Roger I 'd'Espagne' de Tosny / Toni / Toeni, Standard Bearer of Normandy (990 - 1040) MP

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Nicknames: "Roger de Tosny", "Roger de Toni", "Roger de Toeni", "The Spaniard", "the Spaniard", "The Spainiard", "The Spainiard /Conches/", "The /Spainard/", "Roger de Tosni", "de Conches"
Birthplace: of Tosny, Eure, Haute Normandie, France, Conches-en-Ouches, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Conches-en-Ouches, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
Cause of death: killed in battle (along with two of his sons) by Roger I de Beaumont (son of Humphrey of Vieilles) during their rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy
Occupation: Standard Bearer of Normandy, aka "de Conches", Sieur, de Tosny, de Conches, Porte-Etendard, de Normandie, The Standard /Bearer/, the Spaniard, Seigneur de Toeni Lord of Conches
Managed by: Bianca May Evelyn Brennan
Last Updated:

About Roger I 'd'Espagne' de Tosny / Toni / Toeni, Standard Bearer of Normandy

Roger I "d'Espagne" or "Conches" de Tosny/Toeni, Seigneur de Conches

son of Raoul II de Tosny married to Adelaide de Barcelona and Godechilde.

FMG Medieval Lands:

ROGER [I] de Tosny [Conches] ([990]-killed in battle [1040]).

  • Guillaume de Jumièges names "Roger du Ternois, de la mauvaise race de Hulce…oncle du duc Rollon, et se battant avec lui contre les Francs avait jadis concouru par sa valeur à la conquête de la Normandie", recording that Roger was "porte-bannière de toute la Normandie" and left for Spain when Duke Robert II left on pilgrimage to Jerusalem but refused to serve Duke Guillaume II on returning to Normandy[1810].
  • The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" when recording that he left Normandy for Spain[1811].
  • The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" left Normandy for Spain with an army in 1015[1812].
  • He founded the abbey of Conches in 1035[1813].
  • He and his two sons "Helbert et Hélinant" were killed during his rebellion by "Roger de Beaumont"[1814]. "…Rogerii filii Radulfi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated "in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis" to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1815].
  • He left Normandy for Spain in [1030/35], fought against the Moors, and lived there for 15 years with his Spanish wife[1816].
  • "…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis" subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which "Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius" donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1817]. The apparent duplication of these names is difficult to explain.
  • "…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[1818].
  • Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1819].

[m firstly (1018 or soon after) ADELAIDA [Papia] de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BORELL I Conde de Barcelona & his wife Ermesinde de Carcassonne.

  • The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Normanni duce Rotgerio", who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked "comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua" for the hand of her daughter, but does not name the latter[1820].
  • It is not clear that "dux Rotgerius" is Roger de Conches, particularly as it seems surprising that Adémar would have accorded him the title "dux".
  • It is assumed that this marriage proposal took place in 1018 or soon after: if it had taken place much later, there would have been little reason to have referred to the bride's mother as "vidua". In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18.
  • The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis records that "Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis" married "sororem Raymundi-Berengarii Stephaniam" in Spain, specifying that she later married "rex Hispaniæ Garsias"[1821], but this account is even more confused and clearly conflates several different individuals. The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records the same marriage using the same wording[1822].
  • The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.]

m [secondly] as her first husband, GODECHILDIS, daughter of ---. Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of the widow of "Roger du Ternois" and "Richard comte d'Evreux et fils de Robert l'archevêque"[1823]. The Miracles of Sainte-Foy recount her being cured of a serious illness by miracle, when she was still married to her first husband[1824]. She married secondly Richard Comte d'Evreux.

Roger [I] & his [first/second] wife had four children:

a) HELBERT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Helbert et Hélinant" as the two sons of "Roger du Ternois" when recording that they were killed with their father by "Roger de Beaumont" during their rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in the early years of the duke's reign[1825].

b) HELINANT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Helbert et Hélinant" as the two sons of "Roger du Ternois" when recording that they were killed with their father by "Roger de Beaumont" during their rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in the early years of the duke's reign[1826].

c) VUASCO . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1037/1045.

d) ADELISA (-6 Oct ----, bur Abbaye de Lire).

