Robert Buckles, Sr. (1702 - 1790)

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Birthplace: Yorkshire, England, England
Death: Died in Jefferson, WV, United States
Managed by: Theresa Ellen Colvin
Last Updated:

About Robert Buckles, Sr.

From Irene Kelty [kelty@bigpond.net.au]

I have received today a summary of records from taken from West Sussex Records Office papers, that a local Buckle contact obtained, it appears that Robert Buckle may not have been related to Sir Christopher at all, I have attached the details there is not a Robert in sight, except the Cuthbert Robert Buckle I found later (1837-1901) who was a Naval man. The W.S.R.O have heaps of documents on the Buckles including personal letters and family trees of the family., not everything of course is available on the net, If you want to see the original notes of West Sussex Record Office go to:

http://www.a2a.org.uk/

It is a Govt Archive site, do a search by just putting Buckle in the search field and it will bring you up the screed there is a link to West Sussex Record Office.

However earlier Buckles had lands in Yorkshire before they purchased down South it is possible he is a descendent of a branch up there,. The present day Buckles evidently have authenticated records stating the family owned land in the county of Westmorland, residing at Borough-under-Stainmore, and owning estates which bordered on the North Riding of Yorkshire in the reign of Henry VII (1457-1485) so its possible he's related to the earlier Buckles, there is a another lady in America who is a descendent of Robert Buckles says she has a book of Robert Buckles and it is presumed the ancestor of Robert is Sir William Buckle a knight of Scottish Irish descent.

I will try to see if I can find anything on him and will join the Yorkshire list to see if anyone there has any info,.will let you know either way if I find anything or not.

Kind regards Irene

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Robert Buckles was reported to have run away because of the English system of granting the entire estate to the eldest son and became a stowaway to America in 1719 when he was 17 years old. Arrived in Pennsylvania in 1719 at the age of 17; settled in Bucks Co., PA. Later settling in Bucklesville, Berkeley Co., VA by 1751 (now Darkesville, West Virginia). For service in French-Indian War, given 2,090 acres of land.

More About ROBERT BUCKLES I: Burial: Sheperdstown, Jefferson Co., WV Military service: 1758, Served as a soldier in a Ranger Company during the French and Indian Wars Occupation: Farmer Property: Given 2,090 acres for service in French and Indian Wars

Notes for **ROBERT SR. BUCKLES: This information on the Buckles Family was taken from WFT Disc # 1 Tree # 2986. Buried in Buckles-Hendricks-Osburn Cemetery near Univilla, West Virginia.

Researched and Compiled by John Walter Reed, 8720 85th Street NW, Pine Island, Minnesota 55963. Phone: 507-289-5016 e-mail: reed@infonet.isl.net

September 11, 1999

The Buckles Family Line

1. Robert Buckles, Sr., born May 15, 1702 in Yorkshire, England. 2. William Buckles, born about 1743 in Frederick County, Virginia. 3. James Buckles, born about 1770 in Shepardsville, Jefferson County, West Virginia. 4. Mary Buckles, born December 6, 1792, in Sheperdstown, Jefferson County, West Virginia.

Robert Buckles, Sr., - The First Immigrant

Robert Buckles, Sr., was born on May 15, 1702, in Yorkshire, England. Robert was the younger brother of Christopher Buckle, born in 1699, and the grandson (not proven) of Sir Christopher Buckle who died in July, 1594, while Lord Mayor of London. (No information is available on when the surname changed from Buckle to Buckles.) Robert Buckles left England for America in 1719 at age 17. As the second son of a wealth England landlord, Robert may have run away from home due the English tradition of giving the father's estate to the oldest son. Other Buckles family stories indicate that young Robert left England to avoid the military draft. The truth may have been a combination of both situations.

Robert made friends with a ship's crew in order to obtain passage. The crew stowed him away in one of the ballast barrels and he evaded officers who came on board to search the ship. His name has not been found in immigration passenger lists; which would tend to confirm that he made the passage as a stowaway.

