Is your surname Coleman?

Research the Coleman family

Robert Coleman's Geni Profile

Records for Robert Coleman

2,636,835 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Robert Coleman

Also Known As: "Robert S Coleman"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Virginia
Death: Died in Rockingham County, NC, USA
Place of Burial: Coleman Family Cemetery, Rockingham County, North Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Husband of Martha Coleman
Father of Elizabeth "Betsy" Stubblefield (Coleman); Robert "Spill" Coleman; Tilman Sharpe Coleman; William Coleman; Rebecca Barnett and 1 other

Occupation: Revolutionary War - Patriotic Service
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert Coleman

NOTE: The parents of Robert Coleman (who married Martha Sharpe) are not known for certain at this time.

-----------------

No records have been found that indicate Robert Coleman had a middle name. A memorial of Robert's descendant says Robert was from Culpeper County, Virginia. Robert's birth is speculated to be from 1736 to 1752. Culpeper County was established in 1749 from Orange County.

Records of Guilford Court House were burned during the Revolutionary War. No known historical documents in existence provide lineal proof of Robert's grandparents, parents, siblings or other relations prior to his marriage. The given name of Spillsby appears in Robert's descendants and in the descendants of Capt. Robert Coleman of Essex County, Virginia and of Daniel Coleman of Cumberland County, Virginia.

Pittsylvania County Militia Officers, Deed Book 4 records that on Apr. 22, 1778 Robert Coleman gave provisions for the Culpeper Militia. After May 1780, Robert was awarded one certificate for his public service. Daughters of the American Revolution identify this Robert Coleman as the husband of Martha Sharpe. No marriage bond or marriage record has been found.

Guilford County, North Carolina, County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, May 1783, Robert Coleman was appointed Assessor in Mr. [Isham] Browder’s District. August 1783, Robert Coleman was appointed patroler in his district.

Before 1785, Robert Coleman settled his family on land near the Piney Fork of Town Creek in Rockingham County. The Mayo River joins the Dan River at Madison, and Town Fork flows through Germanton and Walnut Cove. The Dan River and Smith River are near Leaksville and Spray. Leaksville is near the mouth of Smith River. Spray is one mile north of Leaksville.

Children born to Robert Coleman and Martha Sharpe in Guilford County:

1. Elizabeth "Betsy", born about 1774; married Richard "Dickie" Carter Stubblefield Jr., son of Richard Carter Stubblefield and Susannah Carter

2. Robert Spillsby "Spill", born Feb. 26, 1776; married Rebecca C. Terry, daughter of Peter Terry and Rebeccah Terry

3. Tilman Sharpe, born about 1780; married Jennett Walker, daughter of James Walker and Diannah Smith

4. William, born about 1784; married Lucy Walker, daughter of James Walker and Diannah Smith

Children known to be born of this union in Rockingham County:

5. Rebecca Ann, born Feb. 16, 1790; married Capt. James Barnett, son of John Barnett and Lucy Matlock [Medlock]

6. Garland Lee, born about 1799; married the widow Mrs. Sarah (Ragsdale) Hight

Third Monday, May 1787, Guilford County Pleas and Quarter Sessions:

Jury Case No. 17, Henry Terrell vs. Robert Colman. Jury impaneled and sworn find for the Plaintiff and assess damage to £15, plus cost of suit. Witness: William Stephens.

Jury Case No. 24, Henry Terrell vs. Samuel Sharp & Robert Colman. Jury impaneled and sworn find for the Plaintiff. Bond not paid. Witness: William Stephens.

The 1790 census for Salisbury District, Rockingham County, North Carolina lists head of household Robert Coleman: six males (Robert; Robert S., Tilman, William, unknown, unknown); five females (wife, Martha; Elizabeth, unknown, unknown, Rebecca); and eight slaves. Near neighbors were Nathaniel Harris, (Capt.) John Leak, Joseph Scales Jr., (Col.) Nathaniel Scales, (Lt.) John Davis, Josuha Smith, Mathew Pigg [Peggs], Watson Gentry, James Sanders Sr., Edward Sims, Richard Sharp, William Smith, John Scales, Samuel Sharp, James Oliver, John Philips, Johh Gunn, John Vaughn, James Sharpe, Catherine Sharp, Charlotte (Gallahue) Dalton, Edward Burton, John Glenn Jr., William Glenn.