  • Guillaume de Jumièges names "Adelise fille de Roger du Ternois" as wife of "Guillaume fils d'Osbern, proche parent du duc Guillaume", recording that her husband buried her in the monastery of Lire which he had built[1827].
  • Robert of Torigny's De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that "Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio" was buried in the monastery of Lire[1828].
  • The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "6 Oct" of "Adeliz uxor Willelmi hujus loci fundatoris"[1829]. The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death "6 Oct" of "mater Willelmi Britolii Adeliza"[1830].

m as his first wife, GUILLAUME FitzOsbern Seigneur de Breteuil, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d'Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Corneilles).

Roger [I] & his [second] wife had one child:

e) RAOUL [III] de Tosny (-24 Mar[1831] [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre). “Radulphus de Tony cum Godehelde matre mea” donated property to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by undated charter[1832].

=============================

Roger I of Tosny

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Roger I of Tosny or Roger of Hispania[1] was a Norman nobleman of the House of Tosny who took part in the Reconquista of Iberia. He was the son of Raoul I of Tosny.

In 1013, Roger and his father Raoul I guarded the castle at Tillières for Richard II, Duke of Normandy. A few years later, for an unknown reason, the pair were forced into exile.

While his father gained a reputation for himself in Apulia, Roger did the same in fighting the Muslims in Iberia. The small Christian states of Northern Iberia welcomed volunteers and adventurers who they could use to mount a strong force for the Reconquista.

Roger was summoned by Ermessenda, regent-countess of Barcelona after the death of her husband Ramon Borrell, to help her against the Muslim threat to her power. Roger rushed to help, marrying Ermesende's daughter[2], terrorising the Saracens and capturing several towns and castles.

Adémar de Chabannes gives an echo of the more or less legendary deeds of Roger in Iberia. He gained the nickname Mangeur de Maures (Moor-Eater). Adémar recounts that Roger took his captured Saracens each day and, in front of them, cut one of their number in two, boiling the first half and giving it to the other Muslims to eat, and pretending to take the other half into his own tent for him and his companions to eat. Then Roger allowed some of these prisoners to escape, to spread these horrific rumours.[3].

Before 1024, Roger and his father gained permission from Richard II to return to Normandy, and Raoul died soon afterwards.

Roger de Tosny founded Conches-en-Ouche. He built its church of Sainte-Foy[4] (before 1026) then the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Castillon (c. 1035) where monks from Fécamp Abbey were installed. This monastery was one of the first baronial foundations in Normandy[5] The foundation charter reveals that the lord of Tosny gave it a small possession around Conches and his forest.

In 1035, Robert I's death began a troubled period in the duchy of Normandy. Civil wars multiplied and Roger (whose relations with his neighbours was already argumentative) was one of the main players in them. According to the Norman chroniclers[6], the lord of Tosny refused to serve the new duke, the future William the Conqueror, due to his being a bastard. He especially took advantage of the weakness of the duke's power by ravaging his neighbours' lands, notably those of Humphrey of Vieilles. Humphrey sent his son Roger to face Roger of Tosny, and around 1040 the latter was killed in battle, and his two eldest sons[7] died a few weeks later of their wounds.

Peace was re-established between the Tosny family and the neighbouring families. The widow Gotelina/Godehildis was forced to marry Richard, Count of Évreux.

Family and descendents

Married :

  • Adelaide, daughter of Ermesende, countess of Barcelona
  • Gotelina/Godehildis who married, after the death of Roger count of Évreux, Richard

Children :

  • Helbert (died 1040 with his father),
  • Elinand, (idem),
  • Raoul II of Tosny, successor of his father
  • Robert of Tosny, lord of Stafford [NOTE: THIS IS QUESTIONABLE]
  • Béranger l'Espagnol, [NOT listed by FMG]
  • Adelise, married Guillaume Fils Osbern
  • Berthe, married Guy de Laval [NOT listed by FMG]
  • One other son

