Robert of Tosny, Lord of Stafford

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About Robert of Tosny, Lord of Stafford

son of Roger I "Conches/The Spaniard" de Tosny and his second wife Godechildis.

married Avice de Clare [Curator's Note: though some sources have him married to Adelisa de Savona, this is not strongly supported, and we have detached her until better evidence becomes available]

children:

  • Nicholas de Stafford

and perhaps:

  • Alan de Stafford
  • Roger de Stafford
  • Jordan de Stafford
  • Nigel de Stafford
  • Robert de Stafford

FMG Medieval Lands:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RogerConchesdied1040 Updated March 2015

RAOUL [II] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [I] [de Tosny] & his wife --- . "…Rodulphi filii Rodulphi de Todeniaco…" subscribed the undated charter under which "Richardus…Normannorum comes" confirmed property of Lisieux[2853]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which he had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois[2854]. m ---. The name of Raoul's wife is not known.

Raoul [II] & his wife had [four] children:

1. ROGER [I] de Tosny [Conches] ([990]-killed in battle [17 Jun] [1040], bur Conches). Guillaume of Jumièges records that Duke Richard appointed “Nigellum Constantinensem atque Rodulfum Toennensem et Rogerium filium eiusdem” as custodians of “castrum Tegulense” (Tillières {Verneuil, Eure}), which he had built to protect against attack by Eudes [II] Comte de Blois[2855]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” was “totius Normanniæ signifer“, that he travelled “in Hispaniam” when Duke Robert II went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, returned after the accession of Duke Guillaume II but refused to serve him because of his ignoble birth, rebelled against him, destroyed property in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” who eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[2856]. The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" when recording that he left Normandy for Spain[2857]. The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy for Spain with an army in 1015[2858]. Orderic Vitalis records that “Rogerius de Toenio” founded “cœnobium Castellionis alias de Conchis”[2859]. Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the foundation by "Rogerius filius Radulphi Toteniensis" for the soul of "coniugis meæ Godehildis", dated to [1130][2860]. "…Rogerii filii Radulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[2861]. He left Normandy for Spain in [1030/35], fought against the Moors, and lived there for 15 years with his Spanish wife[2862]. "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[2863]. The apparent duplication of these names is difficult to explain. "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[2864]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][2865]. His death is dated to [17 Jun] because firstly Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Robertus de Grentesmaisnil” died in the same battle as “Rogerius [de Toenia]“[2866], and secondly the necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "17 Jun" of "Robertus de Grentemesnil"[2867]. His place of burial is confirmed by the charter dated to [1130] under which Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior…", quoting the confirmation by "Radulphus de Totteneio cum Godehilde matre mea" for the burial of "patris mei Rogerii"[2868].

[m firstly (1018 or soon after) ADELAIDA [Papia] de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BORELL I Conde de Barcelona & his wife Ermesinde de Carcassonne. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Normanni duce Rotgerio", who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her daughter, but does not name the latter[2869]. It is not clear that "dux Rotgerius" is Roger de Conches, particularly as it seems surprising that Adémar would have accorded him the title "dux". It is assumed that this marriage proposal took place in 1018 or soon after: if it had taken place much later, there would have been little reason to have referred to the bride's mother as "vidua". In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18. The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" married "sororem Raymundi-Berengarii Stephaniam" in Spain, specifying that she later married "rex Hispaniæ Garsias"[2870], but this account is even more confused and clearly conflates several different individuals. The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records the same marriage using the same wording[2871]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.]

m [secondly] as her first husband, GODECHILDIS, daughter of ---. Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the foundation by "Rogerius filius Radulphi Toteniensis" for the soul of "coniugis meæ Godehildis", dated to [1130][2872]. The Miracles of Sainte-Foy recount her being cured of a serious illness by miracle, when she was still married to her first husband[2873]. She married secondly Richard Comte d'Evreux. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Richardus Ebroicensis comes filius Roberti Archiepiscopi” married “uxore Rogerii de Toenia” by whom he had “Willelmum qui nunc Ebroicensibus principatur”[2874]. Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prædicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Godehildis comitissa Ebroicæ civitatis, quondam uxor Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "seniore meo comite Richardo", dated to [1130][2875].

