Robert Mor Munro (1500 - 1588) MP

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Robert Mor Munro, 15th Baron of Foulis's Geni Profile

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Birthplace: Foulis Castle, Rosshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Foulis Castle, Rosshire, Scotland
Occupation: 15th Baron of Foulis
Managed by: Roderick Brown
Last Updated:

About Robert Mor Munro

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Mor_Munro,_15th_Baron_of_Foulis

Robert "Mor" Munro was the 15th Baron Foulis. Baron Munro added to the Estates of Foulis. Baron Munro was a loyal protector of Queen Mar. Robert "Mor" Munro was the 1st Protestant to ge buried at Kiltearn Church. Robert Munro died in 1588. Robert, like his father, was one of the warmest friends of Queen Mary of Scotland. When Queen Mary went to Aberdeen in 1562, her purpose was, according to Buchanan, to wed John Gordon, son of the Earl of Huntly, and to murder her own half-brother Murray. Upon these events Mary hoped to build up the Catholic relighio anew in Scotland. Buchanan asserts all these things; but his personal share, as a keen partizan, in the events of the reigh of Mary, seems here to strip his account of much of the credit which he ordinarily deserves. It is indeed perfectly impossible to believe him as to the objects and events of this northern journey; since, in place of killing her brother, and marrring the son of Huntly, Queen Mary would not even visit that nobleman's castle, but turned aside when actually in sight of the castle, and, in spite of his entreaties and menaces, went to Inverness, whither, through her confidential attendants, she summoned her Highland subjects to save her from the dangerous ambition of the Gordons. One of the first Gaelic chiefs who rushed to her assistance, at the head of his clan, was Robert-Mor-Munroe, of Foulis, accompanied by the Frasers. These septs were then ranked among "the most valiant in the north". they took for the Queen Inverness Castle, which had refused her admission; and the Earl of Murray finally defeated Huntly in battle, AD 1562, the latter therein losing his life. John Gordon, whom Buchanan calls the queen's proposed Catholic husband, was also executed soon afterwards. All this savours little of a plot with Huntly. Robert "Mor" Monroe, 15th baron of Foulis, did not support his sovereign in this case from peculiar religious leanings, since he became a Protestant at an early period of the Scottish Reformation Movement. Dr. Doddridge, who appended to his well known "Life of Colonel Gardiner" a sketch of the Munro family, calls Robert the "eighteenth" of the Foulis line; but he has seemingly taken into his count sons who predeceased their sires, and made other misreckonings. He says of this same chief--"He was a wise and good man, and left an opulent estate to the family." He seems to have been largely favored by James VI, who granted to him a lease of certain crown-customs or dues in the shires of Inverness, Ross, sutherland, and Caithness. Robert died in 1588. Robert's son Robert survived Robert "Mor" but a year, and was succeeded by his brother, Hector, 17th of his house. Hector left, as his successor, another Robert, the first of the Foulis family who engaged in the religious wars of the European continent.Robert "Mor" Munro, 15th Baron of Foulis, added to the Estates of Foulis. He was a loyal protector of Queen Mary. Robert "Mor" Munro was the first Protestant, and the first to be buried at Kiltearn Church. He died in 1588.Robert "Mor" Munro was the 15th Baron Foulis. Baron Munro added to the Estates of Foulis. Baron Munro was a loyal protector of Queen Mar. Robert "Mor" Munro was the 1st Protestant to ge buried at Kiltearn Church. Robert Munro died in 1588. Robert, like his father, was one of the warmest friends of Queen Mary of Scotland. When Queen Mary went to Aberdeen in 1562, her purpose was, according to Buchanan, to wed John Gordon, son of the Earl of Huntly, and to murder her own half-brother Murray. Upon these events Mary hoped to build up the Catholic relighio anew in Scotland. Buchanan asserts all these things; but his personal share, as a keen partizan, in the events of the reigh of Mary, seems here to strip his account of much of the credit which he ordinarily deserves. It is indeed perfectly impossible to believe him as to the objects and events of this northern journey; since, in place of killing her brother, and marrring the son of Huntly, Queen Mary would not even visit that nobleman's castle, but turned aside when actually in sight of the castle, and, in spite of his entreaties and menaces, went to Inverness, whither, through her confidential attendants, she summoned her Highland subjects to save her from the dangerous ambition of the Gordons. One of the first Gaelic chiefs who rushed to her assistance, at the head of his clan, was Robert-Mor-Munroe, of Foulis, accompanied by the Frasers. These septs were then ranked among "the most valiant in the north". they took for the Queen Inverness Castle, which had refused her admission; and the Earl of Murray finally defeated Huntly in battle, AD 1562, the latter therein losing his life. John Gordon, whom Buchanan calls the queen's proposed Catholic husband, was also executed soon afterwards. All this savours little of a plot with Huntly. Robert "Mor" Monroe, 15th baron of Foulis, did not support his sovereign in this case from peculiar religious leanings, since he became a Protestant at an early period of the Scottish Reformation Movement. Dr. Doddridge, who appended to his well known "Life of Colonel Gardiner" a sketch of the Munro family, calls Robert the "eighteenth" of the Foulis line; but he has seemingly taken into his count sons who predeceased their sires, and made other misreckonings. He says of this same chief--"He was a wise and good man, and left an opulent estate to the family." He seems to have been largely favored by James VI, who granted to him a lease of certain crown-customs or dues in the shires of Inverness, Ross, sutherland, and Caithness. Robert died in 1588. Robert's son Robert survived Robert "Mor" but a year, and was succeeded by his brother, Hector, 17th of his house. Hector left, as his successor, another Robert, the first of the Foulis family who engaged in the religious wars of the European continent.