Robert Buckles probably landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and first settled in Bucks County. Not much is known about the 13 plus years he spent in Pennsylvania other than the fact that he met and married Ann Brown. Ann was from a very prominent Pennsylvania family. Ann's grandfather, Daniel Brown, was a member of the First Pennsylvania Assembly in 1683 and the Brown family farm was adjacent to that of William Penn. Ann Brown was a member of the Quaker community, but relinquished her Quaker faith to marry Robert in 1727.

Robert and Ann Buckles migrated with 15 other families, all or most of whom were Quakers, to Berkeley County, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1727. They had purchased the land from the VanMetre grant of Joist Bite. The land was acquired directly or indirectly from Thomas Lord Fairfax of England who had inherited about five million acres in the new colonies from his grandfather, Lord Fairfax. The elder Fairfax, in turn, had gained the land rights from Charles II of England. (As of October, 1991, Frank Woodruff Buckles had, in his possession, the original Fairfax land grant document in the amount of four hundred acres to Robert Buckles. At the time of Robert Buckles's death in 1790, his land holdings had grown to 2,090 acres.)

The Buckles land was located a few miles from the Potomac River approximately halfway between Sheperdstown and Uvilla in Jefferson County. According to Frank Woodruff Buckles, the original cabin was located on the east side of present day Highway 230, near the point where the road intersects with Rattlesnake Run Creek. Robert and Ann are thought to have built their first home in Jefferson County over a small creek which feeds into Rattlesnake Run. The practice of building a log home over a creek was common since it provided access to water in case of prolonged Indian attacks.

"This was told me by a descendant of Robert Buckles." From HISTORIC SHEPHERDSTOWN by Danske Dandridge, The Michie Co. Printers, Charlottesville, WV., 1910, Page 26, Reprinted by Specialty Binding and Printing Co.. Shepherdstown, WV, 1985

While Robert Buckles and other men of the community were away with Morgan's Company on one occasion, a party of Indians entered the neighborhood and killed and scalped any residents they could find. The children and wife of Robert Buckles were surprised during the night, but managed to escape, leaving behind in the excitement, one little girl who was unable to walk. The Indians scalped the little girl and left her lying in the cabin. When the family returned to the cabin, they discovered that the child was still alive. She recovered fully, grew to womanhood and married.

Robert Buckles primary home was located southwest of Martinsburg, West Virginia, in Berkeley County. The area was initially know as Bucklestown which as named "after General Buckles who resided there." In 1797, Bucklestown was made a town by the Virginia Legislature and the name changed to Darkesville in honor of General William Darke, an Indian fighter and Revolutionary War hero.

In a book about the Buckles family by Florence H. Moore, she said "The Buckles family was among the earliest and thriftiest settlers in our area … Robert Buckles is listed as a Patriot during the American Revolution. Although he was one of the first settlers on the Potomac … he was too old for military service in the Revolution. He furnished supplies for the use of the State of Virginia … He had seen service in the French and Indian War. His name appears on the muster roll of Captain Richard Morgan's Company. It said he gave four sons to the Revolution. The records in the Library of Congress show that one of his sons, Robert Buckles, Jr., served in a Company of Rangers under Captain Rutherford from the time the Company was organized until it was reduced in Berkeley in 1780."

The children of Robert Buckles and Ann Brown were:

1. James Buckles, born in 1732 in Bucklestown (now Darkesville), Berkeley, West Virginia. Married Sara Gerrard in 1762. Died in 1798 in Hamilton County, Ohio. 2. Abraham Buckles, Sr., born 1736 in Fredrick County, Virginia. Married Mary McEvars. Died in Berkeley County, West Virginia, in 1777. 3. Robert Buckles, Jr., born October 10, 1740, in Fredrick County, Virginia. Married Rachel VanMeter about 1760. Died April, 1809, in Jefferson County, West Virginia. 4. William Buckles, born about 1743, in Fredrick County, Virginia. Married Priscilla Hendricks, daughter of James Hendricks and Priscilla Pettit in 1765. Died July, 1824, in SHEPHERDSTOWN, Jefferson County, West Virginia. 5. Mary Elizabeth Buckles, born about 1744 in Fredrick County, Virginia. Married 1) David Osbourn about 1767 and 2) John Hendricks. Died about 1820 in Jefferson County, West Virginia. 6. Jane Buckles, born February 20, 1744/45 in Fredrick County, Virginia. Married Daniel Hendricks. Died about 1836 in Jefferson County, West Virginia.

The will of Robert Buckles, Sr. was dated June 27, 1787, and was probated on December 21, 1790.

"In the name of God amen, I, Robert Buckles of the County of Berkeley, being weak and infirm in body, but of sound and disposing mind and memory and calling to mind the mortality of my nature and that all men must die, do make this my last will and testament.

Imprimis - I give my soul to God who gave it to me trusting for it salvation to the goodness and mercy of God and the merit of the Blessed Savior Christ, my body I give to be buried in a Christian manner as to such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me I do give and devise and bequeath thereof in manner and form following having made provision for my eldest son James, I hereby give and bequeath him one Shilling Sterling and no more.

I give, devise and bequeath unto my son Robert the tract of land I now live on with all its appurtenances to him and his heirs and assigns forever except there out one hundred acres thereof which I direct shall be laid off by my executors at the lower end of the tract by a line across the same which one hundred acres I give and bequeath to my grandson, William Hendricks and his heirs and assigns forever.

I give and devise to the three sons of my son Abraham deceased, a certain tract of land in the said county and adjoining the ore bank for which I have a patent supposed to contain four hundred acres to them and their heirs forever as tenants in common and should either of them die without issue his part to go to the survivors and their heirs assigns.

I give and device to my grandsons Tobias and Daniel Hendricks, son of Daniel Hendricks deceased, the tract upon whereupon Matthew Magarrough lives containing one hundred and forty five acres and also fifty-five acres which I have laid off for them out of a tract of land adjoining the lands I live on to them and their heirs forever as tenants in common and not as joint tenants.

I also give and devise to my son Robert one hundred acres of the tract adjoining my home plantation which he is now in possession of to him and his heirs forever.

I also give to my grandson William Hendricks the track of land on which he now lives and which I have had laid off for him containing about one hundred and seven acres to him and his heirs and assigns forever.

The remainder of the said tract of about one hundred and forty acres together with all of my personal estate of what nature or kind so ever is to be sold by my executors herein after named or such of them as take upon themselves the execution of this my last will and after the payment of my just debts there out the residue of the money arising therefrom and any other money which may come into their hands I do give and bequeath to my female grandchildren to be equally divided among them. I do appoint my son William and my friend John Mark of Shepherds executors of this my will and I do hereby revoke and disannul all former wills by me heretofore made and this only I declare to be my last will and testament."

Witnessed by Phil Henderson, Thomas Hayle and Jahu Lashells.

Robert Buckles and Ann Brown are both buried in the Buckles-Hendricks-Osbourn family cemetery several hundred yards east of the original home site. The cemetery contains a number of fieldstone headstones, but most of the inscriptions are not readable due to the long exposure to the weather. Other family members known to be buried in the cemetery include daughters Jane Buckles and Mary Buckles, grandson Henry Buckles, and great-grandson James A. Buckles.

In April 14, 1970, the Martinsburg Journal newspaper published the following article.

In memory of an American patriot, Robert Buckles, 1702-1790, was honored when member of the Governor Norborne Berkeley Chapter of the Daughters of American Colonists, marked his grave in a tiny family cemetery near Shepherdstown in ceremonies last Saturday. Buckles served as a soldier in a ranger company during the French and Indian Wars, and although he was too old to fight in the Revolutionary War, he was a patriot and assisted in the cause. Three of his sons, James, Robert, Jr., and William served as officers in the Berkeley County Militia during the Revolution. For Buckles' service during the French and Indian Wars, he was given by a court grants of 2,090 acres of land.