References

  1. ^ A name given him by Orderic Vitalis.
  2. ^ However, the marriage in Barcelona is uncertain. Gotelina/Godehildis, Roger's only wife to be known by name, was not Iberian but it is not known if she was his second or first wife. See Lucien Musset, "Aux origines d'une classe dirigeante : les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIe siècle", Sonderdruck aus Francia Forschungen zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, Munich, 1978, p.53.
  3. ^ Chronique d'Adhémar de Chabanais, éd. J. Chavanon, Paris, 1897, p.178-179
  4. ^ Its dedication was linked to the abbey of Sainte-Foy de Conques in Rouergue which Roger probably passed on his way out of Normandy or on his return from Iberia. See Lucien Musset, le nom de Conches « semble n'être qu'une simple transposition en langue d'oïl de celui de Conques »
  5. ^ Before this, creating or restoring monasteries had been a right reserved to the duke of Normandy alone.
  6. ^ Guillaume de Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis, Robert de Torigni, Histoire des Normands, éd. Guizot, Paris, 1826, p.169-170
  7. ^ Robert de Grandmesnil, ally of Roger I de Tosny

Bibliography

   * (French) Lucien Musset, « Aux origines d'une classe dirigeante : les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIe siècle », Sonderdruck aus Francia Forschungen zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, Munich, 1978, pp. 45–80
   * Élisabeth Van Houts, The Normans in Europe, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2000 (Online extracts on Google Books)
   * Lucas Villegas-Aristizabal ,"Algunas notas sobre la participación de Rogelio de Tosny en la Reconquista Ibérica", Estudios Humanísticos de la Universidad de Leon, III, 2004, pp. 263–74. http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=1078914
   * Lucas Villegas-Aristizabal, "Roger of Tosny's adventures in the County of Barcelona", Nottingham Medieval Studies LII, 2008, pp. 5–16.

________________________________________________

Roger Ier de Tosny

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Ier_de_Tosny

Roger Ier de Tosny ou Roger d'Espagne († 1040), est le second membre de la famille de Tosny, un important lignage aristocratique du duché de Normandie. Il participe à la Reconquista espagnole, d'où son autre nom Roger d'Espagne[1].

Biographie

En 1013, Roger garde avec son père Raoul Ier le château de Tillières pour le compte du duc Richard II de Normandie. Quelques années plus tard, pour une raison inconnue, les deux doivent s'exiler. Alors que le père s'illustre en Pouille, Roger se fait un nom en combattant les Musulmans en Espagne. Les petits États chrétiens du Nord accueillent volontiers les aventuriers qui peuvent leur prêter main forte pour la Reconquista. Le Normand est appelé par Ermesende, (voir : Ermessende de Carcassonne), comtesse régente de Barcelone après la mort de son mari Raymond Borrell de Barcelone (972-1017), car le roi musulman Musetus menace son pouvoir. Roger accourt, épouse la fille de la comtesse, — (Le mariage barcelonais est incertain. Gotelina/Godehildis, l'épouse connue de Roger n'était pas espagnole mais est-ce sa première femme[2] ?) — terrorise les Sarrasins et leur prend beaucoup de villes et de châteaux.

Adhémar de Chabanais se fait l'écho des exploits plus ou moins légendaires de Roger. Il y a gagne le surnom de Mangeur de Maures. Adhémar de Chabanais raconte que chaque jour, Roger capturait des Sarrasins. Devant eux, il en coupait un en deux. La première moitié était bouillie et donnée à manger aux autres Musulmans. En ce qui concerne l'autre moitié, le Normand prétendait la ramener à la maison pour ses compagnons et lui. Roger permettait ensuite à quelques captifs de s'enfuir de manière à ce qu'ils colportent ses horreurs[3].

Avant 1024, Roger, ainsi que son père, obtiennent du duc Richard II l'autorisation de revenir en Normandie. Le père meurt peu après.

Roger de Tosny est le véritable fondateur de Conches-en-Ouche. Il y construit l'église Sainte-Foy[4] (avant 1026) puis l'abbaye Saint-Pierre de Castillon (vers 1035) où des moines de Fécamp s'installent. Ce monastère est l'un des premiers de fondation baroniale en Normandie[5]. La charte de fondation révèle que le seigneur de Tosny a un noyau de possession autour de Conches et de sa forêt.

En 1035, la mort du duc Robert le Magnifique inaugure une période de troubles dans le duché. Les guerres privées se multiplient et Roger, dont les relations avec ses voisins paraissent avoir été déjà conflictuelles, en est un des principaux acteurs. Selon les chroniqueurs normands[6], le seigneur de Tosny refuse de servir le nouveau duc, le futur Guillaume le Conquérant, en raison de sa bâtardise. Il profite surtout de la faiblesse du pouvoir ducal pour ravager les terres de ses voisins, notamment celles d'Onfroy de Vieilles. Ce dernier envoie alors son fils Roger combattre le remuant voisin. Vers 1040, ce dernier trouve la mort dans une bataille ainsi que ses deux fils aînés[7], meurt quelques semaines après des suites de ses blessures.

La paix est rétablie la famille de Tosny et ses voisins. La veuve Gotelina/Godehildis doit épouser Richard comte d'Évreux.

Famille et descendance

Père : Raoul Ier de Tosny

Épouse :

  • La fille anonyme de la comtesse de Barcelone Ermesende (?)
  • Gotelina/Godehildis qui épouse après la mort de Roger le comte d'Évreux, Richard

Enfants :

  • Helbert (mort en 1040 avec son père),
  • Elinand, (idem),
  • Raoul II de Tosny, successeur de son père
  • Robert de Tosny, seigneur de Stafford, [SEE ABOVE NOTE]
  • Béranger l'Espagnol, [SEE ABOVE NOTE]
  • Adelise, épouse de Guillaume Fils Osbern
* Berthe, épouse de Guy de Laval [SEE ABOVE NOTE]
  • Un autre fils

Notes et références

  1. ↑ Nommé ainsi par Orderic Vital
  2. ↑ Lucien Musset, « Aux origines d'une classe dirigeante : les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIe siècle », Sonderdruck aus Francia Forschungen zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, Munich, 1978, p.53.
  3. ↑ Chronique d'Adhémar de Chabanais, éd. J. Chavanon, Paris, 1897, p.178-179
  4. ↑ La dédicace de ce sanctuaire est liée à l'abbaye Sainte-Foy de Conques en Rouergue où probablement Roger passa à son départ de Normandie ou à son retour d'Espagne. Selon Lucien Musset, le nom de Conches « semble n'être qu'une simple transposition en langue d'oïl de celui de Conques »
  5. ↑ Auparavant, la création ou la restauration de monastères provenaient d'une initiative ducale
  6. ↑ Guillaume de Jumièges, Orderic Vital, Robert de Torigni, Histoire des Normands, éd. Guizot, Paris, 1826, p.169-170
  7. ↑ Robert de Grandmesnil, allié de Roger Ier de Tosny

Voir aussi

   * Famille de Tosny
   * Duché de Normandie

Bibliographie

   * Lucien Musset, « Aux origines d'une classe dirigeante : les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIe siècle », Sonderdruck aus Francia Forschungen zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, Munich, 1978, p.45-80
   * Élisabeth Van Houts, The Normans in Europe, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2000 (Extraits en ligne sur Google Books)
   * Martin Aurell, Les Noces du comte. Mariage et pouvoir en Catalogne (785-1213), Paris, Publications de la Sorbonne, 1995,p. 56-58.
   * Lucas Villegas Aristizábal, « Algunas notas sobre la participación de Rogelio de Tosny en la reconquista Ibérica », Estudios humanísticos. Historia, nº3, 2004, p.263-274

--------------------

seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I1

b. circa 990, d. 1038/39

Father seigneur de Tosni et Conches Ralph de Tosny II2 b. circa 965?

Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I was born circa 990.3 He was the son of seigneur de Tosni et Conches Ralph de Tosny II.2 Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I joined with his father in the custody of the castle of Tillières in 1013/14.1 He married Godeheut (?); His 2nd.4 Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I attested a charter of Robert I for St. Wandrille in 1031/32.5 He was a powerful and haughty man and standard-bearer of all Normandy.2,1 He distinguished himself in fighting the infidels when he went to Spain while Duke Robert was away on pilgrimage circa 1034.6 He founded the abbey of Châtillion or Conches circa 1035.6 He rebelled against the appointment of William, Duke Robert II's bastard son, as Duke of Normandy.6 He married Adelaide de Barcelona, daughter of Ramón Borrell, conde de Barcelona and Ermesinde, regente de Barcelona; Her 1st.7 Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I died in 1038/39. He was killed, with two of his sons, in battle against Roger de Beaumont.8 Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny I was buried in Conches.4

Family 1

Godeheut (?)

Children

Adelise de Tosny+ b. c 1025?9

Ralph de Tosny of Flamstead+ b. bt 1025 - 1030, d. 24 Mar 1101/29

Robert de Stafford+ b. c 1035?, d. 10889

Family 2

Adelaide de Barcelona b. 1004, d. 1051

Citations

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:755.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VI:448.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:755, about 990.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:756/7.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:755, 1031 or 1032.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:756.

[S1316] Reyes y Reinos Genealogias, online www.homar.org, España - 09.F.

[S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, XII/1:Tony:756/7, 1038 or 1039.

[S643] E.Domesday, online http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/book.html

--------------------

Seigneur de Tosni et Conches Roger de Tosny joined with his father in the custody of the castle of Tillières in 1013/14.

James Bulkeley, La Hougue Bie de Hambie: a tradition of Jersey. Volume 2. London: Gilbert & Rivington, Whitaker & Company, 1837. (Google Books)

Notes to Vol. 1 pp. 195-202 "p. 75 (55.) The constable Gislebert Crispin' Based on Roman de Rou, which is interspersed throughout... summary:

  • Count Eudes of Chartres married Maud, the sister of Duke Richard II, and received in dowry the seigneuries of Dreux and other domains. When Maud died with no children, Richard tried to retake the city Dreux and castle of Tillières back from Eudes by force.
  • He "confided his defences" to Néel de Saint-Sauveur, to Ralph, and to this son Roger de Toesny and de Couches [Conches]
  • Eudes of Chartres allied himself to Valeran de Meulan, Hugh Count of Maine, and a reinforcement of French troops
  • Néel commanded the center, defending the main road into the castle; Ralph the right wing, and Roger the left.
  • Three divisions of Eudes' troops: (1) the troops of Chartres and Blois led by Eudes, (2) those of France and Maine by Count Hugh of Maine, and (3) those of Meulan by Valeran.
  • Néel's column was attacked, but with the aid of Roger's and Ralphs' forces, the Normans routed the Counts of Chartres and Meulan, causing the Count of Maine to flee. When his horse died, he disguised himself as a peasant and was able to escape capture.

The castle of Tillières, as a gateway to Chartres and France, became "of couble consquence to [Duke] Robert," and he gave command of it to Gilbert Crispin, Lord of Bec-Crispin. Later, King Henry of France, along with a group of disaffected Norman barons, "advanced a powerful army on Dreux" to persuade Duke William to raze the fortress. Crispin, indignant, "increased the garrison of the castle" but "could not overcome the brave resistance of the beseiged, or the virtuous obstinacy of the faithful Gilbert Crispin," who had pledged to turn it over only to the Duke, which he died, and Duke William in turn delivered it to King Henry, who "enveloped it in flames." The castle was later ceded by Henry to William after the Battle of Veraville, who named Gilbert's second son, also named Gilbert, as constable in remembrance of his father's loyalty. This younger Gilbert followed Duke William to the Conquest.

--------------------------------

Roger attested a charter of Duke Robert I for St. Wandrille in 1031/32.

Roger was a powerful and haughty man and standard-bearer of all Normandy. He distinguished himself in fighting the infidels when he went to Spain while Duke Robert was away on pilgrimage circa 1034.

Roger founded the abbey of Châtillion or Conches circa 1035.

Roger rebelled against the appointment of William, Duke Robert II's bastard son, as Duke of Normandy.

Roger married Adelaide de Barcelona, daughter of Ramón Borrell, conde de Barcelona and Ermesinde, regente de Barcelona.

Roger was killed, with two of his sons, in battle against Roger de Beaumont. He was buried in Conches.

---------------------------------------

Roger was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his daughter Adelise and through his son Ralph, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p340.htm#i18675 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

--------------------==

-------------------- Roger de Toeni, also called Roger de Conches; fought Muslims in Spain; married 1st? Stephanie (m. 2nd Garsias, King of Spain) sister of Raymond Berenger, Count of Barcelona; married 2nd? Godeheut (m. 2nd Richard, 3rd Count of Evereux), and died

1038 or 1039 in battle against a neighboring noble whose territory he had overrun in a revolt against the succession of William I the Conqueror to his father's Norman possessions on the grounds that William was illegitimate. [Burke's Peerage]

ROGER DE TOENI I, styled also DE CONCHES, son and heir, was born probably about 990, for as stated above he was joined with his father in the custody of the castle of Tillières in 1013 or 1014. He was a powerful and haughty man, and

banner-bearer of all Normandy. In 1031 or 1032 he attested a charter of Robert I for St. Wandrille. About 1035 he founded the abbey of Chatillon or Conches. While Duke Robert was away on pilgrimage, he went to Spain and distinguished himself in

fighting the infidels (b). When he returned to Normandy, he was furious to learn that the boy William had succeeded his father in the Duchy, declaring that a bastard ought not to rule over him and other Normans. Accordingly he rebelled and

ravaged the lands of his neighbours, particularly those of Humphrey de Vieilles; whose son Roger de Beaumont marched against him, and in the battle which followed Roger de Toeni and two of his sons were slain. He was a benefactor to the abbey

of I'Estrée and confirmed a gift to the abbey of Lire, and witnessed a charter for Jumièges. He married, perhaps 2ndly,[g] Godeheut, whose parentage is unknown. He died as above, probably in 1038 or 1039, and was buried 1 May at Conches. His

widow married Richard, 3rd COUNT OF EVREUX. She was a benefactor to Conches. Complete Peerage XII/1:755-7,

(b) Will. de Jumieges, p. 157---by Orderic. In consequence he was styled sometimes Roger of Spain (Orderic, vol i, p. 180; vol iii, p. 338), or Roger the Spaniard (Idem, vol ii, p. 64). However, if the Roger, son of Count Rodulf (cf, p. 755,

note "a" above), who according to the Sens Chron. led an army from Normandy to Spain, can be identified with Roger de Toeni, he is said to have gone there at a much earlier date; and after defeating the Saracens, is said to have married a

Spanish woman and lived there for 15 years. Then owing to the treachery of the natives he lost most of his men and, leaving his wife in Spain, he returned to Normandy; where he made a concord with Duke Richard, who was displeased at the loss of

his army. Afterwards Roger was killed, fighting against a certain neighbor (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p. 223). This Roger's feats in Spain are recorded also by Ademar, who calls him simply Roger, and does not say how long he stayed there

(Idem, p. 156). No other Norman than Roger de Toeni seems to be known, who could be identified with the hero of these stories. Cf. Prentout, op. cit., p. 86. See also p. 755, note (a) above and note (g) below. See "Tony of Belvoir", Charles

Evans, "Geneal. Mag.", vol 15, 1968, pp. 616-18. [last sentence, referencing Charles Evans, added by CP XIV:613]

[g] Roger, son of Count Rodulf (see note "b" above), married, in Spain, Stephanie, sister of Raymond Berenger; which lady afterwards m. Garsias, King of Spain (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p. 223). This agrees with the statement of Ademar,

that he m. a da. (unnamed) of the widowed Ermensede, Countess of Barcelona ((Idem, p. 156), the mother of Raymond abovenamed. If this Roger were Roger de Toeni, he married Godeheut while his 1st wife was alive, and Stephanie m. Garsias III,

King of Navarre, while Roger was living.

-------------------- "standard bearer of Normandie" -------------------- In 1013 Roger and his father Ralph II guarded the castle at Tillières for Richard II, Duke of Normandy. A few years later, for an unknown reason, the pair were forced into exile. While his father gained a reputation for himself in Apulia, Roger did the same in fighting the Muslims in Iberia. The small Christian states of Northern Iberia welcomed volunteers and adventurers who they could use to mount a strong force for the Reconquista. Roger was summoned by Ermessenda, regent-countess of Barcelona after the death of her husband Ramon Borrell, to help her against the Muslim threat to her power. Roger rushed to help, marrying Ermesende's daughter, terrorising the Saracens and capturing several towns and castles. Adémar de Chabannes gives an echo of the more or less legendary deeds of Roger in Iberia. He gained the nickname Mangeur de Maures (Moor Eater). Adémar recounts that Roger took his captured Saracens each day and, in front of them, cut one of their number in two, boiling the first half and giving it to the other Muslims to eat and pretending to take the other half into his own tent for him and his companions to eat. Then Roger allowed some of these prisoners escape to spread these horrific rumours.

Before 1024 Roger and his father gained permission from Richard II to return to Normandy and Ralph died soon afterwards.

Roger de Toeni founded Conches-en-Ouche. He built its church of Sainte-Foy (before 1026) then the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Castillon (c. 1035) where monks from Fécamp Abbey were installed. This monastery was one of the first baronial foundations in Normandy. The foundation charter reveals that the Lord of Toeni gave it a small possession around Conches and his forest.

In 1035 Robert I's death began a troubled period in the Duchy of Normandy. Civil wars multiplied and Roger (whose relations with his neighbours were already argumentative) was one of the main players in them. According to the Norman chroniclers the Lord of Toeni refused to serve the new Duke, the future William the Conqueror, due to his being a bastard. He especially took advantage of the weakness of the Duke's power by ravaging his neighbours' lands, notably those of Humphrey of Vieilles. Humphrey sent his son Roger to face Roger of Toeni and around 1040 the latter was killed in battle and his two eldest sons died a few weeks later of their wounds.

Peace was re-established between the Toeni family and the neighbouring families. The widow Gotelina/Godehildis was forced to marry Richard, Count of Évreux.

Married :

Daughter of Ermesende, countess of Barcelona Gotelina/Godehildis who married, after the death of Roger, Count of Évreux, Richard.

Children :

Helbert (died 1040 with his father). Elinand, (idem). Ralph II de Toeni successor of his father. Robert de Toeni lord of Stafford. Béranger l'Espagnol. Adelise, married Guillaume Fils Osbern. Berthe, married Guy de Laval. One other son. 24 -------------------- Note:

   Also Known As:<_AKA> Roger de /Todeni/, Lord of Guerny
   -------------------------------
   Roger de Toeni, also called Roger de Conches; fought Muslims in Spain;married 1st? Stephanie (m. 2nd Garsias, King of Spain) sister of RaymondBerenger, Count of Barcelona; married 2nd ? Godeheut (m. 2nd Richard, 3rdCount of Evereux), and died 1038 or 1039 in battle against a neighboringnoble whose territory he had over run in a revolt against the successionof William I the Conqueror to his father's Norman possessions on thegrounds that William was illegitimate. [Burke's Peerage]
   According to BP, Roger married two different women as 1st husband, bothmarried later husbands. There is no explanation given. Did the firstmarriage end in divorce? As stated above, I am treating the women as thesame person.
   ------------------------------
   ROGER DE TOENI I, styled also DE CONCHES, son and heir, was born probablyabout 990, for as stated above he was joined with his father in thecustody of the castle of Tillières in 1013 or 1014. He was a powerful andhaughty man, and banner-bearer of all Normandy. In 1031 or 1032 heattested a charter of Robert I for St. Wandrille. About 1035 hefoundedthe abbey of Chatillon or Conches. While Duke Robert was away onpilgrimage, he went to Spain and distinguished himself in fighting theinfidels (b). When he returned to Normandy, he was furious to learn thatthe boy William had succeeded his father in the Duchy, declaring that abastard ought not to rule over him and other Normans. Accordingly herebelled and ravaged the lands of his neighbours, particularly those ofHumphrey de Vieilles; whose son Roger de Beaumont marched against him,and in the battle which followed Roger de Toeni and two of his sons wereslain. He was a benefactor to the abbey of I'Estrée and confirmed a giftto the abbey of Lire, and witnessed a charter for Jumièges. He married,perhaps 2ndly,[g] Godeheut, whose parentage is unknown. He died as above,probably in 1038 or 1039, and was buried 1 May at Conches. His widowmarried Richard, 3rd COUNT OF EVREUX. She was a benefactor to Conches.[Complete Peerage XII/1:755-7, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
   (b) Will. de Jumieges, p. 157---by Orderic. In consequence he was styledsometimes Roger of Spain (Orderic, vol i,p. 180; vol iii, p. 338), orRoger the Spaniard (Idem, vol ii, p. 64). However, if the Roger, son ofCount Rodulf (cf, p. 755, note "a" above), who according to the SensChron. led an army from Normandy to Spain, can be identified withRoger deToeni, he is said to have gone there at a much earlier date; and afterdefeating the Saracens, is said to have married a Spanish woman andlivedthere for 15 years. Then owing to the treachery of the natives helost most of hismen and, leaving his wife in Spain, he returned toNormandy; where he made a concord with Duke Richard, who was displeasedat the loss of his army. Afterwards Roger was killed, fighting against acertain neighbor (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p. 223). This Roger'sfeats in Spain are recorded also by Ademar, who calls him simply Roger,and does not say how long he stayed there (Idem, p.156). No other Normanthan Roger de Toeni seems to be known, who could be identified with thehero of these stories. Cf. Prentout, op. cit., p. 86. See also p. 755,note (a) above and note (g) below. See "Tony of Belvoir", Charles Evans,"Geneal. Mag.", vol 15, 1968, pp. 616-18. [last sentence, referencingCharles Evans, added by CP XIV:613]
   [g] Roger, son of Count Rodulf (see note "b" above), married, in Spain,Stephanie, sister of Raymond Berenger; whichlady afterwards m. Garsias,King of Spain (Rec. des Hist. de France, vol x, p.223). This agrees withthe statement of Ademar,
   With his father, he was given partial custody of the castle of Tillieresin 1013/14. He was a haughty and powerful man--the banner bearer of allNormandy. He founded the abbey of Conches i n 1035. While duke Robertwas away on pilgrimage, Roger went to Spain and had a distinguishedcareer fighting the infidel there. While in Spain, he married, eitherEtienette of Barcelona or, according to later research, Adelaide ofBarcelona. He left her behind when, due to the treachary of some of thenatives, he had to leave Spain.When he returned to Normandy, he was furious to learn that the boy William has succeeded his father as Du ke,declaring that a bastard ought not rule over himand other Normans. Rogerimmediately rebelled, ravaging the lands of his neighbors, particularythose of Humphrey De Vielles. Humphrey' s son, Roger de Beaumont, killedRoger and two of his sons in battle in 1038/39.
   There has long been controversy regarding Roger's wife/wives. Roger wasexiled, and ended up "crusading" in and around Barcelona. Sources fromthat area report that he married an unnamed daughter of the countess ofBarcelona (widow of Ramon Borrell). Norman sources only show him marriedto a Godeheut, who as his widow remarried. Was Adelaide/Adele his firstwife and Godeheut his second? Was Godeheut the Norman name for theBarcelona princess?
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Roger I 'd'Espagne' de Tosny / Toni / Toeni, Standard Bearer of Normandy's Timeline

990
990
Conches-en-Ouches, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
1018
1018
Age 28
Spain
1027
1027
Age 37
Of, Tosni, , France
1028
1028
Age 38
Guerny, Eure, Normandy, France
1029
1029
Age 39
1029
Age 39
Flamstead or Dacorum District, Hertfordshire, England
1030
1030
Age 40
Haute-Normandie, France
1031
1031
Age 41
Tosni, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
1033
1033
Age 43
Of, Tosni, , France
1035
1035
Age 45
Of, Tosni, , France