Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale

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Robert The Competitor de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale

Also Known As: "The Competitor", "Robert de Brus", "5th Lord of Annandale", "137"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Priory, Lochmabven, Dumfrieshire, Scotland
Place of Burial: Priory, Guisburn, Yorkshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert de Brus, the Noble, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isabel of Huntingdon
Husband of Isabella of Gloucester and Hertford and Christina de Brus (de Ireby)
Father of Robert de Bruce, 6th Lord of Annandale; Elizabeth Armstrong; Ada Bruce; Christian Dunbar; William de Bruce and 5 others
Brother of Bernard de Brus, of Conington and Exton; William Bruce; John de Bruce and Beatrice de Brus, of Annandale
Half brother of Euphemia de Kirkpatrick

Occupation: Lord of Ireby, Constable of Carlisle Castle, Sheriff of Cumberland, 5th Lord of Annandale, 5th Lord Annandale, 5th Lord of Annadale Sheriff of Cumberland, Lord of Annadale, Lord Annandale, 5th Lord of Annundale, 5th Lord of Annondale, Sir
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale

Robert V de Brus, Lord of Annandale, Lord of Ireby, Constable of Carlisle Castle, Sheriff of Cumberland Born ca. 1210 Died 31 March 1295(1295-03-31) (aged c. 85) Place of death Lochmaben Castle Buried Gisborough Priory, Guisborough, Redcar and Cleveland Predecessor Robert de Brus, 4th Lord of Annandale Consort 1) Isobel of Gloucester and Hertford 2) Christina de Ireby Offspring 1) Robert de Brus 2) Richard de Brus Father Robert de Brus, 4th Lord of Annandale Mother Isobel of Huntingdon

Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1]), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It's believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[3]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Niall, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland sometime during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognized as a Tanist of the Scottish Throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognize as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on November 1, 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognized as his heir. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around September 26, 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgement in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The [guardians of Scotland] denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, but John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgement processed slowly. On August 3, 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On November 30, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On December 26, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favor of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol; however, in 1306, the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Robert himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir- John Balliol's own son- was smited by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[4]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.[5]

[edit] Family and children He married firstly May 12, 1240:

Isabella, (November 2, 1226- after July 10, 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue: Isabel (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, July 22, 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, county Durham.[6] Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304) He married, secondly on May 3, 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

Christina (d. 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue. Preceded by Robert IV de Brus Lord of Annandale 1226 x 1233-1295 Succeeded by Robert VI de Brus

[edit] Notes ^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md., 2005, p.731-2, ISBN0-8063-1759-0 where he is said to have been of age in or before 1237 ^ Richardson (2005) p.731 ^ Dictionary of National Biography ^ Richardson (2005) p.732 ^ Richardson (2005) p.732 ^ Richardson (2005) p.539 Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale" Categories: 1215 births | 1295 deaths | House of Bruce | Regents of Scotland | Scoto-Normans | Burials at Gisborough Priory, North Yorkshire -------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1]), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It's believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[3]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Niall, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland sometime during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognized as a Tanist of the Scottish Throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognize as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on November 1, 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognized as his heir. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around September 26, 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgement in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The [guardians of Scotland] denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, but John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgement processed slowly. On August 3, 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On November 30, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On December 26, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favor of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol; however, in 1306, the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Robert himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir- John Balliol's own son- was smited by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[4]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.[4]

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale ) -------------------- SOURCES: 1) GENEALOGY: The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom; Page 358; G929.72; G35p; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

2) GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; Page 226; G929.72; C6943ra; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

3) GENEALOGY: The Scots Peerage; Vol II; Page 430; G929.72; P291sc; Denver Public Library; Genealogy -------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

see also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale -------------------- 5th Lord of Annandale The Competitor'; signatory of the Turnberry Band ; (as g-grandson of David de Huntingdon, he claimed the Throne of SCOTLAND, invoking proximity of blood , since John de Baliol, q.v., the heir by primogeniture, was 2-g grandson of Huntingdon) -------------------- Sir_Robert BRUCE. Born 1210. Married first, MAY 1240,

        Isabel CLARE, born 2 NOV 1226, died AFT 10 JUL 1264, daughter of
        Gilbert DE_CLARE and Isabel MARSHALL.  Married second, BEF 10 MAY
        1275, Christian D'IREBY, born Ireby, Cumberland, died BEF  6 JUL
        1305.  Died 31 MAR 1295, Lochmaben Castle.  !GENEALOGY: The
        Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain amd
        the United Kingdom; Page 358; G929.72; G35p; Denver Public
        Library; Genealogy !GENEALOGY: Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta
        Barons; Page 226; G929.72; C6943ra; Denver Public Library;
        Genealogy !GENEALOGY: The Scots Peerage; Vol II; Page 430;
        G929.72; P291sc; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

             Children of Sir_Robert BRUCE and Isabel CLARE:

           46       i   Robert BRUCE, b. 1244, Scotland, d. 1304

             Sir_Robert BRUCE and Christian D'IREBY had no children.

-------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1]), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It's believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[3]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Niall, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland sometime during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognized as a Tanist of the Scottish Throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognize as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on November 1, 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognized as his heir. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around September 26, 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgement in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The [guardians of Scotland] denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, but John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgement processed slowly. On August 3, 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On November 30, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On December 26, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favor of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol; however, in 1306, the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Robert himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir- John Balliol's own son- was smited by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[4]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory. -------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1]), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

He married firstly May 12, 1240:

   * Isabella, (November 2, 1226- after July 10, 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue:
       * Isabel (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, July 22, 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, County Durham.[5]
       * Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304)
       * Constance (b. 1251), married Sir William Scot de Calverley and had daughter, Clarissa Scott (m. Sir John Fairfax)

He married, secondly on May 3, 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

   * Christina (d. 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue.
  1. ^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md., 2005, p.731-2, ISBN0-8063-1759-0 where he is said to have been of age in or before 1237
  2. ^ Richardson (2005) p.731
  3. ^ Dictionary of National Biography
  4. ^ a b Richardson (2005) p.732
  5. ^ Richardson (2005) p.539

-------------------- Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale1 M, #102474, b. 1210, d. 31 March 1295

Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale|b. 1210 d. 31 Mar 1295|p10248.htm#i102474|Robert de Brewes, Lord of Annandale|d. 1245|p10248.htm#i102477|Lady Isabella of Huntingdon|b. c 1206 d. c 1251|p10248.htm#i102478|William de Brus, Lord of Annandale|d. bt 1203 - 1213|p459.htm#i4582|Beatrice de Teyden||p91.htm#i902|David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon|b. bt 1143 - 1152 d. 17 Jun 1219|p10248.htm#i102479|Matilda of Chester|b. 1171 d. 6 Jan 1233|p10248.htm#i102480|

Last Edited=20 Jun 2006

    Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale was born in 1210.2 He was the son of Robert de Brewes, Lord of Annandale and Lady Isabella of Huntingdon.1 He married, firstly, Isabella de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabella Marshal, on 12 May 1240.3 He married, secondly, Christina de Ireby, daughter of Sir William de Ireby and Christian de Hodeholme, on 3 May 1273 at Hoddam, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.3,4 He died on 31 March 1295 at Lochmaben Castle.3 He was buried on 17 April 1295 at Guisborough Priory, Guisborough, Yorkshire, England.3
    Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale gained the title of Lord of Annandale.2 On 19 April 1267 he swore fealty to the King and Prince Edward.1 On 5 June 1291 he agreed to be bound by the decision of the King for the crown of Scotland (which he was a competitor for). However the King decided against him on 6 November 1292.3 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.5
    

Child of Sir Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale and Isabella de Clare Sir Robert le Brus, 1st Lord Brus+ b. Jul 1243, d. b 4 Apr 13046 Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 358. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 68. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 359. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 117. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV. [S77] Leslie Stephen, editor, Dictionary of National Biography (London, U.K.: Smith, Elder & Company, 1908), volume III, page 115-6. Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 193.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_VI_de_Bruce -------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c.1220–31 March 1295[1]), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle Castle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been dissmissed from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It is believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[3]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Niall, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland some time during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognised as a Tanist of the Scottish throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander managed to beget three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognise as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on 1 November 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognised as his successor. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around 26 September 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgment in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The guardians of Scotland denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, and John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgment processed slowly. On 3 August 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On 30 November, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On 26 December, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favour of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol but in 1306 the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Bruce himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir, John Balliol's own son, was smitten by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[4]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.[4] [edit] Family and children

He married firstly 12 May 1240:

   * Isabella, (2 November 1226- after 10 July 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue:
       * Isabel (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, County Durham.[5]
       * Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304)
       * Constance (b. 1251), married Sir William Scot de Calverley and had daughter, Clarissa Scott (m. Sir John Fairfax)

He married, secondly on 3 May 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

   * Christina (d. 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue.

-------------------- Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1])), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It's believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[citation needed]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Neil, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland sometime during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognized as a Tanist of the Scottish Throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognize as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on November 1, 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognized as his heir. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around September 26, 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgement in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The [guardians of Scotland] denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, but John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgement processed slowly. On August 3, 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On November 30, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On December 26, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favor of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol; however, in 1306, the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Robert himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir- John Balliol's own son- was smited by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[3]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.[4]

[edit] Family and children He married firstly May 12, 1240:

Isabella, (November 2, 1226- after July 10, 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester and Hertford and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue:

Isabel (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, July 22, 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, county Durham.[5]

Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304) He married, secondly on May 3, 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

Christina (d. 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue -------------------- Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c1215 – 31 March 1295[1])), 5th Lord of Annandale, was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading Competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290-92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland,[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montford at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been sacked from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It's believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270-4 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[citation needed]

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Neil, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland sometime during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241-1286) and was occasionally recognized as a Tanist of the Scottish Throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognize as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on November 1, 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognized as his heir. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around September 26, 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgement in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The [guardians of Scotland] denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, but John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgement processed slowly. On August 3, 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On November 30, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On December 26, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favor of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol; however, in 1306, the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Robert himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir- John Balliol's own son- was smited by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[3]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.[4]

[edit] Family and children

He married firstly May 12, 1240:

   * Isabella, (November 2, 1226- after July 10, 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester and Hertford and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue:
   *
         o Isabel (b. 1249 - c1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, July 22, 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, county Durham.[5]
   *
         o Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253 - 1304)

He married, secondly on May 3, 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

   * Christina (d. 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale -------------------- Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (Robert de Brus) (c. 1220 – 31 March 1295) was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a leading competitor to be King of Scotland in 1290–92 in the Great Cause.

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon, the second daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester. David in turn was the son of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne; Henry's parents were King David I of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland.

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle Castle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been dissmissed from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion.

It is believed Robert joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270–74 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.

He succeeded in having the young widowed Marjorie of Carrick, heiress of that earldom, married to his son, another Robert Bruce in 1271. She was the daughter of Niall, 2nd Earl of Carrick.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland some time during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241–1286) and was occasionally recognised as a Tanist of the Scottish throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir-presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander managed to beget three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognise as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on 1 November 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognised as his successor. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around 26 September 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne.

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself (grandfather of Robert The Bruce) represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgment in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The guardians of Scotland denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, and John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgment processed slowly. On 3 August 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On 30 November, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On 26 December, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne.

(Edward I decided in favour of the senior legitimate heir by primogeniture, John Balliol but in 1306 the crown was assumed by a grandson of the Bruce himself, who became King Robert I. In doing this, the rightful heir, John Balliol's own son, was smitten by his father's misfortune of having been placed on the throne in an inopportune period.)

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale to his son, the Earl of Carrick, as well as his claim to the Crown. Shortly after this, Robert's daughter-in-law Marjorie died in 1292, and on the day of her death his son transferred Carrick to his eldest grandson, the future Robert I of Scotland thus making the boy the Earl of Carrick.

In 1292 Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Guisborough Priory.

He married firstly 12 May 1240:

   * Isabella (2 November 1226 – after 10 July 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford and 1st Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabel Marshal of Pembroke, with issue:
       * Isabel (1249 – c. 1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, county Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, County Durham.
       * Robert VI the Bruce, Earl of Carrick (1253–1304)
       * Constance (born 1251, date of death unknown), married Sir William Scot de Calverley and had daughter, Clarissa Scott (m. Sir John Fairfax)

He married, secondly on 3 May 1275 at Hoddam, in the diocese of Glasgow:

   * Christina (died 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby of Ireby, Cumberland. They had no issue.

-------------------- Regent of Scotland -------------------- Not listed in FMG. Not listed at Peerage.com. docuentation needed. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus%2C_5th_Lord_of_Annandale -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale

-------------------- He married firstly,[3][7] Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, although some historians dispute Eva's parentage. They had no known issue.

By his second marriage to Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar[3] [7] and Ada, he had issue: Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland,[7] married Bethóc, daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus and his wife Marjorie. He died in 1246. David [7] Leonard Avelina, married Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick •*Some sources list Margaret Galloway as Walter's mother. Galloway is related to William the Conqueror and other royalty.***

Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

He was married twice: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Walter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.[2][3]

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4]

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Walter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Alan Stewart, 2nd Great Steward of Scotland was the son of Walter fitz Alan, 1st Great Steward of Scotland and Eochyna de Molle. He died circa 1204.

Alan Stewart, 2nd Great Steward of Scotland gained the title of 2nd Great Steward of Scotland.

Children of Alan Stewart, 2nd Great Steward of Scotland and Eve (?)

  • David Stewart * Leonard Stewart * Aveline Stewart * Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland+ d. c 1241

-------------------- ID: I19703 Name: @*Alan FitzWalter Sex: M Birth: ABT 1126 in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland Death: 1204 Note: Alan FitzWalter; 2nd Great Steward of Scotland; allegedly Crusader with Richard I; married Eve, possibly daughter of Sweyn Thor's son, overlord of Crawford. [Burke's Peerage] Note: Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Note: Page: 121c-28 Note: Note: Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Note: Page: 1985 Change Date: 19 SEP 2006 -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.[2][3]

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4]

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.[5]

He was married twice[2][6]: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar[2] [6], by whom he had issue:

  • Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland [6] * David [6]

[edit] Notes

1. ^ Anderson, William, The Scottish Nation, Edinburgh, 1867, vol.ix, p.512 2. ^ a b c Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, Edinburgh, 1713. 3. ^ Macquarrie, Alan, Scotland and the Crusades, 1095 - 1560, Edinburgh, 1985: 29/30. 4. ^ Professor Geoffrey W. S. Barrow, editor, The Acts of William 1st, King of Scots, Edinburgh, 1971, vol.II, p.277, charter 237. 5. ^ Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, &c., volume 2, London, 1851, p.xl. 6. ^ a b c d Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales &c., volume 2, London, 1851, p.xl.

-------------------- Alan FITZWALTER

  • Father: Walter FITZALAN * Mother: Eschina DE LUNDIS * Birth: 1126, Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland * Occupation: 2nd High Steward of Scotland * Death: 1204
  • Partnership with: Eve DE CRAWFORD o Child: Walter STEWART Birth: 1178, Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland o Child: David FITZALAN

Ancestors of Alan FITZWALTER

/-Flaald DAPIFER /-Alan Dapifer FITZFLAALD /-Walter FITZALAN | | /-Ernulf DE HESDIN | \-Aveline DE HESDING

Alan FITZWALTER

\-Eschina DE LUNDIS

Descendants of Alan FITZWALTER

1 Alan FITZWALTER

Eve DE CRAWFORD 2 Walter STEWART =Beatrix DE ANGUS 3 John STEWART 3 Euphemia STEWART 3 Alexander STEWART =Jean of BUTE 3 Walter 'Ballioch' STEWART =Mary MENTEITH 3 Elizabeth STEWART 3 Robert STEWART 3 Margaret STEWART 3 William STEWART 3 Beatrix STEWART 3 Christian STEWART 2 David FITZALAN

For further information email: JoeAllison@fastmail.fm -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland. Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4] Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

He was married twice[6][7]: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar[8] [9], by whom he had Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland. -------------------- 1.LDS Baptism: 17 Sep 1992 Temple: PROVO 2.Endowment: 29 Sep 1992 Temple: PROVO

Note: Alan Fitzwalter, 2nd Great Steward of Scotland ; allegedly Crusader with Richard Coeur De Lion The Forgotten Monarchy of Scotland by HRH Prince Michael of Albany -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.[2][3]

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4]

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.[5]

He was married twice[6][7]: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar[8] [9], by whom he had issue:

  • Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland [10] * David [11]

______________________________________________________________

Alan fitz Walter (b. circa 1140 - d. circa 1204), sometimes written as Alan Fitzwalter, was the first son of Walter Fitzalan and Eochyna de Molle. On the death of his father in 1177, Alan fitz Walter inherited the title of High Steward of Scotland. He was thus the second person to hold this title. Alan married Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. She gave him four children: Leonard Stewart, Aveline Stewart, Walter Stewart (born ca. 1198), and David Stewart (born ca. 1204). During the Third Crusade, in 1191, Alan fitz Walter accompanied Richard the Lionheart of England. Alan was a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

Ragnall mac Somhairlidh controlled the lands of Islay, Kintyre, Arran and Bute. These lands were not part of the Kingdom of Scotland; rather the lands fell under Norwegian rule. However, Ragnall's rule was contested by others from his family causing Ragnall to look to Scotland for support — in particular to Alan fitz Walter. In 1192, Ragnall was defeated by his brother Aongus. In order to gain favour of Alan fitz Walter, Ragnall made an offering to Paisley Abbey. This abbey, founded by Alan's father — Walter fitz Alan, is located in Renfrewshire, the historic seat of the Stewarts. Ragnall was to pay annually to the abbey the sum of one penny for every house with a hearth in his lands. [1]

As a result of the continued dispute between Ragnall and Aongus, Alan fitz Walter obtained lordship of the Isle of Bute, thus further increasing his land and influence. This increase of Stewart power caused concern for William, King of Scotland. He took measures to limit the possibility of further Stewart expansion. For example, the king allowed the lands of Cunningham to be inherited by Roland of Galloway in the year 1196. In doing so, preventing Alan fitz Walter from increasing his control to the south of Renfrewshire.[1]

In November 1200, while William was in England, Alan fitz Walter arranged for his daughter Evelina to be married to Donnchad Earl of Carrick. This was done without royal consent. On William's return to Scotland, he was displeased.[2]

Alan was responsible for the building of a Norman-style church on the site of the Chapel of Saint Blane, on the Isle of Bute. In 1204, he issued a charter which granted the church to the monks of Paisley Abbey.[3] ______________________________________________________________

Alan fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland

Alan Fitzwalter was born circa 1140 and died circa 1204. He was the first son of Walter Fitzalan and Eochyna de Molle. Events Henry Jasomirgott was made count palatine of the Rhine. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ...

During the third crusade, Alan Fitzwalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart of England. He was a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland. On the death of his father in 1177, he inherited the title of High Steward of Scotland. The second person to hold this title. Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification - by Athelstan AD 927 Area - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK) 50,346 sq mi Population - 2006 est. ... This article is about the medieval military order. ... Events November 25 - Baldwin IV of Jerusalem and Raynald of Chatillon defeat Saladin at the Battle of Montgisard. ... The High Steward or Great Steward was given in the 12th century to Walter Fitzalan, whose descendants became the Stewart family. ...

He was married to Eva who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson. Though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. She gave him four children: Leonard Stewart, Aveline Stewart, Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland born ca. 1198, and David Stewart born ca. 1204. -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

He was married twice: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar, by whom he had issue:

Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland David -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.[2][3]

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4]

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Walter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Alan fitz Walter (1140 – 1204[1]) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader. Alan was the eldest son of Walter fitz Alan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland. Alan fitz Walter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.[2][3] A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, 'Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.[4] Alan fitz Walter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland. He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.[5] He was married twice,[2][6] first to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, although some historians dispute Eva's parentage. His second marriage was to Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar[2] [6], by whom he had issue: Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland [6] David [6] -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

He was married twice: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar, by whom he had issue:

Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland David

-------------------- b. Abt 1126, Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland Between 1178 and 1204 Second High Steward of Scotland [1] Counselor of William the Lion (1143-1214), King of Scotland (1165-1214) [1] 1191 Took part in the Third Crusade, lead by King Richard I the Lion-Hearted of England [1]

Died 1204 -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Fitzwalter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland -------------------- Crusader with Richard Coeur de Lion. -------------------- Alan FitzWalter (1140 - 1204) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

Alan was the eldest son of Walter Fitzalan by his spouse Eschyna de Londoniis, of Molla & Huntlaw, and succeeded, upon his father's death in 1177, as High Steward of Scotland.

Alan FitzWalter accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.

Alan FitzWalter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

He was married twice: firstly to Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, though some historians dispute Eva's parentage. He married secondly Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar, by whom he had issue:

Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland

David -------------------- Heredó las tierras de Shropshire y el cargo de Senescal, sucediéndole - cuando falleció, en 1204 - su hijo Walter. -------------------- Alan fitz Walter 2nd Lord High Stewart of Scotland.

Accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191. A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, 'Alan, son of Walter the Steward,', and William de Lauder. Alan fitz Walter became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland. He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_5th_Lord_of_Annandale --------------------



Notes ◦Alexander III's nominee (tanistair) for the crown of Scotland.

 

Sources 1.[S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

2.[S289] Betty and Dick Field's Family History, Richard Field

3.[S284] Oxford University Press, (Oxford University Press)

4.[S301] History of the Lands and their Owners in Galloway, Vols III, IV and V, P. H. McKerlie, (James Bell, Kirkcudbright)

5.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Clare1 (Reliability: 3)

6.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Bruce02 (Reliability: 3)


-------------------- Annadale is located in Dumfries and Galloway (Southwest Scotland)

Robert de Brus family was given this land by David I in 1124, as one of the border lordships when David became Prince of the Cumbrians. Along with Carrick, these lands acted as a buffer between the quasi-independent Lordship or Kingdom of Galloway and David's lands of Strathclyde and Cumbria.

____________________

Pedigree Resource File

name: Robert "The Competitor" /de Brus/ (AFN: 9G42-PK) sexo: male nacimiento: 1210 of, Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland defunción: 31 May 1295 Priory, Lochmaben, Dumfriesshire, Scotland bautismo en otra Iglesia: (Abt 85-1295) entierro: 17 April 1295 Priory, Guisburn, Yorkshire, England matrimonio: , , , Scotland

Padres: Padre: Robert /de Bruce/ (AFN: 9G42-M7) madre: Isabelle /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-3G) Matrimonios (1)

cónyuge: Isabel /de Clare/ (AFN: 8WKL-7K) matrimonio: , , , Scotland

	Ocultar hijos (8)

hijo 1: Robert /de Brus/ (AFN: 9G45-B3) sexo: male nacimiento: July 1243 of, Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland defunción: antes de 4 April 1304 , , , Palestine entierro: Holme Abbey, Holme Cultram, Cumberland, England

hijo 2: Bernard /Brus/ (AFN: 9G45-DF) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1247 of, Connington, Huntingsonshire, England defunción:

hijo 3: William /Brus/ (AFN: 9G45-C8) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1248 of, Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland defunción:

hijo 4: Richard de /Brus/ (AFN: VB10-P9) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1249 of, Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland defunción: antes de 26 January 1286

hijo 5: Isabella /Bruce/ (AFN: 9G45-FL) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1252 of, , Argyllshire, Scotland defunción: 1300

hijo 6: John /Brus/ (AFN: 18KB-T4T) sexo: male nacimiento: 1252 Clackmannan, Clackmannan, Scotland defunción:

hijo 7: Alosia /Bruce/ (AFN: 9G45-GR) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1254 of, Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland defunción:

hijo 8: Christiana /Bruce/ (AFN: 9G45-HX) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1256 of, Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland defunción:

Fuentes (1) Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Cita de este registro "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/S5X9-Z4G : accessed 2014-07-30), entry for Robert "The Competitor" /de Brus/.

-------------------- Robert V de Brus (Robert de Brus), 5th Lord of Annandale (ca. 1210 – 31 March or 3 May 1295[1]), was a feudal lord, Justice and Constable of Scotland and England, a Regent of Scotland, and a competitor for the Scottish throne in 1290/92 in the Great Cause. His grandson Robert the Bruce eventually became King of Scots.

Early life

Robert was son of Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale and Isobel of Huntingdon. Widely known as Robert the Noble, he was also grandson of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda de Kevilloc of Chester, Great-grandson of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumberland and Ada de Warenne and Great-great grandson of King David I of Scotland and Maud, Countess of Huntingdon.

In addition to Annandale, Robert was Lord of Hartlepool (otherwise known as Hartness) in county Durham and Writtle and Hatfield Broadoak in Essex, England. His first wife brought to him the village of Ripe, in Sussex, and his second wife the Lordship of Ireby in Cumberland.[2]

His possessions were later increased following the defeat of Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham (1265), via a series of grants that included the estates of the former rebel barons Walter de Fauconberg and John de Melsa. Henry III also re-appointed Robert a Justice, and Constable of Carlisle Castle and keeper of the Castle there in 1267, a position he had been dismissed from in 1255, for his support during the rebellion. Robert probably joined the princes Edward and Edmund on their 1270/74 crusade, as his sons failed to attend.[3]

In 1271, Robert obtained the hand of Marjorie of Carrick, the young widowed heiress of Niall of Carrick, 2nd Earl of Carrick for his son, also called Robert de Brus.

Robert Bruce was Regent of Scotland some time during minority of his second cousin King Alexander III of Scotland (1241–1286) and was occasionally recognised as a Tanist of the Scottish throne. He was the closest surviving male relative to the king: Margaret of Huntingdon's issue were all females up until birth of Hugh Balliol sometime in the 1260s. When Alexander yet was childless, he was officially named as heir presumptive, but never gained the throne as Alexander managed to beget three children. The succession in the main line of the House of Dunkeld became highly precarious when towards the end of Alexander's reign, all three of his children died within a few years. The middle-aged Alexander III induced in 1284 the Estates to recognise as his heir-presumptive his granddaughter Margaret, called the "Maid of Norway", his only surviving descendant. The need for a male heir led Alexander to contract a second marriage to Yolande de Dreux on 1 November 1285. All this was eventually in vain. Alexander died suddenly, in a fall from his horse, when only 45 years old, in 1286. His death ushered in a time of political upheaval for Scotland. His three-year old granddaughter Margaret, who lived in Norway, was recognised as his successor. However, the then 7-year old heiress Margaret died, travelling towards her kingdom, on the Orkney Islands around 26 September 1290. With her death, the main royal line came to an end and thirteen claimants asserted their rights to the Scottish Throne. The Great Cause

After this extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house (the line of William I of Scotland) David of Huntingdon's descendants were the primary candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, John Balliol and Robert himself represented descent through David's daughters Margaret and Isobel respectively.

Robert Bruce pleaded tanistry and proximity of blood in the succession dispute. He descended from the second daughter of David of Huntingdon, whereas John Balliol descended from the eldest, and thus had the lineal right. However, Robert was a second cousin of kings of Scotland and descended in 4th generation from King David I of Scotland, whereas John Balliol was a third cousin of kings and descended in 5th generation from King David I, the most recent common ancestor who had been Scottish king. The ensuing 'Great Cause' was concluded in 1292. It gave the Crown of Scotland to his family's great rival, John Balliol. The events took place as follows:

Soon after the death of young queen Margaret, Robert Bruce raised a body of men with the help of the Earls of Mar and Atholl and marched to Perth with a considerable following and uncertain intentions. Bishop William Fraser of St. Andrews, worried of the possibility of civil war, wrote to Edward I of England, asking for his assistance in choosing a new monarch.

Edward took this chance to demand sasine of the Scottish royal estate, but agreed to pass judgment in return for recognition of his suzerainty. The guardians of Scotland denied him this, but Robert Bruce was quick to pay homage. All the claimants swore oaths of homage, and John Balliol was the last to do so. The guardians were forced to concede and were thus reinstated by Edward.

Judgment processed slowly. On 3 August 1291 Edward asked both Balliol and Bruce to choose forty auditors while he himself chose twenty-four, to decide the case. After considering all of the arguments, in early November the court decided in favour of John Balliol, having the superior claim in feudal law, not to mention greater support from the kingdom of Scotland. In accordance with this, final judgement was given by Edward on 17 November. On 30 November, John Balliol was crowned as King of Scots at Scone Abbey. On 26 December, at Newcastle upon Tyne, King John swore homage to Edward I for the kingdom of Scotland. Edward soon made it clear that he regarded the country as his vassal state. The Bruce family thus lost what they regarded as their rightful place on the Scottish throne. Later years

Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale resigned the lordship of Annandale and his claim to the throne to his eldest son Robert de Brus. Shortly afterwards, in 1292, the younger Robert's wife Marjorie of Carrick died and the earldom of Carrick, which Robert had ruled jure uxoris, devolved upon their eldest son, also called Robert, the future King.

In 1292, Robert V de Brus held a market at Ireby, Cumberland, in right of his wife. The following year he had a market at Hartlepool, county Durham within the liberties of the Bishop of Durham.[4]

Sir Robert de Brus died at Lochmaben Castle and was buried at Gisborough Priory in Cleveland.[4] Family and children

He married firstly on 12 May 1240 Lady Isabella de Clare (2 November 1226 – after 10 July 1264), daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester and Lady Isabel Marshal, with issue:

   Isabel de Brus (1249 – c. 1284), married (as his first wife) Sir John FitzMarmaduke, Knt., of Horden, Eighton, Lamesley, Ravensholm, and Silksworth, County Durham, Sheriff of North Durham, and Joint Warden beyond the Scottish Sea between the Firth of Forth and Orkney. He fought on the English side at the Battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298, and was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. In 1307 he was commanded to assist the Earl of Richmond in expelling Robert de Brus and the Scottish rebels from Galloway. In 1309 his armour and provisions in a vessel bound for Perth were arrested off Great Yarmouth. He was governor of St. John's Town (Perth) in 1310 until his death. Isabel was buried at Easington, County Durham.[5]
   Robert VI the Bruce, 6th Lord of Annandale, Earl of Carrick (1253–1304)
   William de Brus, married Elizabeth de Sully, without issue
   Sir Bernard de Bruce, of Connington, married firstly Alicia de Clare and married secondly Constance de Morleyn, and had:
       Sir John Bruce, of Exton, married and had:
           Jane Bruce, married Sir Nicholas Green
   Richard de Brus (died ca. 26 January 1287), unmarried and without issue

He married, secondly on 3 May 1275 at Hoddam, in the Diocese of Glasgow, Christina (died ca. 1305 or 1305), daughter and heiress of Sir William de Ireby, of Ireby, Cumbria. They had no issue.

Despite claims by amateur genealogists, there is no evidence that Robert fathered other children.[

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Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale's Timeline

1210
1210
Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
1210
Dumfries, Scotland, United Kingdom
1242
1242
Age 32
UK
1243
July 1, 1243
Age 33
Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, United Kingdom
1245
1245
Age 35
Scotland
1246
1246
Age 36
1246
Age 36
Seton East
1248
1248
Age 38
Annandale, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
1249
1249
Age 39
Argyllshire, Scotland
1251
1251
Age 41
East Riding, Yorkshire, , England