From the publication Between The Shenandoah and The Potomac - Historic Homes of Jefferson County, West Virginia.

Hendricks-Buckles Farm (1754)

This farm, three miles south of Shepherdstown on the road to Uvilla, was originally a part of the tract granted to Robert Buckles by Thomas Lord Fairfax by deed dated October 16, 1754.

By will of Robert Buckles dated June 27, 1787, this tract of 145 acres, together with an adjoining tract of 55 acres, was left to Daniel (the second) and Tobias Hendricks, his grandsons. They were the children of his daughter, Jane, who married Daniel Hendricks, born February 20, 1745, and according to the Buckles will deceased by June 27, 1787. These two grandsons, through the will dated June 6, 1795, of James Hendricks, Sr., their paternal grand-father, inherited another tract of land on what is now called Sandy Ridge. Through an exchange, Daniel (the second) received all of this land now owned by the widow of John W. Hendricks.

By will of Daniel Hendricks II, dated June 30, 1847, the land was left to his sons Daniel III and James Hendricks.

After the death of this James Hendricks on August 10, 1848, his son Daniel W. Hendricks bought from the other heirs their interest in his estate. Later, around 1909, he bought the part inherited by his uncle Daniel III, from the latter's descendants.

In 1916, the settlement of the estate of Daniel W. Hendricks the land was bought by his son Harvey H. Hendricks.

In March, 1944, in settlement of the estate of Harvey H. Hendricks, the interest of the other heirs was purchased by his son John W. Hendricks.

The will of Robert Buckles, dated June 27, 1787, carried the statement that Mathew McGarrough (an early form of McGarry) was then living on the land. Today, the location of his dwelling can be only approximated. The first house known definitely was the home of James Hendricks, born in 1812, and may have been built by his father. It has been established that James Hendricks made additions and alterations. Parts of this old house are still used as a shop and a tenant house. The present brick dwelling, or mansion, was built by Daniel W. Hendricks in 1878. All the brick used in its building were molded and burnt on the farm and the timber was also taken from the land. In 1880, Daniel W. Hendricks built a large bank barn. The dwelling is now modernized in all the convenience for living and altogether this farm is recognized as one of the county's find homesteads.

The following information on the Buckles Family was taken from WFT. Disc # 14. Tree #3321. Robert Buckles Sr., emigrated to the colonies in 1719, living in Pennsylvania. He came as a stowaway. He later acquired land in Berkley County, West Virginia (then Virginia), near Martinsburg, moving there from Delaware. He served in the American Revolution in 1758 in a Rangers Company. Robert Sr., appeared in court at Berkeley County, Virginia, 14 January 1780. He swore that in 1758 he served in a Rangers Company under command of Captain Robert Rutherford.

On Disc # 14, stated that he died in Martinsburg, Berkley Co., West Virginia.

Information on Buckles Family from WFT Disc's # 1 Tree # 2986 Disc # 6 Tree # 2938 Disc # 8 Tree # 464 Disc # 8 Tree # 3053 Disc # 13 Tree # 2742

"The Buckles Family - 250 Years in America" by Robert J. Buckles. Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number 77-70255, Berco Press, Harlingen, Texas

The copy that I refer to is located in the Allen County Library at Fort Wayne, Indiana.

