Robert Lord, Jr.

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Robert Lord, Jr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Sudbury, St. Gregory Parrish, Suffolk, England
Death: Died in Ipswich, Essex, MA, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Lord, Sr. and Katherine Lord
Husband of Mary Lord (Waite)
Father of Thomas Lord; Robert Lord; Hannah Grow; Joseph Lord; Samuel Lord and 6 others
Brother of Anna Bartholomew; Faith Warner; Grace D. Fitts; Rachel Barnes and John Lord

Occupation: Town Clerk, clerk of courts & register of deeds in Essex Co., MA
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert Lord, Jr.

Emigrated to America and settled at Ipswich before 1635

He wrote his will 28 June, 1683; it was probated 25 Sept. folg.; he beq. to his wife Mary, mentioning that ,they had lived together in marriage almost 53 years; to eldest son Robert; to sons Thomas and Samuel, living at Charlestown; to son Nathaniel; to dau. Sarah Wilson; to Mary, William, Joseph and Samuel, the ch. of dau. Chandler, dec.; to dau. Abigail Foster and her ch. and to dau. Hannah Grow and her ch. provided that they pay a certain sum to their sister Susanna Osgood and her ch.; to gr. son Samuel Lord, now living with me; to gr. son Robert Lord "tersha," (tertius.)

ROBERT LORD (1603-1683)

Robert Lord was among the early settlers of Ipswich, arriving late 1634 or early 1635 and taking the Freeman’s oath in Boston March 3, 1635/6. He was born in Sudbury, Suffolk, England in 1603. His line has never been verified prior to that time. On November 11, 1630 he married Mary Waite in Finchingfield, Essex, England. They arrived in Ipswich with four children and had five after arrival.

In September 1636, he was appointed Town Clerk and Clerk of the Court of Ipswich and continued to hold that position until his death August 21, 1683. His duties included what would now be considered Clerk of Probate and Register of Deeds. He was appointed Deputy to the General Court March 12, 1637/8. In the latter position he served on committees that fixed the boundaires of the towns surrounding Ipswich and private lands in Essex County. He served as Clerk of Courts in old Norfolk County in 1649, and in 1658 as Clerk of the Salem Court. He was also Marshal or Sheriff until succeeded by his son Robert on March 27 1660.

As Marshal, he is said to have served more than twenty years in the Indian wars and became so inured to camp life and exposure that he could never afterwards sleep upon a feather bed. He is said to have been below the medium stature, but of powerful mould and one of the most athletic, strong, and fearless men in the Colonial service.

There is a tradition, perhaps apocralyphic that the Indians themselves at one time, when confronted by Lord's rangers, proposed to decide the battle that was anticipated by an encounter between the champions of the two parties. Robert Lord walked to the front as champion of the colonists. The Indians selected the most powerful of their tribe, a perfect giant, nearly seven feet in stature. The two men were to meet at full run and take the "Indian hug" as they closed. The Indians anticipated an easy victory. They came together like two infuriated bullocks with a tremendous shock, but in an instant the Indian lay stretched upon the earth, and the shouts of the Colonial scouts rang out in the forest. Not satisfied with a single experiment, they were required to rush and clinch again. In this encounter Lord took the "hip-lock" on his antagonist and threw him with such force that a blood vessel was ruptured in the fall. The Indians took him up and carried him from the arena, fully acknowledging defeat.

Robert Lord was born in 1602 in England, married Nov. 11, 1630 in Filchingfeld, Suffolk County, England, to Mary Waite, of Wethersfield, England. They emigrated to America and settled in Ipswich, Mass. before 1635. he was a "freeman" in 1636, Clerk of the Writs, Register of Deeds and Probate from 1635 to 1683, the latter being the date of his death. He left an estate of some 785 British pounds.

Mary Waite's mother was Mary Ward, daughter of Rev. John M. Ward, a preacher at Ipswich, Suffolk County, England, and sister of the Rev. Nathaniel Ward, the eminent minister, legislator, and author of "The Simple Cobbler of Agawan," of Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Genealogy

1. Robert Lord was born 1603 in Sudbury, St Gregory Parish, Suffolk, England, and died August 21, 1683 in Ipswich, Essex, MA1. He married Mary Waite November 11, 1630 in Finchingfield, Essex, England2,3, daughter of Samuel Waite and Mary Ward.

