Roger le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety (1150 - 1221) MP

‹ Back to le Bigod surname

Is your surname le Bigod?

Research the le Bigod family

Roger le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "Sometimes seen as Roger le Bigod", "Magna Charta Surety", "Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk"
Birthplace: Thetford, Norfolk, England
Death: Died in Thetford, Norfolk, England
Occupation: 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety, Lord of Middleham, 2nd Degree E. Norfolk and Suffolk
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Roger le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety

Surety of the Magna Carta

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

References

^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13

Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

--------------------

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere.

Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny), and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

------------

Marc Morris [The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the thirteenth century (2005), p. 2], cites evidence that Roger's wife was Ida de Tosny, and that she was given to him in marriage by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated after his father's death. As Roger had been holding them for three-quarters of a year at Michaelmas 1182, Morris dates the marriage to around Christmas 1181 [citing Rotuli Hundredorum, vol. 1, pp. 504, 537; Pipe Roll 23 Henry II, pp. 125, 137; Pipe Roll 24 Henry II, pp. 26-7; Pipe Roll 28 Henry II, p. 64].

[Morris's work was pointed out by Linda Jack in September 2005. The question was also discussed by John P. Ravilious, James Cummings, Nichol Storm, Douglas Richardson, Todd A. Farmerie, Peter Stewart and Paul Reed. Item last updated 24 October 2005.]

Volume 9, page 589, note f:

Besides Hugh, the heir, there were sons [of Roger (le Bigod), Earl of Norfolk (d. 1221) and his wife Ida] William ..., Ralph ..., and Roger, ...

The Liber Vitæ of Durham, f. 63d, lists the children of Roger and Ida as Hugh, William, Roger, John, Ralph, Mary, Margaret and Ida [Surtees Society, vol. 136 (1923)].

[This evidence was presented by Rosie Bevan in July 2002.]

http://www.robertsewell.ca/bigod.html

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, built Framlingham circa 1190 - 1210. This revolutionary new castle without a keep reflected crusader experience; and is reminiscent of Byzantine fortresses. Its vast curtain-wall laced with strong towers enabled a large force including cavalry to be kept in the area of maximum defensibility.

Paul Johnson, Castles of England, Scotland and Wales, London, 1989

For more photos and details, click on Michael W. Cook's Framlingham Castle page.

   The following is an excerpts are from Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Pages 279 – 280:
   "Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, was the son of Hugh, Steward to the Kings Henry I. and II., who was descended from Roger Bigod, or Bigot, who in the time of William I. held several Manors in Norfolk; 6 Lordships in Essex; and and 117 in Sufolk. Camden, in his Remains, Lond. 1636, 4to. page 123, states the name to be Norman, signifying Superstitious, or a Bigot; a word of which the Etymology remains yet uncertain, though it is allowed to have been adopted from that language."
   "Camden adds, that the people of France used to call the Normans Bigods, because at every other word they would swear by God; and hence the family of Bigod coming from Normandy,was known by this national characteristic name.  In 1189, the 1st of Richard I., a charter was issued, dated Westminster, Nov. 97th by which Roger Bigod was constituted Earl of Norfolk the office of Steward was also confirmed to him, to gether with several Lordships, for all which he gave the King the sum of 1000 marks or £660 13s. 4d."
   "In the 15th year of the same King, he attended him into Poictou; in 1215 he was one of the Baronial party which exacted from him the Great Charter; and was appointed one of the 25 Securities of that instrument, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. . . . and his son Hugh succeeded him in his estates in 1220-21, the 5th of Henry III., in which year Roger Bigod is supposed to have died."

Richard Thomson also mentions: "He married Isabel, daughter of Hameline, Earl of Warren and Surrey . . . "

. . . Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 280 

More recent sources agree that Roger Bigod married Ida de Tosny, who was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. However, absolute and conclusive evidence of Ida's parentage is lacking. Prior to marrying Roger Bigod, Ida was a "girlfriend" of King Henry II and mother of William Longespée.

See Douglas Richardson: Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 2004, pages 456 – 457

and Marc Morris: The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2005, page 2

Roger married around Christmas 1181 to Ida de Tosny and they had the following children:

   * Hugh Bigod
   * Mary Bigod who married the Yorkshire baron Ranulf fitz Robert.
   * Margaret Bigod who married the royal steward William de Hastings.
   * Alice Bigod who married Aubrey IV de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford (1163 - 1214, d.s.p.)
   * Roger Bigod
   * Ralph Bigod
   * William Bigod
   * John Bigod

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

References

^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13

Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

--------------------

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere.

Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny), and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

------------

Marc Morris [The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the thirteenth century (2005), p. 2], cites evidence that Roger's wife was Ida de Tosny, and that she was given to him in marriage by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated after his father's death. As Roger had been holding them for three-quarters of a year at Michaelmas 1182, Morris dates the marriage to around Christmas 1181 [citing Rotuli Hundredorum, vol. 1, pp. 504, 537; Pipe Roll 23 Henry II, pp. 125, 137; Pipe Roll 24 Henry II, pp. 26-7; Pipe Roll 28 Henry II, p. 64].

[Morris's work was pointed out by Linda Jack in September 2005. The question was also discussed by John P. Ravilious, James Cummings, Nichol Storm, Douglas Richardson, Todd A. Farmerie, Peter Stewart and Paul Reed. Item last updated 24 October 2005.]

Volume 9, page 589, note f:

Besides Hugh, the heir, there were sons [of Roger (le Bigod), Earl of Norfolk (d. 1221) and his wife Ida] William ..., Ralph ..., and Roger, ...

The Liber Vitæ of Durham, f. 63d, lists the children of Roger and Ida as Hugh, William, Roger, John, Ralph, Mary, Margaret and Ida [Surtees Society, vol. 136 (1923)].

[This evidence was presented by Rosie Bevan in July 2002.]

http://www.robertsewell.ca/bigod.html

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, built Framlingham circa 1190 - 1210. This revolutionary new castle without a keep reflected crusader experience; and is reminiscent of Byzantine fortresses. Its vast curtain-wall laced with strong towers enabled a large force including cavalry to be kept in the area of maximum defensibility.

Paul Johnson, Castles of England, Scotland and Wales, London, 1989

For more photos and details, click on Michael W. Cook's Framlingham Castle page.

   The following is an excerpts are from Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Pages 279 – 280:
   "Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, was the son of Hugh, Steward to the Kings Henry I. and II., who was descended from Roger Bigod, or Bigot, who in the time of William I. held several Manors in Norfolk; 6 Lordships in Essex; and and 117 in Sufolk. Camden, in his Remains, Lond. 1636, 4to. page 123, states the name to be Norman, signifying Superstitious, or a Bigot; a word of which the Etymology remains yet uncertain, though it is allowed to have been adopted from that language."
   "Camden adds, that the people of France used to call the Normans Bigods, because at every other word they would swear by God; and hence the family of Bigod coming from Normandy,was known by this national characteristic name.  In 1189, the 1st of Richard I., a charter was issued, dated Westminster, Nov. 97th by which Roger Bigod was constituted Earl of Norfolk the office of Steward was also confirmed to him, to gether with several Lordships, for all which he gave the King the sum of 1000 marks or £660 13s. 4d."
   "In the 15th year of the same King, he attended him into Poictou; in 1215 he was one of the Baronial party which exacted from him the Great Charter; and was appointed one of the 25 Securities of that instrument, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. . . . and his son Hugh succeeded him in his estates in 1220-21, the 5th of Henry III., in which year Roger Bigod is supposed to have died."

Richard Thomson also mentions: "He married Isabel, daughter of Hameline, Earl of Warren and Surrey . . . "

. . . Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 280 

More recent sources agree that Roger Bigod married Ida de Tosny, who was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. However, absolute and conclusive evidence of Ida's parentage is lacking. Prior to marrying Roger Bigod, Ida was a "girlfriend" of King Henry II and mother of William Longespée.

See Douglas Richardson: Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 2004, pages 456 – 457

and Marc Morris: The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2005, page 2

Roger married around Christmas 1181 to Ida de Tosny and they had the following children:

   * Hugh Bigod
   * Mary Bigod who married the Yorkshire baron Ranulf fitz Robert.
   * Margaret Bigod who married the royal steward William de Hastings.
   * Alice Bigod who married Aubrey IV de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford (1163 - 1214, d.s.p.)
   * Roger Bigod
   * Ralph Bigod
   * William Bigod
   * John Bigod

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

  1. Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
  2. William Bigod
  3. Ralph Bigod
  4. Roger Bigod
  5. Margery, married William de Hastings
  6. Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit] References

