Robert I le Vieux, duc de Bourgogne

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Robert I 'le Vieux' de France (von Burgundy), duc de Bourgogne

Also Known As: "Robert I 'le vieux' de Bourgogne", ""The Old"", "le Vieux", "El Viejo", "Prince of France /Robert/", "Duke of Burgundy /Robert I/", ""le /Veille"/", "O Velho", "Robert the Old // 1 Duke of Burgundy", "Robert I Prince Of France //", "The Old", "Robert Capet"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Fleury-sur-Orne, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France
Place of Burial: Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Burgundy, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert II le Pieux, roi des Francs and Constance d'Arles, reine consort de France
Husband of Ermengarde of Anjou and Hélie de Semur, duchesse consort de Bourgogne
Father of Hildegarde of Burgundy; Robert, infant de Bourgogne; Simon de Bourgogne; Hughes de Bourgogne; Henri le Damoiseau, duc de Bourgogne and 1 other
Brother of NN ?2x mistresses of Richard III (mothers of Nicolas and Alix) de Normandie, concubine; Hedwige de France, comtesse d'Auxerre; Hugues, roi associé de France; Henri I, roi de France; Adèle de France and 4 others

Occupation: Duke of Burgundy, duc de Bourgogne, Herzog von Burgund, Hertig i Burgund, Duque de Borgonha (1032-1076), Comte d'Auxerre, Graf von Auxerre, Greve i Auxerre (1040-1060), Duque de Borgoña, Prince of France, duc de Bourgogne, comte d'Auxerre, Duke
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert I le Vieux, duc de Bourgogne

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Burgundy Dukes (covering his married family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDY.htm#RobertIDucdied1076B

ROBERT de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 8 or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d’Or).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and his wife Constance[110]. Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[111].

His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father. His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030. He was installed as ROBERT I Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I.

Comte d'Auxerre in 1040, when he conquered the county after Hugues Bishop of Auxerre died in 1039. He lost it after the 1060 council of Autun which ended his war with Nevers[112].

The necrology of Cîteaux records the death "VIII Id Mar" of "Robertus…dux Burgundie"[113]. The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[114].

m firstly ([1033], repudiated [1048/50]) HELIE de Semur, daughter of DALMAS [I] Seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais & his wife Aramburge --- ([1016]-Semur-en-Brionnais, Saône-et-Loire 22 Apr after 1055).

"Robertus dux Burgundionum" confirmed the possessions of Cluny by charter dated [1040] subscribed by "Ilie uxoris eius"[115]. The marriage is dated by the charter dated to [1034], subscribed by "Roberti ducis et uxoris sue", under which "Gibuinus" confirmed a donation to Saint-Etienne de Dijon[116]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…"[117].

Her origin is confirmed by the Vita S Hugonis, which records that "Dux Burgundie, gener eius" killed the father of St Hugues (abbot of Cluny) by his own hand[118].

The "Notes historiques sur le prieuré de Marcigny", included in the cartulary of Marcigny-sur-Loire, name (in order) "sancti Hugonis abbatis Cluniacensis et Gaufredi Sinemurensis, Andræ levitæ, Joceranni et Dalmatii, et sororum eorundem…Materdis, Adalaidæ et Cecilæ atque Evellæ" as children of "Dalmatius", but do not make the link with Duke Robert[119]. "Robertus dux et uxor sua Hylia" donated money to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[120].

She was repudiated, presumably on grounds of consanguinity, before [1050] when Jean de Fécamp wrote to Pope Leo IX reporting the second marriage of Duke Robert[121]. She became a nun as PETRONILLE after her repudiation[122].

The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 22 Apr of "Helya uxor Rotberti ducis"[123].

m secondly ([1049]) as her second husband, ERMENGARDE [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow of GEOFFROY II "Ferréol" Seigneur de Château-Landon, Comte de Gâtinais, daughter of FOULQUES III "Nerra/the Black" Comte d’Anjou & his second wife Hildegarde de Metz ([1018]-murdered church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Abbaye de Saint-Seine, Côte d'Or).

The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[124].

Her second marriage is deduced from a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[125].

The necrology of Molesme records the death "XV Kal Apr" of "Robertus dux Burgundie et Ermengardis uxor eius"[126]. She was murdered with her husband.

Duke Robert I & his first wife had three children:

1. HUGUES de Bourgogne ([1034]-killed in battle [1059/60]).

"Hugonis ducis filii, bone indolis pueri" is named in a charter of "Robertus dux Burgundionum" dated [1032/39][127]. "Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…seu filiorum nostrorum Hugonis…atque Heinrici"[128].

He was killed during the war with Nevers[129].

2. HENRI de Bourgogne "le Damoiseau" ([1035]-27 Jan [1070/74]).

"Robertus…dux et rector inferioris Burgundiæ" donated property to Saint-Bénigne-de-Dijon by charter dated 1 Mar 1043 which names "Helie uxoris mee…seu filiorum nostrorum Hugonis…atque Heinrici"[130]. He is named as first born son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that Henri died in his father's lifetime leaving three sons whom he names[131].

"Henricus Roberti ducis filius Burgundie" granted rights in the forest of Saint-Julien to the church of Saint-Etienne de Dijon by undated charter[132].

m --- (-6 Jul 1074 or after, bur Besançon, Saint-Etienne). The wife of Henri de Bourgogne has not been identified with certainty. Abbé Maurice Chaume[133] suggested that she was a relative of Ramón Borell I Conde de Barcelona, pointing out the use of the name "Borel" by her son and grandson Dukes Eudes I and Hugues II. Szabolcs de Vajay[134] proposed more specifically that she was --- de Barcelona, daughter of Berenguer Ramón I "el Curvo" Conde de Barcelona & his third wife Guisle de Ampurias, married while her husband and his father were in Barcelona on crusade in Spain. There appears to be nothing to support the suggestion that her first name was Sibylla. Jean Richard[135] suggested that the wife of Henri de Bourgogne was possibly named Clémence, a name used by her descendants, and that she may have originated from Poitiers. There does not appear to be any direct proof to support any of these theories.