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End notes

1. Charles E. Buckles Manuscript, 1935 used in a family genealogy of the Boarman and Buckles family of Hardin County, Kentucky, GC, 929.2, B63022, 209719. 2. The Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Volume XXVII, 1962, DAR Patriot Index, "Buckles, Robert, Sr. b. 6-15-1702 d. 12-21-1790, m. Ann Brown PS VA." 3. Boarman-Buckles and Allied Families by Ann D. Kelly, No record of this marriage has been located to date, but it is believed by some that they married in 1727 . . . 4. Data from Delores Brock, Avilla, Indiana, 1997. 5. Deloris Brock, Has burial as Sheperdstown, Jefferson co., West Virginia Buckles-Hendricks-Osbourn Graveyard (Back of the John W. Hendricks farm near Uvilla). 6. Boarman-Buckles and Allied Families by Ann D. Kelly, No record of this marriage has been located to date, but it is believed by some that they married in 1727 . . . 7. Data from Delores Brock, Avilla, Indiana, 1997. 8. Charles E. Buckles Manuscript, 1935 used in a family genealogy of the Boarman and Buckles family of Hardin County, Kentucky, GC, 929.2, B63022, 209. 9. Rose Janke has his death location near Maysville, KY. She states that the younger children say Redstone, PA. 10. Gerard Book written by Bob & Carolyn Gerard, Has name spelled "Garard." 11. Date of marriage based on the birth dates of children. 12. Data from Delores Brock, Avilla, Indiana, 1997. 13. Greene County Ohio Cemetery Inscriptions, Vol. 4, Sarah's tombstone gives her age as 75y ?m 13d. 14. Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, by John H. Gwathmey, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1979. 15. Date of marriage based on the birth dates of children. 16. Data from Hubert R. Buckles, Phoenix, Arizona, 1997. 17. The Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Volume XXVII, 1962, DAR Patriot Index, "Buckles, Robert, b. 10-10-1740 d. 1809 m. Rachel Van Metre, 2nd Lt. Va." 18. Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, by John H. Gwathmey, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1979. 19. DAR Patriot Index, Page 97. 20. Virginia Militia In the Revolutionary War Part III, Virginia's Share in the Military Movements of the Revolution., Page 189, Buckles, Robert, Jr., S.L., S. May 15, 1781 . . under W. Lucas. 21. The Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Volume XXVII, 1962, Page 53, "Buckles, William, d. July 1824 in his 81st year."DAR Patriot Index - Lt. VA. 22. The Magazine of the Jefferson County Historical Society, Volume XXVII, 1962, Page 53, "Buckles, Priscilla, wife of William Buckles, d. Dec. 1807." 23. Gerard Book written by Bob & Carolyn Gerard, Has name spelled "Garard." 24. Buckles Family 929.2 B85809 F.W.K. Buckles Family Notes - Shepherdstown, WV, Page 1, "William Buckles died July, 1824 in 81st year." 25. Buckles Family 929.2 B85809 F.W.K. Buckles Family Notes - Shepherdstown, WV, Page 1, "Church records show Wm. Buckles, Elder 1814 - gravestone, Elmwood Cemetery, says: William Buckles died July, 1824 in 81st year." 26. Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, by John H. Gwathmey, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1979. 27. DAR Patriot Index, Page 97. 28. Data from Joan Bullard, Merritt Island, Florida, 1997. 29. DAR Patriot Index, Page 507. 30. Index to Patriots' Spouses, Page 103 -, This reference calls her "Jean". Also can be found on page 322 of DAR patriot index. 31. Joan Bullard has Jane born Feb 20, 1745. Is it possible that husband and wife were born on the same day? 32. DAR Patriot Index, Page 322, This reference also says he married "Jean" Buckles. 33. Tombstone Inscriptions, Jefferson Co., WV 1687-1980, 34. Tombstone Inscriptions, Jefferson County., W. VA 1687-1980, Buckles-Hendricks-Osbourn Graveyard (Back of the John W. Hendricks farm near Uvilla).

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From the Soldiery Of West Virginia by Virgil A. Lewis: State Historian and Archivist. First printed 1911.