On May 28, 1796, Robert Coleman purchased land from John Leak on the North side of the Dan River, beginning at the mouth of the Haw Branch, running up the said branch 17 poles to a White Oak, thence along a new line as agreed to per Bazley Bourne’s corner Black Oak; then along his line West 173 poles to a Black Oak; thence along the said Bourne’s line North 45 poles to Joseph Parker’s corner Black Oak; thence along his line 103 poles to Matrimony Creek; thence down said Creek as it meanders to Jno. Menzin’s [Menzies] line on the bank of said Creek; thence East 132 poles to a stump; thence South along said line to a Hickory in the bank of Dan River near the mouth of Matrimony Creek; thence down said River to the first station; containing by estimation 300 acres.

In 1796, Robert Coleman and John Leak were appointed tobacco inspectors.

The community of Leaksville was officially established as a town in 1797 when the North Carolina state legislature passed an act authorizing John Leak to lay off a town on a tract of his land on the north side of the Dan River. The General Assembly appointed John Leak, Robert Coleman, Nathaniel Scales, Alexander Snead, and Terry Hughes commissioners to oversee the building and improvement of Leaksville, in accordance with a plan drawn by Abraham Philips.

The 1800 Salisbury District, Rockingham County, North Carolina, census lists head of household Robert Coleman, 45 and over, female (Martha), 45 and over; one male (Tilman) 26-45, one male (Garland) 0-5 years; 8 slaves. Rebecca and what appear to be other children on the 1790 census are not listed on the 1800 census.

The 1810 census for Rockingham County, North Carolina, lists heads of household:

--Robert Coleman, age over 45; female (Martha), age over 45; male (Tilman), age 16-25; male (Garland), age 10-15; 17 slaves.

--Son, Spill Coleman, age 26-44; female (Rebecca C. Terry), age 26-44; female (unknown), age 16-25; male (William H.), age under 10; female (Manerva Elizabeth Terry Coleman), age under 10; female [unknown, probably died in infancy), age 0-4.

--Son, William Coleman, age 16-24.

Robert Coleman died in 1810. His estate of 256 acres of land and negroes was equally divided among his (surviving?) children: Robert S. Coleman, Elizabeth Stubblefield, Rebecca Barnett, Tilman Coleman, and Garland Coleman. The land reserved for Martha's life (described on her memorial) was Garland's at her death.

No record of the date of Robert's death or his place of burial has been found. Robert's burial is probably on the property he owned at the time of his death.

Biography by Connie Blackwell, a 5th great granddaughter of Robert Coleman and Martha Sharpe.


Source: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=141801262

---------------------

An E-Mail from Sherry Nicole February 2001 =

With help from Mike Coleman and Prentice Darnell, the puzzle of Robert S. Coleman's ancestry has been solved. Mistakes made with his middle name and county of birth set this research back for decades. Robert's middle name was not "Spilsbe", at least not in any legal records, or in the sense of being crucial to the identity of his ancestry. He and his son were not born in Culpeper Co. VA, either. In all official legal records, he was "Robert S. Coleman" and should not be referred to by any other name.

Source:https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:S1DS-HWQ

--------------------

COLEMAN ANCESTRY

John Sharpe of England was left an orphan there under a guardian with a large estate but the guardian became severe with him, so he left all and came over to this, then the "New Country" and settled in Virginia near Hanover, his occupation becoming the importing of Negroes from Africa to this country. He educated a son, or sons, to go back for his estate that he, John Sharpe, had left in England, but they died about the time they were completing their education. John Sharpe had one daughter, Martha, who was born near Hanover, Virginia - was married to Robert S. Coleman I, who to her father as an overseer and worked for him, and won her and carried her back to Rockingham County, North Carolina, near Leaksville; five children were born to them, Vis: Robert Spillsby II, Tillman, Betsey, Rebecca, and Garland.

Robert S. Coleman died in late 1810, say December or late November. His slave probate was entered in February Session 1811 of Rockingham County, N. C. Court. No. 1752, Deed Book O. Pages 137-140. (shown as follows):