Hugues de Bourgogne & his wife had seven children.

3. CONSTANCE de Bourgogne ([1045]-[Jan/Feb] or [3 Apr/25 Oct] 1093, bur Sahagún, León, royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo).

The Chronicon Trenorciensi records that "Constantiæ…filia Roberti Ducis" married firstly "Hugonis Cabilonensis Comitis" and secondly "Hispaniæ Rex Adefonsus"[159]. A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum"[160].

"Infanta donna Urraka Regis domni Adefonsi filia" names her mother "Constantie regina" in her donation to Cluny dated 22 Feb 1117 "Spanish Era"[161], although the date was presumably AD as 1117 Spanish Era was equivalent to 1079 AD. An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "filiam Roberti ducis Bugundionem…Constantiam" married Alfonso VI King of Castile and was mother of a daughter who married "Raymundo comiti"[162]. The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Queen Constance" as the second of the "five legitimate wives" of King Alfonso[163].

Her second marriage date is estimated based on the likely estimated death date of her first husband in [Nov/early Dec] 1079 and her subscribing a document dated 25 Dec 1079 at Dueñas with her second husband[164].

Queen Constance was instrumental in having the Roman rite replace the Visigothic rite in the churches of Castile.

"Adefonsus…Hispaniarum rex…cum coniuge mea Constantia regina" donated property to the monastery of San Salvador de Oña by charter dated 1 May 1092[165].

The date of her death is fixed by her last known mention in a charter dated 25 Jul 1093 and a donation by King Alfonso to the monastery of Sahagún dated 25 Oct 1093, which does not include Queen Constanza's name in the subscription list[166].

m firstly (1065) HUGUES [II] Comte de Chalon-sur-Saône, son of THIBAUT Comte de Chalon & his wife Ermentrude--- (-1078).

m secondly (late 1079 or 8 May 1081) as his third wife, ALFONSO VI King of Castile and León, son of FERNANDO I King of Castile & his wife Sancha de León (Compostella [1036] or before Jun 1040-29 or 30 Jun 1109, bur Sahagún, León, San Mancio chapel in the royal monastery of Santos Facundo y Primitivo).

Duke Robert & his [first/second] wife had two children:

4. ROBERT de Bourgogne (-poisoned [1113]).

He is named as son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis[167]. Jean Richard suggests that Robert was the son of Duke Robert by his second marriage[168]. Given his active career in the early 12th century, a birth date in the 1050s is more likely than in the late 1030s/early 1040s, but there appear to be no surviving primary source which points either way.

He was declared heir to the duchy of Burgundy by his father, after the death of his older [half-]brother, but was dispossessed by his nephew Duke Hugues I[169].

A charter dated 5 Aug 1087 of "Ducem Burgundiæ Oddonem" restored property to Tournus abbey by "comitissa Cabillonensis filia Rotberti ducis", after the death of "mariti sui Hugonis comitis", adding that she subsequently became "Regina Galliciæ et Hispaniarum", subscribed by "Rotberti avunculi ducis fratris Reginæ", the charter signed at León[170]. Orderic Vitalis records that he "made a friendly alliance" with Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, who arranged his marriage and appointed him co-regent for her son[171].

He was murdered by his mother-in-law with a poisoned draught after Count Roger II came of age[172]. His death date is estimated from Orderic Vitalis recording that "for 10 years he defended the principality [Sicily] vigourously against all attacks"[173].

m (1102 or 1103) [SIBYLLE] of Sicily, daughter of ROGER I Count of Sicily & his second wife Eremburge de Mortain.

Orderic Vitalis records that Adelaida, widow of Roger I Count of Sicily, arranged the marriage of "her daughter" (unnamed) to Robert de Bourgogne whom she appointed co-regent for her son[174]. Kerrebrouck says that Sibylle was the possible name of this daughter and that she was born from his third marriage[175], presumably reading the passage in Orderic Vitalis literally. It seems more likely chronologically that she was the daughter of Count Roger's second marriage.

5. SIMON de Bourgogne (-after 1087).

He is named as son of Duke Robert by Orderic Vitalis[176]. He was expelled from Burgundy with his brother Robert.

Bouchard speculates that "Simon" was an error for "Hugh", who is not mentioned by Orderic Vitalis. However, as Hugues had been dead for some time when Orderic wrote his chronicle such an omission may not be surprising[177].

Duke Robert & his second wife had one child:

6. AUDEARDE [Hildegarde] de Bourgogne (-after 1120, bur Poitiers, [église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf]).

The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence records the marriage of "Guido comes" and "Aldeardim filiam Roberti ducis Burgundiæ" after he repudiated his previous wife[178]. She and both her parents are also named in a genealogy of the Comtes d'Anjou which names "Fulco (pater) Gosfridus et Ermengardis (mater) Gosfridus (et) Fulco (et) Hildegardis, de altero patre, filia Roberti ducis fratris Henrici regis"[179].

m (Mar 1069, separated 1076) as his third wife, GUILLAUME VIII Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME VI Comte de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou] & his third wife Agnès de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] (1023-Chizé near Niort, Poitou 25 Sep 1086, bur Poitiers, église abbatiale de Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste de Montierneuf).

References:

[110] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[111] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.

[112] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.

[113] Obituaires de Lyon II, Diocèse de Chalon-sur-Saône, Abbaye chef d'ordre de Cîteaux, p. 608.

[114] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386.

[115] Cluny, Tome IV, 2949, p. 149.

[116] Petit, E. (1885) Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race Capétienne (Paris), Vol. I, 21, p. 362.

[117] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.

[118] Hildeberti Vita S Hugonis chap. 2, para. 9, (PL 159, 857-894), quoted in Petit, Vol. I, p. 167.

[119] Richard, J. (ed.) (1957) Le cartulaire de Marcigny-sur-Loire 1045-1144 (Dijon) ("Marcigny-sur-Loire") 2, p. 1.

[120] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 91, p. 108.

