Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford (c.1031 - 1088) MP

‹ Back to de Tosny surname

View Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford
  • Request to view Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford's family tree

Share

Birthplace: Tosni, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Staffordshire, Tunbridge, Kent, England
Occupation: Baron Stafford, Sheriff of Staffordshire
Managed by: Steve Poland
Last Updated:

About Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford

PLEASE NOTE that while Wikipedia says that he is the son of Roger "Conches/The Spaniard" de Tosny (or alternately of Raoul/Ralph II de Tosny), the scholarly research of the Medieval Lands database (see below) does not support this.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN FRANCE.htm

STAFFORD FAMILY (TOSNY)

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below.

ROBERT, son of --- de Tosny & his wife --- (-1088, bur [Evesham Abbey]). Robert´s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford”[295]. His father has not been identified. It is possible that Robert was either the same person as Robert de Tosny (died after 1063), possible son of Raoul [II] de Tosny, or as Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir in 1086, whose parentage is not known (see above). ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[296].

m [AVICE de Clare], daughter of ---.

Robert & his wife had one children:

1. NICHOLAS de Stafford (-1138 or after, bur Stone Priory). The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Nicolaus fil Rob de Statford" in Staffordshire[297]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[298]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[299]. m MATILDA, daughter of [300][RALPH de Limesey] & his wife --- (-bur Stone). A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stone Priory, among which a donation by “Matildis de Stafford” with the consent of “Roberti de Stafford”, by undated charter[301]. "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[302]. Nicholas & his wife had two children:

a) ROBERT de Stafford (-[1178/84], bur Stone Priory). “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford” by undated charter[303]. The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Robert de Stafford" first in the list under Staffordshire[304]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[305]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from Richard Bishop of Coventry in Staffordshire, and also record the sixty knights fees held from "Roberti de Staffordia" in Stafford[306]. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stafford lx m" in Staffordshire in [1167/68][307]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[308]. m AVICE, daughter of --- (-bur Stone). Robert & his wife had three children:

i) ROBERT de Stafford (-[1193/29 Sep 1194]). ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[309]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Stafford" paying "xxx l, lx milites" in Staffordshire[310]. He was in Jerusalem in 1190. m BASILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1221).

ii) NICHOLAS de Stafford .

iii) MILLICENT de Stafford (-before Jan 1225, bur Stone Priory). “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ”[311]. Her name is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent”[312]. m (before 1193) HERVEY Bagot, son of --- (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory). He adopted the name “Stafford”.

b) JOHN de Stafford . "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[313].

c) --- de Stafford . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to the end-12th century under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[314]. m RALPH de Suleye, son of ---. One child:

i) RALPH de Suleye . "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[315]. It is assumed from these documents that Matilda de Hambye was the wife of Ralph de Suleye, although this is not stated specifically therein. m MATILDA de Hambye, daughter of ---.

2. ALAN de Stafford (-after 1160). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Alanus de Stafford dimidiam marcam i quartam" in Northamptonshire in [1160/61][316].

3. ROGER de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Staffordia" held land in Dorset from the abbot of St Edward´s[317].

4. JORDAN de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Jordanus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from "Alvredi de Lincolnia" in Dorset and one from "Willelmi Malech" [Malet] in Somerset[318].


--------------------

Robert de Stafford, otherwise de Tosney, was an important Domesday tenant-in-chief {ref."Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families," Publications of the Harleian Society, Vol. 103 (1951), p. 99}. But see comments for ID 1473! Burke's "Dormant Peerage" (London, 1883) states "Robert de Stafford possessed, at the time of the General Survey, lordships in Suffolk, Gloucestershire, Lincolnshire, Warwickshire, and Staffordshire, in all 131, and Dugdale surmizes that the assumption of the surname of Stafford arose from his being governor of Stafford Castle, which had been erected by the Conqueror; for his name originally was De Toenei...." - he founded an Augustinian priory at Stone in Staffordshire, "upon the spot where Enysan de Waltone, one of the companions of the Conqueror, had killed two nuns and a priest. He m. Avice de Clare, and was succeeded by his son, Nicholas de Stafford...." (-pp.498-9). His older brother, Ralf de Tosny, was standard-bearer of the duchy.

--------------------

-------------------- Robert De STAFFORD of Belvoir Castle

Born: 1036, Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England

Buried: Eversham Abbey, Worcestershire, England

Notes: Governor of Stafford Castle. Held 131 manors in Warwichshire and Lincolnshire. In his older age he became a monk at Eversham. Castellan of Stafford Castle and a Norman Magnate of some signifcance. He held as a under tenant of Roger de Montgomery. -------------------- Robert De STAFFORD of Belvoir Castle

Born: 1036, Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England

Buried: Eversham Abbey, Worcestershire, England

Notes: Governor of Stafford Castle. Held 131 manors in Warwichshire and Lincolnshire. In his older age he became a monk at Eversham. Castellan of Stafford Castle and a Norman Magnate of some signifcance. He held as a under tenant of Roger de Montgomery.