It is ordered by the court that Nathaniel Scales, John May, Alexander Sneed and Joseph S. Gentry, Esq. and John Menzies be and they are hereby appointed to divide and appropriate the Negroes which belonged to Robert Coleman deceased among his several representatives, and that they make report of such division at the next court. Ro. Galloway C. C. State of North Carolina, Rockingham County. Sct. . In pursuance of an order of the worshipful court of the county aforesaid, bearing date February session 1811, appointing Nathaniel Scales, John May, Alexander Sneed, Joseph S. Gentry, and John Menzies, Commissioners, to divide and appropriate the Negroes of Robert Coleman deceased among his several representatives, to wit, Martha Coleman, Relic (T) and Widow of the said Robert Coleman dec'd. - Robert S. Coleman, Tilman Coleman, Garland L. Coleman, Elizabeth Stubblefield, wife of Richard Stubblefield, and Rebecca Barnett, wife of James Barnett; sons and daughters of the said Robert Coleman, dec'd - - - - We the above named commissioners, having convened for the purpose aforesaid, and after being duly sworn according to law, have proceeded to dividend appropriate the said Negroes in the manner and form following: - That is to say in classes 1st and 2nd - the 1st class divided into shares. Shares 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6. consisting of the following Negroes to wit,

1st share, one Negro girl by the name of Suckey, about 12 years of age, given in advance to Robert S. Coleman, in the lifetime of his father, Robert Coleman, dec'd. - valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $270

2nd share, one Negro girl by the name of Milley, about 9 years of age, given in advance to Elizabeth Stubblefield, wife of Richard Stubblefield, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . $240

3rd share, one Negro girl by the name of Judy, about 10 years of age, given in advance to Rebecca Barnett, Wife of James Barnett, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250

4thshare, one Negro girl by the name of Syddia, about 8 years of age, drawn by Martha Coleman, widow of the said Robert Coleman, dec'd., valued to . . . . . . . . . . . $230

5th share, one Negro girl by the name of Mary, about 8 years of age, drawn by Tilman Coleman, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $230

6th share, one Negro boy by the name of Isaac, about 7 years of age, drawn by Garland L. Coleman, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $240

Total amt. of the class . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1460

Which sum total, divided by 6, the number of shares, make a dividend, or distributive share to each legator of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243.33 1/3

Which we have equalized and appropriated as follows:

The 1st share, advanced to Robert S. Coleman, pays to the 4th share drawn by Martha Coleman, the sum of $13.33 1/3.

The 1st share, advanced to Robert S. Coleman, further pays to the 5th share, drawn by Tilman Coleman the sum of $13.33 1/3.

The 3rd share, advanced to Rebecca Barnett, pays the 2nd share advanced to Elizabeth Stubblefield the sum of $3.33 1/3.

The 3rd share, advanced to Rebecca Barnett, further pays to the 6th share, drawn by Garland L. Coleman, the sum of $3.33 1/3.

The 2nd class, also divided into shares or numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6.

The lot no. 1, drawn by Martha Coleman, the Relic(t) and widow of Robert Coleman, dec'd. consisting of two Negroes, to wit, Rachael and Isham, valued to . . . . . . . . . . $400

The lot no. 2 drawn by Tilman Coleman consisting of two Negroes, to wit, Jenny and Abraham, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $400

The lot no. 3 drawn by Elizabeth Stubblefield, wife of Richard Stubblefield, consisting of two Negroes, to wit, Chester and Linney, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$475

The lot no. 4. drawn by Rebecca Barnett, wife of James Barnett, consisting of three Negroes, to wit, Edy, Charity, Handy, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$475

The lot no. 5 drawn by Robert S. Coleman, consisting of two Negroes, to wit, Lucy and Lea, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $375

The lot no. 6 drawn by Garland L. Coleman, consisting of two Negroes, to wit, Grace and Caroline, valued to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $433

Total amt. of the second class . . . $2558

Which sum total divided by 6, the number of shares, makes a dividend or distributive share to each legate, of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $426.33 1/3

Which we have, also, equalized and appropriated as follows:

The lot no. 3 pays to the lot no. 1 the sum of $26.33 1/3.

The lot no. 3 further pays to the lot no. 2 the sum of $22.33 1/3.

The lot no. 4 pays to the lot no. 2 the sum of $4.0

The lot no. 4 further pays to the lot no. 5 the sum of $6.66 2/3.

The lot 6 also pays to the lot no. 5 the sum of $6.66 2/3.

All which divisions, and appropriations, we have agreed to, and ratified.

Given under our hands and seals the 2nd day of May A. D. 1811. Nath'l. Scales (SEAL) John May (SEAL) Alex. Snead (SEAL) Jos. S. Gentry (SEAL) John Menzies (SEAL)

May Session 1811 State of No. Carolina Rockingham County.

The within division of the Negroes of Robert Coleman deceased, Has on motion ordered to be recorded. Ro. Galloway C.