[121] Migne, J.-P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completus, Series Latina, Vol. CXLIII: 799-800, cited in Bouchard (1987), p. 257.

[122] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.

[123] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 13.

[124] Historiæ Andegavensis, RHGF X, p. 203.

[125] Halphen, L. (ed.), p. 247, cited thus without the full reference in Settipani, C. 'Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), p. 254 footnote 28.

[126] Petit, Vol. V, p. 386.

[127] Cluny, Tome IV, 2888, p. 82.

[128] Chevrier, G. and Chaume, M. (eds.) (1986) Chartes et documents de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon des origines à 1300 (Dijon) ("Dijon Saint-Bénigne") II, 324, p. 104.

[129] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 554.

[130] Dijon Saint-Bénigne II, 324, p. 104.

[131] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) (1969) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis (Oxford Clarendon Press), Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.

[132] Dijon Saint-Etienne, [Tome I], 82, p. 101.

[133] Chaume, M. 'En marge des croisades bourgignonnes d'Espagne', Annales de Bourgogne, t. IX (1937), p. 72, and Chaume, M. 'Les premières croisades bourgignonnes au-delà des Pyrénées', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XVIII (1946), pp. 161-5, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4.

[134] Vajay, S. de 'Etiennette, dite de Vienne, comtesse de Bourgogne. Bourgogne, Lorraine et Espagne au XI siècle', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XXXII (1960), p. 259 note 3, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4.

[135] Richard, J. 'Sur les alliances familiales des ducs de Bourgogne aux XII et XIII siècles', Annales de Bourgogne, t. XXX (1958), pp. 39-42, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 4.

[159] Ex Chronico Trenorciensi, RHGF XI, p. 112.

[160] Chifflet, P. F. (1644) Histoire de l´abbaye royale et de la ville de Tournus (Dijon), Preuves, p. 331.

[161] Cluny, Tome IV, 3533, p. 654, dated 1117 "Spanish Era".

[162] Godefroy, T. (1610) De l'origine des roys de Portugal yssus en ligne masculine de la maison de France (Paris), quoted in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 560 footnote 16, which says that this chronicle fragment was first published at Frankfurt in 1596.

[163] Chronicon Regum Legionensium: Barton, S. and Fletcher, R. (trans. and eds.) The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester UP), p. 87.

[164] Referred to by Reilly (1988), Chapter 6, footnote 58.

[165] Alamo, J. del (ed.) (1950) (Madrid) Colección diplomatica de San Salvador de Oña 822-1284, Tomo I 822-1214 ("San Salvador de Oña (1950)") I, 99, p. 127.

[166] Reilly (1988), Chapter 12, p. 240.

[167] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.

[168] Richard, J. (ed.) (1957) Le cartulaire de Marcigny-sur-Loire 1045-1144 (Dijon), p. 14.

[169] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.

[170] Chifflet (1644), Preuves, p. 331.

[171] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429, the editor in footnote 6 highlighting the absence of corroboration in Italian chronicles for this statement.

[172] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433.

[173] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 433.

[174] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 429.

[175] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 555.

[176] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XIII, p. 431.

[177] Bouchard (1987), p. 257.

[178] Marchegay, P. and Mabille, E. (eds.) (1869) Chroniques des Eglises d'Anjou (Paris) Chronicon sancti Maxentii Pictavensis, p. 404.

[179] Halphen, L. (ed.), p. 247, cited thus without the full reference in Settipani, C. 'Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), p. 254 footnote 28.

------------------------

From the French Wikipedia page on Robert Ier de Bourgogne:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ier_de_Bourgogne

Robert Ier de France dit le Vieux, est né vers 1011. Selon l'historien E. Petit[1], il mourut le 21 mars 1076 d'un accident honteux et tragique sur lequel on n'a aucun détail, en l'église de Fleurey-sur-Ouche[2] et l'historien J. Richard dit au sujet de sa mort[3] : « les historiens ecclésiastiques font grief au vieux duc d'un mariage « incestueux » contracté après la répudiation de la duchesse Hélie de Semur ; on fait allusion à une mort « honteuse » en ajoutant : « Robert mourut « dedecorose »[4] en l'église de Fleurey-sur-Ouche ».

Robert Ier était un prince de sang royal français, fils du roi de France Robert II le Pieux et de Constance d'Arles. Il fut duc de Bourgogne de 1032 à 1076, comte de Charolais, de Langres (1227), et d'Auxerre (de 1040 à 1060).

Robert, duc de Bourgogne

En 1030, sans doute poussé par la reine Constance, il se révolta avec son frère Henri Ier contre le roi, leur père. Henri prit le château de Dreux et Robert enleva Beaune et Avallon. Ils se réconcilièrent à l'instigation de Guillaume de Volpiano abbé de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon. L'année suivante, après la mort de son père, soutenu par sa mère Constance d'Arles, il se révolta contre son frère aîné, revendiquant le trône. La guerre s'ensuivit entre les deux frères. Henri soutenu par le duc de Normandie rendit toute résistance impossible et Robert vaincu près de Villeneuve-Saint-Georges renonça à la succession et rentra en possession du duché de Bourgogne que son père avait projeté de lui accorder[5]. Il ne put en prendre possession que fin 1031 ou au début de 1032, qu'après que son frère Henri, chassé du domaine royal par Constance, eut réussi à recouvrer son trône.

Mariage avec Hélie de Semur-en-Brionnais

En 1033, il contracta alliance avec la famille richement possessionnée en Autunois et en Charolais des seigneurs de Semur-en-Brionnais en épousant, en premières noces, Hélie de Semur-en-Brionnais (1016 - †1056), fille de Dalmace (ou Dalmas ou encore Damas), seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais, et d'Aremburge de Vergy. Hélie de Sémur était la sœur de l'abbé Hugues de Cluny[6] (1024-1109), et la petite-nièce du comte-évêque Hugues de Chalon. Le duc Robert devenait par ce mariage le beau-frère de l'abbé Hugues de Cluny.

