Richard Mór de Burgh, 1st Baron of Connaught

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Richard 'The Great' de Burgh, Lord of Connaught

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Connaught, Ireland
Death: Died in Aquitaine, France
Place of Burial: Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland,Lord Of Connaught
Immediate Family:

Son of William de Burgh, Lord of Connacht and Mor O'Brien
Husband of Petronilla - Pernel de Lacy; Hodierna de Burgh and Egidia de Lacy, Lady of Connacht
Father of Margaret (Margery) de Burgh; Alice Burgh; Richard De Burgh; daughter of Richard de Burgh; William Mo'r De Burgh and 3 others

Occupation: Lord of Connacht, Lord of Trim and Connaught, 1st Lord of Connaught
Managed by: David Bradbury Stewart
Last Updated:

About Richard Mór de Burgh, 1st Baron of Connaught

Richard Mor de Burgh Added by randyandjulia on 14 Sep 2008

Richard Mor de Burgh (c. 1194 – 1242).[1] was the eldest son of William de Burgh and founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway.

In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, handed over. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favor of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh (who may have been his uncle), and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. From 1228 to 1232, he was the Justiciar of Ireland. He was not immediately able to take possession, but in 1235, he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him and expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".[1] He married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and had seven children:

Richard (? - 1248), Lord of Connaught Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster William (? - 1270) Margery (? - after March 1253), married Theobald Butler Unnamed daughter who married as second wife to Gerald de Prendergast Alice Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue. Richard was succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

-------------------- Richard Mor de Burgh (c. 1194 – 1242).[1] was the eldest son of William de Burgh and More O'Brien. He was the founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway.

In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, handed over. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favor of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh (who may have been his uncle), and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. From 1228 to 1232, he was the Justiciar of Ireland. He was not immediately able to take possession, but in 1235, he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him and expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".[1] He married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose, and had seven children:

Richard (? - 1248), Lord of Connaught Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster William (? - 1270) Margery (? - after March 1253), married Theobald Butler Unnamed daughter who married as his second wife, Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir, by whom she had a daughter, Maud. Alice Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue. Richard was succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

[edit] References 1.^ a b Curtis, Edmund (2004) [1950]. A History of Ireland (6th ed. ed.). New York: Routledge. pp. 70–72. ISBN 0-415-27949-6. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 73-30, 177B-8, 177B-9. The Tribes and customs of Hy-Many, John O'Donovan, 1843 The Surnames of Ireland, Edward MacLysaght, Dublin, 1978. The Anglo-Normans in Co. Galway: the process of colonization, Patrick Holland, Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, vol. 41,(1987–88) Excavation on the line of the medieval town defences of Loughrea, Co. Galway, J.G.A.& H.S., vol. 41, (1987–88) Anglo-Norman Galway; rectangular earthworks and moated sites, Patrick Holland, J.G.A. & H.S., vol. 46 (1993) Rindown Castle: a royal fortress in Co. Roscommon, Sheelagh Harbison, J.G.A. & H.S., vol. 47 (1995) The Anglo-Norman landscape in County Galway; land-holdings, castles and settlements, Patrick Holland, J.G.A.& H.S., vol. 49 (1997) Annals of Ulster at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork Annals of Tigernach at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork Revised edition of McCarthy's synchronisms at Trinity College Dublin. FMG on Richard Mor de Burgh, son of William, Lord of Connaught and his decendants

This Irish biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. 

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Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_M%C3%B3r_de_Burgh" Categories: Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland | People from County Limerick | People from County Galway | Irish chieftains | 1194 births | 1243 deaths | Irish people stubs -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Mor_de_Burgh

A book of genealogies recorded in the 15th century by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters (published in Annalecta Hibernica 18), indicates that the mother of Richard Mor de Burgh, William's son and successor, was the "daughter of the Saxon [English] king", an illegitimate daughter of Henry II of England or perhaps Richard I of England. Such a connection would explain the use of the term consanguineus [kinsman] by Edward I of England to describe Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster. -------------------- Richard Mor de Burgh (c. 1194 – 1242).[1] was the eldest son of William de Burgh and founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway.

In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, handed over. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favor of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh (who may have been his uncle), and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. From 1228 to 1232, he was the Justiciar of Ireland. He was not immediately able to take possession, but in 1235, he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him and expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".[1] He married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose, and had seven children:

Richard (? - 1248), Lord of Connaught Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster William (? - 1270) Margery (? - after March 1253), married Theobald Butler Unnamed daughter who married as second wife to Gerald de Prendergast Alice Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue. Richard was succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

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The title of Lord of Connaught was used by several Norman barons in Ireland.

During the Norman conquest of Ireland, William de Burgh was apparently granted Connacht, but never took possession of it. It remained in the hands of native kings until 1224, when Richard Mor de Burgh claimed it on the basis of his father's grant. His uncle Hubert de Burgh was then Justiciar of Ireland and upheld the claim in 1227. Richard called upon the feudal levies of Ireland and conquered Connacht in 1235, taking the title Lord of Connaught. Richard's son Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster, his son Richard Og de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, and Richard's grandson William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster all seem to have used the title, but upon the death of the latter in 1333, civil war broke out over control of the de Burgh lands. Connacht was divided between Sir Ulick Burke and Edmond Albanach Burke[1], and the title fell out of use. It was not recognized in the Peerage of Ireland, and the heirs-general of William Donn, who retained the title Earl of Ulster, did not use it.

-------------------- Richard Mor de Burgh (c. 1194 – 1242).[1] was the eldest son of William de Burgh and More O'Brien. He was the founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway.

In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, handed over. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favor of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh (who may have been his uncle), and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. From 1228 to 1232, he was the Justiciar of Ireland. He was not immediately able to take possession, but in 1235, he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him and expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".[1] He married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose, and had seven children:

Richard (? - 1248), Lord of Connaught Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster William (? - 1270) Margery (? - after March 1253), married Theobald Butler Unnamed daughter who married as his second wife, Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir, by whom she had a daughter, Maud. Alice Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue. Richard was succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

[edit] References ^ a b Curtis, Edmund (2004) [1950]. A History of Ireland (6th ed. ed.). New York: Routledge. pp. 70–72. ISBN 0-415-27949-6. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 73-30, 177B-8, 177B-9. The Tribes and customs of Hy-Many, John O'Donovan, 1843 The Surnames of Ireland, Edward MacLysaght, Dublin, 1978. The Anglo-Normans in Co. Galway: the process of colonization, Patrick Holland, Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society, vol. 41,(1987–88) Excavation on the line of the medieval town defences of Loughrea, Co. Galway, J.G.A.& H.S., vol. 41, (1987–88) Anglo-Norman Galway; rectangular earthworks and moated sites, Patrick Holland, J.G.A. & H.S., vol. 46 (1993) Rindown Castle: a royal fortress in Co. Roscommon, Sheelagh Harbison, J.G.A. & H.S., vol. 47 (1995) The Anglo-Norman landscape in County Galway; land-holdings, castles and settlements, Patrick Holland, J.G.A.& H.S., vol. 49 (1997) Annals of Ulster at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork Annals of Tigernach at CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts at University College Cork Revised edition of McCarthy's synchronisms at Trinity College Dublin. FMG on Richard Mor de Burgh, son of William, Lord of Connaught and his decendants

--------------------

  1. Birth: Abt 1175
  2. Death: 1243 in On passage to France 1 1
  3. Event: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Titled
  4. Event: 1st Earl of Ulster Titled
  5. Event: Lord of Connaught Titled

-------------------- Richard Mór -------------------- Richard Mor de Burgh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Richard Mor de Burgh (c. 1194 – 1242).[1] was the eldest son of William de Burgh and founder of the towns of Ballinasloe, Loughrea and Galway.

In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, handed over. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favor of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh (who may have been his uncle), and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. From 1228 to 1232, he was the Justiciar of Ireland. He was not immediately able to take possession, but in 1235, he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him and expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".[1] He married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose, and had seven children:

Richard (? - 1248), Lord of Connaught

Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster

William (? - 1270)

Margery (? - after March 1253), married Theobald Butler

Unnamed daughter who married as second wife to Gerald de Prendergast

Alice

Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue.

Richard was succeeded by his son, Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

[edit]References

^ a b Curtis, Edmund (2004) [1950]. A History of Ireland (6th ed. ed.). New York: Routledge. pp. 70–72. ISBN 0-415-27949-6.

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 73-30, 177B-8, 177B-9.

FMG on Richard Mor de Burgh, son of William, Lord of Connaught and his decendants -------------------- Lord Deputy of Ireland 1227-1229 -------------------- Information came from wikipedia

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Richard Mór de Burgh, 1st Baron of Connaught's Timeline

1193
1193
Ireland
1224
1224
Age 31
Of, Galway, Galway, Ireland
1225
April 21, 1225
Age 32
1225
Age 32
Galway, Galway City, Galway, Ireland
1226
1226
Age 33
1228
February 13, 1228
- 1232
Age 35
1228
Age 35
Ireland
1230
1230
Age 37
Galway Castle, Connaught, Ireland
1234
1234
Age 41
Of,Connaught,,Ireland
1242
1242
Age 49
Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland,Lord Of Connaught