Roger [I] & his [first/second] wife had four children:

a) HELBERT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” who eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[2876]. b) HELINANT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Rogerius Toenites de stirpe Malahulcii qui Rollonis ducis patruus fuerat” rebelled against Duke Guillaume II and destroyed property, in particular that of “Humfridi de Vetulis” who eventually killed Roger [I] along with “duobus filiis suis Helberto et Elinantio”[2877]. c) VUASO . “...Vuaso filius Rogerii Tothennensis...” subscribed the charter under which Guillaume Duke of Normandy donated the church of Arques to Saint-Wandrille, dated to [1035/55][2878]. d) ADELISE (-6 Oct ----, bur Abbaye de Lyre). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Willelmus...filius Osberni, propinquus ducis Willelmi” founded “duo monasteriain honorem...Mariæ unum apud Liram...alterum apud Cormelias”, adding that he buried “Adelinam filiam Rogerii de Toenio uxorem suam” at Lyre[2879]. "Willelmo filio Osberni et…Ælicia eius uxore filia Rogeri de Thoneio" founded the abbey of Lyre by charter dated 1046[2880]. Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio" was buried in the monastery of Lyre[2881]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "6 Oct" of "Adeliz uxor Willelmi hujus loci fundatoris"[2882]. The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "6 Oct" of "mater Willelmi Britolii Adeliza"[2883]. m (before 1046) as his first wife, GUILLAUME FitzOsbern Seigneur de Breteuil, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Cormeilles).

Roger [I] & his [second] wife had two children:

e) RAOUL [III] de Tosny (-24 Mar[2884] [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre). “Radulphus de Tony cum Godehelde matre mea” donated property to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by undated charter[2885].

- see below.

f) ROBERT [III] de Tosny (-[1088], bur [Evesham Abbey]). Domesday Book records “Robert of Stafford” holding Denchworth in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire; “Robert de Tosny” holding Miswell in Tring Hundred and Barwythe in Danish Hundred in Hertfordshire; "Robert of Stafford" holding land in Oxfordshire; Stoneton in Northamptonshire [Warwickshire][2886]. The entries in Hertfordshire precede those which record the holdings of Raoul de Tosny in Hertfordshire, which suggests that they refer to the Robert Tosny/Stafford who was Raoul´s brother. Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao", by charter dated to [1130][2887]. Robert´s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford”[2888]. No indication has been found of the identity of Robert [III]´s mother, but assuming that he was legitimate the chronology suggests that he must have been born from his father´s [second] marriage. Lord of Stafford. see below for ENGLISH NOBILITY – STAFFORD.


Sources

  • [2853] Le Prévost, A. ´Pouillés du diocèse de Lisieux´, Mémoires de la Société des antiquaires de Normandie, 2e Série, 3ème Volume (1842-43), p. 9, footnote 5.
  • [2854] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253.
  • [2855] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber V, X, p. 253.
  • [2856] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.
  • [2857] Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis, RHGF X, p. 223.
  • [2858] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, p. 30.
  • [2859] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. II, Liber III, I, p. 12.
  • [2860] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
  • [2861] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 9, p. 10.
  • [2862] CP XII/1, p. 756, article Tony, and Chavanon, J. (ed.) (1897) Adémar de Chabannes, Chronique (Paris), Book III, c. 55.
  • [2863] Jumièges, Tome I, XX, p. 63.
  • [2864] Delisle (1867), Pièces justificatives, 16, p. 17.
  • [2865] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
  • [2866] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, IV, p. 269.
  • [2867] RHGF XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 487.
  • [2868] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
  • [2869] Adémar de Chabannes, Chronique, III, 55, p. 178.
  • [2870] Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis, RHGF X, p. 223.
  • [2871] Clarii, Chronico Sancti Petri Vivi Senonensi 1015, MGH SS XXVI, p. 31.
  • [2872] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
  • [2873] Liber Miraculorum sancte Fidis, ed. A. Bouillet (Paris, 1897), pp. 144-5, quoted and trans. by Houts (2000), p. 214.
  • [2874] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, IV, p. 269.
  • [2875] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
  • [2876] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.
  • [2877] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, III, p. 268.
  • [2878] Saint-Wandrille, 17, p. 59.
  • [2879] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VII, XXII, p. 278.
  • [2880] Neustria Pia, p. 535.
  • [2881] Robert de Torigny, Vol. II, p. 198.
  • [2882] RHGF XXIII, Ex Obituario Lirensis monasterii, p. 474.
  • [2883] RHGF XXIII, Ex Uticensis monasterii necrologio, p. 489.
  • [2884] Orderic Vitalis (Chibnall), Vol. III, Book V, p. 129.
  • [2885] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire III, p. 995.
  • [2886] Domesday Translation, Berkshire, XLII, p. 154, Hertfordshire, XXI, p. 382, Oxfordshire, XXVII, pp. 433-4, Northamptonshire, XXVII, p. 609.
  • [2887] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128, 131.