La succession d'Outre-Saône

Outre-Saône, en comté de Bourgogne, le dernier roi, Rodolphe III mourait en 1032 sans postérité. Deux de ses neveux, Eudes, fils de sa sœur Berthe de Bourgogne et Conrad, mari de sa nièce Gisèle, fille de sa sœur Gerberge, pouvaient prétendre à sa succession. Écartant Eudes, le choix de Rodolphe s'arrêta sur Conrad qu'il appela à sa succession. Eudes revendiqua son droit. Renaud Ier, fils d'Otte-Guillaume embrassa son parti, entra dans la ligue contre Conrad et appuya les deux tentatives (1033-1036) que fit Eudes pour se mettre en possession du royaume de Bourgogne. Le 17 mai 1038, jour de la diète de Soleure qui voyait le rattachement à l'Empire du comté, Renaud Ier préféra paraître à Dijon, en compagnie des comtes de Chalon et de Nevers, des évêques de Langres et de Soissons, plutôt que de rendre hommage à l'empereur ; prouvant l'intérêt et l'appui (?) que devait montrer le duc Robert pour les affaires d'Outre-Saône[7].

Interventions en Auxerrois

Le 4 novembre 1039 Hugues de Chalon, comte de Chalon et évêque d'Auxerre mourait. Il avait été le seul défenseur des droits revendiqués par le roi Robert le Pieux dans sa lutte pour se rendre maître de la Bourgogne et il devait à la faveur royale d'avoir été sacré le 5 mars 999 comme évêque d’Auxerre. Il avait joué un rôle de conseiller auprès du duc et son influence en Bourgogne avait été considérable. Sa mort déclencha une intervention de Robert Ier dans l'Auxerrois contre Renaud, le comte de Nevers, beau-frère du duc[8]. Robert voulait-il prendre possession du comté ou faire reconnaître sa suzeraineté par Renaud, ou encore de faire accepter Héribert en qualité d'évêque, successeur de Hugues de Chalon ? L'historien J. Richard écrit que les motifs de son intervention en Auxerrois sont obscurs[9]. La rencontre armée qui eut lieu entre les deux adversaires à Sainte-Vertu, dans l'Yonne, coûta la vie au comte Renaud. La mort du comte mit fin aux hostilités et permit à Robert Ier de maintenir sa domination sur l'Auxerrois.

Le fils de Renaud, Guillaume Ier, renforça sa puissance par son mariage en 1045 avec Ermengarde de Tonnerre et revendiqua ses droits sur le comté d'Auxerre. La guerre reprit. En 1057 une armée ducale commandée par Hugues, le fils aîné du duc, envahit l'Auxerrois et brûla la cité de Saint-Bris[10]. En 1058 Robert Ier, aidé de Thibaud, comte de Blois, devenu aussi comte de Champagne, attaquèrent l'abbaye Saint-Germain d'Auxerre[11]. Vers 1059 et 1060, le fils aîné de Robert Ier, Hugues, trouva la mort peu après dans une action de guerre contre le comte Guillaume Ier de Nevers. L’année suivante, Thibaud, revint guerroyer dans l’Auxerrois et ne parvint qu’à brûler Toucy. Le concile d’Autun en 1060 marque la fin de cette guerre en Auxerrois. Le duc semble avoir abandonné ses droits sur l’Auxerrois[12].

Le « meurtre » de Dalmas de Semur-en-Brionnais

Robert était d'un caractère violent et farouche. Selon les dires de certains historiens, en particulier E. Petit, repris par Eugène Jarry[13], auxquels ne souscrit pas l'historien J. Richard[14] : qui écrit « Nous ne savons rien du genre de mort auquel succomba Damas de Semur », le duc Robert aurait, dans un accès de colère à la suite d'une querelle au cours d'un repas, tué Dalmace de Semur[14], son beau-père, ainsi que son beau-frère, Jocerand[15], fils de Dalmace, qui voulait s'interposer.

Expédition en Espagne

L'abbé Hugues de Cluny, qui joua un rôle en Espagne dans la propagation de la réforme grégorienne et dans l'éradication du rite mozarabe, intéressa la noblesse bourguignonne à la Reconquista. Robert Ier le Vieux se rendit en 1058 à Barcelone, à la cour du comte de cette ville Raymond Borel. Il était accompagné de son second fils Henri, fils de sa première épouse Helie de Semur. À la suite de cette rencontre, Henri aurait épousé une parente du comte[16], dont le surnom passa à ses descendants[17].

Violences et brigandages

La rareté des informations concernant Robert Ier est extrême, déplore J. Richard. Néanmoins, les faits que les historiens connaissent de lui dans les dernières années de sa vie ne sont que violences et brigandages auxquels il se livrait. Ces exactions pourraient être le reflet de son impécuniosité grandissante, plus peut-être que d'un caractère emporté[18]. Les historiens comme J. Garnier et A. Kleinclausz lui ont même donné le surnom de « Robert sans terre ». Les exactions du duc commises à l’égard des églises et des abbayes sont nombreuses. Il avait enlevé les récoltes, saisi les dîmes, s'était emparé des celliers. En Auxerrois, en Langrois, dans le Dijonnais et l’Auxois, partout s'élevaient les plaintes des religieux. De tels crimes ne pouvaient restés impunis. Ils valurent à Robert d'être excommunié. Les religieux le convoquèrent au concile tenu à Autun (1060 ?) où il fit amende honorable. Il est probable que c’est au concile d’Autun que se décida son voyage à Rome qui dut avoir lieu entre les années 1060 et 1064 et qui devait lui apporter le pardon de ses crimes.