Children of Robert Lord and Mary Waite are:

i. Hannah Lord, m. John Grow, December 15, 1669, Ipswich, Essex, MA

ii. Mary Lord, d. October 03, 1676, Newbury, Essex, Ma; m. William Chandler, February 26, 1666/67, Newbury, Essex, Ma.

iii. Thomas Lord, b. 1633; d. June 04, 1713, Charlestown, Suffolk, Ma; m. Alice Rand, June 26, 1660, Ipswich, Essex, MA

iv. Robert Jr Lord, b. 1634, England; d. November 11, 1696, Ipswich, Essex, Ma; m. Hannah Day, 1657, Ipswich,Essex, MA.

v. Samuel Lord, b. 1640, Ipswich, Essex, MA d. May 27, 1696, Charlestown, Suffolk, Ma; m. (1) Elizabeth Ted, October 15, 1667, Charlestown, Suffolk, Ma; m. (2) Rebecca Eddington, December 16, 1684, Charlestown, Suffolk, Ma

vi. Abigaill Lord, b. 1646; d. June 04, 1729; m. Jacob Foster, February 26, 1665/66, Ipswich, Essex, MA.

vii. Sarah Lord, b. 1647; d. Ma; m. Joseph Wilson, April 24, 1678, Andover, Essex, Ma.

viii. Susannah Lord, b. Abt. 1650, Ipswich, Essex, MA; d. January 1726/27, Berkley Co, SC; m. Thomas Osgood, May 22, 1674, Ipswich, Essex, MA.

ix. Nathaniel Lord, b. Abt. 1653, Ipswich, Essex, MA; d. January 18, 1732/33, Ipswich, Essex, MA; m. Mary Call, December 31, 1685, Ipswich, Essex, MA.

Sources

1. Vital Records of Ipswich Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, (Published by The Essex Institute, Salem, Mass, 1910).

2. Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, (Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc 1985).

3. "The New England Historical and Genealogical Register," New England Historical and Genealogical Society: Volume L, Page 112 (1896), "Genealogical Gleanings in England" Waters.

4. Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England

5. Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, (Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc 1985).

6. Charlestown Genealogies and Estates Pages 628-631.

7. Hammatt, Abraham; The Hammatt Papers -- Early Inhabitants of Ipswich, Massachusetts 1633-1700. (1980)

8. Felt, History of Ipswich, Essex and Hamilton

9. Genealogy And Family History Of New Hampshire, Lewis Publishing Co. 1908

Submitted by Bruce Lord - Bellingham, Massachusetts bwl@ma.ultranet.com (Click for dire

-------------------- Notes for Robert Sr Lord: There are three main Lord families with early roots in New England. Robert is the founder of one line. Nathan Lord settled about 1650 in Maine. Thomas arrived in Cambridge about 1635 and settled in Hartford, Ct about 1639. There is no evidence that the three were related. A fourth Lord, William settled about 1650 in Salem, Ma but this line appears to have disappated in this area within fifty years or so.

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"Robert Lord is believed to have been the son of the widow Katherine Lord, who came with him to Ipswich about or perhaps earlier than 1635. He was born in England about 1602 or 1603, and married there, about 1630, Mary Waite. His life was given largely to public service and by reason of this long connection with official duties he always has been regarded as one of the prominent early public characters in colonial history. He was made a freeman 1635-6; deputy to general court, 1637-8; a member of committee to fix county, town and farm lines, 1637-8; clerk of court at Ipswich, 1648; recorder, 1649; sealer of weights and measures, Ipswich, 1649; clerk of court in Salem, 1658; impowered to issue executions, 1652; searcher of coin, 1654; marshal or sheriff of Ipswich court 1648-60. He died on or before August 21, 1683."

