvers Family and the Earldom of Devon 1090-1217' by Robert Bearman, pub 1994 by Devon and Cornwall Record Society, New Series, Vol 37. "The origins of the Redvers family are obscure. For many years genealogists thought otherwise, due to their reliance on William Dugdale's 'Baronage of England' (1675-6), which had mistakenly equated Richard de Redvers with Richard the son of Baldwin de Meules, William I's sheriff of Devon. [footnote: His mistake was still being repeated more than 200 years later: eg DNB, iii, 34; Notes and Queries, 12th series, vii,(4 Dec 1920), p445.] The editors of 'The Complete Peerage' were aware of Dugdale's error but further compounded matters by proposing as Richard's father William de Vernon, prominent in Normandy in the eleventh century.['Complete Peerage',iv,310; 'William the Conqueror, D.C.Douglas, London, 1964,pp87-8.] The evidence on which they relied, however, does not bear this out, [footnote: their argument hinged on the relationship between Hugh and William de Vernon in a charter quoted in Round, 'Calendar', p23, no 82. The calendar makes William the father of Hugh, but in fact the relationship was the other way round ('Chartularium de Mont Rothomagi, p430, no 16).] A more plausible theory had already been advanced by Thomas Stapleton in the 1840s but in such a confused manner that later genealogists were unable to follow his arguments, [footnote: 'Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae', 2 vols, Royal Historical Society, London, 1840-4, ii, pp cclxix-cclxxx; and see JR Planche, 'The Conqueror and his Companions', 2 vols, London, 1874, ii, 46, and GH White in 'The Genealogist', NS xxxvii (1921), p131.]. It was based on a charter of 1060, now available in modern edition, which mentions three Redvers brothers: Richard (who died in that year), William and Baldwin, [footnote: 'Recueil des Actes des Ducs de Normandie', ed M. Faroux, Caen, 1961, p328, no 147. The brothers' surname occurs only in the rubric.]. It was Stapleton's belief that this Baldwin was Richard's father, mainly on the grounds that Richard in turn named his eldest son Baldwin. This may seem inconclusive but the argument is given some support by Robert de Torigni in one of his interpolations in the Chronicle of William de Jumieges [pp 328-9]. Clearly the matter must be left in some doubt, but Stapleton's argument, unlike the others, is at least not based on errors and should therefore be preferred." [Ref: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jast/D0026/G0000005.html]

Research note: CP Shows that Baldwin de Redvers (II), Earl of Devon, had an uncle Hugh. Assuming correct use of latin this would mean that his father Richard had a brother of this name. It is then hypothesized that this Hugh was the same as the Hugh, son of William de Vernon and his wife Emma, which would provide the same parentage for Richard. The Genealogy of the founders of Carisbrook show this same Richard to be nephew of William Fitz Osbern, and thus it was hypothesized that Richard, the first English Redvers/Vernon, was son of William de Vernon and Emma Fitz Osbern, who in turn was daughter of Osbern de Bolbec (in a 2nd msg TAF corrected name to de Crepon) and Emma d'Ivry. However this parentage for Richard was disproven. This is reported in van Houtz article, Robert de Torigni as Genealogist, in Studies in Medieval History presented to R Allen Brown, and I have not had the time to track down her reference for the disproof.

In a more complete discussion of the family in the article Aspects of Robert de Torigny's Genealogies Revisited (in Nottingham Medieval Studies 27:21-7). This shows that in the generation prior to Richard, there is a Baldwin, a Richard who d.s.p., and their (presumed) brother William, son of Hugh (the author hypothesizes that William was either the youngest child of Hugh, or the only child, making Richard and Baldwin half-brothers). This last William appears identical to the William who married Emma, and had Hugh. The author calls her Emma Fitz Osbern, but this forgets that her identity as a Fitz Osbern depends on her identity as mother of Richard, which has been rejected (if he has other reasons, he does not give them). The author then hypothesizes that Richard (father of Earl Baldwin) and his brother Hugh are sons of Baldwin, and that this Baldwin is the same as the Baldwin de Redvers that Robert names as son of a daughter of Osmund de Centumuilliers, vicomte de Vernon (otherwise difficult to identify) by a niece of Duchess Gunnor.