Descendance

De son premier mariage avec Hélie de Semur, ils eurent[19] :

1. Hugues de Bourgogne, né en 1034, († 1058 ou 1059?).

2. Henri de Bourgogne (1035 - († 1070 ou 1072)

3. Constance (1046 - † 1092), mariée à Hugues II de Chalon († 1078), puis en 1081 avec Alphonse VI de León (1040 - † 1109)

Il répudia Hélie[20] et se remaria avec Ermengarde, dite Blanche, fille de Foulque III Nerra, comte d'Anjou, et Hildegarde de Sundgau, et veuve du comte du Gâtinais Geoffroy Ferréol. Ils eurent :

1. Robert (1040 - † 1113)

2. Simon (1044 - † 1088)

Robert et Simon furent exilés par leur neveu Hugues Ier de Bourgogne lorsqu'il se mit en possession du duché. E. Petit écrit qu'ayant pris part à l'expédition d'Espagne contre les Maures, Robert se trouvait à León en Espagne en 1087 et qu'il passa ensuite en Sicile où il épousa la fille du roi Roger Ier de Sicile. La veuve de ce dernier, Adélaïde de Montferrat, lui confia la régence de ses États pendant la minorité de son fils[21]. Robert serait mort en 1112. D'après Orderic Vital[22], il serait mort empoisonné, de la main même de celle qui l'avait appelé en Sicile pour sauver le pays menacé d'une ruine imminente et lui avait donné en mariage une de ses filles. Quant à Simon, E. Petit, en s'appuyant sur Orderic Vital, écrit qu'il suivit la fortune de son frère et qu'il ne le rencontre cité nulle part dans les documents.

3. Audéarde (Hildegarde) (vers 1050 - † après 1120), mariée en 1069 avec Guillaume VIII (1023 - † 1086), duc d'Aquitaine et comte de Poitiers

Robert Ier de Bourgogne, duc de Bourgogne 1032-1076

Précédé par Robert II, puis Henri Ier, rois de France

Suivi par Hugues Ier

Bibliographie

1. Jean Richard, Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, Société Les Belles Lettres, Paris, 1954.

2. Ernest Petit, Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, Paris, 1885.

3. Maurice Chaume, Les origines du duché de Bourgogne, Académie des Sciences, Arts et Belles Lettres, 1925.

4. Eugène Jarry, Formation territoriale de la Bourgogne. essai de géographie historique, Paris, 1948.

Liens externes

Semur-en-Brionnais, ses barons, ses établissements civils, judiciaires et écclésiastiques depuis l'an 860 jusqu'à nos jours

http://pjpmartin.pagesperso-orange.fr/site/Semur_Cucherat.htm

Notes et références

1.↑ Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, T. I, p, 187.

2.↑ Robert Ier de Bourgogne sur le site de la Fondation pour la généalogie médiévale [archive]

3.↑ Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 13, r. 4.

4.↑ D'après les sources indiquées par J. Richard : Quomodo, p. 70, n° 1 ; Saint-Marcel, n° 33.

5.↑ J. Richard, dans Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 8, écrit ceci:

« Robert le Vieux, affirme dans un diplôme de 1035 que son père avait projeté de faire de lui un duc de Bourgogne, et nous n'avons pas de raison pour rejeter son témoignage. Que ce soit après sa révolte, en 1030, ou à une autre date, le jeune Robert avait donc été désigné pour recevoir le duché. »

6.↑ Université Jean Monnet-Saint-Étienne, Les Religieuses dans le cloître et dans le monde des origines à nos jours,1994, p. 198

7.↑ La forme interrogative est employée par J. Richard dans Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 13.

8.↑ Il avait pris pour épouse Adélaïde de France, une sœur du duc

9.↑ Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 12.

10.↑ Jacques-Antoine Dulaure, Histoire critique de la noblesse, depuis le commencement de la monarchie [archive], 1790, p. 53

11.↑ Waast Barthélemy Henry, Histoire de l'abbaye de Saint-Germain d'Auxerre, 1853, p. [archive]173

12.↑ J. Richard dans Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 12, écrit : Robert avait-il dû abandonner ce qu’il avait acquis en 1040 ?

13.↑ Dans Formation territoriale de la Bourgogne. essai de géographie historique, Paris, 1948. Dans J. Richard, Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 146, r. 3.

14.↑ a et b Cette version des faits est identique à la thèse développée par E. Petit dans Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, T. I, p. 167-169.

L'historien Jean Richard dans Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, Société Les Belles Lettres, Paris, 1954, p. 12, r. 3, la réfute et, pour sa part, se contente d’écrire notamment au sujet de la mort de Dalmas (ou Damas ainsi qu'il l'écrit) :

« Nous ne savons rien du genre de mort auquel succomba Damas de Semur ».

Mais il apporte néanmoins les précisions suivantes :

« Hildebert (Hildebert du Mans), rapporte que le duc son gendre l’avait fait périr « propria manu », ce qui a permis aux historiens brionnais de supposer qu’il avait trouvé la mort pendant la guerre d’Auxerrois. Quant à Petit, il ajoute à la mort de Damas celle du fils de ce dernier, Joceran, tué par « deux soldats du duc », dépassant ici le témoignage de nos sources (Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, T. I, p. 167-168). Le même historien, suivant une interprétation due à Maillard de Chambure, Histoire et description de l’église de N.-D. de Semur-en-Auxois (M.C.A.C.O., Ier série, I, 1832-1833, p. 76-84), suppose que Damas aurait été empoisonné lors d’un banquet auquel assistait son gendre, ceci d’après le tympan de la porte des Bleds, à la Collégiale Notre-Dame de Semur-en-Auxois, exécuté seulement après 1250 et qui représente un banquet à la cour du roi Gondophorus, parmi d’autres scènes de la légende de saint Thomas. Les contorsions d’une danseuse ont été assimilées aux convulsions de Damas empoisonné (P. de Truchis, Notre-Dame de Semur , dans le Guide du congrès archéologique. D’Avallon , 1907 ; Kleinclausz, Quomodo , p. 70, n° 2). Cette erreur d’interprétation est due à une confusion entre les deux Semur, commise par Courtépée qui savait cependant que le sceau de la duchesse Hélie avait été découvert au château de Semur-en-Brionnais (Description… , III, p. 84) et affirme néanmoins que N.-D. de Semur avait été bâtie par Robert Ier en expiation du meurtre de Damas. La mort de celui-ci est antérieure à 1048, comme le montre une charte de Cluny (n° 2940) ».