     -----------William Richard Cutter, ed, Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts (1908) 

"No name is oftener met in the Colonial records for this section than Mr. Robert Lord's. His life was occupied in the details of the courts. By virtue of his office as clerk, he was also registrar of probate. His clerkship covered a period of forty seven years -- from September 1636 to August 21, 1683. He was born about 1602 or '03, and appears to have been son of widow Katherine, who came with her sons to Ipswich as early as 1635. He married, about 1630, Mary Wait, who, with eight children, survived him. He was made freeman March 3, 1635/36, deputy to the General Court March 12, 1636/37, and was on a committee to raise fifteen hundred pounds for the Colony. He fixed the boundaries of towns and private lands, was clerk of court a year in Norfolk before the establishment of that county; was clerk of the Salem Court in June, 1658; in 1649 was town-sealer of weights and measures; March 30, 1652, was empowered by the magistrates to "issue all executions in civil and criminal cases"; was "searcher of coins" in 1654; was sheriff of the Ipswich Court till march 27, 1660, when he was superseded by his son Robert. He was also clerk of writs, whose duty it was to issue attachments, summons, replevin, etc. He made his last entry July 13, 1683, and on or before August 21st closed his mortal record. He was a good penman and a faithful and correct official. His line has furnished two registrars in the person of Nathaniel and Nathaniel's son George Robert." -- "History of Essex County" (1888) p 628

Robert or his son erected a grist mill in 1666 -- "History of Essex County" (1888) p 637

"1683. Aug. 21st. Robert Lord d. in his eightieth year. He appears to have been son of Widow Catharine Lord, who was of Ipswich 1637. He became freeman in 1636, was Deputy to the General Court in 1638. He was appointed searcher of coin for this town in 1654. He was long Town Clerk, and also Clerk of the Court till his decease. The latter office included the duties now performed by the Clerk of Probate and Register of Deeds. He m. Mary Wait in 1630, who survived him. He left children Robert, Sarah Wilson, Nathaniel, Thomas, and Samuel, (these two last living at Charlestown,) Abigail Foster, Susannah Osgood, Hannah Gow, and children of his daughter Chandler. His estate was L645. Mr. Lord was a useful, upwright, and worthy man" --Felt, Joseph B. History of Ipswich, Essex, and Hamilton (1834) p167

"1654 Robert Lord is appointed searcher of cin at Ipswich. This referred to a late law, forbidding any specie to be exported, except for necessary expenses." --Felt, Joseph B. History of Ipswich, Essex, and Hamilton (1834) p105

"Robert Lord 1, took the freeman's oath at Boston, March 3, 1635-6; was one of Denison's subscribers 1648; had a share in Plum Island, &c., 1664; was a voter in Town affairs, 1679.

     1645. He was on a committee with Richard Saltonstall, Daniel Denison, Samuel Appleton, Richard Jacob, John Payne, empowered to grant houselots to the settlers. 
     1639. He had a house lot on High Street, next east from Mr. William Bartholomew; which property yet remains a possession of his descendents [1847] 
     He was Town Clerk, and Clerk of the Court, and Register of Deeds, for many years, -- till his decease in 1683. 
     He was selectman, 1661, and many years after. 
     He was Representative in 1638. 
     He died August 12, 1683, in the eightieth year of his age. His will is dated June 28, and was proved September 25, 1683. In the will he mentions his wife, Mary, "with whom by God's good providence we have lived comfortably together in a married condition almost fifty three years." He bequeathes to her all his estate during her life. 
     His wife was Mary Waite, whom he married, 1630. 
     In an account book, under date of 1660, he mentions his "sister ffitt." 

He gives legacies to his eldest son, Robert 2; to his daughter Sarah Wilson; to his sons Nathaniel 2; Thomas 2, who removed to Charlestown; to the children of his daughter Chandler, deceased, viz: Mary, William, Joseph and Samuel; to his daughters Susannah Osgood, Abigail Foster, Hannah Grow (wife of John Grow) and to his grandchild Robert Lord 3.

     His houselot on High Street was granted to him February 19, 1637. It adjoined the homestead of Mr. Humphrey Vincent." 

