Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford

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Roger de Clifford, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Appleby Castle, Westmoreland, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in York, Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
Cause of death: Executed for taking part in the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford / Marshall of England and Maud de Clare
Husband of Julian DeClare
Ex-husband of Alianore de Clifford
Father of Catherine de Waller and Christina Clifford
Brother of Idonea de Clifford, Baronness Percy; Robert de Clifford, 3rd Lord of Skipton, Sheriff of Westmoreland; John De Clifford; Margaret de Mauley; Andrew Clifford and 1 other

Occupation: 2nd Baron de Clifford
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford

Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford1

M, #228068, b. 21 January 1299/0, d. circa April 1322

    Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford was born on 21 January 1299/0.

1 He was the son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare.

He was also reported to have been born on 2 February 1299/0.
He died circa April 1322 at York, Yorkshire, England, executed, without issue.
An inquest post mortem was held for his on 12 February 1326/27.
    Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord Clifford [E., 1299] on 24 June 1314.
He fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1321/22, where he was taken prisoner, after joining Thomas, Earl of Lancaster's rebellion

http://thepeerage.com/p22807.htm#i228068

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The House of Clifford chapter 13.

Only 14 when his father died at Bannockburn. He became the 2nd Lord Clifford and hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland but the castles and estates were granted to his uncle Bartholomew De Badlesmere for the duration of his minority.

Along with the Earls of Hereford and Lancaster he opposed Hugh Despencer, King Edward II's new favourite, and took part in the siege of Tickhill Castle. They were forced to fall back to Pontefract and then they moved north but were intercepted by Edward's northern forces at Boroughbridge.

Roger Clifford was wounded and surrendered to the King's commander Sir Andrew De Harclay. He was hanged at the beginning of 1327 and left no legitimate children but he did have a mistress, Julian of the Bower, with whom he had a number of natural children.

Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford was born on 21 January 1299/0.1 He was the son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Lord Clifford and Maud de Clare.1 He was also reported to have been born on 2 February 1299/0.2

He died circa April 1322 at York, Yorkshire, England, executed, without issue.1 An inquest post mortem was held for his on 12 February 1326/27.1

    

Roger de Clifford, 2nd Lord Clifford succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord Clifford [E., 1299] on 24 June 1314.1

He fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1321/22, where he was taken prisoner, after joining Thomas, Earl of Lancaster's rebellion.1

Citations

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Note: He joined the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, against the rule of Edward II and his favourites. Taken prisoner at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322, he was executed at York 23 March 1322 after being captured at the Battle of Boroughbridge. Clifford's Tower (castle). Clifford's Tower was built by Henry III, it commemorates Roger de Clifford. It is sited on top of a mound that William the Conqueror built for his original wooden castle, destroyed by fire during anti-Jewish riots in 1190.

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Roger chose to support the Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion and was taken prisoner at the battle of Boroughbridge and was executed in 1322 by King Edward II. The castle was then passed by the Crown to Andrew de Harcla, Earl of Carlisle.

A year later the castle was returned to the Clifford family after de Harcla was himself executed.

Cliffords Tower (Built on the site of two former wooden structures commissioned by William The Conqueror in the 11th Century, the stone keep that is named after Roger de Clifford who was hanged there in 1322 is another popular landmark in York's historical past.)

http://www.abbingdonyork.co.uk/abbhistoricyork.html

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From Wikipedia:

Roger Clifford, 2nd Lord of Skipton (1300–1326) was a member of the Clifford family which held the seat of Skipton from 1310 to 1676. He inherited his title when his father died at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. He was also hereditary Sheriff of Westmoreland.

He was involved in a rebellion against King Edward II's favourite Huge Lord de Despencer, and ultimately against the King himself. He took part in the Siege of Tickhill. The rebel forces were then brought to battle by the King's forces in Boroughbridge in March 1322 at which Roger Clifford received severe wounds. Forced to surrender, he was condemned to death and held captive in York. Reprieved, probably because of his wounds, he survived until the beginning of 1327, when he was hanged and his estates forfeited, including Skipton castle. They were restored to Robert Clifford, 3rd Lord of Skipton in 1327.

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Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford's Timeline

1299
January 21, 1299
Appleby Castle, Westmoreland, England, (Present UK)
1322
March 23, 1322
Age 23
York, Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)

Clifford's Tower (remains of the stone keep of York Castle)
The castle played the same role in 1322 for King Edward II in his campaign against his rebellious barons. Following the Battle of Boroughbridge in 1322, some of the defeated rebel leaders, including Sir Roger Clifford, were executed at York. One source reports that they were executed and their bodies were hung in chains from the keep;[1]; this account does not mention the mode of execution. Another account refers to the mode of execution as "hanging in chains",[2] presumably after the fashion that Robert Aske chose.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford%27s_Tower

1322
Age 22
Lamberhurst, Sussex, England
1323
1323
Age 23
Of, , , England
1932
December 3, 1932
Age 23
December 3, 1932
Age 23
December 3, 1932
Age 23
December 3, 1932
Age 23
1934
January 26, 1934
Age 23
January 26, 1934
Age 23