  1. ^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
  2. ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
   * Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
   * Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
   * Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny), and by her had a number of children including:

1.Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

2.William Bigod

3.Ralph Bigod

4.Roger Bigod

5.Margery, married William de Hastings

6.Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

References

1.^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

2.^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

  1. Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
  2. William Bigod
  3. Ralph Bigod
  4. Roger Bigod
  5. Margery, married William de Hastings
  6. Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit] References

  1. ^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
  2. ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
   * Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
   * Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
   * Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

  1. Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
  2. William Bigod
  3. Ralph Bigod
  4. Roger Bigod
  5. Margery, married William de Hastings
  6. Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit] References

  1. ^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
  2. ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
   * Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
   * Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
   * Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

References

^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13

Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

--------------------

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere.

Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny), and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

------------

Marc Morris [The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the thirteenth century (2005), p. 2], cites evidence that Roger's wife was Ida de Tosny, and that she was given to him in marriage by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated after his father's death. As Roger had been holding them for three-quarters of a year at Michaelmas 1182, Morris dates the marriage to around Christmas 1181 [citing Rotuli Hundredorum, vol. 1, pp. 504, 537; Pipe Roll 23 Henry II, pp. 125, 137; Pipe Roll 24 Henry II, pp. 26-7; Pipe Roll 28 Henry II, p. 64].

[Morris's work was pointed out by Linda Jack in September 2005. The question was also discussed by John P. Ravilious, James Cummings, Nichol Storm, Douglas Richardson, Todd A. Farmerie, Peter Stewart and Paul Reed. Item last updated 24 October 2005.]

Volume 9, page 589, note f:

Besides Hugh, the heir, there were sons [of Roger (le Bigod), Earl of Norfolk (d. 1221) and his wife Ida] William ..., Ralph ..., and Roger, ...

The Liber Vitæ of Durham, f. 63d, lists the children of Roger and Ida as Hugh, William, Roger, John, Ralph, Mary, Margaret and Ida [Surtees Society, vol. 136 (1923)].

[This evidence was presented by Rosie Bevan in July 2002.]

http://www.robertsewell.ca/bigod.html

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, built Framlingham circa 1190 - 1210. This revolutionary new castle without a keep reflected crusader experience; and is reminiscent of Byzantine fortresses. Its vast curtain-wall laced with strong towers enabled a large force including cavalry to be kept in the area of maximum defensibility.

Paul Johnson, Castles of England, Scotland and Wales, London, 1989

For more photos and details, click on Michael W. Cook's Framlingham Castle page.

   The following is an excerpts are from Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Pages 279 – 280:
   "Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, was the son of Hugh, Steward to the Kings Henry I. and II., who was descended from Roger Bigod, or Bigot, who in the time of William I. held several Manors in Norfolk; 6 Lordships in Essex; and and 117 in Sufolk. Camden, in his Remains, Lond. 1636, 4to. page 123, states the name to be Norman, signifying Superstitious, or a Bigot; a word of which the Etymology remains yet uncertain, though it is allowed to have been adopted from that language."
   "Camden adds, that the people of France used to call the Normans Bigods, because at every other word they would swear by God; and hence the family of Bigod coming from Normandy,was known by this national characteristic name.  In 1189, the 1st of Richard I., a charter was issued, dated Westminster, Nov. 97th by which Roger Bigod was constituted Earl of Norfolk the office of Steward was also confirmed to him, to gether with several Lordships, for all which he gave the King the sum of 1000 marks or £660 13s. 4d."
   "In the 15th year of the same King, he attended him into Poictou; in 1215 he was one of the Baronial party which exacted from him the Great Charter; and was appointed one of the 25 Securities of that instrument, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. . . . and his son Hugh succeeded him in his estates in 1220-21, the 5th of Henry III., in which year Roger Bigod is supposed to have died."

Richard Thomson also mentions: "He married Isabel, daughter of Hameline, Earl of Warren and Surrey . . . "

. . . Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 280 

More recent sources agree that Roger Bigod married Ida de Tosny, who was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. However, absolute and conclusive evidence of Ida's parentage is lacking. Prior to marrying Roger Bigod, Ida was a "girlfriend" of King Henry II and mother of William Longespée.