15.↑ Dans Histoire de l'Ordre de Cluny depuis la fondation de l'abbaye jusqu'à la mort de Pierre-le-Vénérable de J.-Henri Pignot, T. II, 1868, p. 4, r. 1, J.-H Pignot écrit au sujet de la mort de Jocerand : « Jocerand fut tué encore jeune par un soldat qui chercha un asile à Cluny ».

16.↑ M. Chaume prénomme cette parente :« Clémence de Barcelone, petit-fille présumée de Raymond Borel Ier ».

17.↑ Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 13, r. 1, et M. Chaume, Les premières croisades bourguignonnes au delà des Pyrénées , Annales de Bourgogne, XVIII, 1946, p. 161-165, et En marge des croisades bourguignonnes d'Espagne, Annales de Bourgogne, IX, 1937, p. 68-73.

18.↑ J. Richard, Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 13.

19.↑ Les contradictions relevées lors de la consultation de divers documents ne permettent pas de considérer les renseignements concernant l'attribution de la descendance entre premier et deuxième lit comme fiables. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne les quatre fils de Robert Ier, l'historien J. Richard dans Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 14. écrit que Hugues et Henri sont du premier mariage et Robert et Simon, auxquels il destinait son héritage, du second lit.

20.↑ Vers 1048-1054 ? Un acte daté du 16 janvier 1055, confirmant aux religieux de Saint-Bénigne de Dijon le droit de banvin, sur lequel un espace, où était ordinairement inscrit le nom de la duchesse, avait été laissé en blanc, permet à l'historien E. Petit d'écrire que la répudiation dut avoir lieu avant cette date. Dans son arbre généalogique des ducs de Bourgogne, Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, p. 515, il indique la date de 1055 comme date de répudiation de la duchesse Hélie.

21.↑ Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, p. 152.

22.↑ Ordericus Vitalis, lib. XIII, p. 897. Dans Histoire de la Sicile sous la domination des Normands de C. Lecat de Bazancourt, Paris, 1846.

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From the Wikipedia page on Robert I Duke of Burgundy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Duke_of_Burgundy

Robert I Capet or Robert I of Burgundy, known as Robert the Old (ne: Robert le Vieux, 1011 – March 21, 1076) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. (According to historian E. Petit, he died 21 March 1076 in a shameful and tragic accident in which there was no detail in the church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, and historian J. Richard said about his death, "Ecclesiastical historians complained that the marriage of the old Duke was incestuous, and acquired after the divorce of Duchess Helie de Semur, which alludes to his death as being 'shameful,'" adding, "Robert died 'dedecorose' in the church of Fleurey-sur-Ouche."

Robert I was a French Royal blood prince, and son of King Robert II The Pious of France and Constance of Arles. He was Duke of Burgundy from 1032 to 1076, Comte de Charolais, de Langres (from 1027), et d'Auxerre (from 1040 to 1060).

Robert was brother of Henry I of France.

In 1025, with the death of his eldest brother Hugh Magnus, he and Henry rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris. In 1031, after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother, in which he was supported by his mother, Constance of Arles.

(French Wikipedia states: In 1030, no doubt prompted by Queen Constance, he rebelled with his brother Henri I against the King, their father. Henri took the castle of Dreux and Robert took Avallon Beaune. They were reconciled at the instigation of William Volpiano, Abbot of St-Benignus of Dijon.)

Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy (1032).

(French Wikipedia states: The following year, after the death of his father, he rebelled with the support of his mother Constance of Arles against his eldest brother, claiming the throne. Henri, supported by the Duke of Normandy, overwhelmed his defenses and nearly defeated Robert at Villeneuve-St-Georges, forcing the Duke to renounce his right to succession in return for the Duchy of Burgundy, which his father had originally planned to give to him. He could not take possession until the end of 1031 or early 1032, after his brother Henri, ousted from his royal domain by the Queen Mother Constance, managed to regain his throne.)

Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon. He burgled the abbey of St-Germain at Auxerre.

(French Wikipedia states: In 1033, he contracted an alliance with the wealthy family holding Autun and Charolais, the Seigneur Semur-en-Brionnais, marrying as his first wife Helie of Semur-en Brionnais (1016-1056), daughter of Dalmace (or Dalmas, or Damas), Seigneur de Semur-en-Brionnais et d'Aremburge de Vergy. Helie de Semur was the sister of the abbot Hugh de Cluny (1024-1109) and a grand-niece of the Comte-Bishop Hugues de Chalon. Duke Robert by this marriage became the brother of the Abbot Hugh de Cluny.)

(French Wikipedia states: Across the Saone River, in the Comte de Bourgogne, its last lord Rudolf III died in 1032 childless. Two of his nephews - Odo, son of his sister Bertha de Bourgogne, and Conrad, husband of his niece Gisele who was daughter of his sister Gerberga - had rights to claim his succession. Odo actively sought it. Renaud I, son of William de Otte, joined his party and entered a league against Conrad, supporting two campaigns (1033 and 1036) to establish Odo in possession of the Comte de Bourgogne. On 17 May 1038, the day of the Diet of Solothurn, which approved the sovereignty of the Holy Roman Empire over the county, Renaud I chose to appear in Dijon in the company of the comtes of Chalon and Nevers, and the bishops of Langres and Soissons. Rather than pay homage to the Emperor, they sided with Duke Robert in his interest to cross the Saone.)

(French Wikipedia states: On 4 November 1039, Hugues de Chalon, Comte de Chalon and Bishop of Auxerre, died. He was the only defender of the rights claimed by King Robert the Pious in his struggle to become master of Burgundy, and by royal favor was sanctified on 5 March 999 as Bishop of Auxerre. He was an advisor of the Duke and his influence was considerable in Burgundy. His death triggered an intervention by Robert I into the Auxerre against his brother Renaud, Comte de Nevers. Robert took possession of the county and refused to recognize his suzerainty to Renaud, or to accept Heribert as successor to Hugues de Chalon as bishop. Historian J. Richard says that his reasons for intervening in Auxerre are unclear. The armed encounter which took place between the two adversaries at Ste-Vertu in the Yonne cost the life of Comte Renaud. The death of the Comte put an end to hostilities, and allowed Robert I to maintain his domination of Auxerre.)