---- Hammatt, Abraham; The Hammatt Papers -- Early Inhabitants of Ipswich, Massachusetts 1633-1700.

"Robert, Senior, Ipswich, frm. March 3, 1635-6. Town officer, Recorder, deputy. He was a cousin of John L. of Sudbury, Suffolk, Eng., to whom he and his mother Katherine sold a tenenment in S. shortly before the date of his will, 1 March, 1640. The mother came to Ipswich; propr. 1637; was made a commoner 1641. (Reg. XXXI, 160, and L. 111.) He wrote a letter to Wm. Bartholomew, calling him brother; mentioned his own wife and son Thomas Lord; letter presented Midlx Court Feb. 2, 1673. He deposed July 30, 1660, ae 57 years. (Es Files) "He wrote his will 28 June, 1683; it was probated 25 Sept. folg.; he beq to his wife Mary, mentioning that they had lived together in marriage almost 53 years; to eldest son Robert; to sons Thomas and Samuel, living at Charlestown; to son Nathaniel; to dau. Sarah Wilson; to Mary, William, Joseph and Samuel, the ch of dau. Chandler, dec., to dau Abigail Foster and her ch. and to dau Hannah Grow and her ch. provided that they pay a certain sum to their sister Susanna Osgood and her ch., to gr. son Samuel Lord, now living with me; to gr. son Robert Lord "tersha" --- Pope, Charles Henry (Pastor First Church, Charlestown, Boston), The Pioneers of Massachusetts (1900)

GENEALOGY AND FAMILY HISTORY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE LEWIS PUBLISHING CO. 1908

LORD

     Many of the Lords of New Hampshire trace their descent to Robert, the 

immigrant, who since he settled in New England before 1650, is entitled to be called a pioneer. Sterling worth and upright in character have been attributes of the Lords as a family, and many of them have attained positions of prominence in manufactures, trades and the professions.

     (1) Robert Lord, the immigrant, was born in England in 1603, and appears to have been the son of widow Catherine Lord, who was residing in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1637, and was a commoner in 1641. Robert Lord took the freeman's oath at Boston, March 3, 1636. His house lot on High street was granted to him February 19, 1637. In 1639 he he had a house lot on High street, which property remains a possession of his descendants. He was one of Denison's subscribers in 1648; had a share in Plum Island, in 1664; and was a voter in town affairs in 1679. He was on a committee with Richard Saltonstall and others, empowered to grant house lots to settlers, in 1645.He was representative in 1638; selectman in 1661 and many years after; and was appointed "searcher of the coin" for the town of Ipswich in 1654. He was long town clerk, and also clerk of the court till his decease. The latter office included the duties now erformed by the clerk of probate and register of deeds. He served more than wenty years in the Indian wars and became so inured to camp life and exposure that he could never afterwards sleep upon a feather bed. He is said to have been below the medium stature, but of powerful mould and one of the most athletic, strong, and fearless men in the Colonial service. 
     There is a tradition that the Indians themselves at one time, when onfronted by Lord's rangers, proposed to decide the battle that was anticipated by an encounter between the champions of the two parties; to this the whites agreed, and Robert Lord walked to the front. The Indians selected the most powerful of their tribe, a perfect giant, full seven feet in stature. The two men were to meet at full run and take the "Indian hug" as they closed. The savages anticipated an easy victory. They came together like two infuriated bullocks with a tremendous shock, but in an instant the redskin lay stretched upon the earth, and the shouts of the Colonial scouts rang out in the forest. Not satisfied with a single experiment, they were required to rush and clinch again. In this encounter Lord took the "hip-lock" on his greasy antagonist and threw him with such force that a blood vessel was ruptured in the fall. The Indians took him up and carried 

him from the arena, fully acknowledging themselves defeated; they afterward reported that some whiteman's devil invested Lord with supernatural strength. (This tale is certainly just a tale as to Robert Sr but Robert Jr was a blacksmith and very well may have been to person referred to in the tale)

"In Feb. 1643-4, Robert Lord was chosen by the Town, "from this time forward to be present at every general meeting of the Town, and of the freemen and of the seven men, and to record in a book what is committed to him by [ ] Moderator of every such meeting, and to tend in some convenient time before the end of the meeting to read over what is written, and he is to have [ ] third parts of the fines for not appearing at meetings, for this service." He was termed Recorder, but the duties of his office were very similar to those of the Town Clerk of later days."