Father: Roger "The Spaniard" De TOENI

Mother: Godeheut BORRELL

Married 1: Adelisa De SAVONA

Children:

1. Adelisa De TOENI

Married 2: Avice De CLARE ABT 1065

Children:

2. Nicholas De STAFFORD

3. Nigel De STAFFORD

4. Robert De STAFFORD -------------------- Dugdale, William, Sir. Priory of Wotton Wawen, alias Walwaynes, in Warwickshire in Dugdale's Monasticon Anglicanum (1655-1673), Volume 6 Part 2: 994-95.

Robert de Tonei, says Tanner, alias Stafford, son to Roger Tonei, Standard Bearer of Normandy, gave, not long after the Conquest, the Church of St. Peter, with some lands in this town, to the Abbey of Castellion, or Conches, in Normandy, founded by his said father, which were confirmed to them by Nicolas de Stafford, his son temp. Henry I and Robert de Stafford his grandson temp. Henry II; and hereupon a Cell of Benedictine Monks from that foreign Monastery was sent over hither, and continued here till the seisures of Alien Priories temp. Edw III. This was granted 22 Ric II to the Priory of St. Anne near Coventry, and afterward 22 Hen VI to the Provost and Scholars of Kings College in Cambridge, who stil enjoy the same.

---------------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH NOBILITY MEDIEVAL2.htm

STAFFORD FAMILY (TOSNY)

The primary sources which confirm the parentage and marriages of the members of this family have not yet been identified, unless otherwise indicated below.

ROBERT, son of --- de Tosny & his wife --- (-1088, bur [Evesham Abbey]). Robert´s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford”[295]. His father has not been identified. It is possible that Robert was either the same person as Robert de Tosny (died after 1063), possible son of Raoul [II] de Tosny, or as Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir in 1086, whose parentage is not known (see above). ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[296].

m [AVICE de Clare], daughter of ---.

Robert & his wife had one children:

1. NICHOLAS de Stafford (-1138 or after, bur Stone Priory). The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Nicolaus fil Rob de Statford" in Staffordshire[297]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[298]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[299]. m MATILDA, daughter of [300][RALPH de Limesey] & his wife --- (-bur Stone). A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stone Priory, among which a donation by “Matildis de Stafford” with the consent of “Roberti de Stafford”, by undated charter[301]. "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[302]. Nicholas & his wife had two children:

a) ROBERT de Stafford (-[1178/84], bur Stone Priory). “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford” by undated charter[303]. The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Robert de Stafford" first in the list under Staffordshire[304]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[305]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from Richard Bishop of Coventry in Staffordshire, and also record the sixty knights fees held from "Roberti de Staffordia" in Stafford[306]. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stafford lx m" in Staffordshire in [1167/68][307]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[308]. m AVICE, daughter of --- (-bur Stone). Robert & his wife had three children:

i) ROBERT de Stafford (-[1193/29 Sep 1194]). ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[309]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Stafford" paying "xxx l, lx milites" in Staffordshire[310]. He was in Jerusalem in 1190. m BASILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1221).

ii) NICHOLAS de Stafford .

iii) MILLICENT de Stafford (-before Jan 1225, bur Stone Priory). “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ”[311]. Her name is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent”[312]. m (before 1193) HERVEY Bagot, son of --- (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory). He adopted the name “Stafford”.

b) JOHN de Stafford . "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[313].

c) --- de Stafford . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to the end-12th century under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[314]. m RALPH de Suleye, son of ---. One child:

i) RALPH de Suleye . "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[315]. It is assumed from these documents that Matilda de Hambye was the wife of Ralph de Suleye, although this is not stated specifically therein. m MATILDA de Hambye, daughter of ---.

2. ALAN de Stafford (-after 1160). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Alanus de Stafford dimidiam marcam i quartam" in Northamptonshire in [1160/61][316].

3. ROGER de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Staffordia" held land in Dorset from the abbot of St Edward´s[317].

4. JORDAN de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Jordanus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from "Alvredi de Lincolnia" in Dorset and one from "Willelmi Malech" [Malet] in Somerset[318].

--------------------------------

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36525

43. THE PRIORY OF WOOTTON WAWEN

Not long after the Conquest, Robert de Tony gave the church of Wootton Wawen with all its tithes and oblations, and an adjacent hide of land, together with a hide at Doversele, to the Benedictine abbey of Conches, Normandy, which had been founded by his father Roger de Tony. These grants were confirmed by Nicholas de Stafford, the founder's son, temp. Henry I, and by Robert de Stafford his grandson, temp. Henry II. A small cell or priory of monks from Conches was established here by the founder. Henry I granted to the abbey of Conches that all men on their English lands were to be free, and that they were to be exempt from all manner of service and toll; moreover the monks were always to have free passage from the port of Dieppe.