Now for my own speculation (entirely unsupported!). Either the first Baldwin de Redvers, in marrying a sister of William Fitz Osbern was within the prohibited degree (of which the Normans tended to be rather scrupulous) since his wife would be granddaughter of Gunnor's brother, and his mother was granddaughter of one of Gunnor's siblings, or else Robert has erred here. Could it be that there was only one relationship with Gunnor, that Richard was great-nephew of William Fitz Osbern, and that Baldwin's mother, was daughter of a nephew (Osbern de Crepon, son of Herfast, her brother) and not of a niece (the unnamed wife of Osmund)? One could even go a step more (if William, son of Hugh was in fact a half-brother), and suggest that Robert, in confusing Osmund with Osbert shuffled generations somewhat, and that Osmund de Centumuilliers married a great-niece of Gunnor, daughter of her nephew Osbert, and by him was mother of Baldwin (rather than him being maternal grandson).

It could even be (I am speculating on the fly, without my references, but I suspect this version would stretch chronology too much, making William Fitz Osbern too much older than Richard) that Baldwin was maternal grandson of Osmund, and he in turn married the daughter of Osbert (Robert did have a tendancy to drop generations, as appears to have been the case in the Montgomery and Warenne connections to Gunnor). [Ref: TAF 15 Nov 1996]

Richard de Reviers. "Redvers" is a later spelling. The Lordship of the Island was valued for its rents, not its "very high honour" ~ a concept of later times. Richard did not adopt the style of Earl, and he died on 8 September 1107, not in 1140. [Ref: http://www.baronage.co.uk/bphtm-03/beaver1a.html]

Regards, Curt

Sources: 1.Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 832 Text: does not name him Earl of Devon 2.Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: IV:309-11 3.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 11 Jan 2005 4.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 12 Jan 2005 5.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 14 Jan 2005 6.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 18 Jan 2005 7.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 19 Jan 2005 8.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 20 Feb 2005 9.Title: jweber.ged Repository: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: 5 Mar 2005

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Richard de Reviers

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_de_Reviers

Richard de Reviers († 8 septembre 1107), fut un baron anglo-normand, qui a peut-être accompagné Guillaume le Conquérant dans sa conquête de l'Angleterre en 1066. Il était seigneur de Reviers, de Vernon (Eure) et de Néhou (Manche) en Normandie, et lord de Plympton, Christchurch et Carisbrooke en Angleterre1.

ombeau de Richard de Reviers, Abbaye de Montebourg

Il portait le nom de Richard de Reviers (de Ripariis en latin), anglicisé en Redvers, Revières ou moins communément, Rivers. Ses origines ne sont pas très claires, sa parenté a été établie par recoupement de plusieurs chartes de dons à des églises2. Il est probable qu'il soit le fils de Guillaume de Vernon, et d'Emma, une fille d'Osbern de Crépon.

Il participa peut-être à la bataille de Hastings. Il est cité dans le Domesday Book (1086) en tant que détenteur d'un seul manoir : Mosterton (comté de Dorset, 6 hides, £12). Il s'attache au service d'Henri, le plus jeune fils de Guillaume le Conquérant, et quand ce dernier devient roi en 1100, il est largement récompensé par de vastes domaines dans le Devon, le Dorset, le Hampshire et l'île de Wight. Ses domaines seront connus comme les honneurs de Plympton (Devon), Christchurch (Dorset) et Carisbrooke (Île de Wight)1.

Il est l'un des conseillers d'Henri Ier3, et lors de l'invasion de 1101, menée par le duc Robert Courteheuse, il est l'un des principaux alliés du roi contre son frère.

Il reçoit l'île de Wight en 1102, peut-être parce qu'il est parent d'un précédent seigneur de l'île, Roger de Breteuil, comte de Hereford. Ce territoire reste dans la famille à travers les Redvers ou Reviers et Vernons jusqu'au règne Édouard Ier.