(the above is from Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database)

---------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORTHERN FRANCE.htm Updated March 2015

ROBERT [I], son of ROGER [I] de Tosny & his [second wife Godechildis ---] (-1088, bur [Evesham Abbey]). His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated to [1130] under which Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao"[560]. Robert´s connection with the Tosny family is confirmed by the undated charter under which “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford”[561]. No indication has been found of the identity of Robert [III]´s mother, but assuming that he was legitimate the chronology suggests that he must have been born from his father´s [second] marriage. Domesday Book records “Robert of Stafford” holding Denchworth in Wantage Hundred in Berkshire; “Robert de Tosny” holding Miswell in Tring Hundred and Barwythe in Danish Hundred in Hertfordshire; "Robert of Stafford" holding land in Oxfordshire; Stoneton in Northamptonshire [Warwickshire]; numerous properties in Warwickshire; and Staffordshire[562]. The entries in Hertfordshire precede those which record the holdings of Raoul de Tosny in Hertfordshire, which suggests that they refer to the Robert Tosny/Stafford who was Raoul´s brother. "Robertus de Stafford…monachus factus in infirmitate mea" donated Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey, for "conjuge mea et filio meo Nicholao", by charter dated 1088[563]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[564].

m [AVICE de Clare], daughter of --- (-after 1088, bur [Stone priory]). A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Avice de Clare” as the wife of Robert and records their burial at Stone[565]. It is far from certain that this information is accurate. No person of that name has yet been identified, and the name "Clare" only appears to have been used by the descendants of Robert de Brionne from the early 12th century (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY A-C).

Robert [I] & his wife had one child:

1. NICHOLAS de Stafford (-1138 or after, bur Stone Priory). "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote to Kenilworth priory by charter dated to [1122/25][566]. Henry I King of England confirmed donations to Conches, including the donation of "ecclesiam de Octona" made by "Robertus de Stafort filius Rogerii de Totteneio" with the consent of "filio meo Nicholao", by charter dated to [1130][567]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Nicolaus fil Rob de Statford" as security for a debt in Staffordshire[568]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[569]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[570].