FIRST WHITE SETTLEMENT IN WEST VIRGINIA---THE FRONTIER IN 1756

The first white man to find a home in West Virgina, was Morgan Morgan, who in 1726 reared cabin on the site of the present village of Bunker Hill in Mill Creek district, Berkeley county. The next year, a number of Germans from the Valley of the Susquehanna in PA, crossed the Potomac at what has been known for more than a hundred years, as the old "Pack Horse Ford" and about a mile above the southern bank of that river, founded a village which they named New Mecklenberg, in memory of their early home in the Fatherland, and such it continued to be called until changed to that of Shepherdstown, by an act of the House of Burgesses in 1772. In 1734 Richard Morgan obtained a grant for a track of land in the vicinity of New Mecklenberg and there made his home. Among those who came at the same time and settled along the Upper Potomac in what is now the northern part of the West Virginia County of Berkeley and Jefferson were Robert Harper (and Harper's Ferry) William Stroop, Thomas and William Forester, Israel Friend, Thomas Shepherd, Van Swearingen, James Formanfi, Edward Lucas, Jacob White, James lemon, Richard Mercer, Edward Mercer, Jacob VanMeter, Robert Stockton, Robert Buckles, John Taylor, Samuel Taylor, and John Wright. In 1735 the first settlement was made on the South Branch of the Potomac by four families of the name of Coburn, Howard, Walker, and Rutledge. The next year Isaac VanMeter, Peter Casey, and numbers of others found homes in the valley of that river in what is now Hampshire and Hardy Counties; and within the next few years cabin homes dotted the valley of the Opequon, the Great and Little Cacapon rivers, and that of Lost River and Back and Patterson Creek.

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Supplied by : Danni Monn clueless@clnk.com.FTW

In April 14, 1970, the Martinsburg Journal newspaper published the following article.

In memory of an American patriot, Robert Buckles, 1702-1790, was honored when member of the Governor Norborne Berkeley Chapter of the Daughters of American Colonists, marked his grave in a tiny family cemetery near Shepherdstown in ceremonies last Saturday. Buckles served as a soldier in a ranger company during the French and Indian Wars, and although he was too old to fight in the Revolutionary War, he was a patriot and assisted in the cause. Three of his sons, James, Robert, Jr., and William served as officers in the Berkeley County Militia during the Revolution. For Buckles' service during the French and Indian Wars, he was given by a court grants of 2,090 acres of land.

SIMS INDEX TO LAND GRANTS IN WEST VIRGINIA Berkeley County Virginia 1762 - 1863

Name of Grantee Acres Local Description Year Book Page

Buckles, Robert Sr. 404 Adj. Henry Stroap 1790 1 95

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Berkeley County West Virginia Communities:

Darkesville (historical post office). Also known as Darkes, Darkesville, James Town, Locke, Bucklestown, Buckels Town, Bucklestown, Bucklestown, and Bucklestown.

Darkesville Historic District: (Route 11, South of Martinsburg) The village of Darkesville was laid out in 1790 by James Buckles and called Bucklestown. Later, when General Darke of Revolutionary War fame had his headquarters here, the village was renamed Darkesville. Many Civil War engagements took place here. Several original buildings from 1790 to 1850 remain.

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Berkeley Journal features old county families Don C. Wood POSTED: December 7, 2008 Save | Print | Email Email: "Berkeley Journal features old county families"

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The Buckles family of old Berkeley County by Don C. Wood, often referred to as Mr. Berkeley County. Wood has been researching the area's history, buildings and families for the last 40 years.

Though the book focuses on these families, there are many other families which tie to these families. We feel that it is an honor to have Frank Buckles, the United States' only living World War I veteran in our area and that his 1700's ancestor lived in what is today both Berkeley County and Jefferson County. Jefferson County was established in 1801 and was taken off Berkeley County.

Three of the families have towns in Berkeley County named for them. Ganotown was originally named Jamesburg after its founder James Gano. The village of Bucklestown was named after its founder, James Buckles and today is called Darkesville. On the 1847 map of Berkeley County - by John P. Kearfott - both Bucklestown and Darkesville are listed.