Richard de Reviers meurt en 1107 dans le monastère de Montebourg, dans le Cotentin, et dont il était devenu le patron depuis qu'Henri Ier Beauclerc lui en avait donné la garde4. Il est inhumé dans l'église abbatiale, où son sarcophage se trouve toujours aujourd'hui. Il porte l'inscription tronquée: RICE DE REVIERS FV[NDATOR].

Mariage et descendance

Il épousa, v. 1082, Adeliza Peverel († entre 1156 et 1165), fille de Guillaume Peverel de Nottingham (1085-1114) et d'Adeline de Lancastre, dame de Loders et d'Ouvelay5. Ils eurent cinq enfants connus :

  • Baudouin de Reviers († 1155), 1er comte de Devon.
  • Guillaume de Vernon, qui conserva l'essentiel des biens continentaux (dont le château de Vernon et celui de Néhou), marié à Lucie de Saint-Floxel, fille du Chambellan Guillaume de Tancarville
  • Robert de Sainte-Mère-Église.
  • Hadevise ou Hawise de Reviers, mariée à Guillaume de Roumare, 1er comte de Lincoln.

Notes

  1. ↑ a et b Robert Bearman, « Revières, Baldwin de, earl of Devon (c.1095–1155) », ODNB.
  2. ↑ Voir lien externe vers MedLands.
  3. ↑ Ordéric Vital, Histoire de la Normandie, éd. Guizot, 1826, tome 4, p. 76. Disponible sur Gallica [archive]
  4. ↑ Robert de Torigni, Chronique, édition Léopold Delisle, t. II, p. 203-204.
  5. ↑ Page généalogique de Michel Leconte [archive].

Voir aussi

Famille de Reviers

Liens externes

  • The Conqueror and His Companions: Richard de Redvers
  • [PDF] Seigneurs de Reviers
  • [xls] Détenteurs du Dorset dans le Domesday Book

Sources

  • Robert Bearman, « Revières, Baldwin de, earl of Devon (c.1095–1155) », dans Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Accédé en novembre 2008.
  • Richard de Reviers sur MedLands
  • Pierre Bauduin, La Première Normandie (Xe-XIe siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, (ISBN 2841331458).

Bibliographie

  • R. Bearman, « Charters or the Redvers family and the Earldom of Devon, 1090-1217 », Devon and Cornwall Record Society, New Series, 37, 1994.
  • F. Hockey, « The House of Redvers and its Monastic fondations », Anglo-Norman Studies, V, 1982, p. 146-152

-------------------- Notes: the Shipbrook Vernons of Cheshire had risen to the top of the Cheshire aristocracy, Sir Richard de Vernon having been chosen the second baron in the ranks of Earl Hugh Lupus, cousin of the Conqueror, among the Earl's original establishment in 1087 A.D. Four barons were chosen. The first in rank was Sir William de Venables. The third was Sir Hugh de Malbank. Later, these families intermarried.

Richard de Reviers, the first Vernon, was a good and loyal officer serving the Duke of Normandy, William the Bastard, future William the Conqueror. He was such a good and loyal officer, that in 1050 he was given the little town of Vernon-sur-Seine as a reward. From then on, Richard de Reviers and all his descendants to come, took the name of their town for their name. The VERNON family was born. Richard de Reviers changed has name to Richard de Vernon. Sixteen years later, William the Conqueror invaded England in 1066 at least two of his high ranking officers were Vernon's. Richard de Vernon definitely took part in the invasion. Many others of the family also accompanied him. For the service more great estates in Normandy and England were granted to the Vernon family and its members were ranked among the wealthiest and most powerful in both counties. Several members became Barons and were Knighted.

view all 13

Richard de Vernon, seigneur de Reviers's Timeline

1045
1045
Vernon Castle, Department of Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
1085
1085
Age 40
Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England
1095
1095
Age 50
Vernon, Eure, Normandy, France
1102
1102
Age 57
Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England
1107
September 8, 1107
Age 62
Mosterton, Beaminster, Dorsetshire, England
1117
September 8, 1117
Age 62
Abbey Of Montebourg
1995
June 8, 1995
Age 62
June 30, 1995
Age 62
1996
March 8, 1996
Age 62
????