m MATILDA, daughter of --- (-bur Stone). A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Maude Moolte” as the wife of Nicholas and records their burial at Stone[571]. "Nicholaus filius Roberti de Stafford…et Mathildi uxori mee" donated Idlicote to Kenilworth priory by charter dated to [1122/25][572]. Matilda´s parentage is unknown. The Stone Priory table suggests a link with a family named "Moult", but the probable late dating of the source suggests that the information may not be reliable. Domesday Descendants states that Matilda was "probably the daughter of Ralph I de Limesey" without specifying any reasoning[573]. This speculation is presumably based on the undated charter under which “Radulfus de Limesey” donated property to Hertford priory, with the consent of “Hadwisiæ uxori suæ”, witnessed by "Raerus filius domini, Robertus de Statford nepos domini…"[574], on the assumption that "Robertus de Statford" was the same person as Robert [II] de Stafford, Matilda´s son. If that is correct, she was Matilda de Limesey, daughter of Ralph [I] de Limesey & his wife ---. Matilda is also recorded in relation to land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire. Firstly, "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire, held from her by "Toruerdus le mutere et Gilebertus filius eius", to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[575]. Secondly, "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[576]. "Matilda de Hamby" was therefore the god-daughter of Matilda, wife of Nicholas de Stafford. Presumably Theddlethorpe entered the Stafford family through Matilda´s marriage and later passed to Matilda´s grandson "Radulfus de Suleya" junior (see below). It appears probable that the second parcel of land in Theddlethorpe, granted to Matilda de Hamby by "Haraldus frater eius", formed part of the same property which, if correct, would have been held jointly by Ralph "de Suleya" and Harold. As noted in the first charter, Matilda de Hamby was the daughter of Robert FitzGilbert. It appears unlikely that Matilda, wife of Nicholas, was related to "Toruerdus le mutere et Gilebertus filius eius" who held land from her. On the other hand, it seems equally unlikely that "Radulfus de Suleya" junior would have confirmed the grant of land by Harold to his sister Matilda de Hamby unless there had been some family connection. One explanation could be that Matilda held the land jointly with an unknown relative who had transferred his/her share to Harold. A charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Stone Priory, among which a donation by “Matildis de Stafford” with the consent of “Roberti de Stafford”, by undated charter[577]. Nicholas & his wife had two children:

a) ROBERT [II] de Stafford (-[1178/84], bur Stone Priory). “Robertus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford” by undated charter[578]. "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[579]. The 1156 and 1157 Pipe Rolls record "Robert de Stafford" first in the list under Staffordshire[580]. “Nicholaus, filius Roberti de Statfort, et Robertus primogenitus et hæres mei” donated Stone priory to Kenilworth by undated charter[581]. "Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus" confirmed the donation of Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey made by "Rodbertus avus meus et pater meus Nicholaus" by charter dated to [1161/65][582]. Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Robertus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from Richard Bishop of Coventry in Staffordshire, and also record the sixty knights fees held from "Roberti de Staffordia" in Stafford[583]. The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Robertus de Stafford lx m" in Staffordshire in [1167/68][584]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[585]. "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[586].

m AVICE, daughter of --- (-bur Stone). "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Stone priory, for the souls of "meæ et Aviciæ uxoris mee", by charter dated to [1155], witnessed by "Roberto Bagot…"[587]. "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[588]. It is unclear from the wording of this document whether Avice was alive or deceased at the time. A table (obviously of late composition because of the language), hanging in Stone priory at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, names “Avice” as the wife of Robert and records their burial at Stone[589]. Robert [II] & his wife had three children:

i) ROBERT [III] de Stafford (-[1193/29 Sep 1194]). "Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus" confirmed the donation of Wrottesley and Loynton to Evesham abbey made by "Rodbertus avus meus et pater meus Nicholaus" by charter dated to [1161/65][590]. "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[591]. ”Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres” confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by “Rodbertus avus meus…et pater meus Nicholaus” by undated charter[592]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1190/91], records "Robertus de Stafford" paying "xxx l, lx milites" in Staffordshire[593]. He was in Jerusalem in 1190. m BASILIA, daughter of --- (-after 1221). The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.

ii) NICHOLAS de Stafford (-after 1183). "Robertus de Stafford…et Robertum filium meum et heredum" donated property to Bordesley abbey, for the soul of "Avice uxoris meæ et matris R. filii mei", by charter dated 1183, witnessed by "Roberto filio meo, Nicholao filio meo…"[594].