See Douglas Richardson: Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, 2004, pages 456 – 457

and Marc Morris: The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2005, page 2

Roger married around Christmas 1181 to Ida de Tosny and they had the following children:

   * Hugh Bigod
   * Mary Bigod who married the Yorkshire baron Ranulf fitz Robert.
   * Margaret Bigod who married the royal steward William de Hastings.
   * Alice Bigod who married Aubrey IV de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford (1163 - 1214, d.s.p.)
   * Roger Bigod
   * Ralph Bigod
   * William Bigod
   * John Bigod

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk

b. circa 1150, d. 1220

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk|b. c 1150\nd. 1220|p387.htm#i6921|Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk|b. b 1107\nd. 1177|p375.htm#i7187|Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk|b. c 1129\nd. 1200|p381.htm#i6956|Roger "the Sheriff" le Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1107|p357.htm#i7066|Adelicia de Tosny of Belvoir|b. c 1070?|p225.htm#i26070|Aubrey de Vere II|b. c 1082\nd. 15 May 1141|p366.htm#i750|Adeliza de Clare|b. a 1076\nd. c 1163|p371.htm#i751|

Father Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk b. before 1107, d. 1177

Mother Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk1 b. circa 1129, d. 1200

    Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.2 He had two wives, Ida de Thouy and Isabella de Warenne.3 Arms: Or, a cross gules.4 He was born circa 1150 at Norfolk, Norfolk, England.2 He was the son of Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk.1 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184.5 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris and Isabelle de Varennes.5,6 Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221 at Suffolk, England.7 He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189 at 1 Richard I, Westminster, England.1 2nd Earl Bigod of Norfolk and Suffolk between 27 November 1189 and 1221.8 The Signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England. He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.2 He died in 1220 at Thetford, Norfolk, England.2,1

Family 1

Countess Ida de Tosny b. circa 1155

Children

   * Mary Bigod+ b. c 11841
   * Margery Bigod+ b. c 11851
   * Hugh le Bigod the Surety, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk+ b. c 1186, d. Feb 12452
   * Adeliza Bigod b. c 11871
   * William Bigod b. c 11871

Family 2

Isabel de Warenne b. circa 1165

--------------------

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

1.Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

2.William Bigod

3.Ralph Bigod

4.Roger Bigod

5.Margery, married William de Hastings

6.Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit] References

1.^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

2.^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13

Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

Preceded by:

Hugh Bigod Earl of Norfolk Followed by:

Hugh Bigod

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk"

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

--------------------

Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died in 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny)[1], and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207 a daughter of William Marshal

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

Margery, married William de Hastings

Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[2]

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV,Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit]References

^ Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of a young son William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury) (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king's youngest son made Beaumont's daughter his mistress. Ida's ancestry was unknown for many years, but a charter by her eldest (illegitimate) son refers to his mother as the "Countess Ida" which pins her down to the wife of Roger Bigod. For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century

^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13

Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk

--------------------

One of 25 Barons who gave surety (enforcement) of Magna Charta along with son Hugh Bigod in 1215 at Runymede

--------------------

Roger le Bigod the Surety, Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, was 15th in descent from Sveide the Viking.

Roger married Countess Ida de Tosny, daughter of seigneur de Conches Roger III de Tosny and Gertrud de Hainaut, before 1184. He married Isabel de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey jure uxoris, and Isabelle de Varennes.

Roger made a gift to Dodnash Priory of a tenement and land at East Bergholt, a holding perhaps of Countess Ida's, whose possible mother Ida of Hainault received it from King Henry I, between 1189 and 1221, in Suffolk. He reconstituted Earl of Norfolk, and steward of the household, and at the same time obtained restitution of some manors, with grants of others, and confirmation of all his widespread demesnes, in a charter on 27 November 1189.

Roger was at the signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, Surrey, England.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p387.htm#i6921 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Notes: Magna Charta Surety.

Buried: Thetford, Norfolk, England

Bigod is the name associated with Framlingham Castle in Suffolk. It is an imposing structure. The outer walls are forty-four feet high and eight feet thick. Thirteen towers fifty-eight feet in height remain, along with a gateway and some outworks. In early Roman times it was probably the site of the fortified earthwork that sheltered Saint Edmund when he fled from the Danes in 870, but we cannot be sure of the authenticity of this tradition. The Danes seized the fort, but they lost it in 921; it then remained a Crown possession, which passed into the hands of William the Conqueror when he became King. In 1100 Henry I granted the Castle to Roger Bigod, and possibly Roger was the one to erect the first masonry building.

The ruins indicate a 12th Century dating, though material from an older building may very well have been used in the walls. Evidently the Castle was completely rebuilt in 1170. It remained in the Bigod family for some generations, then passed into the hands of the Mowbrays.

ROGER BIGOD, the Surety, was born about 1150 and succeeded as second Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk. It is fitting that, after Richard's return to England after his captivity in Germany, Roger Bigod was chosen to be one of the four Earls who carried the silken canopy for the King, as Hugh Bigod had borne the Royal sceptre in the Royal procession.

Roger Bigod was appointed in 1189 by King Richard one of the Ambassadors to King Philip of France, to obtain aid for the recovery of the Holy Land. In 1191 he was keeper of Hereford Castle. He was chief judge in the King's Court from 1195 to 1202. In 120() he was sent by King John as one of his messengers to summon William the Lion, King of Scotland, to do homage to him in the Parliament which was held at Lincoln, and subsequently attended King John into Poitou; but on his return he was won over to the opposition by the rebel Barons and became one of the strongest advocates of the Charter of Liberty, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III He died before August 1221, having married as his first wife, Isabella daughter of Hameline Plantagenet, who was descended from the Earls of Warren. -------------------- Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk in 1189, was confirmed in his earldom and other honours by Richard I, for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother in the reign of Henry II. King Richard also sent him to France as an ambassador in 1189.

He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became justiciar. The earl was one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name appears among the signatories to this document.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida de Tosny, a former mistress of King Henry II, and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

(Alice Bigod)

Margery Bigod

Mary Bigod -------------------- Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk in 1189, was confirmed in his earldom and other honours by Richard I, for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother in the reign of Henry II. King Richard also sent him to France as an ambassador in 1189.

He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became justiciar. The earl was one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name appears among the signatories to this document.

Around Christmas 1181 Roger married Ida de Tosny, a former mistress of King Henry II, and by her had a number of children including:

Hugh

William Bigod

Ralph Bigod

Roger Bigod

(Alice Bigod)

Margery Bigod

Mary Bigod -------------------- Son and heir by his father's first wife, Roger appears to have been a loyal subject to the Crown, and certainly not of the rebellious nature of his father. At the battle of Fornham in 1173, he bore the standard of St. Edmund, under which the royal forces fought, being thus in opposition to his father. Upon his father's death he became responsible for the balance of his father's fine. He appears to have attended the King at Windsor, and the young King at Westminster ca. Apr 1180. In 1182, Henry forgave him the fine for his father's debts and restored him the demesnes of the Crown which his father had held. He served as Steward in 1186, and on 3 Sep 1189, was among the barons who attended the Coronation of Richard I, who, on 25 Nov following made him Earl of Norfolk. In 1191, in Richard's absence, Earl Roger acted in support of the Chancellor against Prince John. For the following two years, he appears to have been mostly occupied with duty as a judge, both at Westminster and one eyre in the provinces. He attended Richard's second Coronation, 17 Apr 1194, and in 1195 and 1996 sat as one of the Barons of the Exchequer. He attended the Coronation of John at Westminster, 27 May 1190, and was one of the Earls sent to bring the King of Scotland to Lincoln to do homage to John. He was in England the following three years, until the summer of 1206, when he appears to been abroad in the King's service. In Jan of 1214/15, he was still acting as a royal official, but in June he joined the Barons in their ultimatum from Stamford to King John, and with his son, Hugh, was among the 25 Barons elected to maintain Magna Carta. Roger was among those magnates excommunicated by the Pope in December, whereby his lands were forfeited and ravaged by the King. But he returned to John's allegiance and had order for restoration of his lands Sep 1217. He died four years later. -------------------- http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I2465&tree=Nixon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Norfolk

Roger Bigod (c. 1144/1150 – 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Bigod,_2nd_Earl_of_Norfolk

view all 97

Roger le Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk's Timeline

1150
1150
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1174
1174
Age 24
Norfolk, England
1177
1177
Age 27
His father, 1st earl of Norfold, died but Henry II Curtmantle would not let him
1182
1182
Age 32
1185
December 1185
Age 35
England
1186
1186
Age 36
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1188
1188
Age 38
Thetford, Norfolk, England or Framlingham, Suffolk, England
1188
Age 38
Thetford, Norfolk, England
1189
1189
Age 39
Ambassador to France
1189
Age 39
2nd Earl of Norfolk, before 1221 was Royal Steward