The church was appropriated to the priory in 1178, and a vicarage ordained, which remained in the gift of the priory of Wootton or the abbey of Conches until it was made over to King's College, Cambridge, in the fifteenth century.

Among other benefactions to this priory were several parcels of land at Ullenhall, in this parish, by Robert de Stafford; a mill at Henley in Arden, by Henry de Montfort; lands at Mockley and Ullenhall, by Robert de Chaucombe; a virgate of land with croft and messuage and chapel at Burley, by William de Burley; lands at Buckley, by Godfrey de Pouncefote; and the manor of Monkenlane, and other tithes and lands in the county of Hereford. (fn. 1)


1. MSS. of King's Coll. Camb. cited in Dugdale, Warw. ii, 815, and in the Mon. vi, 994-5.

excerpted from 'Alien houses: Priory of Wootton Wawen', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 133-136. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36525 Date accessed: 16 January 2010.

-------------------------------

http://www.woottonwawen-pc.gov.uk/history/origins.htm

Early Development

A Brief Village History

In 1086, Wootton Wawen's entry in the Domesday book read as follows:

"Robert holds 7 hides in Wootton. Land for 9 ploughs. 23 villagers with a priest and 22 smallholders who have 6 ploughs. 2 mills at 11s and 8 sticks of eels; woodland 2 leagues long and 1 wide. Value £4. Waga held it freely." (A stick of eels consisted of 25, therefore payment of rent totalled 200 eels.)

Origins

The parish of Wootton Wawen lies on the southwestern edge of the Forest of Arden, which has stretched across Warwickshire since the Middle Stone Age. An Anglian tribe settled at Stoppingas, in the basin of the River Alne in early Saxon times. Known to the Celts as the Alwen, meaning "white", "bright" or "shining", the Alne rises at the edge of the Arden plateau and eventually joins the Avon. About ten miles of the river flows within Wootton Wawen parish, which once included Henley-in-Arden and the Chapelry of Ullenhall.

Wootton Wawen derives its name from "Wudutun" or "Uuidutuun", meaning an enclosure or village in or by a wood, and Wagen, the thane who gave his name to the settlement. In the Domesday Book of 1086, it is called "Wotone", but Wagen's name is also mentioned - "Waga held it freely". Over the centuries, the village's name has been spelt in a number of ways, for example; "Wagenes-Witone", "Waghnes Wotton", and "Wavens Wotton". However, "Wootton" has also been used since the 12th. century, and its present form, "Wootton Wawen" was in frequent use between the 15th. and 17th. centuries, although it is more commonly thought of as a 19th. and 20th. century version.

The Church at the Heart of the Early Settlement

19th Century Engraving of Wootton Wawen Church

The first wooden church was built at Wootton between 720 and 740 A.D, as a direct result of a charter granted by King Aethalbad of Mercia to Earl Aethelric for 20 hides of land, (around 2,000 acres) on which to build a monastery or minster of St. Mary. The first church may have been burnt and pillaged by Viking invaders, but between about 970 and 1040, Wagen, an Anglo-Danish landowner, established the present church.

Today, the remains of this stone church form the heart of the parish church of St. Peter's, including the lower two- thirds of the tower and the four arches enclosing the Saxon Sanctuary. Following the Norman Conquest of 1066, Wagen's lands were transferred to Robert of Stafford, formerly Robert de Tonei, and Wootton's church was given to the Abbey of Conches in Normandy, which had been founded in 1035 by Robert's father.

Conches Abbey was responsible for building a small priory opposite the church. Wootton was one of forty parishes and manors from which the Prior collected tithes and Papal taxes on behalf of the Abbey. -------------------- Governor of Stafford Castle. Held 131 manors in Warwichshire and Lincolnshire. In his older age he became a monk at Eversham. Castellan of Stafford Castle and a Norman Magnate of some signifcance. He held as a under tenant of Roger de Montgomery.

view all 24

Robert of Tosny, Lord of Stafford's Timeline

1031
1031
Staffordshire, , England
1031
Tosni, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
1040
1040
Age 9
<Of, Tosni, , France>
1057
1057
Age 26
1065
1065
Age 34
Of,,,England
1070
1070
Age 39
1072
1072
Age 41
St Saveur, , Normandy, France
1075
1075
Age 44
Stone, Staffordshire
1076
1076
Age 45
France
1081
1081
Age 50
Stafford, Staffordshire, England