PERSONS APPOINTED TO DIVIDE AND APPROPRIATE THE NEGROES:

Nathaniel Scales: Sone of Joseph Scales who was of English origin. Large land owners of Rockingham county. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. He married Ann (Nancy) Allen and they had ten children. He owned Mulberry Island Plantation, The Deep Springs Plantation, High Rock Plantation, and many acres of land between Reidsville and Yanceyville. His will was probated in Rockingham county in 1840.

John May: He lived about three miles south west of Robert Coleman and about two miles north of Eagle Falls. He was born 27 Feb. 1757 and died 28 March 1844. He is buried at Wesley Chapple near Leaksville. He was a Revolutionary war officer. He married Elizabeth Hunter daughter of John Hunter.

Alexander Sneed: The Sneeds were among the first colonists to arrive in America in 1635. They settled in Williamsburgh, VA and Samuel Sneed received a land grant in King Charles County. Alexander was born in 1776 and died in 1825. He married Elizabeth Jones in 1796. He owned considerable land on Lickfork Creek and Buffalo Island Creek. He served in North Carolina House of Commons in 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806. He was Register of Deeds in Rockingham County in 1818.

Joseph S. Gentry:

John Menzies: He lived just about one mile south of Robert Coleman and south west of Leaksville, and on the same side of the Dan River.

Max C. Coleman notes on the above document = R. S. had 19 slaves before his death. 3 he gave in advance before his death, having him 16 owned at at death.

The probate only mentions Martha his wife and relic does show her as receiving slaves. It stands to reason that she was not stripped. This probate also reveals that the children were valued at a difference of $10 per year of age for the girls. The boy was valued at $20 more than a girl of the same age.

The grown ups is quite a study in contrasts also as Chester and Linney must have been quite young like 20 years old and good breeding stock against Edy, Charity and Handy as being much older and having less useful lives.

It appears also that care was given to holding the pairs together. They must have lived together as man and wife in what ever served as marriage in these circumstances. Max C. Coleman 12/5/83 (end)

In Robert Coleman's will was listed = To Tilman went: (a.) Mary 8 year old girl. (B.) Jenny and Abraham - Listed as though they were married and not showing any age.

EARLY FAMILIES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA COUNTIES OF ROCKINGHAM AND STOKES WITH REVOLUTIONARY SERVICE, VOLUME II (Received by Max C. Coleman from Bill Hanks 11-2-87)

Compiled and Published by Members of James Hunter Chapter, National society Daughters of American Revolution of Madison, North Carolina 1981.

STATE RECORDS, Vol 23, page 994.

ROBERT COLEMAN - - Born ca 1740 - 45, died before Feb Court 1811 in Rockingham Co., NC; married Martha Sharp.

As a resident of Guilford Co., NC, Robert Coleman was a Patriot of the American Revolution, being paid for Voucher #14 by the Auditors of the Salisbury District as shown in Revolutionary Army Accounts, Vol V, page 32, folio 3. He was paid 1 pound 5 shillings which appears to be the interest on a larger sum of which no record was found. The page heading is entitled, "An Account of Clothing, Currency, and Species Certificates sent to the Commissary in New York by the Comptroller of Public Accounts of the State of North Carolina".

Robert Coleman lived on Piney Fork of Town Creek which tract he bought in 1786, but also may have bought land while Rockingham was part of Guilford Co. He later bought at least one more tract.

Children of Robert and Martha Coleman, as named in the Division of Slaves in Rockingham Co. Deed Book O, page 137 and the Division of Land in deed book N, page 88 - - only 5 children named but 1790 Census indicates 5 sons and 4 daus.

Robert S. Coleman was living in Stewart Co., TN in 1825 when he sold land that had belonged to his father.

Note from Bill Hanks = William Coleman (a probable son) md 15 Jan 1811 Rockingham Co. Lucy Walker. (Max says he may have had a William that died about 1809.)

Notes from Max C. Coleman: It is my present opinion that William Coleman was a son of a William Coleman, perhaps of Spotsylvania County, VA. in 1785 in which this Wm. Coleman empowered William Robbins of Glochester County, VA. to claim "his share" of his father Robert Coleman's estate. (Robert, Thomas, Thomas, Robert the imigrant that married Elizabeth Grizzill). There was a Haw River Wm. Coleman but this one might have been the Wm. married to Chloe, or Sarah or Sareh Chloe(?) and of the Daniel Coleman line and son of Daniel and Patience Elliott. (Wm, Daniel, Daniel, Daniel, Robert the imigrant that married Elizabeth Grizzell). This Wm. would have been brother to Spilsby (Elizabeth Burton) and Stephen (Sarah Watson) Spilsby of Caswell County, N.C. Kentucky legend says that Robert Spilsby Coleman (Martha Sharp) Sr. of Rockingham County, N.C. was presumed to have had a brother William.