     "Glimpses are had here of the rigor with which the body of voters directed its own action. In 1648, in general Town meeting, it was ordered that all the inhabitants of the Town that shall be absent fronm the yearly meeting, or any other part whereof they have lawful warning, shall forfeit a shilling. Robert Lord earned his two- thirds no doubt, for his duties included ringing the bell, calling the roll, and collecting the forfeit. Twelve Freemen were soon called upon to pay a fine of 12d apiece for absence." ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 57-58 
     "Commendable care for the neat and tidy appearance of the public throughfares was manifested in the vote of March, 1645, that Robert Lord "keep the streets clear of wood and timber under penalty 12d the load and as proportionable for more or less for lying or standing above three days in any of the streets or lanes," and in 1652, the Town 

"Ordered that all dung-hills lying in the streets shall be removed by the 20th of October and from that time noe dung hills to be layed in the streets under the pnealty of 10s." ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 66

"The cordwainers" as the men of the awl and lapstone were called, were quite a numerous body, amd they were men of quality, too: Dea. Thomas Knowlton, Robert Lord, Thomas Smith, Nathaniel Knowlton, John Wilson, John Lovell and William Bulkley." ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 83

"1678--"in that year, Charles II ordered a new oath of allegiance to be taken, and the constables of every town and village were ordered to convene all the inhabitants for the administration of the oath. In Feb., 1678-9, a list of commoners was recorded and in December 1679, a list of freeman was also prepared and put on record.

     Freeman:       Robert Lord, Sen. 
                 Robert Lord, Jun. 
     Commonage:      Robert Lord, Sen. 
                 Robert Lord, Marshall 

---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 91-96

Listed as one of 72 signers of Loyalist petition to General Court in support of the King 1666 along with Robert Jun. ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 137-9

More About Robert Sr Lord: Immigration Date: 1636, Boston, Ma

Notes for Mary Waite: Called sister of Rev. John Ward the father of Rev. Nathaniel W.;--Charlestown Genealogies and Estates

"The tailor went often from house to house to measure and cut and sew the garments made from the homespun fabric of the good wife, and the more finished product of the professional weaver. John Annibal, Thomas Clark, Jr., John French and one woman, Mary Lord, were of this most useful guild." ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 83

Thomas Wells Lot "First, a lot about six rods square, on the corner where the Town Hall now stands 1905 was sold to Henry Bennett, who sold in turn to Obadiah Bridges, Sept 21, 1673 (Ipsw. Deeds 4: 112). Bridges built a house, and after his death, his widow Elizabeth sold the property to Nathaniel Rust, Sept. 2, 1680 (Ips. Deeds 4: 497). John Knowlton was in possession in 1685 (Hubbard's deed to Wilson, Ipsw. Deeds 5: 182), and he sold to Mary Lord, Taylor, a lot four rods front, "and one old house on the ground, east northeast by hie way going to Mr. Rust's" (10: 185). Thomas Lord was the owner of this small corner lot in 1758 (105: 171)."\\ ---- Thomas Franklin Waters, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Volume I, the Ipswich Historical Society (1905), Page 450-451

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Robert Lord, Jr.'s Timeline

1602
April 12, 1602
Sudbury, Suffolk, UK
1603
1603
Sudbury, St. Gregory Parrish, Suffolk, England
1630
November 11, 1630
Age 27
Fitchingfield, Essex, England, (Present UK)
1633
1633
Age 30
Finchingfield, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1634
1634
Age 31
Finchingfield, Essex, England
1635
1635
Age 32
Ipswich, Essex Co., Massachusetts, United States
1638
1638
Age 35
1640
1640
Age 37
Ipswich, MA, USA
1644
1644
Age 41
Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
1646
1646
Age 43
Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts