Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford / Marshall of England

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron Clifford

Also Known As: "Rober 1st Baron /Clifford/", "1st Baron de Clifford", "1st Lord of Skipton"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England
Death: Died in Stirlingshire, Scotland
Cause of death: Killed at the Battle of Bannockburn
Place of Burial: Shap Abbey, Shap, Westmoreland, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Roger de Clifford, III, Kt. and Isabel Clifford
Husband of Maud de Clare
Father of Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford; Idonea de Clifford, Baronness Percy; Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord of Skipton, Sheriff of Westmoreland; John De Clifford; Margaret de Mauley and 2 others
Brother of Simon de Clifford; Idonea de Clifford and Agnes de Clifford

Occupation: Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298; Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308, Died at the battle of Bannockburn, Sheriff of Westmoreland, Fortifed Skipton Castle - 1st Baron Clifford, 1st Lord
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford / Marshall of England

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_de_Clifford

Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, also 1st Lord of Skipton (c. 1274–1314), was an English soldier who became first Lord Warden of the Marches, defending the English border with Scotland. He was born in Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, and was married there in 1295 to Maud de Clare, eldest daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald. Robert de Clifford and Maud de Clare had three children.

A son of Roger de Clifford the younger (d.1282) and his wife Isabella de Vieuxpont, he inherited the estates of his grandfather, Roger de Clifford the elder, in 1286. He then obtained through his mother (d.1291) part of the extensive land of the Viponts. He was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1299. In 1308 he acquired on the death of his mother's sister Idonea the remainder of the Vipont lands and thus became one of the most powerful barons of his age.

During the reigns of Edward I and Edward II, Clifford was a prominent soldier from an early age. In 1296 he was sent with Henry Percy to quell the Scots who asked for terms at Irvine. He was appointed governor of Carlisle. During the reign of the first king, he was styled Warden of the Marches and then, during the reign of the second, Lord Warden of the Marches, being the first holder of this office. In 1298 he fought with Edward I at the Battle of Falkirk in which William Wallace was defeated, for which he was rewarded with Governorship of Nottingham Castle. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Falkirk_(1298)

He won great renown at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300.

After the death of Edward I in 1307 and along with the Earls of Lincoln, Warwick and Pembroke he was appointed counsellor to Edward II. In the same year the new king appointed him as Marshal of England, and in this capacity he probably organised Edward's coronation on 25 February 1308. On 12 March he was relieved on the marshalcy, Nottingham Castle and his forest justiceship, but on 20 August he was appointed captain and chief guardian of Scotland. In 1310 Edward also granted him Skipton Castle and the Honour of Skipton in Craven.

He took part in 1312 with the Earl of Lancaster in the movement against Edward's favourite, Piers Gaveston, besieging him at Scarborough Castle. Clifford was killed on 24 June 1314 fighting at the Battle of Bannockburn. and was buried at Shap Abbey in Westmoreland. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bannockburn

His son Roger succeeded him as the 2nd Baron de Clifford. Daughter Idonia married Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy, 9th Baron Percy and 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick.

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford

Baron de Clifford is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1299 for Robert de Clifford. The title was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. The de Clifford family settled in England after the Norman conquest and were a notable family in late medieval England. The first Baron notably served as Earl Marshal of England but was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. His great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson, the eleventh Baron, was created Earl of Cumberland in 1525. His grandson, the third Earl, was a noted naval commander. On his death in 1605 the earldom passed to his younger brother, the fourth Earl (see the Earl of Cumberland for later history of this title).

The barony of de Clifford was claimed in 1628 by his daughter and only child, Anne, but the House of Lords postponed the hearing. The barony remained dormant until 1678, when Nicholas Tufton, 3rd Earl of Thanet, was allowed to claim the peerage and became the fifteenth Baron de Clifford. He was the son of Lady Margaret Sackville, daughter of the aforementioned Anne. On the death in 1721 of the Earl's younger brother, the sixth Earl, the earldom and barony separated. The earldom was inherited by the late Earl's nephew, the seventh Earl (see the Earl of Thanet for further information on this title).

The barony fell into abeyance between the Earl's five daughters, Lady Katherine, Lady Anne, Lady Isabel, Lady Margaret and Lady Mary. It remained in abeyance until 1734 when the abeyance was terminated in favour of the third daughter, Margaret, who became the nineteenth Baroness. She was the wife of Thomas Coke, 1st Earl of Leicester. On her death in 1775 the title again fell into abeyance, this time between her sisters and their heirs. The abeyance was terminated only a year later in favour of Edward Southwell, the twentieth Baron. He was the grandson of Lady Catherine Tufton, eldest daughter of the sixth Earl of Thanet. He was succeeded by his son, the twenty-first Baron. He was childless and on his death in 1832 the barony fell into abeyance between his sisters Hon. Sophia and Hon. Elizabeth and the heirs of his deceased sister Hon. Catherine.

The peerage was called out of abeyance in 1833 in favour of Sophia, the twenty-second holder. She was the only surviving child of Hon. Catherine and her husband George Coussmaker. Lady de Clifford was the wife of John Russell, third son of Lord William Russell, third son of Francis Russell, Marquess of Tavistock, eldest son and heir of John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford. She was succeeded by her son, the twenty-third Baron. He represented Tavistock in Parliament as a Liberal. As of 2010[update] the title is held by his great-great-grandson, the twenty-seventh Baron, who succeeded his father in 1982. As a descendant of the fourth Duke of Bedford he is also in remainder to this peerage and its subsidiary titles.

Other members of the family have been created barons as Baron Clifford and Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, and baronets as Baronet Clifford of Flaxbourne, New Zealand, Baronet Clifford of the Navy and Baronet Clifford-Constable of Tixall, Staffordshire

In Great Haywood, a village approximately two miles from Tixall, the main public house is called 'The Clifford Arms'

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Lord of Appleby, Westmorland, Sheriff of Westmorland, 1291, M.P. 1299-1313. [5]

Governor of Nottingham Castle, Captain General of the Marshes of Scotland in 1299. [51]

Robert inherited Brougham castle in 1283, and was a leading figure in Edward I’s campaigns against Scotland. He made extensive changes to the castle, improving both its defensive properties and standard of accommodation. He added a new gatehouse complex, with an inner and outer gatehouse separated by a small courtyard, new domestic buildings suitable to house and serve the garrison he needed for his battles in Scotland, a new stone curtain wall to replace the timber palisade and in one corner he built the Tower of League which provided accommodation for important visitors. He also increased the height of the keep by one floor to provide new private chambers which included a small oratory.

Robert was granted Skipton Castle by Edward II in 1310. [105]

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford held the office of Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308. He held the office of Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298. He held the office of Captain General of the Marches of Scotland in 1299. He was created 1st Lord Clifford [England by writ] on 29 December 1299. He fought in the Scottish Wars. He held the office of Marshal of England in 1307. He held the office of Justice of Eyre South of the Trent from 1307 to 1308. He held the office of Warden of the Scottish Marches in 1308. He was killed in the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bannockburn

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Clifford%2C_1st_Baron_de_Clifford

http://www.edgeguide.co.uk/cumbria/pendragoncastle.html

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (c. 1274–1314), was an English soldier.

A son of Roger de Clifford (d. 1282), he inherited the estates of his grandfather, Roger de Clifford, in 1286. He then obtained through his mother part of the extensive land of the Viponts, and thus became one of the most powerful barons of his age. He was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1299.

During the reigns of Edward I and Edward II, Clifford was a prominent soldier. He won great renown at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. After taking part in the movement against Edward II's favourite, Piers Gaveston, Clifford was killed at Bannockburn.

His son Roger became the 2nd Baron de Clifford.

============================

Name: Robert De Clifford 1

Sex: M

Birth: 1 APR 1274 in Clifford Castle, Clifford, Herefordshire, England 1

Death: 24 JUN 1314 in Clifford Castle, Clifford, Herefordshire, England 1

Note:

Robert de Clifford, son of Roger de Clifford by Isabel de Vipont, survived his grandfather, Roger de Clifford, and was summoned to parliament as a Baron from 29 December, 1299 to 26 November, 1313. First Lord Clifford, Lord of Appleby, Sheriff of Westmoreland, Justice in Eyre north of the Trent, and Governor of Nottingham CastleThis nobleman participated in the Scottish wars of King Edward I and had a principal command in the English army. He fell in the following reign at the battle of Bannockburn. His lordship married Maud, daughter and co-heiress of Thomas, 2nd son of Richard de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester, and had issue, besides an elder son, Roger, Lord of Westmoreland, who 1327, a 2nd son, Robert de Clifford. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 122, Clifford, Earls of Cumberland and Barons Clifford].

Lord of Appleby, Westmoreland, Sheriff of Westmoreland 1291, Member of Parliament 1299-1313. History of Rutland: said Baron summond to Parliament 29 Dec 28 Ed 1. Complete Peerage vol 3 p 290-291 succeeded grandfather in 1286 and 1291 part of moiety of mother's family. served in scottish wars.[JohnFaye (8 Jun 05).FTW]

Father: Roger III De Clifford b: ABT 1243 in Clifford Castle, Clifford, Herefordshire, England

Mother: Isabel De Vipont b: ABT 1254 in Ricester, Oxfordshire, England

Marriage 1 Maud De Clare b: ABT 1285 in Bunratty Castle, Thomond, Clare, Ireland

Children

Ideona De Clifford b: ABT 1300 in Appleby Castle, Westmorland, England
Robert De Clifford b: 5 NOV 1305 in Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England
John De Clifford b: ABT 1307
Margaret De Clifford b: ABT 1307
Andrew De Clifford b: ABT 1309
John De Clifford b: ABT 1307

Sources:

Title: JohnFaye (8 Jun 05).FTW

Repository:

Media: Other

Text: Date of Import: 27 Jun 2005

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See The House of Clifford Ch.12. On page 55 it mentions a poem that describes Robert's grandmother as Isabel De Bigod, Dau. of Hugh le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk; yet on page 51 it describes his ancestors which does not include Isabel De Bigod.

Inherited the his mother's half of the Vipont estates in 1291 and following the death of his aunt Idonea in 1308 he was able to reunite the two halves of the Vipont estates under the Clifford name.

Robert was very active against the Scots from a very early age and in 1296/7 along with Henry Percy he was ordered to invade Scotland.

Scots, who were camped at Irvine, quickly asked for terms rather than fight the combined cavalries of Percy and Clifford.

Robert was appointed Governor of Carlisle, captain and guardian of the Scottish marches and of the county of Cumberland.

Lord Clifford took part in the battle of Falkirk that saw King Edward I's decisive victory over William Wallace and was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle.

Robert was present at the death of Edward I in 1307 and along with the Earls of Lincoln, Warwick and Pembroke he was appointed counsellor to Edward II and in the same year the new King appointed him as the Justiciar of England South of the Trent.

In 1310 Edward II granted him Skipton Castle and the Honour of Skipton in Craven.

Robert Clifford had promised the dying Edward I that he would not let Piers Gaveston lead the new King astray so in May 1312, along with the Earl of Lancaster, he besieged Scarborough Castle where Gaveston had taken refuge.

Gaveston soon surrendered and was executed without trial. Robert was appointed Governor of Norham Castle in 1314 as he mustered men for what was to become know as the battle of Bannockburn.

King Edward's army was defeated on 24th Jun 1314 and among the English dead was Robert 1st Lord Clifford. By his wife, Maud De Clare, Robert left three children, Roger, Robert and Idoine.

Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford was born on 1 April 1274 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.

He was the son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont.

He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice, on 3 November 1295 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.

He died on 24 June 1314 at age 40 at Bannockburn, Stirlingshire, Scotland, killed in action.

He was buried at Shap Abbey, Westmorland, England.

    

Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford held the office of Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308.

He held the office of Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298.

He held the office of Captain General of the Marches of Scotland in 1299.

He was created 1st Lord Clifford [England by writ] on 29 December 1299.

He fought in the Scottish Wars.

He held the office of Marshal of England in 1307.

He held the office of Justice of Eyre South of the Trent from 1307 to 1308.

He held the office of Warden of the Scottish Marches in 1308.

He fought in the Battle of Bannockburn.

Children of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare

Idoine de Clifford+ b. c 1300, d. 24 Aug 1365

Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford b. 21 Jan 1299/0, d. c Apr 1322

Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord Clifford+ b. 5 Nov 1305, d. 20 May 1344

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Notes: See The House of Clifford Ch.12. On page 55 it mentions a poem that describes Robert's grandmother as Isabel De Bigod, Dau. of Hugh le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk; yet on page 51 it describes his ancestors which does not include Isabel De Bigod. Inherited the his mother's half of the Vipont estates in 1291 and following the Died of his aunt Idonea in 1308 he was able to reunite the two halves of the Vipont estates under the Clifford name. Robert was very active against the Scots from a very early age and in 1296/7 along with Henry Percy he was ordered to invade Scotland. Scots, who were camped at Irvine, quickly asked for terms rather than fight the combined cavalries of Percy and Clifford. Robert was appointed Governor of Carlisle, captain and guardian of the Scottish marches and of the county of Cumberland. Lord Clifford took part in the battle of Falkirk that saw King Edward I's decisive victory over William Wallace and was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle. Robert was present at the death of Edward I in 1307 and along with the Earls of Lincoln, Warwick and Pembroke he was appointed counsellor to Edward II and in the same year the new King appointed him as the Justiciar of England South of the Trent. In 1310 Edward II granted him Skipton Castle and the Honour of Skipton in Craven. Robert Clifford had promised the dying Edward I that he would not let Piers Gaveston lead the new King astray so in May 1312, along with the Earl of Lancaster, he besieged Scarborough Castle where Gaveston had taken refuge. Gaveston soon surrendered and was executed without trial. Robert was appointed Governor of Norham Castle in 1314 as he mustered men for what was to become know as the battle of Bannockburn. King Edward's army was defeated on 24th Jun 1314 and among the English dead was Robert 1st Lord Clifford. By his wife, Maud De Clare, Robert left three children, Roger, Robert and Idoine.

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford1

M, #3520, b. 1 April 1274, d. 24 June 1314

    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford was born on 1 April 1274 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.
He was the son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont.
He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice, on 3 November 1295 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.
He died on 24 June 1314 at age 40 at Bannockburn, Stirlingshire, Scotland, killed in action.
He was buried at Shap Abbey, Westmorland, England.
    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford held the office of Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308.2 

He held the office of Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298.2

He held the office of Captain General of the Marches of Scotland in 1299.

He was created 1st Lord Clifford [England by writ] on 29 December 1299.

2 He fought in the Scottish Wars.

He held the office of Marshal of England in 1307.

5 He held the office of Justice of Eyre South of the Trent from 1307 to 1308.

5 He held the office of Warden of the Scottish Marches in 1308.

5 He fought in the Battle of Bannockburn.

Children of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare

1.Idoine de Clifford+1 b. c 1300, d. 24 Aug 1365

2.Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford5 b. 21 Jan 1299/0, d. c Apr 1322

3.Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord Clifford+5 b. 5 Nov 1305, d. 20 May 1344

http://thepeerage.com/p352.htm#i3520

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From Wikipedia:

Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (c. 1274–1314), was an English soldier who became first Lord Warden of the Marches, defending the English border with Scotland. He was born in Castle Clifford,Herfordshire and married there in 1295 Maud de Clare by whom he had three children.

A son of Roger de Clifford (d. 1282), he inherited the estates of his grandfather, Roger de Clifford, in 1286. He then obtained through his mother part of the extensive land of the Viponts. He was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1299. In 1308 he acquired on the death of his aunt the remainder of the Vipont lands and thus became one of the most powerful barons of his age.

During the reigns of Edward I and Edward II, Clifford was a prominent soldier from an early age. In 1296 he was sent with Henry Percy to quell the Scots who asked for terms at Irvine. He was appointed Governor of Carlisle. During the reign of the first king, he was styled Warden of the Marches and then, during the reign of the second, Lord Warden of the Marches, being the first holder of this office.[1] In 1298 he fought with Edward I at the Battle of Falkirk in which William Wallace was defeated,for which he was rewarded with Gocernorship of Nottingham castle. He won great renown at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300.