These people were all born and raised under the old English and European custom which was that the 1st born son, if he lived, always inherited the home place. The rest of the male heirs had to scrounge for themselves or the old father went far afield to acquire land for the junior male members and in many instances for the females also. In the early days there was always land available just over the next hill of in the next valley. Land was the most plentiful thing the Colonial Governments had. All our obligations were always satisfied to our war veterans with land starting with the French and Indian wars of the original colonies.

Up through the Revolutionary War, each state paid any soldier from where ever, if they fought in their state. So, for example, North Carolina paid all men who fought in their state with land warrants, except interest. The U.S. Congress later paid accrued interest in species. My Robert Spilsby Sr. was paid interest on a bill of goods and or services but no bill ever showed up for the services rendered. It has to be assumed that this was taken care of by his taking the 200 acre land grant on Horsepasture Creek of Dan river in 1783. That land at that time was in Gilford County, N.C., and it has to be assumed that Robert Spilsby Sr. did in some capacity, participate in the Battle of Gilford Court House. The battle in which Cornwallis was so thoroughly done in that he had to camp on the Battle Field for a few weeks before he could even move and then made his way to Yorktown but never being able to go on the offensive again until he was bottled up and starved out.

If this Robert Spilsby with General Green in N.C. and he was living in Culpepper County, VA. as the Kentucky letter of Robert Humphries Coleman letter implies then he was in the Culpepper Minute Men. That was the group that had the flag with the snake and the wording "Don't Tread On Me". This battle group was also commanded by General Edward Stevens who was married to Grizzell Coleman (Gilley). She was the daughter of Robert and Sarah Ann Saunders Coleman who was son of Thomas and Sarah Coleman of King & King County, VA. who was 2nd son of Robert and Ann Spillsby Coleman of Essix County, VA.

As a matter of fact, General William Green was also from Culpepper County, VA. and his wife was Ann Coleman, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Wyatt Coleman of Caroline County, VA., known as the courthouse Colemans for the Courthouse at Bowling Green was built on land that Samuel had made available. Samuel descended from the first of all times Robert Spilsby Coleman who was married to Mary Clayton and they lived in King & Queen County, VA., and this 1st Robert Spilsby was son of the Robert & Ann Spilsby C. of Essix County, VA. The reason this was known as the Royal Coleman is because Elizabeth Wyatt was a descendant of the reigning Kings & Queens of England, even today. She and they are from the House of Brunswick. In Charles 1st (Charlemein) Empire WELF I was the King of 3 of Charlemein 9 kingdoms. Henry I (Henry the Fowler) was the 1st English King of the WELF (alias Wyatt in England) name or house of Brunswick. Sir Thomas Wyatt of English literary fame was the contemporary of Henry VIII.

So if Robert Spilsby Sr. was in Culpepper County until 1783 and he did in fact come to Rockingham County, N.C. (Gilford County) with them before the Battle, then he was for sure in good and well known company. There is no mention ever of this Robert Spilsby Sr. as having been a soldier or officer in the Continental or any state army. However, someone did claim him for entry into the D.A.R. - more about this later - maybe. In the Rebeccah Coleman Robertson of Paducah, Kentucky oration as related by her daughter Emma Robertson Lane, she states that Robert Silsby Sr. came to John Sharp as an overseer. John Sharp also had 2 boys that he educated with the intent of sending them back to England to reclaim his estate from a harsh uncle and guardian that he, John Sharp, ran away from and came to America.

The Stubblefield and Waters families, descendants of Richard Carter & Elizabeth Coleman Stubblefield, have a long tradition in their families that says that John S & his wife was known as Lord and Lady Sharp. That is Thier story not mine. However, Robert Spilsby Sr and Martha Sharp Coleman did name their children after names that were strange to most Coleman lines except his probably oldest son that he named after himself. His second son was named Tillman or Tilman. Most say Tillman. This is my great great grandfather. later from the Rockingham County, N.C. Historical Society Newsletter I found that Tillman had a middle initial of S. That could be for Spilsby but I really think it was for Sharp. Tillman S. C. served 2 or 3 terms as Constable of Leaksville and at least 1 term as Justice of the Peace. I have never seen a birth date for Tillman except from Barbra Martin Thompson of Santa Rosa, Ca. and she wrote it down on my query as 1780.

