Robert Looney, Sr.

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Robert Looney, Sr.

Also Known As: "Luna"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ballagilley, Kirk Lonan, Maughold, Isle Of Mann, England / Ireland
Death: Died in Augusta, now, Botetourt County, Virginia, Colonial America
Place of Burial: Reed Creek Area of, Augusta, now, Botetourt County, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Looney; John Looney; Elizabeth Llewellen and Elizabeth Looney
Husband of Elizabeth Looney; Mary Elizabeth Looney and Elizabeth Stover Barabar
Father of Martha Rowland; Robert Looney, Jr.; Thomas Looney; Daniel Looney; Adam Looney, Sr. and 30 others
Brother of Moses Looney; James Looney; Josiah Looney; Peter Looney; Adam Looney and 21 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert Looney, Sr.

Robert Looney Sr was born about 1692 in Ballagilley Farm, Maughold, Isle of Mann, Great Britain.

He died on 14 Sep 1769 in Looney's Mill Creek, Augusta (Now Botetourt), VA, USA.

In about 1724, Robert and Elizabeth Looney came to America from the Isle of Man, Great Britain, with their family, settling first in Philadelphia, PA and later in colonial Maryland. Soon thereafter they moved west to the new frontier and settled in Augusta County, Virginia on the James River. There on Looney Creek, Robert and Elizabeth raised their family, established the first ferry crossing of the James River, built a mill, grew crops and raised livestock. Due to the constant conflict between France and England, as well as the threat of Indian attack, a fort was ordered built in 1755 around the Looney homesite. This fort was named Fort Looney and was at the junction of Looney Creek and the James River. This fort was part of a series of forts ordered built along the frontier to protect settlers and to keep the French from claiming the territory.

Fort Looney was visited in 1756 by Col. George Washington, future first president of the United States. The Looney sons were frontiersmen and pioneers. Some fought and died with the British against the French and Indians. Some were killed by Indians during frequent frontier raids on settlers while others helped to explore and expand the frontier boundaries first into southwestern Virginia and eventually into Tenneessee Indian Territory. The Looney sons and grandsons fought against the British in the War of Independence.

He was married to Elizabeth Llewellyn (Looney) about 1715 in Ballagilley Farm, Maughold, Isle of Mann, Great Britain.

--------------------

Derived from a 1974 article appearing in "The Bulletin of North American Manx Assoc."

Little did Robert Looney, a Manx farmer from Ballagilley, Maughold realize that when he arrived in the New World about 1731, that he and his decendants would be recorded in the annals of their new land as frontiersmen and patriots. Records show that by 1734, Robert Looney and his wife, Elizabeth Llwellyn, and at least seven sons (they were to have 14 sons!) were in Philadelphia where they joined an expedition into the colony of Virginia.

The following year he settled on a patent of 291 acres - for which he was to pay the Crown land rent of one shilling a year- on the south bank of Cohongoronta (Upper Potomac) river, probably near present day Hagerstown, Maryland. By 1739-1740 Robert Looney and his family moved southward through the Shenandoah Valley, finally settling on a grant of 250 acres on the James river, in what was to become Augusta County, where another Manxman, Israel Christian, had prospered. They later donated lands for the county seat, and became influential in colonial politics.

In 1742 Robert gained another 400 acres in grants, and became one of the most prosperous farmers in the area, with his own mill, orchards, nursery, cattle and horses, and even operated a ferry across what may still be found today not far from Natrual Bridge - Looney's Mill creek. At least three of his sons served in the Augusta County Militia.

One of these sons, Absolem, was of a true frontier spirit, trapping and hunting in the rugged southwest of the colony, Virginia's last frontier. There, while living in caves to avoid the Indians, Absolem discovered a fertile valley, rich in blue grass pastures, to which he led his family and some followers and founded a new settlement, at least four years before that noted frontier explorer, Daniel Boone, arrived in the same area to build a fort only six miles from Absolem's homestead. To this day, the quiet valley, some seventeen miles from Bluefield, Virginia, is known as "Abb's Valley" in honor of its discoverer, Absolem Looney.

Indian attacks on these frontier communities were not uncommon, but soon the Indians were to be joined by a new ally, the French, and the settlers were swept violently into the bloody conflict between the Britsh and the French known as the "Seven Years War" or "French and Indian War". General Braddock, the British commander in Cief, was mortally wounded and his regiment turned to route at the "Battle of the Wilderness". Col George Washington commander of the Virginia Militia lost some of his men in the same engagement. The picture was grim, no regular army, no militia to protect the settlers. Robert Looney's son Peter, was captured by the Indians and held prisoner at Fort Detroit for almost a year, dying three years after his release. Another son, Samuel, was killed by the Indians in 1760, and the homestead of Robert's daughter Lucy Jane, was raided and looted by the Indians. Robert Looney, mindful of his responsibilities to his family and followers, errected a fort (Fort Looney). This was one of the few Forts which withstood capture and provided provisions to the militia until the end of the war in 1763. Absolem, recalled from Abb's Valley with his family to assist his father in building the fort, was to learn that those who remained in his valley settlement had been massacred by the Indians, a fate which would later befall him at Dunkard's Spring, VA between 1791-96.

But the end of the Indian Wars was not to spare the Looney family. During the American Revolution, two of Robert Looney's sons, Absolem and David were to see duty. Absolem in patriotic service under General George Washington and David as a Major in the Notrth Carolina Militia. Three of Absolem's sons, like the offsprings of his brothers, were to serve in the Virginia Militia, with one dying of gunshot wounds in both legs after his role in the American Victory at the Battle of King's Mountain in North Carolina.

Absolem's son Michael, homesteaded after the revolution in eastern Tennessee, where his log cabin stood until 1919 and where the 1,500 acre farm he acquired at a half-shilling an acre is still held by his heirs. Others moved westward into Missouri, and is documented in LeRoy Tilton's "Early Looney's in America". Seven branches of the family founded by Robert Looney's sons have extended into more than fifteen states.

Robert and Elizabeth Looney are presumed buried near the Reed Creek area of Augusta Co. (Botetourt Co.), VA. Another of his sons, Joseph, was a Captain in the Botetort County, Virginia Militia, and is described in a following article. -------------------- Link

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/i/x/Peggy-L-Hix-GA/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0407.html

-------------------- In 1735, Robert and Elizabeth Looney came to America from the Isle of Mann, Great Britain, with their family and settled in colonial Maryland. Soon thereafter they moved west to the new frontier and settled in Augusta County, Virginia on the James River. There on Looney Creek, Robert and Elizabeth raised their family, established the first ferry crossing of the James River, build a mill, grew crops and raised livestock.

Due to the constant conflict between France and England, as well as the threat of an Indian attack, a fort was ordered built in 1755 around the Looney homesite. The fort was named Fort Looney and was at the junction of Looney Creek and the James River. This fort was a part of a series of forts ordered along the frontier to protect settlers and to keep the French from claiming the territory. Fort Looney was visited in 1756 by Col. George Washington, future first president of the United States.

The Looney sons were frontiersmen and pioneers. Some fought and died with the British against the French and Indians. Some were killed by Indians during frequent frontier raids on settlers while others helped to explore and expand the frontier boundaries first into southwestern Virginia and eventually to Tennessee Indian Territory.

The Looney sons and grandsons fought against the British in the War of Independence. John Looney was wounded in the siege of Savannah, Georgia in 1779. He was later granted a total disability pension of $8 per month for this service by special Act on Congress in 1837.

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Robert Looney, Sr.'s Timeline

1692
1692
Kirk Lonan, Maughold, Isle Of Mann, England / Ireland
1715
1715
Age 23
Botetourt County, Virginia
1718
1718
Age 26
Kirk Loman, Isle of Man, England / Ireland
1718
Age 26
Ireland
1721
1721
Age 29
Botetourt, Virginia
1721
Age 29
Isle of Man
1723
1723
Age 31
Probably Ballagilley, Maughold Parish, Isle of Man
1725
1725
Age 33
1727
1727
Age 35
Probably Ballagilley, Maughold Parish, Isle of Man
1728
1728
Age 36