(According to French Wikipedia: The son of Renaud, William I, solidified his power by a marriage in 1045 to Ermengarde de Tonnerre, and he claimed his rights in the county of Auxerre. The war resumed. In 1057, a ducal army commanded by Hugh, eldest son of the Duke, invaded Auxerre and burned the city of St-Bris. In 1058, Robert I helped Thibaud, Comte de Blois et Comte de Champagne, attack the Abbey of St-Germain of Auxerre. Around 1059 or 1060, the eldest son of Robert I, Hugh, was killed shortly after going to war against Comte William I of Nevers. The following year, Thibaud returned to fight in Auxerre but only managed to burn Toucy. The Council of Autun in 1060 marked the end of the war in Auxerre. The Duke appeared to have abandoned his rights there.)

In 1055, he repudiated his wife, Helie of Semur, and assassinated her brother Joceran and murdered her father, his father-in-law, Lord Dalmace I of Semur, with his own hands. In that same year, the bishop of Langres, Harduoin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not "to be exposed to the violence of the duke."

(French Wikipedia says: Robert was violent and savage. According to the statements of some historians, especially E. Petit, as recorded by Eugene Jarry, (who disagrees with J. Richard who says: "We know nothing of the kind of death which befell Dalmas de Semur-en-Brionnais"), Duke Robert, in a fit of rage after a quarrel over a meal, killed Dalmas de Semur, his father-in-law, and his brother-in-law Jocerand, who tried to intervene.)

(French Wikipedia states: Abbot Hugh de Cluny, who played a role in Spain in the spread of Gregorian reform and the eradication of the Mozarabic rite, sought the interest of the Burgundian nobility in the Reconquista. Robert I went to Barcelona in 1058, to the court of county Raymond Borel. He was accompanied by his second son Henry, son of his first wife Helie de Semur. Following this meeting, Henry would marry a relative of the count, whose name was passed on to his descendants.)

(French Wikipedia states: The lack of information about Robert I is extremely regretful. Nevertheless, historians know that in the last years of his life he indulged in assault and robbery. These abuses may reflect a lack of maturity, or perhaps moreso a temper. Historians such as J. Garnier and A. Kleinclausz even gave him the nickname of "Robert the Landless". The exactions of the Duke committed against churches and monasteries abounded. He stole crops before the tithes, and siezed cellars. In Auxerre, in Langres, Dijon and in the Auxois, complaints arose from the clergy. Such crimes could not go unpunished, and Robert was excommunicated. The clergy summoned him to a Council of Autun (1060?), where he made amends. It is likely that the Council of Autun decided that he must travel to Rome between 1060 and 1064 to seek forgiveness for his crimes.)

His first son, Hugh, died in battle at a young age and his second son, Henry, also predeceased him. He was succeeded by Henry's eldest son, his grandson, Hugh I.

Family

He married his first wife, Helie of Semur, about 1033, and repudiated her in 1046.

Robert and Helie had five children:

1.Hugues de Bourgogne (1034–1058/1059), killed in battle

2.Henri de Bourgogne (1035–ca.1074). He died shortly before his father, thus making his son Robert's heir. The name of his wife is unknown (that it was Sybil has been discredited) as is her origin, although a connection to the Counts of Barcelona has been hypothesized. Their children were:Hugh I, Duke of Burgundy (1057-1093); Odo I, Duke of Burgundy (1058-1103); Robert, bishop of Langres (1059-1111); Helie, a nun (b. 1061); Beatrice (b. 1063), married Guy I, count of Vignory; Reginald, abbot of St Pierre (1065-1092); Henry, Count of Portugal (1066-1112), who became a vassal of León and ruler of the county of Portugal in 1093 - his son would be Afonso Henriques, first king of Portugal

3.Robert (1040–1113), poisoned; married Violante of Sicily, daughter of Roger I of Sicily

4.Simon (1045–1087)

(French Wikipedia states: Robert and Simon were exiled by their nephew: Hugues I de Bourgogne when he took possession of the duchy. E. Petit wrote that having taken part in the expedition to Spain against the Moors, Robert remained in Leon in 1087 and went to Sicily where he married the daughter of King Roger I of Sicily. The widow of the latter, Adelaide de Montferrat, gave him the regency of his dominions during the minority of his son. Robert died in 1112. According to the Orderic Vitalis, he was poisoned by her hand, even though he was called to Sicily to save the country from imminent collapse and shared a daughter. As with Simon, E. Petit, based on the Orderic Vitalis, wrote that he followed the fortunes of his brother, and his fate is found nowhere in cited documents.)

5.Constance (1046–1093), married Hugues II de Chalon (d. 1078), and then in 1081 Alfonso VI of León and Castile (1040-1109)

From his second wife, Ermengarde (nicknamed Blanche), daughter of Fulk III Nerra, Comte d'Anjou, and Hildegard Sundgau (widow of Geoffroy Ferreol, Comte de Gatinais) he had one daughter:

1.Hildegard (or Audearde, c.1056–1104), married Duke William VIII of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitiers (1023-1086)

Sources

Gwatking, H. M., Whitney, J. P., et al. Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III—Germany and the Western Empire. Cambridge University Press: London, 1930.

French Wikipedia Bibliography

Jean Richard, Les ducs de Bourgogne et la formation du duché du XIe au XIVe siècles, Société Les Belles Lettres, Paris, 1954.

Ernest Petit, Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne de la race capétienne, Paris, 1885.

Maurice Chaume, Les origines du duché de Bourgogne, Académie des Sciences, Arts et Belles Lettres, 1925.

Eugène Jarry, Formation territoriale de la Bourgogne. essai de géographie historique, Paris, 1948.