The last and youngest child of Robert Spilsby Sr. was Garland. In the Rockingham County, N.C. Newsletter it showed that Garland also served at least one term as Constable of Leaksville and he also was shown with a middle initial of S. and it has to be presumed that S also stood for Sharp. These two men and Robert Spilsby Jr. are and were the only male heirs of Robert Silsby Sr. as shown by his slave probate that was entered into his probate in Rockingham county, N.C. in the February session of court of 1811. These three men along with two daughters was all the children he had left at his death. His land probate did not come until the November session of Court 1811. This same procedure was carried out in the Tillman S. Coleman probate in the year 1845. It must be then assumed that placing the, so called slaves, was of paramount importance at the death of an owner for they were the only thing that was all that perishable and needed to know rather soon who was going to feed, clothe and house them.

It is my belief that Robert Spilsby Sr. and Martha Sharp actually had a total of 11 children during their marriage. It is believed they had 6 children, the 5th of which was Tillman S. in Culpepper County, VA., and before they came to Gilford County, N.C. (now Rockingham County) in 1783 and after or about. The 6th child probably being Rebeccah that later married James Barnette in Leaksville. Their first child I think was Elizabeth that later in 1780's married Richard C. (Carter) Stubblefield who as a teen age boy was a runner for his Uncle Captain William Bethel at the Battle of Gilford Court House and was married to a Stubblefield. I suspect that Elizabeth was born ca. 1772, so her parents were married about 1770-71 in Hanover County, VA. after John Sharp died. Her brothers were already dead and so she had no relatives, known of, so, Robert Silby Sr. married her and probably salvaged as much of John Sharp's estate as it was possible to do, including some of his slaves. It is conceivable that they ended up with not enough slaves to tend to the land he might have been trying to handle. So they liquidated John Sharps estate and moved to Culpepper County (out west: where new land could be had. Then of course by 1776 the war began.

I think they had a number of slaves left and when the war came on he used them and his other resources to be in the transporting of Army supplies. I suspect that he was a principle in General Greens Baggage Train. This train worked back and forth along the northern fork of the Dan River while the General and Cornwallis and Tarleton maneuvered back and forth along and north of the Dan River and north of Gilford Court House. As a baggage man he would not have necessarily been listed as a Continental Soldier, but he would have definitely been a participant and later deemed to have been a veteran, of sort, of the Rev. War, so far as pay and land grants are concerned. Thus the ability of Mrs Dr Stilley & Hodge in Kentucky to be able to claim him in the D.A.R. Of course they also had Captain Peter Jules Gideon Vanansular Terry to fall back on for the D.A.R. also. That alone allowed them to be listed in the Rockingham and Stokes (I think) County, N.C., D.A.R. listings.

Further when Robert Silsby Sr. and family settled in on what was probably a 200 acre grant, which was customary at that time, on Horsepasture Creek it was a very unhealthy place to live, it being on the South bank and fairly close to the Dan River. The south bank being the flood plane side of the river and the north bank being the high bank of the river. Malaria would have been a big problem to Robert Spilsby Sr and his family eventually. Even his black slave numbers also suffered greatly. If thus he did receive form his fathers estate some and enough money in 1785 to buy another like piece of ground and place to live just west of Oregon Hill on the Brushy Fork of Town Creek of Dan River, he quickly did so in 1786 and did move quickly there.