iii) MILLICENT de Stafford (-before Jan 1225, bur Stone Priory). “Herveus…dominus de Stafford” confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by “Robertus de Tony et Nicolaus filius suus de Stafford et Robertus filius eius” by undated charter which names “dominus Robertus de Stafford, pater uxoris meæ”[595]. Her name is confirmed by the undated charter under which her son “Willelmus de Stafford filius Hervei Bagot” confirmed donations to the priory of St Thomas, Stafford, with the consent of “fratris mei Hervei Bagot…matris meæ Mylisent”[596]. m (before 1193) HERVEY Bagot, son of --- (-before 25 Aug 1214, bur Stone Priory). He adopted the name “Stafford”.

b) JOHN de Stafford . "Matildis de Stafford" granted land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi filie Roberti filii Gilberti filiole mee", with the consent of "Johannis filii mei et Radulfi nepotis mei", by charter dated to the reign of King Henry II, witnessed by "…Willelmo filio Otueri, Rannulfo de Seis, Ingeramo Bagot…"[597].

c) --- de Stafford . Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated to the end-12th century under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea"[598]. m RALPH "de Suleya", son of ---. No other record has so far been found of a "Suleya/Suleye" family. It is uncertain which English surname is represented by the Latin "Suleya". However, it is similar to "Sudeley" and one possibility is that "Radulfus de Suleya" senior was the same person as Ralph [I] de Sudeley, son of John de Sudeley & his wife --- (-before 29 Sep 1192). The chronology appears favourable for this co-identity, but its likelihood depends on establishing a connection between the Sudeley family and Theddlethorpe. No such connection has yet been identified. [Two] children:

i) RALPH "de Suleya" . "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi" granted to her by "Matildis de Staforda avia sua", and land given to her in the same place by "Haraldus frater eius", by charter dated to the end-12th century, another charter which records the same confirmation clarifying "Radulfus de Suleya…Matildis de Estafford avia mea", the second charter being witnessed by "Ricardo de Suleya…"[599].

ii) [RICHARD "de Suleya" . "Ricardo de Suleya…" witnessed one version of the charter under which "Radulfus de Suleya filius Radulfi de Suleya" confirmed land in Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire to "Matildi de Hambi"[600]. It is probable that Richard was closely related to the confirmant, maybe his younger brother.]


Cawley also has these men listed but is not definite as to whether they are sons or not:

1. ALAN de Stafford (-after 1160). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Alanus de Stafford dimidiam marcam i quartam" in Northamptonshire in [1160/61][601].


2. ROGER de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Rogerus de Staffordia" held land in Dorset from the abbot of St Edward´s[602].


3. JORDAN de Stafford (-after 1166). Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record that "Jordanus de Stafford" held one knight´s fee from "Alvredi de Lincolnia" in Dorset and one from "Willelmi Malech" [Malet] in Somerset[603].


Sources

  • [560] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128, 131.
  • [561] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire I, p. 994.
  • [562] Domesday Translation, Berkshire, XLII, p. 154, Hertfordshire, XXI, p. 382, Oxfordshire, XXVII, pp. 433-4, Northamptonshire, XXVII, p. 609, Warwickshire, XXII, pp. 664-5, Staffordshire, XI, pp. 680-4.
  • [563] Eyton, R. W. (ed.) ´The Staffordshire Chartulary, Wm Salt Archæological Society (ed.) (1881) Collections for a History of Staffordshire, Vol. II (Birmingham), Series I, no. II, p. 182.
  • [564] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.
  • [565] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231.
  • [566] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. I, p. 195.
  • [567] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128, 131.
  • [568] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1833) Magnum rotulum scaccarii vel magnum rotulum pipæ de anno 31 regni Henrici primi (London) ("Pipe Roll 31 Hen I (1129/30)"), Staffordshire, p. 73.
  • [569] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, IV, p. 232.
  • [570] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.
  • [571] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231.
  • [572] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. I, p. 195.
  • [573] Domesday Descendants, p. 716.
  • [574] Dugdale Monasticon III, Hertford Priory, II, p. 300.
  • [575] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 483, p. 353.
  • [576] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4.
  • [577] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, VI, p. 232.
  • [578] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire I, p. 994.
  • [579] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XV, p. 236.
  • [580] Pipe Roll 3 Hen II (1156), Staffordshire, pp. 97 and 160.
  • [581] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, IV, p. 232.
  • [582] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary, Series I, no. V, p. 193.
  • [583] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 263 and 264.
  • [584] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42.
  • [585] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.
  • [586] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259.
  • [587] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XV, p. 236.
  • [588] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259.
  • [589] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Stone Priory, Staffordshire, II, p. 231.
  • [590] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary, Series I, no. V, p. 193.
  • [591] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259.
  • [592] Dugdale Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18.
  • [593] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno secundo regis Ricardi…scutagium Walliæ assisum, p. 71.
  • [594] Eyton ´The Staffordshire Chartulary (1881), Vol. II, Series II, no. XXIV, p. 259.
  • [595] Dugdale Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire II, p. 995.
  • [596] Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XXXIII, p. 249.
  • [597] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 483, p. 353.
  • [598] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4.
  • [599] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 484 and 485, pp. 353-4.
  • [600] Stenton (Danelaw, 1920), 485, p. 354.
  • [601] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 25.
  • [602] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 214.
  • [603] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, pp. 215 and 227.