Robert Buckles, the ancestors of our Buckles family, first appeared in our records in 1735. On Aug. 2, 1748, he purchased for 15 pounds Pennsylvania money a "certain improvement where he lives adjoining Israel Friend's Patten Land" from William Heath. It was his son, James Buckles, who laid out the village of Bucklestown. William Buckles, born in 1743, was one of the men who helped to establish our independence from England by serving in the Revolutionary War. His brother, Robert Buckles Jr., born Oct. 10, 1740, and died in 1809, was married to Rachel VanMetre. Robert was a 2nd Lt. in the Revolutionary War. He is the ancestor of Frank Buckles. The Old Buckles Cemetery is located in Jefferson County on land where Robert lived. When he wrote his will, he left the home place to Abraham Buckles.

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Furnished by: Aaron Buckles vivaharrycaray@aol.com

from PIONEERS of OLD FREDERICK COUNTY VIRGINIA by CECIL O'DELL

Robert Buckles made a warrant to Lord Fairfax's land office for a survey on 4 April 1750 and a grant for 407 acres, adjacent to Edward Lucas and west of Samuel Taylor's 125-acre patent land on Rattlesnake Run, was issued 14 June 1751.

On 23 October 1754, he received a 403- acre grant located south of Taylor's and adadjacent southeast of his 407 acres and on 30 Octoer 1754, he received a grant for 145 acres located south of his 403 acres.

He received his last grant on 11 March 1763 which consisted of 400 acres located adjacent west of Israel Friend's patet land. (228) 228: Gray, Northerm Neck Grants, G-552, H-505, H-516, M-143

On 1 November 1733, Robert was witness to a deed for a land sale by Abel Janney of Makefield, Bucks County, Pennsylvannia.(229) 229: Bucks County, Pennsylvania Deed Book 6, p. 73.

By 1735, he had moved to Orange County, Virginia where he signed a petition requesting the Court "to suspend an order for a waggon or cart road over the Blue Mountains." Thomas Chester and Jacob Funk had petitioned for this road and the motion to suspend the petition was presented to the Court by Morgan Morgan on 20 July 1735 (230) 230: Dorman, Orange County, Virginia Deed Book 3 & 4 Judgements 1736, p 100.

On 3 February 1752 Buckles purchased 500 acres from Peter Lechan for 100 pounds; (231) this tract on Middle Creek, a branch of the Opequon Creek, was originally John Peteate's 12 November 1735 patent land located at present-day Darkesville, Berkeley County, WV. 231: Frederick County, Virginia Deed Book 2,p. 432

His eldest son James received a 147-acre Fairfax grant on 15 August 1766 which had been surveyed for "Bartholimew" Fryatt on 9 April 1753 and subsequently assigned to James; this tract lay adjacent north to Robert's 500 acres.

Robert also purchased 301 acres from Peter Bradford for 95 pounds on 9 August 1753; this tract for which Bradford had received a Fairfax grant on 1 June 1751(232) was located one mile northwest of his 407-acre home place. 232:Gray, Northern Neck Grants, N-130, G-524.

Buckles disposed of this land on 14 March 1785 to his son William Buckles for 5 shillings (a gift) (233) 233: Berkeley County, West Virginia Deed Book 6, p 384

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view all 17

Robert Buckles, Sr.'s Timeline

1702
May 15, 1702
Yorkshire, England, England
1727
1727
Age 24
Bucks, PA, United States
1732
September 17, 1732
Age 30
Philadelphia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, USA
1736
1736
Age 33
Frederick, West Virginia, United States
1740
October 10, 1740
Age 38
Frederick County, Virginia, USA
1743
1743
Age 40
Berkeley, Jefferson, West Virginia, United States
1744
February 20, 1744
Age 41
Jefferson, Berkeley, West Virginia, United States
1745
February 20, 1745
Age 42
Jefferson, Berkeley, West Virginia, United States
1745
Age 42
Berkeley, USA
1759
1759
Age 56
Frederick County, VA