Then on 28 May 1796 John Leak Esq. sold to Richard Spilsby Sr. 300 acres for 400 pounds on the north side of the Dan River adjacent to Bagley Barnes, Joseph Parker, John Peay, Thomas Peay and John Lemon Jr. Deed Book D. Page 310 of Rockingham county Records. Sometime before Feb. 1811 session of court Robert Spilsby Sr. sold 40 acres of this 300 to John Menzies, his next door neighbor to the south west and on north side of the Dan River. John Menzies was also the tavern owner in Leaksville. This land was on the General Green Baggage road which was also the main trunk road from Virginia and north to Georgia and beyond. In Leaksville, now called Eaden, this road is now called Washington St. This land was on the high bank of the Dan River and I have some belief that Robert Spilsby Sr. had seen and journeyed on this ground several times during the General Green pre battle maneuverings and had wanted to live on ground in that area to start with. This piece of land had at one time belonged to James Coleman. The James of Daniel and Patience Elliott Coleman but do not think James ever lived there. Also there does not seem to be any record of Robert Spilsby Sr. ever disposing of the Horsepasture Creek on the Oregon Hill land. It is possible that John Leek took the estimated 400 acres in on the Purchase price of the 300 acres. I reconstructed the boundaries of this piece of land and the division of it into 5 lots from the estate settlement as recorded in the November 1811 session of Court. At one time Robert Spilsby Sr. bought at least one lot in Leaksville but it was not in his estate settlement of 1811. I have a copy of the Feb 1811 session of court division of the slaves and the Nov 1811 session of court for the division of land. I happen to think that this Robert Spilsby Sr. was a personal friend of Patrick Henry. Patrick was born and raised in Hanover County, VA. I have a book called "Old Houses of Hanover Co. VA." which is a production of "The Hanover County, VA. Historical Society". In this book on page 135 is the description of "The Mills Home". This place is one tenth mile north of Route 54 which was a cross road named Negrofoot Cross Roads. According to legend this place was owned by a family named Sharps. Thus was probably the old English spelling of the Sharp name. About 1.26 miles from this place to the NN East is located Scotchtown which is where Patrick Henry was born and raised.

In the fall term of court in 1763 Patrick Henry tried his first court case which was known as the "Parsons Case". John Lewis, the attorney for the people, retired from the case and they called on Patrick Henry to take his place. Patrick had just married a daughter of John Shelton and was helping Mr. Shelton out in the Inn that was just across the road from the Court House. Patrick was 27 in 1763. Robert Spilsby Sr would have been 15 to 18 years old at the same time, and plenty old enough to be an overseer for John sharp. It is all together possible he may have been in attendance at the trial, for people came from far and near, and the court was packed and a large crowd was gathered all around the court room at every window and door.

Due to this case Patrick's fame spread rapidly and it seems that John Shelton must have moved along with him for not too long later the Inn was being run by a Tilghman. In at least one public record Robert Spilsby's son Tillman S. was recorded as Tilghman. Also one of Elizabeth Coleman Stubblefield's descendants was named Tilghman Stublefield. Tillman S. C. was a younger brother of Elizabeth C. Stubblefield. When Patrick Henry started making his will in about 1797 he discovered he did not have quite enough land to properly take care of his youngest son Nathaniel. He contacted someone in Rockingham County, N.C. for the 28000 acre Byrd-Farley, "Land of Eaden" was being sold off. That person most probably was my Robert Spilsby Sr. A deed to a piece of property is recorded in 1798 to Patrick Henry on White Oat Creek of the South side of the Dan River and less than two miles north east of what had been Robert Silby Jr's Horsepasture Creek piece of property of deed of 1783.

Later in 1818 a Leaksville Academy was set up in Leaksville and Madison, N.C. In 1820 the Academies opened for business. In Feb 1820, James Barnett conveyed to the trustees of the Leaksville Male academy a lot on Henry St. for $1.00. There were 27 trustees. 27 November 1809 this James Barnett had married Rebeccah Coleman daughter of Robert Silsby Sr. and Martha Sharp Coleman. Daniel Field noted that in 1839 there existed in Leaksville a male academy directed by Patrick M. Henry and a female academy conducted by Miss charlotte Jennings of New York, who later married John Lawson a town merchant. The other Henry in this school system was Nathaniel for whom the land in the Byrd-Farley Estate was purchased by his father Patrick in 1798. Source = Tilla Coleman, Lindsay, Bill Hanks and Max C. Coleman, personal knowledge, Bible records and research.

Note on back of family page for Daniel Coleman (b. 1704) by Max C. Coleman = In 1775 when the Committee of Safety were organized, there was a Robert Coleman on the Goochland County Committee - Max says this was the Robert who was of the Daniel line to Robert of England.

The following notes were obtained from Debra Elaine Thompson Hill (Jan 2000) via e-mail:

Patriot of American Revolution. Paid for Voucher #14 by the Auditors of the Salisbury District as shown in Revolutionary Army Accounts, Col. V, pg 32, foli3. Paid 1pound,5 shillings which appears to be the interest on a larger sum of which no record was found. the page heading is entitles "An Account of clothing, Currency, and Species Certificates sent to the Commissary in New York by the Comptroller of Public Accounts of the State of North Carolina".

-Lived on Piney Fork of Town Creek which tract he bought in 1786.

-Children named in the Division of Slaves in Rockingham Co Deed Book O, pg 137and the Division of Land in Deed Book N, pg 88. Only 5 children named, but 1790 Census indicates 5 sons and 4 daughters. (end)

Source: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:S1DS-QJM

--------------------

Marriage 1 Martha SHARPE b: 1754 in , Hanover, Virginia, USA

Married: in Virginia, USA

Children

  1. Elizabeth (Betsy) COLEMAN b: ABT 1774 in Leaksville, Rockingham, North Carolina, USA
  2. Robert Spilsbe COLEMAN Jr. b: 26 Feb 1776 in Rockingham, North Carolina, USA
  3. Tilman COLEMAN b: ABT 1779 in Leaksville, Rockingham, North Carolina, USA
  4. William COLEMAN b: ABT 1783 in Rockingham, North Carolina, USA
  5. Rebecca COLEMAN b: 16 Feb 1790 in Leaksville, Rockingham, North Carolina, USA
  6. Garland Lee COLEMAN b: 1798 in , Rockingham, North Carolina, USA

-------------------

They were living in Rockingham Co., North Carolina by 1783 and were in the 1790 census there w/ 5 sons and 4 daughters.

Robert Coleman 1790 Federal Census -- Rockingham, North Carolina, Heads of Households

1796 shown as a grantee on a deed in Rockingham Co, NC

[1800 Census Extract, Rockingham Co. NC, roll 32]

[head/FWM:10 16 26 45 45+/FWF:10 16 26 45 45+/colored persons(not indians)/slaves]

Robert Coleman /1 0 0 1 1 /0 0 0 0 1 /0 /3

1806 name appears on a deed in Rockingham Co, NC.

1810 United State Census, Robert Coleman, Rockingham Co., North Carolina, 17 slaves

1811 Estate of Robert Coleman mentions his wife Martha and 5 children; Robert S. Coleman, Tilman Coleman, Garland L. Coleman, Elizabeth Stubblefield (wife of Richard Stubblefield) and Rebecca Barnett (wife of James Barnett). The estate of Robert Coleman deeds land and slaves to his 5 children.

----------------------

Patriot of American Revolution. Paid for Voucher #14 by the Auditors of the Salisbury District as shown in Revolutionary Army Accounts, Col. V, pg 32, foli 3. Paid 1pound,5 shillings which appears to be the interest on a larger sum of which no record was found. the page heading is entitles "An Account of clothing, Currency, and Species Certificates sent to the Commissary in New York by the Comptroller of Puclic Accounts of the State of North Carolina". -Lived on Piney Fork of Town Creek which tract he bought in 1786. -Children named in the Division of Slaves in Rockingham Co Deed Book O, pg 137 and the Division of Land in Deed Book N, pg 88. Only 5 children named, but 1790 Census indicates 5 sons and 4 daughters. -See "Early families of the NC Counties of Rockingham and Stokes with Revolutionary Service", 1990 (Vol.2,pg 23). -See NC State Records Vol 3, pg 994. Compact Disc #38 Pin #585965

------------------------


COLEMAN, ROBERT

Ancestor #: A106151

Service: NORTH CAROLINA Rank: PATRIOTIC SERVICE

Birth: (CIRCA) 1745 CAROLINE CO VIRGINIA

Death: 1-2-1811 LEAKSVILLE ROCKINGHAM CO NORTH CAROLINA

Service Description: 1) FURNISHED MATERIAL AID

Residence 1) City: LEAKSVILLE - County: ROCKINGHAM CO - State: NORTH CAROLINA


Spouse 1) MARTHA SHARP

DAR Ancestor #: A106151

view all

Robert Coleman's Timeline

1745
1745
Virginia
1774
1774
Age 29
Guilford (now Rockingham) County, North Carolina
1774
Age 29
1776
February 26, 1776
Age 31
Guilford (now Rockingham) County, NC, USA
1780
1780
Age 35
Guilford (now Rockingham) County, NC, USA
1784
1784
Age 39
Guilford (now Rockingham) County, NC, USA
1790
February 16, 1790
Age 45
Rockingham, NC, USA
1798
1798
Age 53
Rockingham, NC, USA
1811
February 1811
Age 66
Rockingham County, NC, USA
????
Rockingham County, North Carolina, United States