--------------------

http://homepages.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy2/ps05/ps05_390.htm

Robert de Stafford, otherwise de Tosney, was an important Domesday tenant-in-chief {ref."Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families," Publications of the Harleian Society, Vol. 103 (1951), p. 99}. But see comments for ID 1473! Burke's "Dormant Peerage" (London, 1883) states "Robert de Stafford possessed, at the time of the General Survey, lordships in Suffolk, Gloucestershire, Lincolnshire, Warwickshire, and Staffordshire, in all 131, and Dugdale surmizes that the assumption of the surname of Stafford arose from his being governor of Stafford Castle, which had been erected by the Conqueror; for his name originally was De Toenei...." - he founded an Augustinian priory at Stone in Staffordshire, "upon the spot where Enysan de Waltone, one of the companions of the Conqueror, had killed two nuns and a priest. He m. Avice de Clare, and was succeeded by his son, Nicholas de Stafford...." (-pp.498-9). His older brother, Ralf de Tosny, was standard-bearer of the duchy.

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Robert de Stafford From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert de Stafford (known also as Robert of Tosny and Robert de Toeni) (c. 1039 – c. 1100) was a Norman nobleman, the builder of Stafford Castle in England. He is generally said to have been a son of Roger I of Tosny;[1] primary evidence is lacking to determine his parentage, according to Cawley.[2] Cawley notes that Robert de Stafford is connected to the Tosny family through a charter (not dated) under which "Robertus de Stafford" confirmed donations to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by "avus meus Robertus de Toenio et pater meus Nicolaus de Stafford." [3] Also "Robertus de Staffordia et Robertus filius meus et hæres" confirmed donations of property to Evesham Monastery by "Rodbertus avus meus...et pater meus Nicholaus" by undated charter.[4] He held a large number of lordships in the Domesday Survey, a high proportion lying in Staffordshire.[5] They included Barlaston[6] and Bradley[7] in Staffordshire and part of Duns Tew in Oxfordshire.[8] de Stafford is buried in Evesham Abbey.

Family

Although some sources [9] say that he married Adelisa de Savona, with whom he had a daughter Adelisa de Toeni, who married Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, the Adelisa de Tosny who married Roger Bigod was in fact the heiress of Belvoir and was clearly the daughter of Robert de Tosny Lord of Belvoir and his wife Adeliza fitzOsulf du Plessis, through whom Belvoir had been inherited, since the honour of Belvoir was then passed to Cecily Bigod, the daughter of Roger and Adelisa Bigod.[10]

Robert de Stafford apparently married Avice de Clare,[1][2] with whom he had sons, variously listed as.