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Robert Munro of Fowlis -------------------- Knight.

15th Baron of Foulis.

The first protestant. -------------------- Robert Mor Munro, 15th Baron of Foulis and 18th chief of the Clan Munro was a 16th century Scottish chief. [1] He was known as Robert Mor on account of his large stature. He was the eldest son of Robert Munro, 14th Baron of Foulis.[2] Although this Robert Munro is traditionally 15th Baron and 18th overall chief of the clan, he is only the 8th Munro chief that can be proved by contemporary evidence.[3]


[edit] Lands and Charters

In 1550 Robert Mor Munro, 15th Baron is recorded in a bond of manrent and friendship with George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly, chief of Clan Gordon. The document dated 1550 is found amongst the papers in the charter chest of Gordon Castle.[4] However, later Robert Mor would support Mary, Queen of Scots in her feud against the Gordon House of Huntly.[5]

In 1552 Robert Mor Munro sold lands in Wester Fowlis to Margaret Ogilvie, Lady of Moy who was the widow of William MacKintosh, chief of Clan Mackintosh who had been executed at Aberdeen in 1550. In 1553 Queen Mary also granted a Crown charter of the same lands to Margaret Ogilvie. Later, Robert Mor's first marriage would be to Margaret Ogilvie which would bring back to him these lands.[6]

[edit] Mary, Queen of Scots and Inverness Castle

In the Parliament held at Edinburgh on the 1st August 1560, amongst the names of those present is "Robert Munro of Fowlis".[7] Robert Mor Munro was a staunch supporter and faithful friend of Mary, Queen of Scots and he consequently was treated favourably by her son James VI. George Buchanan states, that when the unfortunate princess went to Inverness in 1562 and found the gates of the castle shut against her; "as soon as they heard of their sovereign's danger, a great number of the most eminent Scots poured in around her, especially the Frasers and Munros, who were esteemed the most valiant of the clans inhabiting those countries in the north". These two clans took Inverness Castle for the Queen, which had refused her admission. The Queen later hanged the governor, a Gordon who had refused her admission.[8][9] George Buchanan's original writings state: Audito Principis periculo magna Priscorun Scotorum multitudo partim excita partim sua spoute afferit, imprimis Fraserie et Munoroii hominum fortissimorum in illis gentibus familiae.[10]

Which translates in English as: That as soon as they heard of their Sovereign's danger a great number of the ancient Scots poured in around her, especially the Frasers and Munros, which were esteemed the most valiant families inhabiting those countries.

According to one source the Clan Munro were among the clans who supported Mary, Queen of Scots in her victory over the Earl of Huntly at the Battle of Corrichie in 1562.[11] In 1563 a charter was granted to Robert Mor Munro at Foulis Castle and was witnessed by his brother, George Munro and his great-uncle, William Munro, Vicar of Dingwall. [12] Later, on the 23rd June 1567, Robert was one of the jury in the general service of John Gordon, 11th Earl of Sutherland to be heir to his grandmother, Elizabeth, Countess of Sutherland. John being the first Gordon to be Earl of Sutherland.[13]

[edit] Castle Canonry of Ross

In 1569 a feud arose between the Clan MacKenzie and Clan Munro, who by this time were among the most powerful clans in Ross-shire. Andrew Munro of Milntown defended and held, for three years, the Castle Chanonry of Ross, which he had received from the Regent Moray who died in 1569, against the Clan MacKenzie, at the expense of many lives on both sides. The feud was settled when the castle was handed over to the Mackenzies peacefully, because the MacKenzies had obtained more legal right to own the castle.[14]

Sir Robert Gordon (1580 - 1656) writes of the feud in his book "Genealogical History of the Earldom of Sutherland":

The Munros defended and keipt the Castle for the space of thrie yeirs, with great slaughter on either syd, vntill it was delyvered to the Clanchenzie, by the Act of Pacification. And this wes the ground beginning of the feud and hartburning, which to this day, remaynes between the Clanchenzie and Munrois.[15]

In 1571, 4 July, King James VI of Scotland granted to Robert Mor Munro all of the goods that belonged to Duncan Chalmers, Chancellor of Ross who had become a fugitive from the law for his part in the Battle of Langside and for the slaughter of James Balvany, William Purvis and Alexander Hume.[16] As a reward for his faithful services to the Crown, Robert Mor obtained from King James VI, a grant of all the customs due as royalties "furth of the town and Sheriffdom of Inverness", as registered under the Privy Seal, dated at Edinburgh on the 5th of January 1572.

[edit] Sheriffs of Inverness

Robert Mor Munro was also one of the members of a Commission appointed to act as Sheriffs of Inverness, for serving Alexander Gordon, 12th Earl of Sutherland, on the 30th May 1573. The other members were Colin MacKenzie of Kintail, Lord Hugh Fraser of Lovat and Lachlan MacKintosh of MacKintosh. In 1584 King James II of Scotland confirmed another charter to Robert Munro of Foulis.[17] In 1585 Robert Mor signed a bond of marrent with George Gordon, 1st Marquess of Huntly to assist each other as allies against any person except for the King or Queen.[18]

In 1588, May 6, Robert Mor Munro of Foulis is listed along with other highland chiefs in a grant to give special protection to Alexander Gordon, 12th Earl of Sutherland, to protect his church lands in Caithness or elsewhere. Others included are Gordon of Huntly, MacKenzie of Kintail, Rose of Kilravrock, Fraser of Lovat, Grant of Freuchie and Ross of Balnagowan.[19] On the 20th July 1588 Robert Mor Munro of Foulis was appointed by the King, collector, for Inverness-shire, which included Ross. He was to collect a tax for the repair of Edinburgh Castle. On the 27th of that month, Robert Mor Munro of Foulis along with Colin MacKenzie of Kintail are appointed Commissioners for the shires of Inverness and Cromarty for the better administration of justice in these counties.[20]

[edit] Family and famous descendants

Robert Mor Munro first married Margaret Ogilvie, a daughter of the chief of Clan Ogilvy. Later Robert married Kathrine Ross, a daughter of the chief of Clan Ross of Balnagowan. Robert had a total of 13 children over two marriages. Robert died on the 4th November 1588 at Foulis Castle. He was succeeded by his eldest son, from his first marriage, Robert Munro, 16th Baron of Foulis, however in the following century the head of the House of Foulis and chief of the Clan Munro would be succeeded to by descendants of his second marriage.[21]

From Robert's marriage to Margarat Ogilvie:

1.Robert Munro, 16th Baron of Foulis.

2.Hugh Munro. (little is known, only found recorded once in the Coul MS)

3.Hector Munro, 17th Baron of Foulis, whose son was Robert Munro, 18th Baron of Foulis (The Black Baron).

4.Florence Munro, married Roderick Mackenzie of Redcastle.

5.Christian Munro.

6.Cathrine Munro, married William Ballie, Provost of Inverness.

From Robert's marriage to Kathrine Ross:

1.George Munro, 1st of Obsdale, whose grandson would succeed to the head of the house of Foulis: See: Sir Robert Munro, 3rd Baronet of Foulis.

2.John Munro, 1st of Meikle Daan.

3.Andrew Munro, 1st of Lemlair.

4.Margaret Munro, married Colin Campbell of Ardbreath.

5.Janet Munro, married James Innes of Inverbreakie.

6.Marjory Munro, married James Hepburn, merchant of Inverness.

7.Elizabeth Munro, married a minister of Kiltearn in Rosshire.

Two well known descendants of Robert Mor Munro are General Robert Monro and George Munro, 1st of Newmore, both cadets of the Obsdale branch of the clan.

[edit] References

1.^ The Chief

2.^ "History of the Munros of Fowlis" by Alexander MacKenzie. p.43.

3.^ "The Munro Tree 1734". Published in 1978, Edinburgh. By R. W. Munro. ISBN 0950368911.

4.^ "History of the Munros of Fowlis" by Alexander MacKenzie. p.43 -44.

5.^ "The Clan Munro" by CI Fraser of Reeling. p.21.

6.^ Register of the Great Seal, Book xxxi, No. 122.

7.^ "History of the Munros of Fowlis" by Alexander MacKenzie. p.43 -44.

8.^ George Buchanan's (1506 -1582), History of Scotland, completed in 1579, first published in 1582.

9.^ Clan MUNRO

10.^ George Buchanan's (1506 -1582), History of Scotland, completed in 1579, first published in 1582.

11.^ "The Scottish Clans and Their Tartans”. W. & A. K. Johnston Limited. Edinburgh and London. Page 25. 1886.

12.^ Register of the Great Seal, Lib. xxxii, No's 593 - 594, and Register of the Privy Seal, vol. xxxi, folios 98 and 99.

13.^ "The Sutherland Book", by Sir William Fraser, KCB, vol.iii. p.139

14.^ Doings of Mackay and the Earl of Caithness

15.^ Genealogical History of the Earldom of SutherlandBy Sir Robert Gordon of Gordonstoun (1580 - 1656)

16.^ Orig. Par. Scot, vol, ii, p. 575

17.^ "History of the Munros of Fowlis" by Alexander MacKenzie. p.50 - 52

18.^ Invernessiana. p.245

19.^ "The Sutherland Book", vol.i. p.150

20.^ "History of the Munros of Fowlis" by Alexander MacKenzie. p.50.

21.^ "History of the Munroes of Foulis" by Alexander MacKenzie. P.55 - 57

--------------------

Biographical Summary

"I. Hugh Munro, third son of Robert Munro, fourteenth Baron of Fowlis. He received from John Leslie, Bishop of Ross, the lands of Assynt and Inchcoulter, now Balconie, on the north bank of the Allt-Grand, parish of Alness, and James VI. confirmed the grant on the 19th of March, 1580. Hugh also had a grant of other lands in Ross-shire. In 1552 Queen Mary granted him the non-entry and other dues of half the " lands of Ferrincosque in Brachat," lying between the rivers Shin and Cassley, namely the half of Inveran, with the half of the mill, multures, and fishing, the half respectively of Linside, Alltbeg, and Achness, with the half of the fishing, lying in Queen Mary's hands since "the redemption and lowsing tharof maid be Thomas Dingwall of Kildun, furth of the handis of George Munro of Dochcarty." In 1577 James VI. granted to Hugh and his wife, Christina Munro, a Crown charter of half the lands of the Intown of Easter Aird, in the parish of Fearn, "occupied by Hugh Munro, and alienated in heritage to him and his wife by James Dunbar of Tarbat." In 1584 Hugh bought from George Ross, X. of Balnagowan, the lands of Strath-Oykel, Inverchassly, Glenminck, and the wood of Scatwell, " with Lounillodoch, Cromlie, the salmon fishing of the Halfapolmorall, Stronroschir, with the salmon fishing," all in Strath-Oykel and Strathcarron.*

Hugh married Christina, daughter of Robert Munro of Carbisdale, with issue —

  • Hector, his heir and successor.
  • William, of Mid-Swordale, parish of Kiltearn, who married Euphemia, daughter of Hugh Ross, I. of Achnacloich, with issue
  • John, who studied for the Church at the University of St. Andrew's, where he graduated M.A. in 1590. In 1591 he was a member of the General Assembly, and in 1599 was presented to the parish of Tain...
  • Robert, who like his brother John, entered the Church, was minister of Creich from about 1609 to 1640, and he was proprietor of Meikle Creich. One of his daughters, Christian, married her cousin Donald, second son of Donald Mackay, I. of Scourie, with issue — several children.
  • Euphemia, who married Donald Mackay, I. of Scourie, with issue —
    • Hugh, who married Ann, daughter of John Corbet of Arboll, with issue —
      • William
      • Hector
      • Hugh, the celebrated General, who commanded the Government forces at the battle of Killiecrankie
      • James
      • Roderick
      • Barbara, who married John Lord Reay
      • Elizabeth, who married Hugh Munro of Eriboll ; and
      • Ann, who married the Hon. William Mackay of Kinloch
    • Donald, who married Christian, daughter of the Rev. Robert Munro, minister of Creich
    • William, a Colonel in the army
    • Neil
    • Margaret
    • Janet
    • Christian ; and
    • Ann.
  • Catherine, who married William Ross, III. of Invercharron, "ane honorabil man," with issue —
    • Walter, IV. of Invercharron
    • Robert, ancestor of the Rosses of Easter Fearn
    • Hugh
    • Alexander ; and
    • Catherine, who married William Ross of Priesthill.
  • Margaret, who married, first, in 1584, as his second wife, Alexander Ross, II. of Little Tarrel, whom she married without issue. He having died shortly after their marriage, she married, secondly, Nicholas Ross, I. of Pitcalnie, with issue —
    • David, II. of Pitcalnie, and
    • Christian, who, as his second wife, married Donald Macleod, VII. of Assynt, with issue —
      • Donald, " of whom there is no succession" ; and
      • Hugh of Cambuscurry, who married Christian, daughter of Walter Ross, IV. of Invercharron, with issue —
        • Roderick, II. of Cambuscurry
        • Æneas, ancestor of the Macleods of Cadboll ; and
        • Alexander of Sallachie. Nicholas Ross died in 1611, his wife, Margaret Munro, having predeceased him in 1592.
  • Christian, who married the Rev. John Ross, minister of Logic Easter, brother of the above Alexander Ross, II. of Little Tarrel, whom he succeeded as III. of Little Tarrel. He was minister of Tain from 1580 to 1581 ; and of Logie from 1581 to the 22nd of October, i6r6, when he died. His eldest son, Hugh, was served heir to his father on the 21st of January, 1617.
  • Janet, who married Robert Munro, II. of Teaninich, with issue.
  • Rose, who married Alexander Munro, in Inveran, with issue.

Hugh, I. of Assynt, was succeeded by his eldest son."

SOURCE: History of the Munros of Fowlis: with genealogies of the principal families of the name to which are added those of Lexington and New England; Alexander Mackenzie; 1898; page 465

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Robert Mor Munro, 15th Baron of Foulis's Timeline

1500
1500
Foulis Castle, Rosshire, Scotland
1518
1518
Age 18
Scotland
1520
1520
Age 20
Scotland
1526
1526
Age 26
1530
1530
Age 30
Cromarty, Ross & Cromarty, , Scotland
1530
Age 30
1532
1532
Age 32
Cromarty, Ross & Cromarty, , Scotland
1545
1545
Age 45
Cromarty, Ross & Cromarty, , Scotland
1560
1560
Age 60
1561
1561
Age 61
Kintail, Rosshire, Scotland