Roger North (1638 - 1701)

‹ Back to North surname

Is your surname North?

Research the North family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: of Newcastle, Westmeath, Ireland
Death: Died in of Newcastle, Westmeath, Ireland
Occupation: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
Managed by: Scott Ronald Fleischer
Last Updated:

About Roger North

Born before 1635

The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the King's representative and head of the Irish executive during the Lordship of Ireland (1171–1541), the Kingdom of Ireland (1541–1800) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1922). The term is always pronounced as 'Lord Lef-tenant of Ireland'.[citation needed]

The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the viceroy, from the French vice roi or deputy king, with his consort known as the Vicereine. Although in the Middle Ages some Lords Deputy had been Irish noblemen, after that, with the very odd exception, only noblemen from Great Britain were appointed to the office.

Prior to the Act of Union 1800 which abolished the Irish parliament, the Lord Lieutenant formally delivered the Speech from the Throne outlining his Government's policies. His Government exercised effective control of parliament through the extensive exercise of the powers of patronage, namely the awarding of peerages, baronetcies and state honours. Critics accused successive viceroys of using their patronage power as a corrupt means of controlling parliament. On one day in July 1777, Lord Buckinghamshire as Lord Lieutenant upgraded 5 viscounts to earls, 7 barons to viscounts, and created 18 new barons.[1] The power of patronage was used to bribe MPs and peers into supporting the Act of Union 1800, with many of those who changed sides and supported the Union in Parliament awarded peerages and honours for doing so.

Until the 1500s Irish or Anglo-Irish noblemen such as the 8th Earl of Kildare and the 9th Earl of Kildare traditionally held the post of Judiciar or Lord Deputy. Following the plantations, however, noblemen from Great Britain were given the post. The last Irish Catholic to hold the position was Lord Tyrconnell from 1685-91, during the brief Catholic Ascendancy in the reign of James II that was ended by the Williamite war in Ireland. Until 1767 none of the latter lived full time in Ireland. Instead they resided in Ireland during meetings of the Irish Parliament (a number of months every two years). However the British cabinet decided in 1765 that full time residency should be required to enable the Lord Lieutenant to keep a full time eye on public affairs in Ireland.[2]

In addition to the restriction that only English or British noblemen could be appointed to the viceroyalty, a further restriction following the Glorious Revolution excluded Roman Catholics, though it was the overwhelming faith of the majority on the island of Ireland, from holding the office. The office was restricted to members of the Anglican faith. The first Catholic appointed to the post since the reign of the Catholic King James II was in fact the last viceroy, Lord FitzAlan of Derwent, in April 1921.

-------------------- Of Newcastle.

-------------------- Of Newcastle.

view all 13

Roger North's Timeline

1638
1638
of Newcastle, Westmeath, Ireland
1649
1649
Age 11
Ireland
1675
1675
Age 37
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland
1676
1676
Age 38
of Newcastle, Westmeath, Ireland
1678
1678
Age 40
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland
1678
Age 40
of Kilbride, Westmeath, Ireland
1682
1682
Age 44
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland
1684
1684
Age 46
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland
1686
1686
Age 48
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland
1688
1688
Age 50
of Newcastle Clonfad, Westmeath, Ireland