  • Nicholas de Stafford[2][11]
  • Alan de Stafford[2]
  • Roger de Stafford[2]
  • Jordan de Stafford[2]
  • Nigel de Stafford[11]
  • Robert de Stafford[11]

The Gresley family of Drakelow, baronets, were descendants of the de Tosny family through their de Stafford ancestors, including Robert.[12]

Notes

  1. "Toeni1". Stirnet. Peter Barns-Graham. June 15, 2003. Retrieved July 17, 2013.
  2. Charles Cawley, "England, Earls, Created 1207–1466," Medieval Lands Project, http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm
  3. William Dugdale, Monasticon VI.2, Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire I, p. 994
  4. Dugdale, Monasticon II, Evesham Monastery, Worcestershire X, p. 18
  5. Saxon owner or governors, – Leofric, Algar; – notices in Domesday Book, – Edwin and Morcar's revolt. – Robert De Stafford and his property
  6. Barlaston Yesterday
  7. Stafford Borough Council – History of Stafford
  8. Crossley, Alan (ed.); AP Baggs; Christina Colvin; HM Colvin; Janet Cooper; CJ Day; Nesta Selwyn; A Tomkinson (1983). Victoria County History: A History of the County of Oxford, Volume 11. pp. 209–222.
  9. [1], doubts about identification of wife or wives.
  10. Judith A. Green, The Descent of Belvoir, Prosopon Newsletter, 1999, http://users.ox.ac.uk/~prosop/prosopon/issue10-2.pdf
  11. Stafford at tudorpace.com
  12. On the Bradshaws and Staffords of Eyam, with a Notice of the Old Hall, Peter Furness Esq., GENUKI

External links

  • Robert de "de Toeni" Stafford at Find a Grave
  • JohnStafford.org: Searching For the First Stafford and his wife the Elusive Avice de Clare
  • Stafford Family Genealogy Web Site: Robert de Toni (archived at Internet Archive)

----------------------------

Robert De STAFFORD of Belvoir Castle

Born: 1036, Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England

Buried: Eversham Abbey, Worcestershire, England

Notes: Governor of Stafford Castle. Held 131 manors in Warwichshire and Lincolnshire. In his older age he became a monk at Eversham. Castellan of Stafford Castle and a Norman Magnate of some signifcance. He held as a under tenant of Roger de Montgomery.

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Dugdale, William, Sir. Priory of Wotton Wawen, alias Walwaynes, in Warwickshire in Dugdale's Monasticon Anglicanum (1655-1673), Volume 6 Part 2: 994-95.

Robert de Tonei, says Tanner, alias Stafford, son to Roger Tonei, Standard Bearer of Normandy, gave, not long after the Conquest, the Church of St. Peter, with some lands in this town, to the Abbey of Castellion, or Conches, in Normandy, founded by his said father, which were confirmed to them by Nicolas de Stafford, his son temp. Henry I and Robert de Stafford his grandson temp. Henry II; and hereupon a Cell of Benedictine Monks from that foreign Monastery was sent over hither, and continued here till the seisures of Alien Priories temp. Edw III. This was granted 22 Ric II to the Priory of St. Anne near Coventry, and afterward 22 Hen VI to the Provost and Scholars of Kings College in Cambridge, who stil enjoy the same.

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http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36525

43. THE PRIORY OF WOOTTON WAWEN

Not long after the Conquest, Robert de Tony gave the church of Wootton Wawen with all its tithes and oblations, and an adjacent hide of land, together with a hide at Doversele, to the Benedictine abbey of Conches, Normandy, which had been founded by his father Roger de Tony. These grants were confirmed by Nicholas de Stafford, the founder's son, temp. Henry I, and by Robert de Stafford his grandson, temp. Henry II. A small cell or priory of monks from Conches was established here by the founder. Henry I granted to the abbey of Conches that all men on their English lands were to be free, and that they were to be exempt from all manner of service and toll; moreover the monks were always to have free passage from the port of Dieppe.

The church was appropriated to the priory in 1178, and a vicarage ordained, which remained in the gift of the priory of Wootton or the abbey of Conches until it was made over to King's College, Cambridge, in the fifteenth century.