After the death of Edward I in 1307 and along with the Earls of Lincoln, Warwick and Pembroke he was appointed counsellor to Edward II and in the same year the new king appointed him as the Justiciar of England South of the Trent. In 1310 Edward also granted him Skipton Castle and the Honour of Skipton in Craven.

He took part in 1312 with the Earl of Lancaster in the movement against Edward's favourite, Piers Gaveston, besieging him at Scarborough Castle. Clifford was killed on 24 June 1314 fighting at the Battle of Bannockburn.[1] and was buried at Shap Abbey in Westmoreland. His son Roger succeeded him as the 2nd Baron de Clifford.

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The history of Skipton castle is inseparable from that of the Clifford family who were granted the property by Edward II in 1310, when Robert Clifford was appointed first Lord Clifford of Skipton and Guardian of Craven, the wide tract of countryside to the north and west of Skipton.

The Clifford's Norman forebears took the name from Clifford Castle in Herefordshire which they also owned. Robert Clifford began heavily fortifying the castle, but he was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 with his new stronghold barely completed.

(www.skiptoncastle.co.uk)

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford1

M, #3520, b. 1 April 1274, d. 24 June 1314

Last Edited=19 Dec 2007

    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford was born on 1 April 1274 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.3 He was the son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont.2 He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice, on 3 November 1295 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England.4 He died on 24 June 1314 at age 40 at Bannockburn, Stirlingshire, Scotland, killed in action.3 He was buried at Shap Abbey, Westmorland, England.3
    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford held the office of Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308.2 He held the office of Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298.2 He held the office of Captain General of the Marches of Scotland in 1299.5 He was created 1st Lord Clifford [England by writ] on 29 December 1299.2 He fought in the Scottish Wars.2 He held the office of Marshal of England in 1307.5 He held the office of Justice of Eyre South of the Trent from 1307 to 1308.5 He held the office of Warden of the Scottish Marches in 1308.5 He fought in the Battle of Bannockburn.3

Children of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare

Idoine de Clifford+ b. c 1300, d. 24 Aug 13651

Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford b. 21 Jan 1299/0, d. c Apr 13225

Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord Clifford+ b. 5 Nov 1305, d. 20 May 13445

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 502. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 290.

[S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 247.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 291.


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Clifford Castle,Herefordshire,England

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1st Lord Cliffton

1296 with Henry Percy invaded Scotland

1297 Governor of Carlisle, captain of Scottish marches

Fought at Falkirk

Present at death of Edward I

Counsellor to Edvard II

1312 With Earl Lancaster, captured & executed Piers Gaveston

Killed at Battle of Bannockburn

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (c. 1274–1314), was an English soldier.

A son of Roger de Clifford (d. 1282), he inherited the estates of his grandfather, Roger de Clifford, in 1286. He then obtained through his mother part of the extensive land of the Viponts, and thus became one of the most powerful barons of his age. He was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1299.

During the reigns of Edward I and Edward II, Clifford was a prominent soldier. He won great renown at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. After taking part in the movement against Edward II's favourite, Piers Gaveston, Clifford was killed at Bannockburn.

His son Roger became the 2nd Baron de Clifford.

-------------------- Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (c. 1274–1314), was an English soldier who became first Lord Warden of the Marches, defending the English border with Scotland.

A son of Roger de Clifford (d. 1282), he inherited the estates of his grandfather, Roger de Clifford, in 1286. He then obtained through his mother part of the extensive land of the Viponts, and thus became one of the most powerful barons of his age. He was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1299.

During the reigns of Edward I and Edward II, Clifford was a prominent soldier. During the reign of the first king, he was styled Warden of the Marches and then, during the reign of the second, Lord Warden of the Marches, being the first holder of this office.[1] He won great renown at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. After taking part in the movement against Edward II's favourite, Piers Gaveston, Clifford was killed at Bannockburn.[1]

His son Roger became the 2nd Baron de Clifford.

Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford

b. 1 April 1274, d. 24 June 1314
    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford was born on 1 April 1274 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England. He was the son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont. He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzMaurice, on 3 November 1295 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England. He died on 24 June 1314 at age 40 at Bannockburn, Stirlingshire, Scotland, killed in action. He was buried at Shap Abbey, Westmorland, England.
    Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford held the office of Justice in Eyre North of Trent from 1297 to 1308. He held the office of Governor of Nottingham Castle in July 1298. He held the office of Captain General of the Marches of Scotland in 1299. He was created 1st Lord Clifford [England by writ] on 29 December 1299. He fought in the Scottish Wars. He held the office of Marshal of England in 1307. He held the office of Justice of Eyre South of the Trent from 1307 to 1308. He held the office of Warden of the Scottish Marches in 1308. He fought in the Battle of Bannockburn.

Children of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare

1.Idoine de Clifford b. c 1300, d. 24 Aug 1365

2.Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford b. 21 Jan 1299/0, d. c Apr 1322

3.Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord Clifford b. 5 Nov 1305, d. 20 May 1344

Citations

G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 502. 
Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 290.

Richard Glanville-Brown, (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 247.

Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 291. --------------------

Sir Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, Knight, of Appleby, Broughham, Westmorland. Hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, son and heir.

Only son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont, born about Easter 1276 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire. Husband of Maud de Clare, daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane FitzMaurice, married at Clifford's Castle, and the father of three children: Roger, 2nd Lord Clifford, Robert, 3rd Lord Clifford and Idonia, who married Sir Henry de Percy.

Robert served with King Edward I in the Scottish wars and the Battle of Falkirk, after which he was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle. Robert's sergeants at Falkirk included Cumbrians and Westmorlands, Robert de Whiterugg, Thomas de Hauteclou and William de Boyville.

He was at the siege of Caerlaverock in 1300, and was summoned to Parliament from 29 Dec 1299 as Roberto de Clifford. Robert was assigned councillor to Edward II, wand was appointed Marshal of England. He signed the Barons letter to the pope as Robertus de Clifford Castellanus de Appleby.

Robert's aunt, Idoine de Vipont de Cromwell granted her share of Appleby to him in 1308, making him the sole owner of the Vipont properties. He inherited the lands of his grandfather as well as those of his mother, making him one of the most wealthy and powerful barons of the era.

Robert was pardoned for his part in the 1312 murder of Piers Gaveston in 1313, and was slain at the Battle of Bannockburn on June 24, 1314, and was buried with his mother at Shap Abbey.

His wife was abducted by John le Irish, keeper of Barnard Castle Nov 1315. William de Montagu gathered a force of fourty men to rescue her. She would marry Robert de Welle about Dec 1315.


Family links:

Parents:
 Roger de Clifford (1243 - 1282)
 Isabel Vieuxpont Clifford (1254 - 1292)

Children:
 Idoine Clifford Percy (1300 - 1365)*
 Robert de Clifford (1305 - 1344)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Shap Abbey Shap Cumbria, England


Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren Record added: Oct 31, 2010 Find A Grave Memorial# 60910199 -------------------- Sir Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, Knight, of Appleby, Broughham, Westmorland. Hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, son and heir.

Only son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont, born about Easter 1276 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire. Husband of Maud de Clare, daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane FitzMaurice, married at Clifford's Castle, and the father of three children: Roger, 2nd Lord Clifford, Robert, 3rd Lord Clifford and Idonia, who married Sir Henry de Percy.

Robert served with King Edward I in the Scottish wars and the Battle of Falkirk, after which he was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle. Robert's sergeants at Falkirk included Cumbrians and Westmorlands, Robert de Whiterugg, Thomas de Hauteclou and William de Boyville.

He was at the siege of Caerlaverock in 1300, and was summoned to Parliament from 29 Dec 1299 as Roberto de Clifford. Robert was assigned councillor to Edward II, wand was appointed Marshal of England. He signed the Barons letter to the pope as Robertus de Clifford Castellanus de Appleby.

Robert's aunt, Idoine de Vipont de Cromwell granted her share of Appleby to him in 1308, making him the sole owner of the Vipont properties. He inherited the lands of his grandfather as well as those of his mother, making him one of the most wealthy and powerful barons of the era.

Robert was pardoned for his part in the 1312 murder of Piers Gaveston in 1313, and was slain at the Battle of Bannockburn on June 24, 1314, and was buried with his mother at Shap Abbey.

His wife was abducted by John le Irish, keeper of Barnard Castle Nov 1315. William de Montagu gathered a force of fourty men to rescue her. She would marry Robert de Welle about Dec 1315.


-------------------- Sir Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, Knight, of Appleby, Broughham, Westmorland. Hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, son and heir.

Only son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont, born about Easter 1276 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire. Husband of Maud de Clare, daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane FitzMaurice, married at Clifford's Castle, and the father of three children: Roger, 2nd Lord Clifford, Robert, 3rd Lord Clifford and Idonia, who married Sir Henry de Percy.

Robert served with King Edward I in the Scottish wars and the Battle of Falkirk, after which he was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle. Robert's sergeants at Falkirk included Cumbrians and Westmorlands, Robert de Whiterugg, Thomas de Hauteclou and William de Boyville.

He was at the siege of Caerlaverock in 1300, and was summoned to Parliament from 29 Dec 1299 as Roberto de Clifford. Robert was assigned councillor to Edward II, wand was appointed Marshal of England. He signed the Barons letter to the pope as Robertus de Clifford Castellanus de Appleby.

Robert's aunt, Idoine de Vipont de Cromwell granted her share of Appleby to him in 1308, making him the sole owner of the Vipont properties. He inherited the lands of his grandfather as well as those of his mother, making him one of the most wealthy and powerful barons of the era.

Robert was pardoned for his part in the 1312 murder of Piers Gaveston in 1313, and was slain at the Battle of Bannockburn on June 24, 1314, and was buried with his mother at Shap Abbey.

His wife was abducted by John le Irish, keeper of Barnard Castle Nov 1315. William de Montagu gathered a force of fourty men to rescue her. She would marry Robert de Welle about Dec 1315. -------------------- Sir Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, Knight, of Appleby, Broughham, Westmorland. Hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, son and heir.

Only son of Roger de Clifford and Isabel de Vipont, born about Easter 1276 at Clifford Castle, Herefordshire. Husband of Maud de Clare, daughter of Thomas de Clare and Juliane FitzMaurice, married at Clifford's Castle, and the father of three children: Roger, 2nd Lord Clifford, Robert, 3rd Lord Clifford and Idonia, who married Sir Henry de Percy.

Robert served with King Edward I in the Scottish wars and the Battle of Falkirk, after which he was rewarded with the governorship of Nottingham Castle. Robert's sergeants at Falkirk included Cumbrians and Westmorlands, Robert de Whiterugg, Thomas de Hauteclou and William de Boyville.

He was at the siege of Caerlaverock in 1300, and was summoned to Parliament from 29 Dec 1299 as Roberto de Clifford. Robert was assigned councillor to Edward II, wand was appointed Marshal of England. He signed the Barons letter to the pope as Robertus de Clifford Castellanus de Appleby.

Robert's aunt, Idoine de Vipont de Cromwell granted her share of Appleby to him in 1308, making him the sole owner of the Vipont properties. He inherited the lands of his grandfather as well as those of his mother, making him one of the most wealthy and powerful barons of the era.

Robert was pardoned for his part in the 1312 murder of Piers Gaveston in 1313, and was slain at the Battle of Bannockburn on June 24, 1314, and was buried with his mother at Shap Abbey.

His wife was abducted by John le Irish, keeper of Barnard Castle Nov 1315. William de Montagu gathered a force of fourty men to rescue her. She would marry Robert de Welle about Dec 1315.

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Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford / Marshall of England's Timeline

1274
April 1, 1274
Herefordshire, England
1291
1291
Age 16
sheriff of Westmoreland
1291
Age 16
1295
November 3, 1295
Age 21
Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England, (Present UK)
1299
January 21, 1299
Age 24
Appleby Castle, Westmoreland, England, (Present UK)
1303
1303
Age 28
Herefordshire, Westorlandshire, England
1305
November 5, 1305
Age 31
Ellingham, Chathill, Northumberland (Present Cumbria), England
1307
1307
Age 32
Of, Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England
1307
Age 32
Appleby, Westmoreland, England
1309
1309
Age 34
Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England