Roger de Vieilles de Beaumont, comte de Meulan (1022 - 1094) MP

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Nicknames: "Barbatus", "la Barbe", "le Barbu", "Roger /de Beaumont/", "Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven.", "also known as Roger de Bellomont Earl of Mellent", "La Barbe"
Birthplace: Pont-Audemer, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Abbey,Preaux,Normandy,France
Occupation: Lord of Beaumont, Sn de Beaumont et de Pont-Audomer
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Roger de Vieilles de Beaumont, comte de Meulan

Roger de Beaumont http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Beaumont

Roger de Beaumont (le Barbu) http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Beaumont_%28le_Barbu%29

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Beaumont

(Numerous Geni managers have Roger's birth as 1022, but this Wiki article state c1015. Please delete this comment if resolved. Arthur Jackson)

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Birth Date 1049 or 1020

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Roger de Beaumont

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Life

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the forty-first panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

Family and children

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

Roger de Beaumont in Literature

Roger de Beaumont appears as a minor character (the overlord of the secondary hero) in Georgette Heyer's historical novel The Conqueror. His family appears little in the book, but reference is made to Roger's wife and daughters and his eldest son.

External links

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 50-24, 151-24.

Beaumont genealogy , to be used with caution (check soc.genealogy.medieval)

The Conqueror and His Companions: Robert de Beaumont (link now broken)

Sources

Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

J.R. Planché. The Conqueror and His Companions. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.

--------------------

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Life

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

Family and children

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

Roger de Beaumont in Literature

Roger de Beaumont appears as a minor character (the overlord of the secondary hero) in Georgette Heyer's historical novel The Conqueror. His family appears little in the book, but reference is made to Roger's wife and daughters and his eldest son.

External links

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 50-24, 151-24.

Beaumont genealogy , to be used with caution (check soc.genealogy.medieval)

The Conqueror and His Companions: Robert de Beaumont (link now broken)

Sources

Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

J.R. Planché. The Conqueror and His Companions. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1874.

--------------------

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

  1. Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.
  2. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.
  3. William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).
  4. Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

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Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

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Roger de Beaumont

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about a French nobleman. For bishop of St Andrews, see Roger de Beaumont (bishop).

Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Life

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

[edit]Family and children

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

[edit]Roger de Beaumont in Literature

Roger de Beaumont appears as a minor character (the overlord of the secondary hero) in Georgette Heyer's historical novel The Conqueror. His family appears little in the book, but reference is made to Roger's wife and daughters and his eldest son.

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http://www.thepeerage.com/p381.htm#i3810

Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer

M, #3810, d. 29 November 1094

Last Edited=12 Jun 2009

    Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer was the son of Humphrey de Vieilles, Seigneur de Vielles et Pont-Audemer and Aubreye (?).1 He died on 29 November 1094.
    Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer was also known as Roger de Bellomont, Earl of Mellent.2 He gained the title of Seigneur de Portaudemer.

Child of Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer

Anice (?)3

Children of Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer and Adeline de Meulan

Henry de Newburgh, 1st Earl of Warwick+2 d. 1123

Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester+ b. c 1046, d. 5 Jun 1118

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VII, page 521. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 167.

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Le Barbu

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Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

Life

Roger was nicknamed Barbatus or La Barbe because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast with Duke William on his left hand, Odo, brother of William and Bishop of Bayeux, in the centre.

Planché tells us that "he was the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish family." There is an explanation for this - as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn notes that William relied on relatives descended via his mother (namely his half-brothers and brothers-in-law) and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

Wace, the 12th century historian, says that "at the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but that he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years." Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing his share of the cost, for he provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were awarded rich lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror.

Family and children

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

  1. Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.
  2. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.
  3. William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).
  4. Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

Roger de Beaumont in Literature

Roger de Beaumont appears as a minor character (the overlord of the secondary hero) in Georgette Heyer's historical novel The Conqueror. His family appears little in the book, but reference is made to Roger's wife and daughters and his eldest son.

--------------------

Note:

   CHARLEMAGNE, Holy Roman EMPEROR is the 8th great-grandfather of Roger DeBEAUMONT Count.
   Roger de Beaumont; Seigneur (feudal Lord) of Beaumont, Pontaudemer,Brionne and Vatteville, Normandy; married Adeline, sister of Hugh Countof Meulan and daughter by his 1st wife of Waleran Count ofMeulan.[Burke's Peerage]
   ---------------------------------------
   The well-known Roger de Beaumont held Sturminster Marshal, Dorset, in1086; it descended to the counts of Meulan through Roger's eldest son,Robert count of Meulan. That Roger took his name from Beaumont is a partofthe general history of Normandy. It follows that Roger's descendants,the counts of Meulan, the Earls of Leicester, and the Earls of Warwick,all derive from Beaumont-le-Roger. [The Origins of Some Anglo-NormanFamilies]
   Roger was one of the most powerful noblemen of his era. He furnishedsixty warships for William the Conqueror's invasion fleet, but remainedbehind to govern Normandy in William's absence. In later life, he becamea monk.

-------------------- Roger de Beaumont-le-Roger (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094) was son of Humphrey de Vielles (himself a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) and his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont, Lord of Beaumont-le-Roger and Pont-Audemer, Viscount of Hiesmes, was thus a second cousin once removed of the Conqueror.

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton. -------------------- ROGER DE BEAUMONT; SIRE, (Count de Meullant): was born about 1010 of Pont Audemer, Normandy, France and succeeded to the family estates in Normandy, as Sire du Ponteaudemer, Seigneur de Veulles, Préaux, Torville, and du Ponteaitorf, and Seigneur de Beaumont (or Bellomont), by which last name he came to be generally described. By his marriage he greatly increased the possessions and prestige of the family, and he rose to be one of the most powerful feudal noblemen of his age in Normandy. When William the Conqueror invaded England in 1066, Roger de Beaumont furnished sixty armed vessels for the fleet and was left in charge of the government of Normandy when the Conqueror started on the expedition. There is some debate as to whether Roger accompanied William and was at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and afterwards was sent back to govern Normandy. He munificently endowed the Abbey of Préaux, of which late in life he became a monk; and he died in 1094 at advanced age and was buried in this monastery, the Abbey de Préaux, Ponteaudemer, Normandy. He married in Ponteaudemer, Normandy about 1040, ADELINE DE MEULLANT born 1014 of Pontaudemer, Normandy, France and daughter of and eventually sole heiress of Waleran, Comte de Meullant, a great feudal nobleman of France. Adeline died in 1081.

Children: Abbot William, Abbess Albrede, Earl Robert, Earl Henry (c.1045) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Earl of Meulan Roger Beaumont Roger was born in 1022 in Pontaudemer, Normandy, France.1 Roger's father was Seigneur de Beaumont Humphrey de Harcourt and his mother was Nevia Snendsdatter. His paternal grandparents were Tourude de Harcourt and Senfrie (Eva) de Crepon; his maternal grandparents were King Sveyn (Forkbeard) Haraldsson of Denmark I and Gunhild of Poland. He was an only child. He died at the age of 72 on November 29th, 1094 in St. Pierre, Point Audemer, Normandy.1

Ancestor Pedigree Chart

Lived 1022 - 29 Nov 1094

son Earl of Warwick Henry de Beaumont 1045 - 20 Jun 1123

son 1st Earl of Leicester Robert de Beaumont I 1046 - 05 Jun 1118

Click here for details of Roger's family with Adeline de Meulan



      
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Roger de Vieilles de Beaumont, comte de Meulan's Timeline

1022
October 16, 1022
Pont-Audemer, Haute-Normandie, France
1045
1045
Age 22
Castle of Newbor, Normandy
1046
December 6, 1046
Age 24
Pont-Audemer, Beaumont, Normandy, France
1048
1048
Age 25
Probably Pays de France (Present Region Ile-de-France), France
1049
1049
Age 26
1049
Age 26
Neubourg,Normandy,France
1094
November 29, 1094
Age 72
Abbey,Preaux,Normandy,France
1921
November 8, 1921
Age 72
November 8, 1921
Age 72
November 8, 1921
Age 72