Among other benefactions to this priory were several parcels of land at Ullenhall, in this parish, by Robert de Stafford; a mill at Henley in Arden, by Henry de Montfort; lands at Mockley and Ullenhall, by Robert de Chaucombe; a virgate of land with croft and messuage and chapel at Burley, by William de Burley; lands at Buckley, by Godfrey de Pouncefote; and the manor of Monkenlane, and other tithes and lands in the county of Hereford. (fn. 1)

1. MSS. of King's Coll. Camb. cited in Dugdale, Warw. ii, 815, and in the Mon. vi, 994-5.

excerpted from 'Alien houses: Priory of Wootton Wawen', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 133-136. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36525 Date accessed: 16 January 2010.

-------------------------------

http://www.woottonwawen-pc.gov.uk/history/origins.htm

Early Development

A Brief Village History

In 1086, Wootton Wawen's entry in the Domesday book read as follows:

"Robert holds 7 hides in Wootton. Land for 9 ploughs. 23 villagers with a priest and 22 smallholders who have 6 ploughs. 2 mills at 11s and 8 sticks of eels; woodland 2 leagues long and 1 wide. Value £4. Waga held it freely." (A stick of eels consisted of 25, therefore payment of rent totalled 200 eels.)

Origins

The parish of Wootton Wawen lies on the southwestern edge of the Forest of Arden, which has stretched across Warwickshire since the Middle Stone Age. An Anglian tribe settled at Stoppingas, in the basin of the River Alne in early Saxon times. Known to the Celts as the Alwen, meaning "white", "bright" or "shining", the Alne rises at the edge of the Arden plateau and eventually joins the Avon. About ten miles of the river flows within Wootton Wawen parish, which once included Henley-in-Arden and the Chapelry of Ullenhall.

Wootton Wawen derives its name from "Wudutun" or "Uuidutuun", meaning an enclosure or village in or by a wood, and Wagen, the thane who gave his name to the settlement. In the Domesday Book of 1086, it is called "Wotone", but Wagen's name is also mentioned - "Waga held it freely". Over the centuries, the village's name has been spelt in a number of ways, for example; "Wagenes-Witone", "Waghnes Wotton", and "Wavens Wotton". However, "Wootton" has also been used since the 12th. century, and its present form, "Wootton Wawen" was in frequent use between the 15th. and 17th. centuries, although it is more commonly thought of as a 19th. and 20th. century version.

The Church at the Heart of the Early Settlement

19th Century Engraving of Wootton Wawen Church

The first wooden church was built at Wootton between 720 and 740 A.D, as a direct result of a charter granted by King Aethalbad of Mercia to Earl Aethelric for 20 hides of land, (around 2,000 acres) on which to build a monastery or minster of St. Mary. The first church may have been burnt and pillaged by Viking invaders, but between about 970 and 1040, Wagen, an Anglo-Danish landowner, established the present church.

Today, the remains of this stone church form the heart of the parish church of St. Peter's, including the lower two- thirds of the tower and the four arches enclosing the Saxon Sanctuary. Following the Norman Conquest of 1066, Wagen's lands were transferred to Robert of Stafford, formerly Robert de Tonei, and Wootton's church was given to the Abbey of Conches in Normandy, which had been founded in 1035 by Robert's father.

Conches Abbey was responsible for building a small priory opposite the church. Wootton was one of forty parishes and manors from which the Prior collected tithes and Papal taxes on behalf of the Abbey.

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Governor of Stafford Castle. Held 131 manors in Warwichshire and Lincolnshire. In his older age he became a monk at Eversham. Castellan of Stafford Castle and a Norman Magnate of some signifcance. He held as a under tenant of Roger de Montgomery.

view all 23

Robert of Tosny, Lord of Stafford's Timeline

1031
1031
Staffordshire, , England
1031
Tosni, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
1040
1040
Age 9
Tosni, Louviers, Eure, Normandy, France
1057
1057
Age 26
1065
1065
Age 34
Of,,,England
1070
1070
Age 39
1072
1072
Age 41
St Saveur, , Normandy, France
1076
1076
Age 45
France
1081
1081
Age 50
Stafford, Staffordshire, England
1088
August 4, 1088
Age 57
Staffordshire, Tunbridge, Kent, England