See also

Dukes of Burgundy family tree

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dukes_of_Burgundy_family_tree

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I._%28Burgund%29

--------------------

Principe francés de la dinastía Capeto y 1º Duque de Borgoña de dicha casa, conde de Charolais y Langres (1027) y conde de Auxerre (1040 - 1060).

--------------------

Robert I Capet (1011 – March 21, 1076) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. Robert was son of King Robert II of France and brother of Henry I.

In 1025, with the death of his eldest brother Hugh Magnus, he and Henry rebelled against their father and defeated him, forcing him back to Paris. In 1031, after the death of his father the king, Robert participated in a rebellion against his brother, in which he was supported by his mother, Queen Constance d'Arles. Peace was only achieved when Robert was given Burgundy (1032).

Throughout his reign, he was little more than a robber baron who had no control over his own vassals, whose estates he often plundered, especially those of the Church. He seized the income of the diocese of Autun and the wine of the canons of Dijon. He burgled the abbey of St-Germain at Auxerre. In 1055, he repudiated his wife, Helie of Semur, and assassinated her brother Joceran and murdered her father, his father-in-law, Lord Dalmace I of Semur, with his own hands. In that same year, the bishop of Langres, Harduoin, refused to dedicate the church of Sennecy so as not "to be exposed to the violence of the duke."

His first son, Hugh, died in battle at a young age and his second son, Henry, also predeceased him. He was succeeded by Henry's eldest son, his grandson, Hugh I.

He married his first wife, Helie of Semur, about 1033, and repudiated her in 1055. Robert and Helie had five children:

Hugh (1034–1059), killed in battle

Henry (1035–ca.1074)

Robert (1040–1113), poisoned; married Violante of Sicily, daughter of Roger I of Sicily

Simon (1045–1087)

Constance (1046–1093), married Alfonso VI of Castile

From his second wife, Ermengarde of Anjou, daughter of Fulk III of Anjou, he had one daughter:

Hildegard (c.1056–1104), married Duke William VIII of Aquitaine -------------------- Roberto I, Duque da Borgonha ou Roberto I Capeto (1011 — Fleury-sur-Ouche, França, 21 de Março 1076), cognominado o Velho, foi Duque da Borgonha entre 1032 e a sua morte, e o primeiro duque da dinastia Capetiana que haveria de governar o ducado até ao século XIV. Roberto era o filho mais novo do rei Roberto II de França e irmão de Henrique I.

Roberto tornou-se Duque da Borgonha por doação do seu irmão Henrique, depois da sua ascensão à coroa de França. Foi sucedido pelo seu neto Hugo I, filho de Henrique. O seu neto Henrique tornou-se Conde de Portugal e foi pai de Afonso Henriques.

-------------------- Roberto I, Duque da Borgonha

Roberto I, Duque da Borgonha ou Roberto I Capeto (1011 — Fleury-sur-Ouche, França, 21 de Março 1076), cognominado o Velho, foi Duque da Borgonha entre 1032 e a sua morte, e o primeiro duque da dinastia Capetiana que haveria de governar o ducado até ao século XIV. Roberto era o filho mais novo do rei Roberto II de França e irmão de Henrique I.

Roberto tornou-se Duque da Borgonha por doação do seu irmão Henrique, depois da sua ascensão à coroa de França. Foi sucedido pelo seu neto Hugo I, filho de Henrique. O seu neto Henrique tornou-se Conde de Portugal e foi pai de Afonso Henriques. [editar] Descendência

De Hélia de Semur filha de Damásio de Semur, teve:

  1. Hugo da Borgonha (1034–1059), morto em batalha
  2. Henrique da Borgonha (1035–ca.1074) casou com Beatriz de Barcelona ou Cibila de Barcelona (1023 - 1074) filha de Berengário Raimundo (1005 - 26 de Maio de 1035)
  3. Roberto da Borgonha (1040–1113), envenenado; casou com Violante da Sicília, filha de Rogério I da Sicília
  4. Simão da Borgonha (1045–1087)
  5. Constança da Borgonha (1046–1093), casou com Afonso VI de Castela

De Ermengarda Branca de Anjou (1018 - 1076), filha de Fulco III de Anjou conde de Anjou (970 - 1040) e de Ildegarda de Mitz, teve:

  1. Hildegarda da Borgonha (c.1056–1104), casou com Guilherme VIII, Duque da Aquitânia

in: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre. <http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_I,_Duque_de_Borgonha>

-------------------- Robert I, Duke of Burgundy was born in 1011. He was the son of Robert II "the Pious" Capet King of France and Constance de Toulouse. Robert I, Duke of Burgundy married Ermengarde of Anjou Duchess of Burgundy after 1046. Robert I, Duke of Burgundy died on 21 March 1076. -------------------- Duc de Bourgogne. Robert le Vieux est l'auteur de la première maison de Bourgogne de la race capétienne. La Bourgogne des ducs capétiens avait pour limites, à l'est la Franche-Comté, la Bresse et les Dombes ; à l'ouest le Nivernais, les Pays de la Loire et le Beaujolais ; au nord la Champagne et le Châtillonnais ; au sud le Lyonnais.


Sources:

- personne: Encyclopédie Généalogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde

-------------------- Roberto I o Velho, duque de Borgonha

-------------------- Leo: Europäische Stammtafeln, Band II, Frank Baron Freytag von Loringhoven, 1975, Isenburg, W. K. Prinz von, Reference: Page 24.

Leo: Europäische Stammtafeln, J.A. Stargardt Verlag, Marburg, Schwennicke, Detlev (Ed.), Reference: II 20.

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Robert I le Vieux, duc de Bourgogne's Timeline

1011
1011
1030
1030
Age 19
France
1031
1031
Age 20
1032
1032
Age 21
Duke of, BURGUNDY, , France
1032
Age 21
Duke of, BURGUNDY, , France
1032
Age 21
Duke of, BURGUNDY, , France
1032
- 1076
Age 21
Burgundy, France
1033
1033
Age 22
Burgundy, France
1034
1034
Age 23
1035
1035
Age 24